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Topic: Twisting the Aces - Alternate handling between Ace 2 & 3
Message: Posted by: Chollet (Mar 2, 2018 03:29PM)
Hello all!

I have been performing a version of Twisting the Aces for about 20+ years that has some slightly different handling after the first 2 Aces. I am trying to find the origins of this version and the name of the move used.

Here is what happens: The routine starts out the same as the classic handling, but after the second ACE is revealed, I don't flip anything over (well, I actually flip EVERYTHING over, as you will soon read). Holding the cards in my left-hand in mechanics grip, I turn the entire hand over, palm down and push the cards "through my hand" with my left thumb, and as they exit toward the spectator I grab the far side and twist the cards again and they rotate partially against my left middle finger. This turns the entire packet over and begins a twist in one move. I am now set up to reveal the third Ace, taking care to not flash the 4th Ace/AS that is on the bottom. I reveal the 3rd ace (which is 2nd from the top). I then use the top card to cleanly flip that 3rd ace over and place the card I was using to flip it over underneath the packet. This places the AS in the 3rd position. Ready for an EC to hide it with the plot that "the twist doesn't work on the AS". I then proceed to reveal it is the last card turned over after whatever "magic" IS required to get the stubborn AS to flip.

I really like this handling for a few reasons. One, the only time a card is flipped back over to face down is the third Ace. In the classic handling, you have to do it twice, and the manner in which it is done is always a bit odd to me and suspect. Also, in the version I perform, the flipping of the third Ace is super clean because there is no funny business happening. I flip that third Ace openly while mentioning the difficulty of getting the AS to flip over – that line seems to be perfect misdirection for doing something a little different.

The drawbacks are that the turnover and push through the hand is not conventional, and it makes the following twist (twist #3) look different, but I have NEVER been called out on it, and it cleans up so much of the routine. It just looks a bit like a flourish and then clean.

Back to my question: Does anyone know the origin of this routine??? It was taught to me in person by someone 25 years ago, and I don't remember who it was or I would ask them.

I realize my explanation might not be perfectly clear. If anyone wants to see a performance of it, I am happy to shoot a video and upload it.

Cheers!
Message: Posted by: seraph127 (Mar 12, 2018 11:27AM)
In the second paragraph of your description, I take it you're talking about Vernon's Through-the-Fist Flourish.

It took me a while to grasp that after the first Ace, you're doing a straight EC (where normally one does an Underground Elmsley, placing the last card on bottom). Then you do the TTF flourish, retake the packet, deal the top card into the right hand to reveal the AD, and flip it face-down with the right hand's card, which goes underneath the packet. So you're still openly turning a card over and in the bargain changing up a lot of the visible procedure.

I dunno. It's something to think about.
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (Mar 12, 2018 05:29PM)
There was a gaffed four card trick where you show any named King to be face up - then odd backed. Seeing that - a student is likely to have invented a twisting version that uses a half pass and then the Elmsley Count ... so it's a tough call after about 1976 or so.
Message: Posted by: Chollet (Mar 13, 2018 01:48AM)
Seraph127. What you described is how I perform the routine. Thanks for the name of the move, the “Through-the-Fist Flourish”. I’m curious if there is a published version of using this method in Twisting the Aces.

[quote]On Mar 12, 2018, seraph127 wrote:
In the second paragraph of your description, I take it you're talking about Vernon's Through-the-Fist Flourish.

It took me a while to grasp that after the first Ace, you're doing a straight EC (where normally one does an Underground Elmsley, placing the last card on bottom). Then you do the TTF flourish, retake the packet, deal the top card into the right hand to reveal the AD, and flip it face-down with the right hand's card, which goes underneath the packet. So you're still openly turning a card over and in the bargain changing up a lot of the visible procedure.

I dunno. It's something to think about. [/quote]
Message: Posted by: korttihai_82 (Apr 19, 2018 10:57AM)
It is published by few different persons at least. I am not 100% sure by whom itbis originally but I am tempted to say Larry Jennings was the first to do last two aces with Vernons thru the fist flourish and jordan counts

Juha-Matti
Message: Posted by: Chollet (Apr 23, 2018 12:26AM)
[quote]On Apr 19, 2018, korttihai_82 wrote:
It is published by few different persons at least. I am not 100% sure by whom itbis originally but I am tempted to say Larry Jennings was the first to do last two aces with Vernons thru the fist flourish and jordan counts

Juha-Matti [/quote]

Thanks. I’ll look into his versions!
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (May 15, 2018 07:17AM)
There's another option around - ;)
https://www.lybrary.com/turnantula-p-922491.html 0:27
He made a video of it :D
Message: Posted by: Chollet (May 16, 2018 05:30PM)
[quote]On May 15, 2018, Jonathan Townsend wrote:
There's another option around - ;)
https://www.lybrary.com/turnantula-p-922491.html 0:27
He made a video of it :D [/quote]

Very interesting. Looks like something fun to learn. Thanks!
Message: Posted by: martyjacobs (Sep 2, 2018 01:11PM)
Allan Ackerman includes this handling on his DVD [url="https://www.lybrary.com/advanced-card-control-volume-7-false-counts-p-4380.html"][i]Advanced Card Control Series: Vol. 7: False Counts[/i][/url]. This series was first released on VHS by A-1 Multimedia, so this handling was probably first released in the 1990s. I'm not sure if it actually belongs to Ackerman, though.

Jay Sankey also re-invented this and published it in one of his email newsletters a few years ago.

Marty