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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » The workshop » » How to remove the "velvet" from velvet? (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

Fornby
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Dear members,

I'll try to explain what I mean - my native language is not English...

I want to wrap velvet around some pieces of plywood.
However; those pieces are then going to be joined and in those joins there is no place for the "hairy surface" of the velvet - only for the "bottom material" (I hope you understand). Adding a piece to wrap is not an option, I'm afraid (tried that).

Does anyone of you know if it is at all possible to remove that "hairy surface"? Or not Smile

TIA
Gene
silverking
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That "hairy surface" is pretty much what holds velvet together.
If you were to remove it, the backing has nothing stopping it from unraveling.

I'd suggest you talk to somebody who knows their fabrics (like Rose Brand in the USA) as they would likely be able to suggest a fabric that looks like velvet, but performs similarly to what you're looking for in terms of how you will assemble it into a finished product.
Fornby
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Hi Silverking,

Thanks for your reply.

This seems to be different for different velvets, I believe...
The "triple velvet" sold by Don Drake is very easy to pinch the "hair" off, leaving the bottom material intact.
Unfortunately it's black. I need white.
A much heavier velvet (maybe it's made from cotton) I also have a piece of is quite different - the "hair" cannot be pinched off. It is of course white.

Regards,
Gene

PS. It isn't easy living really out-back, hours from a "decent" city. It's easier to ask for a short-cut than planning a trip into town. Going there only once a week, maybe...
makeupguy
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I've been to an actualy VELVet Factory...

and the "velvet" part is woven into the fabric.. however.. it's normally made from Nylon..which is flamable..

If you want to un velvet the velvet... I'd head up a butterknife.. and use it like a spatula to melt thevelvet off the fabric.. leaving just the fabric..
ChrisG
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Gene
One way you might try to remove the pile from velvet would be to use a sweater shaver. They are sold at any fabric store.

If you wrap the material around what ever thickness of wood you are using you can control the width of the shaved area.

I hope this makes sense.

ChrisG
"Consensus is the negation of Leadership"

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Fornby
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Thanks for the ideas!

Makeupguy: The velvet I have is not flammable, however. That's why I think it's made from cotton. I have more than enough and it's the right colour...

ChrisG: *Shave it*! Great idea! Will try it later (right now, the order is "week-end shopping, cleaning the house" and GKW according to the better half Smile)
Any special brand of shaving-foam you recommend? Smile

Thanks,
Gene
m.ruetz
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This may be a dumb question, but why use velvet if you want to remove the "hairy surface"? Isn't the "hairy surface" what makes it velvet? I am not toally getting what you are trying to do, but possibly you can join the wood first and then glue the material on after.
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silverking
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In his first post, he mentioned that he wants to remove the "nape" at the assembly points of his project. I think he's indicating (english not being his first language) that the tolerance at the joins won't accomodate the thickness of the material with the nape attached to the backing material.

He doesn't want to wander to far of a velvet finish, because that's the actual look he's going for.......he only wants to thin the fabric at the assembly points.

.........at least that's what I got from his question!!
Fornby
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Hi all,

Silverking, you're right on the spot when you say "he only wants to thin the fabric at the assembly points".
When I join the plywood the join is too thin (8mm sheets - 1/3") to be stable with all the thick material in between. I've found no other way to join them but to staple them together (carpenter's stapler) and I cannot press them together hard enough to make the join stable.
The velvet is *inside* a box.

ChrisG: Regarding the shaver; there is no fabric store here so I tried it with a ususal Bic razor Smile Smile Smile
Didn't get anything off until the bottom material was worn... and ripped Smile
Maybe my velvet is too thick/close.
I will look for that special shaver (never heard of anything such) and more types of velvet next time we go to town...

m.ruetz: You ask why not glue it?
My experience is that the edges of the fabric get fringes (frays?) that get loose if I glue carefully and look glued if I use more glue to secure it. The inside of the box will be used - not only looked into.

So; my next step (that I didn't want to do) will be to mill (?) some 10mm wide and maybe 3mm deep along the edges of the plywood. Then add another fabric to the velvet and fold the velvet and the margin of the other fabric into the milled space. And then use the added fabric to wrap around and fasten it at the back. (The outside of *this* box is never seen Smile)

Lots of work and I have to wait until next week to do that. And I suspect it may look bulky anyway if not done with very high precision. But as this will be a gift; the work is a joy!

Thanks to all for your suggestions!
Gene
kaytracy
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I am not certain that I have a clear image of the issue, however, I will suggest a possiblility, it might even be useful!

How about taking your velvet at the corner edge, and sewing it to a fabric that can then fit the join, something like a muslin or other light strong fabric that can handle your glues etc.
if you sew it and fold the seam so that the velvet half is to the outer edge, and the smooth fabric wraps the corner to the rear, you can glue or tack that into place, then glue up the entire assembly. I have used muslin and trigger cloth fabric with glues and resin glues to great success even on curved surfaces and multiple layers.

The other consideration when using velvet is to take advantage of the nap and the fuzzines to not have to wrap your edge fully to the rear, but to wrap and fasten it at the visible inner corner (if a box shape) so the unseen surfaces are clean of the fabric. Upon assemply, use a small stiff brush to pull the nap up and mask the join.

When working with fabric on wood, be sure to consider the use of a tack strip, if the dimensions are thick enough to allow the tacks. Otherwise, a good spray adhesive avoids seepage and lumps inthe fabric.

You can buy tack strips ready made, or make your own by using a strip of medium to thin card stock cut with a straight edge. Put small flat headed tacks in a line down the center of the strip every inch to couple of inches. Lay the fabric in place (then fold it away from the surface so the edge to be tacked is laying undersit up along the edge, with the fabric folded pretty side down away from the item to be covered), line the edge of the tack strip up with the edge of the item to be covered, and smack it into place. Fold the now secured fabric over the tack strip.
For the other side, fold the fabric and mark that edge point with a fold (an iron can help here, put the tack strip into the fold from the back, with the tacks looking up at you, fold it over once so the tacks are down, and wham it home with a soft face mallet (rubber or no mar surface)
Good luck
Kay
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Joe Mansfield
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Instead of velvet, you may try FLOCKING the pieces after you join them together.
You can check rockler.com for Flocking kits.
Fornby
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Hi,

Two more replies, thank you Kay and Joe. I will look into them.

At the workshop yesterday, I was shown a way to do the inside of the box. (Reading my posts, I find it maybe is not clear that I am going to make a wooden box where the inside is covered with velvet. This phase of the project is dealing with the interior only, as there will be something more to it... Yes; it is going to be a "prop" - a gift to my magician friend, in late spring)

It really came out nicely but forces me to use thicker wood-material than I thought, so I have to re-think and go back to the drawing-board. Smile

We glued velvet to one side of a piece of 4mm plywood. We wrapped it around the edges and glued a 1cm margin on the other side.
We cut a piece of 9mm plywood, some of the measurments were then 9mm larger than the velvet-covered piece, and then we milled down a track that fit the velvet "margin".
Finally we glued those two pieces together.

Joining two such (double) pieces made it possible to have a very tight and very stable join using glue and staples. And the velvet looks great in the corner.

This was a *lot* better than my own ideas.
And I also learned something from this: Show the idea to a pro immediately instead of wasting time thinking up theories - or worse; wasting other peoples time by asking them the "wrong" questions on a message-board... Smile


Thanks all,
Gene
Fornby
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Oops! Forgot to say that by making the 9mm plywood frame-shaped (a square hole in the middle) I still have thin 4mm wood in the walls to give room for the extras. The wood is then only thick at the edges and that is OK. So it's not a *total* re-work...
kaytracy
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Learning is all part of the process!
k
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Michael Baker
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I would love to see a photo of this project. Smile

~michael
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Fornby
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Michael,

Of course... As I'm building my first illusion now (an "Artist's Dream") I think I will start building the box in February and I hope/have to have it finished in late May. I'm in the workshop only one night a week, though Smile

Gene
Fornby
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Hi there,

Long time no seen... But sometimes one have to prioritize...

It took me a bit longer to really finish the prototype for "Artist's dream" but eventually it was done. Works great.

Then I began building the box. Several obstacles here. But at last a prototype was finished yesterday. Now it is going to be disassembled to make working plans. And then I'll start building the real one.

Just to keep you updated...

http://web.telia.com/~u35311259/mag.htm
(Sorry for the pic-quality...)

/Gene
Michael Taggert
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Very nice work fronby. you arelearning that going into the shop to create magic is a challenge to even the best craftsman as the detial need is only exceeded by you rcreativity. bravo we cant wait to see the final projects.
Mike
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atsilus
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I know that this is late but... they make velvet out of many things. I get white velvet yardage that has a silk base fabric and a plant based nap (the fuzzy stuff). There are a number of products available that will dissolve such a nap in any pattern you can imagine, including places where wood would join. My fave is called FiberEtch but there are many. The technique is called devore. You've probably seen scarves made this way, they were very popular a few years back. Faced with a similar problem though, I might just have ironed the sections I wanted flat. With some water and a good iron it is possible to 'ruin' the fluff sufficiently.
malaki
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Old thread, new solution:

What this gentleman was needing is the style of velvet fabric known as devoré or burnout. The original French name is from the word meaning "devour." Because of how the fabric is made, which is with a synthetic base and a natural fiber pile (the fuzz), it's possible to use chemicals to eat away select parts of the fuzzy surface, leaving a mix of plush velvet and sheer backing that can be seen through. This is also known as "etched velvet" Check out this site:

https://feltmagnet.com/textiles-sewing/Devore-Velvet-Fabric
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