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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Periods & styles of Magic » » American Civil War . . . (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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Pokie-Poke
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Bensalem, PA
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Two compleatly diffrent notes
one, why age your props? unless you are a zombie, come back from the dead to do magic. Kinda like this thread.

Two, I would love some ideas on tricks with paper coins, as this would be a bit unique to the time.
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Dr_J_Ayala
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In search of Vlad Dracul and his
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Quote:
On 2011-07-07 18:08, Pokie-Poke wrote:
Two compleatly diffrent notes
one, why age your props?


First reason is to be historically accurate when performing with dedicated groups. If you are not, even in the smallest way, completely historically accurate, they will crucify you.

Second, you are trying to recreate authenticity for the presentation.

Third, it just looks cool.

Fourth, if you were to actually use coins from that far back in a modern setting, they would usually show quite a bit of age. If you are using modern reproductions as a re-enactor, depending on the dates of the reproductions and the years of re-enactment, you may need to dirty them up a little to make them look used. If that second part is confusing, take this example: A well circulated coin made in 2008 will looked used now.

I like that idea for the paper coins, and also it would be cool to find cheap re-production paper bills from the day. Some of them were tiny!
Intrepid
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Pokie, in reenacting the rule of thumb is to let your items age naturally through use and avoid making it look 150 years old. That's because in 1860 the items they used weren't 150 years old. From our perspective today, we association civil war artifacts with having deep patina and rust, but you have to put yourself in the perspective of traveling back in time to that time period. The men were routinely issues new equipment so at any given time the gear of a soldier would typically be anywhere from a week old to a year. A few weekends at a reenactments will produce the nature dings and stains of use. No need to fake anything.
Bob
Intrepid
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Quote:
On 2011-07-07 21:13, Dr_J_Ayala wrote:.

I like that idea for the paper coins, and also it would be cool to find cheap re-production paper bills from the day. Some of them were tiny!

Bob Sullivan is the go to person for all your civil war paper goods.
http://www.sullivanpress.com/
Bob
Ace of Spades
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Sullivan Press is great to work with. Go there.
Dr_J_Ayala
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Quote:
On 2011-07-07 22:40, Intrepid wrote:
Pokie, in reenacting the rule of thumb is to let your items age naturally through use and avoid making it look 150 years old. That's because in 1860 the items they used weren't 150 years old. From our perspective today, we association civil war artifacts with having deep patina and rust, but you have to put yourself in the perspective of traveling back in time to that time period. The men were routinely issues new equipment so at any given time the gear of a soldier would typically be anywhere from a week old to a year. A few weekends at a reenactments will produce the nature dings and stains of use. No need to fake anything.


The above post by Intrepid, without the intention of such, clarifies the meaning of the things I was trying to say in my earlier post, especially the fourth part. If you are doing a modern act based around coins/objects/props from 150 years ago and the routine/effect counted on that aged look, then of course you need to age them. If you are re-enacting the time period in the moment, then of course, as stated by Intrepid, things would be new, or newer looking.

My thanks to you, Intrepid, for the post.
Pokie-Poke
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Ok, I read the post to imply you are making the props look old, that is what ageing a prop is, not every day ware and tear. and ageing a paper coin would be bad, as they had exparation dates and no one wants old bills as they might expire soon. also people cleaned there stuff, just like today, and replaced things when they had to. (not as bad as today)
you want your props to look lived in, not aged.

I have been playing with the papper coins looking for ideas, but comeing up blank.
they are blank on the back, some expire, to be traded in after the war, come in odd sizes and denominations. and were printed both by state and as best as I recall by local banks.

and if you want to count the threads in my shirt, or the nails in my shoes feal free. Smile
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Intrepid
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As a Civil War reenactor this is a topic which natutally appeals to me. So far I haven't combined the to hobbies, but have begun to do some research into the history of magic during this period. I already have an extensive collect of magic books from the late 1800s and early 1900s, and have purchased several eBooks from the Miracle Factory on magic books and performers from the 1600s and 1700s. And thanks to the above advice I've purchased the Wizard of the North Book, which I've just started on. At present I'm not sure if I will actual put the time into creating a period act, but will shared some of the things I learn as I go along in the event that it might be of use to others. It appears that the initial poster to the thread is no longer active here, but with this year making the 150th anniversary of the start of the Civil War I'm thinking this could be of use to other people. More to follow.
Bob
Ms. Merizing
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Edwin Carl Erwin is digging postholes for
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In 1863, Professor John H. Pepper Henry Dircks took out letters patent for what came to be known as "Pepper's Ghost". If your venue & budget will support this effect, consider having a go.
Pleased to continue finding that all the world's a stage.
cwcoe
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Intrepid, I'm very interested to hear what you've learned about Civil War era magic. I also am a reenactor and have thought about doing some magic at events but just for the folks in camp.
Intrepid
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Cwcoe, I got side tracked when my computer went down. Now that I know there is interest I'll get back on this and share with you what I have shortly.

Bob
Bob
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