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Pizpor
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Also - one of the headliner acts main bit is a strait jacket escape.
gomerel
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Ooops! Forgot the pirates. Lots of them too.
devilstick peat
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Accurate verse entertaining. that's a hard one. My own opinion is that it's ok to use a moden trick, as long as you put it in a period setting.
E.G. At some fairs, whilst doing walk about, I work the tables around the beer tent (this way I get free beer). When I come across a table with kids as well as adults on it I use 3 small colouring books in a 3 card monte routine. But before I pull then out I give them the following spill.
"When the crusades happened, we jesters followed the armies and, after the battle, when the soilders were celibrating the fact that they are still alive and able celibrate. that's when we'd perform, in return for gifts from the now very happy soilders. But when they were fighting the battles, we fools would stay well clear (we're no fool) and meet and chat with other fools, some from other countries. And that's how we discovered playing cards, and tricks with them, like 3 card monte."
I then give a very quick show of 3 card monte.
"but when the crusades were over, and we all sailed back home, we came upon a problem. the sea winds would blow the cards over, revealing which was which. So we came up with a nortical version (So called because it was invented in the nortics). It's called 3 book monte. As I say this last bit so I lay the 3 small books on the table. I'm sure you can guess the rest of the routine (If not I'm happy to sell it to you).
The point I'm trying to make is this
By useing speach to set the stage they are so into what I'm doing and saying that no one has ever mentioned the fact that the books arnt medieval in look.
The kids (and therefore the adults) are happy and entertained.
The kids (and quite often the more stupid of the parents) 100% believe every word I say
And my free beer is ready and waiting at the bar
In short, "ITS NOT WHAT YOU DO, ITS HOW YOU DO IT"
As for detachible arms, with the right costume these are completely accurate
Pizpor
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Quote:
"ITS NOT WHAT YOU DO, ITS HOW YOU DO IT"

As for detachible arms, with the right costume these are completely accurate


You got that right. Or, in my case - 'it's not what you do, it's what you can get away with.'

(The detachable arm gag is how I close my show. That one always gets big laughs)
malaki
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100 BCE
China
The illusion which later became known as the Chinese Linking Rings is developed. 2

2) Claflin, Edward. Street Magic: An Illustrated History of Wandering Magicians and their Conjuring Arts. New York: Doubleday and Company. 1977.*

*Magical Renaissance : A Modern Wizard's Grimoire, Volume I: Timeline of Magic. Oklahoma City: Magic Mouse Publications. 2002.
HenryleTregetour
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Quote:
On Apr 11, 2017, malaki wrote:
100 BCE
China
The illusion which later became known as the Chinese Linking Rings is developed.


I will add that in Melbourne Christopher's The Illustrated History of Magic there is a discussion of Spanish magicians in the 1500s. In addition to causing a card to rise from a deck, one of the tricks mentioned consists of throwing rings in the air and having them link together.

HLT
malaki
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As far as Egg Bag and the C&B, there are some surviving posters of the Saint Bartholomew Fair (in the actual Renaissance) that shows a magician performing the egg bag with C&B set on his table.

As long as they had, in the Middle Ages, the item with which to perform, I am sure that SOME magician SOMEWHERE developed a routine around it.
As long as an attempt is made to make the apparatus look period, then only the Laurels will make a fuss (see Laurel's Handshake*).


* Laurel's Handshake
In the SCA (Society for Creative Anachronism) Laurels are those who have been issued the title of Mastery in their own area of expertise. Many then think that they are therefore masters of ALL of the arts & sciences. The Laurel's Handshake is performed as a normal handshake, but as soon as the other person's hand is held by the Laurel, he/she will turn back your cuff to see if it is hand sewn. It was a Laurel who made the authoritative statement that the "Linking Rings are not period". My research shows that they first appeared c. 200 BCE.
Mr. Woolery
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Not the egg bag per se, but in Hocus Pocus Jr, the same principle is used for Bonus Genius.

Patrick
Pop Haydn
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Quote:
On Apr 11, 2017, malaki wrote:
100 BCE
China
The illusion which later became known as the Chinese Linking Rings is developed. 2

2) Claflin, Edward. Street Magic: An Illustrated History of Wandering Magicians and their Conjuring Arts. New York: Doubleday and Company. 1977.*

*Magical Renaissance : A Modern Wizard's Grimoire, Volume I: Timeline of Magic. Oklahoma City: Magic Mouse Publications. 2002.


Do you have a source for the Chinese rings development? I thought it was less than 700 years old.
malaki
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Chinese Linking Rings
2) Claflin, Edward. Street Magic: An Illustrated History of Wandering Magicians and Their Conjuring Arts. New York: Doubleday and Company, 1977.
ISBN: 0385128649
Pop Haydn
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Quote:
On Nov 2, 2017, malaki wrote:
Chinese Linking Rings
2) Claflin, Edward. Street Magic: An Illustrated History of Wandering Magicians and Their Conjuring Arts. New York: Doubleday and Company, 1977.
ISBN: 0385128649


I meant did Claflin state a source for this? I haven't seen any ancient source that mentions the rings...would love to be able to have one.
malaki
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Hey, Pop, sorry, I didn't realize that you wanted the background references. Here you go. The list of references in the Timeline of Magic is more than 20 pages long because I did include the sub-references.

2) Claflin, Edward. Street Magic: An Illustrated History of Wandering Magicians and their Conjuring Arts. New York: Doubleday and Company, 1977.
A) Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark: or, A Treatise Concerning the Nature of Witches and Withchraft. London, 1656.
B) Baldwin, Samri S. Secrets of Mahatma Land Explained. Brooklyn: T.J. Dyson, 1895.
C) Black, Ishii. “Japanese Magic.” The Magician Monthly, Volumes X-XI, September 1914 - May 1915.
D) Buringham, H.J. Herrmann the Magician: His Life, His Secrets. Chicago: Laird and Lee, 1897.
E) Christopher, Milbourne. Panorama of Magic. New York: Dover, 1962.
F) Christopher, Milbourne. The Illustrated History of Magic. New York: Thomas Y. Crowwell, 1973.
G) Christopher, Milbourne. Houdini: The Untold Story. New York: Thomas Y. Crowwell, 1969.
H) Clarke, Sydney W. The Annals of Conjuring. Pub. serially in The Magic Wand magazine, 1924-1928. Also pub. London: George Johnson, 1929.
I) Coryat, Thomas. Coryat’s Crudities. New York: Macmillan, 1905.
J) Dare, Paul. Magie Blanche et Magie Noire aux Indes. Paris: Payot, 1947.
K) Evans, Henry Ridgely. The Old and the New Magic. Chicago: The Open Court, 1906.
L) Fischer, Ottokar. Illustrated Magic. Trans. & Ed. by J.B. Mussey and Fulton Ousler. New York: Macmillan, 1955.
M) Frazer, Sir James George. The Golden Bough, A Study in Magic and Religion. abridged edition. New York: Macmillan, 1974.
N) Frost, Thomas. The Lives of the Conjurers. London: Tinsley Brothers, 1874.
O) Gibson, Walter B. and Morris N. Young. Houdini on Magic. New York: Dover, 1953.
P) Gibson, Walter B. and Morris N. Young. Secrets of Magic: Ancient and Modern. New York: Grosset and Dunlap, 1967.
Q) Hopkins, Albert A. Magic, Stage Illusion and Scientific Diversions, Including Trick Photography. Intr. by Henry Ridgley Evans. New York: Munn, 1898.
R) Huggins, Wilfred and Fred Culpitt. Secrets of the Street Conjurer. London: G. Johnson, 1943.
S) Hughes, Pennethorne. Witchcraft. London: Penguin, 1973.
T) Keel, John A. Jadoo. New York: Julian Messner, 1957.
U) Kellar, Harry. A Magician’s Tour Up and Down and Round About the Earth: Being the Life and Adventures of the American Nostradamus, Harry Kellar, Ed. by
“Satan, Junior.” Chicago: R.R. Donnelley, 1886.
V) Kellar, Harry. “High-Caste Indian Magic.” The North American Review, Volume CLVI, Number 3. New York: 1893.
W) Kellock, Harold. Houdini: His Life Story; from the Recollections and Documents of Beatrice Houdini. New York: Harcourt, Brace, 1928.
X) Kirby, E.T. “Popular Entertainments.” The Drama Review, Volume XVIII, Number 1, March, 1974.
Y) Kreskin. The Amazing World of Kreskin. New York: Random House, 1973.
Z) Lynn, Professor H.S. The Adventures of the Strange Man. London: Pub. by author, 1873.
AA) MacKay, Charles. Extraordinary Popular Dilusions and the Madness of Crowds. London: 1852.
AB) Maskelyne, Nevil and David Devant. Our Magic. 2nd ed. Berkeley Heights, New Jersey: Fleming, 1946.
AC) McKechnie, Samuel. Popular Entertainments Through the Ages. London: Samson Low, Marston, nd.
AD) Morley, Henry. Memoires of Bartholomew Fair. London: Chapman and Hall, 1859.
AE) Robert-Houdin, Jean Eugene. Memoires of Robert-Houdin, Ambassador, Author, and Conjurer, Written by Himself. Trans. by Lascelles WraxallKellar, Harry. London: Chapman and Hall, 1860.
AF) Scot, Reginald. The Discoverie of Witchcraft. London: 1584.
AG) Tarbell, Harlan. The Tarbell Course in Magic. New York: Louis Tannen, Beginning 1944.
AH) Yva, Yvon. Les Fakirs et Leurs Secrets. Paris: Gallimard (l’Air du Temps 178), 1963.
Pop Haydn
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Quote:
On Nov 3, 2017, malaki wrote:
Hey, Pop, sorry, I didn't realize that you wanted the background references. Here you go. The list of references in the Timeline of Magic is more than 20 pages long because I did include the sub-references.

2) Claflin, Edward. Street Magic: An Illustrated History of Wandering Magicians and their Conjuring Arts. New York: Doubleday and Company, 1977.
A) Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark: or, A Treatise Concerning the Nature of Witches and Withchraft. London, 1656.
B) Baldwin, Samri S. Secrets of Mahatma Land Explained. Brooklyn: T.J. Dyson, 1895.
C) Black, Ishii. “Japanese Magic.” The Magician Monthly, Volumes X-XI, September 1914 - May 1915.
D) Buringham, H.J. Herrmann the Magician: His Life, His Secrets. Chicago: Laird and Lee, 1897.
E) Christopher, Milbourne. Panorama of Magic. New York: Dover, 1962.
F) Christopher, Milbourne. The Illustrated History of Magic. New York: Thomas Y. Crowwell, 1973.
G) Christopher, Milbourne. Houdini: The Untold Story. New York: Thomas Y. Crowwell, 1969.
H) Clarke, Sydney W. The Annals of Conjuring. Pub. serially in The Magic Wand magazine, 1924-1928. Also pub. London: George Johnson, 1929.
I) Coryat, Thomas. Coryat’s Crudities. New York: Macmillan, 1905.
J) Dare, Paul. Magie Blanche et Magie Noire aux Indes. Paris: Payot, 1947.
K) Evans, Henry Ridgely. The Old and the New Magic. Chicago: The Open Court, 1906.
L) Fischer, Ottokar. Illustrated Magic. Trans. & Ed. by J.B. Mussey and Fulton Ousler. New York: Macmillan, 1955.
M) Frazer, Sir James George. The Golden Bough, A Study in Magic and Religion. abridged edition. New York: Macmillan, 1974.
N) Frost, Thomas. The Lives of the Conjurers. London: Tinsley Brothers, 1874.
O) Gibson, Walter B. and Morris N. Young. Houdini on Magic. New York: Dover, 1953.
P) Gibson, Walter B. and Morris N. Young. Secrets of Magic: Ancient and Modern. New York: Grosset and Dunlap, 1967.
Q) Hopkins, Albert A. Magic, Stage Illusion and Scientific Diversions, Including Trick Photography. Intr. by Henry Ridgley Evans. New York: Munn, 1898.
R) Huggins, Wilfred and Fred Culpitt. Secrets of the Street Conjurer. London: G. Johnson, 1943.
S) Hughes, Pennethorne. Witchcraft. London: Penguin, 1973.
T) Keel, John A. Jadoo. New York: Julian Messner, 1957.
U) Kellar, Harry. A Magician’s Tour Up and Down and Round About the Earth: Being the Life and Adventures of the American Nostradamus, Harry Kellar, Ed. by
“Satan, Junior.” Chicago: R.R. Donnelley, 1886.
V) Kellar, Harry. “High-Caste Indian Magic.” The North American Review, Volume CLVI, Number 3. New York: 1893.
W) Kellock, Harold. Houdini: His Life Story; from the Recollections and Documents of Beatrice Houdini. New York: Harcourt, Brace, 1928.
X) Kirby, E.T. “Popular Entertainments.” The Drama Review, Volume XVIII, Number 1, March, 1974.
Y) Kreskin. The Amazing World of Kreskin. New York: Random House, 1973.
Z) Lynn, Professor H.S. The Adventures of the Strange Man. London: Pub. by author, 1873.
AA) MacKay, Charles. Extraordinary Popular Dilusions and the Madness of Crowds. London: 1852.
AB) Maskelyne, Nevil and David Devant. Our Magic. 2nd ed. Berkeley Heights, New Jersey: Fleming, 1946.
AC) McKechnie, Samuel. Popular Entertainments Through the Ages. London: Samson Low, Marston, nd.
AD) Morley, Henry. Memoires of Bartholomew Fair. London: Chapman and Hall, 1859.
AE) Robert-Houdin, Jean Eugene. Memoires of Robert-Houdin, Ambassador, Author, and Conjurer, Written by Himself. Trans. by Lascelles WraxallKellar, Harry. London: Chapman and Hall, 1860.
AF) Scot, Reginald. The Discoverie of Witchcraft. London: 1584.
AG) Tarbell, Harlan. The Tarbell Course in Magic. New York: Louis Tannen, Beginning 1944.
AH) Yva, Yvon. Les Fakirs et Leurs Secrets. Paris: Gallimard (l’Air du Temps 178), 1963.



I just wanted the source for the 2000 year old history of the rings. Do you have ANY ancient source that backs the 2000 year date? I am not aware of any sources that go back further than 700 years.
malaki
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I have not found anything but what I have supplied to you here. I basically compiled all of the information that I was able to get, with a date and reference attached to it, so that the information would be all in one place. As simple as the rings are, and as easy as they would be to make (especially in comparison to making chain mail, which dates to before Rome), I am sure that the general effect could have and probably would have been used, even if it weren't a set of eight.

In the SCA, everything's authenticity is in doubt until you can show some form of documentation that assigns it to a date. Up until I found this reference, I kept being told by the "experts" (read Laurels) that it only dated to the 1800s - not that they were offering any form of documentation to back up their claim... Of course, the research goes on. I realize that one reference in one book is not exactly a stone upon which to stand. If I find anything more solid, I will let you know.
Pop Haydn
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Well, I just wondered if the source cited had offered any evidence. Evidently not.
Intrepid
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Quote:
On Oct 19, 2017, malaki wrote:
As far as Egg Bag and the C&B, there are some surviving posters of the Saint Bartholomew Fair (in the actual Renaissance) that shows a magician performing the egg bag with C&B set on his table.


Would love to see a tradition egg bag routine being performed. The traditional egg bag act was much different from the malini egg bag routine we know today. The descriptions I’ve come across use a much larger bag, about a foot and a half long and is loaded with dozens of eggs. The climax being the production of a live chicken.
Bob
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