We Remember The Magic Café We Remember
Username:
Password:
[ Lost Password ]
  [ Forgot Username ]
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Tricky business » » How Many Ways Do You Market? (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

Mindpro
View Profile
Inner circle
8796 Posts

Profile of Mindpro
I was recently asked to write a column/blog post on how many ways do entertainers need to market. This came about initially when I was asked a similar question during an interview and the host seemed stunned at my answer. I had explained that while many of us would like to seek out a "magic bullet" in which we find one method that becomes gold and generates all of your bookings/income, I explained that this was rarely the case, if ever, and that too many waste their time chasing after and trying to find that holy grail of marketing.

So I pose the question to you, how many different means or methods of marking, advertising and promotion do you do to get bookings, generate business and sustain your business? If you decided to increase your business by say 20-25% what methods would be your go-to methods you trust to reach this target?

Of course, I know much of this depends on the performance markets you serve, the type of performer you are, and even where you are located (tourist area vs. out in the middle of nowhere, etc.) But as anyone in business or any amount of time knows, there are tried and true methods that are your preferred and best performing, as well as others you choose not to waste your time with. Of course, word of mouth and referrals are the most cost-effective and preferred, that is a given, but other than these, what are your thoughts?
charliecheckers
View Profile
Inner circle
1917 Posts

Profile of charliecheckers
I market to the children’s entertainment market.
A few things that come to mind are:
In person visits
email blasts
Hard copy flyers
Conference displays
Meeting presentations
Website presence
Social media
Post show giveaways

My most often go to method of increasing bookings is emailing a specific flyer to as many relevant recipients as possible. My go to method of increasing bookings when looking a bit further down the time line is to increase in-person interactions with targeted individuals, groups and/or market types.
Gerry Walkowski
View Profile
Inner circle
1378 Posts

Profile of Gerry Walkowski
I'm not the best barometer on how to book (market) shows, but to me nothing beats a direct target market. On the occasions whereby I found a perfect match for my style of show and a particular event, I've hit a homerun just about every time. I've reached these groups by phone call, letter or an email.

To me, nothing beats having a GREAT SHOW. If you do a fantastic job, the odds are in your favor that you'll be called back next year for another command performance. I have to say that most of my work is repeat business. I'm already up to 10 Christmas show bookings, all of which are customers that have me back year after year.

Gerry
charliecheckers
View Profile
Inner circle
1917 Posts

Profile of charliecheckers
Gerry- thanks for the point about phone calls- that is very high on my list as well, often used as a follow up to email blasts for some of the targets as well as past clients.
Dannydoyle
View Profile
Eternal Order
19041 Posts

Profile of Dannydoyle
All of my marketing efforts revolve around getting long term residencies. I never liked the idea that every time you finish a show you are out of work. (That is extreme, but the sentiment is right.) The constant revolving of materials and finding new leads seems absolutely exhausting to me.
Danny Doyle
<BR>Semper Occultus
<BR>In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act....George Orwell
thomasR
View Profile
Special user
553 Posts

Profile of thomasR
That makes a lot of sense Danny. That's a topic that could be explored way more in depth I think!
Dannydoyle
View Profile
Eternal Order
19041 Posts

Profile of Dannydoyle
It certainly could, but so few do it that it wouldn't really matter if we did.

I do one off shows that result from long term gigs but never market for them. I have always just thought that I can spend time and resources to get the long term job and then spend that time and money I'm not spending marketing doing things I actually enjoy doing.

In truth (And Mindpro can tell you this is absolutely the truth.) I do NOT enjoy the business end of this at all. I do not like having to be on the phone or Web or any of the hundreds of tasks necessary to be successful in the one night show markets. As I said it seems exhausting to me and you may as well have a job.

So to me the idea is not to have to do all that work. The disadvantages do come into play. For example odds are pretty good you might have to relocate. I lived in Chicago, Key Largo, Branson, Las Vegas, and usually more than 6 months a year in some Caribbean destination. In other words you may not find a long term residency in your own back yard. If you are not willing to move to chase it then it is meaningless.

In reality that is sort of the only disadvantage of doing it that way. But it a completely different mindset. It isn't for everyone and the approach to doing things this way is vastly different from what you read in all the courses.
Danny Doyle
<BR>Semper Occultus
<BR>In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act....George Orwell
thomasR
View Profile
Special user
553 Posts

Profile of thomasR
When you do long term, do you 100% move to that town, or do you keep your home base and just rent a short term apartment or something where you got the contract?
Obviously that could vary from gig to gig but what is the normal for you?
Dannydoyle
View Profile
Eternal Order
19041 Posts

Profile of Dannydoyle
We do a complete move. I was born in Chicago so that was home. Then Key Largo for 3 years, Branson for 10 and Las Vegas for almost 4 now. We still own the home in Branson where my mom lives so we are Missouri residents. (She also watches our dogs when we are out of the country for long periods of time.)

So we commit to it. Burn the boats if you will. Google Cortez or read this for a reference. https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.forbes.......net/amp/

I happen to believe that in an unrelated point performers who do not burn their boats have more trouble succeeding than those who do. I'm not encouraging anyone to so. Just pointing out an opinion.
Danny Doyle
<BR>Semper Occultus
<BR>In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act....George Orwell
thomasR
View Profile
Special user
553 Posts

Profile of thomasR
I think you are right. That doesn't only mean moving... if you quit your job and focus 100% on your entertainment business you have to figure out how to make it work. If you keep your job and do magic on the side, it's very easy to fall back into the easy, steady paycheck. I know that from experience! (It's even worse for me, as my fall back job is a lot of fun and pays pretty good.)

I wonder if so few try to get long-term work because they don't think the work is out there? It certainly seems logical to me that if you are going to invest time and moeny into marketing your performances, it's a better ROI if you market to those who would hire you for months at a time.
Mindpro
View Profile
Inner circle
8796 Posts

Profile of Mindpro
Quote:
On Sep 17, 2018, thomasR wrote:
I wonder if so few try to get long-term work because they don't think the work is out there? It certainly seems logical to me that if you are going to invest time and moeny into marketing your performances, it's a better ROI if you market to those who would hire you for months at a time.


As someone who has worked with thousands of performers, I can tell you 95% of them have no idea there are even any other entertainment business models other than the get a gig, do a gig and look for more bookings. The closest are probably local-level restaurant workers and those serving the amusement parks industry where the simply view them as "accounts", but not as a different business model.

Danny's business model, while on the surface can be appealing to many, there is much to it that comes into play that does not under the standard "default" business model. There is often a great deal more pressure, higherups to answer to and be accountable to on several levels, higher stakes, and in many ways is an "all your eggs in one basket" type of model. Like 2/4-walling, I have seen guys riding high while all things are good, yet become completely destroyed and devastated when it ends unexpectedly and they are left with nothing.

I spent 10 years in working that business model and it was very fruitful. I actually created a specialty agency to accommodate that model and marketplace, and also a production company to create and produce several of our own shows. There is a lot to learn about that model and part of the industry but for us it lead to other venues, growth to other properties within the portfolio, tours, and more.

But like I said, I don't think most performers have any idea about other business models including this one.
Dannydoyle
View Profile
Eternal Order
19041 Posts

Profile of Dannydoyle
Absolutely right. All the eggs in one basket can be unappealing and I have seen many an example of the ruin losing the basket can cause. We went through it to a point in each transition. Life happens. I actively strive to not have them all in the one basket. Fortunately having a marketable show is never out of style.

In reality the transition is not much worse than having a show patch in marketing day to day. That happens to lots of guys.

Also the longer you do it this was the easier the transition actually is.
Danny Doyle
<BR>Semper Occultus
<BR>In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act....George Orwell
thomasR
View Profile
Special user
553 Posts

Profile of thomasR
Quote:
On Sep 17, 2018, Mindpro wrote:
Danny's business model, while on the surface can be appealing to many, there is much to it that comes into play that does not under the standard "default" business model. There is often a great deal more pressure, higherups to answer to and be accountable to on several levels, higher stakes, and in many ways is an "all your eggs in one basket" type of model.


I feel like that is true for all areas of entertainment. From birthday parties to headlining in Vegas.
Mindpro
View Profile
Inner circle
8796 Posts

Profile of Mindpro
Not the same at all. Huge difference in the amount of pressure, expectations, financial responsibility on the line, reputation, and one mistake, one poor performance, one specific dissatisfied customer could have millions of dollars at stake and extreme ramifications. Nothing like birthday parties or most type of performance markets at all, sorry. Unless I'm misunderstanding you.
thomasR
View Profile
Special user
553 Posts

Profile of thomasR
I was saying your statement is true across the board in entertainment, not that the pressures were exactly the same.
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Tricky business » » How Many Ways Do You Market? (0 Likes)
[ Top of Page ]
All content & postings Copyright © 2001-2018 Steve Brooks. All Rights Reserved.
This page was created in 0.11 seconds requiring 5 database queries.
The views and comments expressed on The Magic Café
are not necessarily those of The Magic Café, Steve Brooks, or Steve Brooks Magic.
> Privacy Statement <

ROTFL Billions and billions served! ROTFL