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Topic: Chen Lee's Water Suspension. Should I get it?
Message: Posted by: VMC_Alex (Oct 16, 2002 12:29AM)
Should I get this trick for Christmas? And if I do, what do you think would be a reasonable price to buy it at?
Message: Posted by: alexhui (Oct 16, 2002 04:59AM)
Hi,Alex,
It's a great trick. But a very good presentation is needed to perform this one. For the price,check it around the Internet and you will find your reasonable price.
Cheers,
Alex
Message: Posted by: KingStardog (Oct 16, 2002 10:52AM)
The question is where and who you will perform it for. It is an excellent mini-illusion. It requires about six feet of separation from the spectator and a place where it can be controlled both before and after to avoid exposing the secret. It is really designed for a stage setting and if you are only going to get it for non-commercial venues, no, don't get it. You would be better off investing another ten dollars and get a Paul Harris, or Michael Ammar book for the money. If you are just beginning with stage/parlor and are willing to invest the time for a proper presentation, it will be a valuable tool in your collection of effects. I use it for small groups, and charity shows, for kids and the disabled. I have a small oak trunk that I use to control these types of props, so the secrets are not exposed, and put a masterlock on it when done performing.
Message: Posted by: charliemagic (Oct 16, 2002 06:57PM)
I agree with KingStardog. I have had kids yell "I see the Glass" or "I see something" etc., etc., as they look from the ground up.
Even though it may be my fault for not taking control of my audience, I stopped using it.
Message: Posted by: David Regal (Oct 16, 2002 07:14PM)
This is one of my favorite effects - I did it at kid shows as a teenager. I recently bought another (a secondhand one) at a swap meet because I like the trick so much - and it's a great value for the money (it used to cost about five bucks when I was a kid - now it's probably up to fifteen). I noticed that over the years some poorly-made sets were put on the market. These poorly-made sets did not use a properly-sized celluloid gaff, but simply a smaller glass inside a larger. You want a nice-fitting celluloid gaff! So I'd say yes, get it, but make sure you ask about the gaff.
Message: Posted by: Grandillusionsmagic (Oct 17, 2002 04:55PM)
I think for the $15 or so, it is worth it. I couldn't think of when I would use it but now I use it all the time.
I think it is a great trick just to have.
Grand Illusions
Message: Posted by: Snidini (Jan 12, 2003 05:10PM)
Magic magazine ran an excellent routine a few months back regarding this prop teaching kids just how important education was. I wish I could remember the exact month, maybe August or September but it was good enough to make go out and pick one up. I soon added it to my children's show and adapted some of the routine to fit my own background. The routine does seem to capture the kids attention and I have used it on early teens also with the same effect.

Scott
Message: Posted by: magicbob116 (May 27, 2009 11:46PM)
[quote]
On 2003-01-12 18:10, Snidini wrote:
Magic magazine ran an excellent routine a few months back regarding this prop teaching kids just how important education was. I wish I could remember the exact month, maybe August or September but it was good enough to make go out and pick one up. I soon added it to my children's show and adapted some of the routine to fit my own background. The routine does seem to capture the kids attention and I have used it on early teens also with the same effect.

Scott
[/quote]

http://www.sillymagic.com/columnseducation.htm
Message: Posted by: dragonash (Jul 13, 2009 06:56AM)
When pouring water into the can during performance I have had a problem with the water making a loud splattering sound as if it were pouring into something.

to kill this sound I now position the works towards the front of the can and tilt it slightly towards the audience. I aim the pouring liquid to hit the inside front wall (of the thing it is supposed to hit).

instead of holding the can by the sides I hold it (with the left fingers and thumb) by the top front edge. the fingers point more to the right than straight down.

there are a couple of viewing advantages to this grip. 1) the hand obscures flashing of the witherspork from the top. 2) the slight tilt towards the audience and positioning of the hokus toward the front of the can prevents flashing from the bottom.

unfortunately it may look suspicious.

readers, please post further thoughts on handling.