(Close Window)
Topic: Eureka Table Base, Strong?
Message: Posted by: Gideon Sylvan (Jul 3, 2005 10:08AM)
How much weight can the Eureka Table Base hold? Can it attach to any top, or only specially manufactured tops?

Thanks,
Gideon
Message: Posted by: Sam Pearce (Jul 3, 2005 05:02PM)
Right now, my Murder Inc. illusion is sitting on it, and it is quite sturdy, and I'am sure that it could easyly hold the weight, extending 3-4 feet, but if you put it up too high it will start to wobble.

The table base comes with its own speciality top, that you can put on the bottom of any table top or item that you are looking to hold.

It is really a great base, you cant go wrong with this!

Magically yours, Sam Pearce.
Message: Posted by: Alan Munro (Jul 4, 2005 01:17PM)
The table that I made using a Eureka Base is so sturdy that I can lean on it, without worry. I weigh just over 190#, so that's a strong table.
Message: Posted by: Bob Sanders (Jul 30, 2005 10:28PM)
[quote]
On 2005-07-03 11:08, SwissKid 52 wrote:
How much weight can the Eureka Table Base hold? Can it attach to any top, or only specially manufactured tops?

Thanks,
Gideon
[/quote]

Gideon,

I'm not sure if we have 12 or 16 Eureka Table bases. All are converted to accept 1/2" water pipe thread flanges. Most are used as JetSet stands (for portable curtains or backdrops). Two are used for Chalet Gloves to Dove or Dove in Balloon, two are used for Chalet Doves to Rabbit and two are used for small table tops. All are exactly alike so there is no lost efforts or need to match. My last dozen were probably bought in 1976. They are tough and will last until someone loses them or they get stolen. The only two parts that ever give me trouble are the twist knobs that get broken and the rubber feet that fall off. The knobs are available at most RV and Camper supply stores and the rubber feet have to be re-dipped in the plastic "stuff" that stays usually for many years.

Simply put, they are tough, adaptable, very portable and handy. I've never regretted a penny I've spent on them.

Bob
Magic By Sander
Message: Posted by: olivertwist (Nov 2, 2005 07:39PM)
I just got my first Eureka table base and I am very impressed with the strength and stability. It looks like I'll want 3 more to replace the other bases I'm using now.
Message: Posted by: Regan (Nov 3, 2005 09:09AM)
I don't like the Eureka bases. The tripod base on my stands are very sturdy in the lowest position. However, my stands will not stay in a raised position. I made my own tables from microphone stands and I am very well pleased with them.

Regan
Message: Posted by: Bob Sanders (Nov 8, 2005 09:50PM)
An advantage of mic stands is that there are so many different things made to screw on to them and lock to them. Don't overlook the uses of the boom pole top! (The curtain support isn't where it appears to be!)

Bob Sanders
Magic By Sander
Message: Posted by: Regan (Nov 12, 2005 10:57AM)
You're exactly right Bob. I use a these little trays on two of my 'mic stand' tables that are handy-dandy little shelves. They look great too.

I also use speaker stands (with a little modification) for my backdrop stands. They look great and are very sturdy.

Regan
Message: Posted by: Magicalpro (Nov 15, 2005 05:11PM)
My issue with the Eureka Table bases is the little extra piece that MAK puts on the top to screw into a flange, I use them with Joe Leflers cube Table, the threads strip eventually on the Eureka table base, so I go through them about every 6 months.
Message: Posted by: Bob Sanders (Nov 15, 2005 08:14PM)
[quote]
On 2005-11-15 18:11, Magicalpro wrote:
My issue with the Eureka Table bases is the little extra piece that MAK puts on the top to screw into a flange, I use them with Joe Leflers cube Table, the threads strip eventually on the Eureka table base, so I go through them about every 6 months.
[/quote]

Your statement did not go unnoticed. I don't like the "glued on" look myself. It is an EMT joint with cast waterpipe thread. Actually it turns out to be very handy. But it does look awful. However, it is also very durable. If you are having trouble with the softer EMT threads put an iron waterpipe union above it. I have never striped one but I'm sure it can be done.

You moght prefer the mic stand arrangement Regan uses. It is harder metal.

Good Luck!

Bob Sanders
Magic By Sander
Message: Posted by: Regan (Nov 16, 2005 04:29PM)
[quote]
On 2005-11-15 18:11, Magicalpro wrote:
My issue with the Eureka Table bases is the little extra piece that MAK puts on the top to screw into a flange, I use them with Joe Leflers cube Table, the threads strip eventually on the Eureka table base, so I go through them about every 6 months.
[/quote]

I have issues with this also. I have not ruined the threads on this piece, but I did damage them on one of my Eureka's. I also do not like the height adjuster. That is what gave me the most problems.
Message: Posted by: Cory Gallupe (Nov 16, 2005 04:55PM)
What do you think would be the better idea, I might build my own wooden table, but I am also thinking of getting a cheap table base and putting a table on it. Where can I see a bunch of tables to choose from?
Message: Posted by: threecardmonte (Nov 17, 2005 10:32AM)
I use a cymbal stand to put my table top on. Very similar to the Eureka but less than half the price.
Tim
Message: Posted by: Bob Sanders (Nov 24, 2005 09:15AM)
OK --- Friday night I saw proof that old Eureka bases are not allowed to die. Michael has one with a small "C" clamp to lock it open.

He is ahead of me on one very important item. He has redipped all the feet and they match! It's been decades since mine matched. But they do have "character".

Bob Sanders
Magic By Sander

PS --- After that same show, I had an engineer asks me if thirty years isn't expecting a lot of heavily used vanishing dove cage. He didn't seem impressed when I replied, "Check with me again in thirty more years." Some equipment isn't allowed to die.
Message: Posted by: Michael Taggert (Nov 25, 2005 09:03PM)
Eureka tables keep on ticking. So you do have to maintain them if you use them a lot. But the parts are easy to find and with a few minutes of work every few months you are back up to speed on this work horse. Like Bob, I use a plumbing flange on the bottom of my tables and have taken the time to paint them and the connector the same color. My oldest Eureka is over 20years old and has out lived five standard tops. Tt folds up to the right size for my trunk and has been a staple in over 3000 shows. I pile a lot of stuff on my tables including heavy props and it won't budge on stage. Some times lighter, cheaper and faster are not they way to go.
Message: Posted by: John C (Jan 6, 2006 03:41PM)
Anyone know where I can purchase some poly olefin fiber to cover a case? I've searched google. This is the same stuff that covers Joe Lefler's Pro Suitcase.

Thanks,

John
Message: Posted by: algebraic (Jan 6, 2006 06:58PM)
You can find one here that supports up to 100lbs: http://www.vikingmagiccompany.com/?nd=full&key=929
Message: Posted by: Owen Anderson (Jan 7, 2006 08:48AM)
>>>Anyone know where I can purchase some poly olefin fiber to cover a case? I've searched google. This is the same stuff that covers Joe Lefler's Pro Suitcase.<<<

Visit a car audio shop.
Especially the type that caters to the 'pimp my ride' crowd. Along with all the super-sized auto noisemakers you can usually get the olefin.
I paid about $7-8 a metre for it. Same stuff as on Lefler's tables.
Message: Posted by: Regan (Jan 7, 2006 09:31AM)
Owen is correct. I'm not sure if it is the exact same stuff, but it is very similar to the material used for trunk liner.

Regan
Message: Posted by: Dynamike (Jan 12, 2006 02:33AM)
Here are a couple of links to microphone stands: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=NavBar&A=search&Q=&ci=8695
http://www.kraftmusic.com/catalog/accessories/microphonestands/index.asp?page=2&brand=

You microphone stands users, do you use a tripod or round base? I never thought about using one before. I always uses the Eureka Base. But I will investigate the microphone stands to see which one pleases me more.
Message: Posted by: Regan (Jan 12, 2006 06:37AM)
I use a tripod base.
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Jan 12, 2006 11:01PM)
The Eureka base is basically an adapted cymbal or drum stand.

If you go to your local hardware store, you can usually find copper flange adapters that are threaded to fit a floor flange. The kind you want would be the ones that have a fit that you solder to copper pipe. Pull the central column out of the Eureka base or drum stand. Find a fitting that will slip over it with as little play as possible, then solder it in place with Sta-Brite.
Message: Posted by: mikeypresto (Dec 31, 2006 06:22PM)
Use a mic stand with a flange, much stronger and cheaper
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Jan 1, 2007 06:32PM)
That depends on the mike stand. If you use a standard Atlas mike stand, you will find that the weak spot is the place where the upright threads into the base. The folding three-legged mike stands from Asia are good for small amounts of weight, but they will come apart over time. The Eureka base is very strong.

Personally, I don't like them, though. They look like a big chunk of Erector set gone wrong. The Viking tables are great. I have some old P&L tables that are better than any of these, though.
Message: Posted by: Bob Sanders (Jan 21, 2007 09:59AM)
Bill,

We all seem to try Atlas mic stands. Ultimately the cast stand strips out the threads. Then we put pipe nuts on both sides until the post twist at the wrong time for the last time. Next we buy good bases. My orignals are now holding the lake bottom down. They even escaped from the trotline!

The other problem with them is that the friction connectors holding the rubber feet on ultimately fall off. Then they wobble.

At best, they are mic stands.

Bob Sanders
Magic By Sander
Message: Posted by: TheAmbitiousCard (Jan 21, 2007 11:03AM)
How easy it it to find a flange for a mic stand?
Message: Posted by: Bob Sanders (Jan 21, 2007 04:22PM)
That is easy. Just go to Radio Shack.

The real question is: What will it support?

Not much!

Bob Sanders
Magic By Sander
Message: Posted by: TheAmbitiousCard (Jan 22, 2007 09:31PM)
Thanks bob.
I believe you. :)
Message: Posted by: WoodRat (Jan 27, 2007 12:30AM)
ProLine makes a nice, sturdy conductor's music stand in black for $40, Tri-pod base with quick release levers for the legs, a 2-piece, telescoping upright with quick-release lever and a top tube the accepts 3/4" OD stock. The music platform is removeable.

If you are handy with tools, You can use the music platform as a base for your custom top, or you can get a round, single-threaded conduit plate and short piece of riser from the local hardware store and use that to mount your top. Either way, it breaks down in a matter of 2 minutes, and is very light-weight and compact.

Cheers!