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Topic: I know how you did that!!
Message: Posted by: sethbek (Oct 25, 2002 04:26PM)
When you are doing a trick, and someone screams out "[b]I know how you did that!!! I saw you put that coin in your pocket!! I saw it!!![/b]," (for example).
What in the world am I suppose to do?
(Obviously practice, but at the moment, what do I do?)
:pepper: :spinningcoin: :pepper:
Message: Posted by: Mr. Ed (Oct 25, 2002 05:55PM)
Any number of things. If you are caught red handed so to speak, you could just continue as if nothing happened. When this happens you could say "Ssshhhhh this guy over here missed it, keep it our secret." Of course everyone hears this and the tension is lifted. It really depends on the situation.
The most important think to do is to analyze why this happened and take measures to try and prevent it in the future.
Message: Posted by: twistedace (Oct 25, 2002 09:53PM)
Depends really,
If it's a french drop and they catch it and seem like the "narrate the rest of the trick kind of person" do a spider vanish immediately after a real french drop and they'll more than likely say "and see look it's in that hand" you immediately open it and they look bad for trying to make you look bad. Tell you the truth when i'm performing for people they tend to really get into it and like me so when someone tries to ruin the trick, someone in the audience usually says "hey shut up we're watching what he does not what you think you know!" Just have fun and they'll be on your side from the get go!
Bryan
Message: Posted by: Chris S (Oct 25, 2002 11:53PM)
Tell them to shut up or you will not do any more effects. Some people are just jerks and hoping to get them onside is just not feasible. In this case, walk off and perform elsewhere. If it is a precocious child (now THERE'S a remote possibility :hrmph: ) then lean down and whisper softly "My medication helps me ignore people like you - but it only works up..to..a..point". :bat:
Message: Posted by: Alan Munro (Oct 26, 2002 03:27AM)
Start rehearsing with a video camera, at several different angles?
:)
Just get on with it. If they get the least indication that you're worried, they'll believe the heckler.
Message: Posted by: r4bid (Oct 26, 2002 08:54AM)
In that specific case here is what I would do. Reach into your pocket and finger palm the coin quickly while pulling out the entire pocket to show it empty.

I don't like dealing with hecklers verbally as it will usually just escalate the conflict so I just prove them wrong and then immediatly move on.
Message: Posted by: cataquet (Oct 26, 2002 11:36AM)
If this is a common reaction, then I suspect you are probably doing something fundamentally wrong. So, what we need to do is to use the information to improve your technique.

For example, let's suppose you are doing a really bad French drop. Go in the mirror and look at how you would genuinely pick up the coin and see how you are doing when you do the false transfer. If the two don't look the same, then you're doing something wrong in the "move". If they both look the same, then try taking a different position vis a vis the mirror. It could easily be that you are not watching your angles properly. In both of these checks, look in the mirror, not in you hands. Alan's video camera idea is very good, but play it from all the angles so that you are aware of how the spectators see things.

Your line of sight might be giving the game away. Maybe you're looking at where the coin genuinely is as opposed to where it should be. Your body language after and during the move is just as important as the mechanics of the move itself. There are really too many possible errors, and hence so many possible solutions. If we know the error, then we could solve the problem.

My biggest advise is don't perform if you can't perform well!

Bye for now

Harold
Message: Posted by: Curtis Kam (Oct 26, 2002 10:39PM)
This response is inevitable whether the loudmouth in question actually did see something or not. However, I agree with Harold that the first thing to do is to make sure they don't see anything in the first place.

That's not just a matter of practice, either. Perhaps the routine you're using leaves the spectator with no other explanation other than the right one.

Or, perhaps you're doing something that convinces the spectator that it would be more fun to bust you than to see where you're heading with the trick.

That being said, there is still the question of "what do I do right now?"

My favorite response comes from a unknown (to me, at least) carny performer who, when confronted in this way, would tell the heckler, "Sorry buddy, but I'm all out of medals."

The line needs updating, but the point is sound. The guy who shouts out explanations is missing the point of the entire experience. There are no prizes for guessing right (unless you'd like to pay me a dollar every time you're wrong--and I have done this a few times...)

For the more serious minded, Tommy Wonder has a well-considered solution in the Books of Wonder, which you do,of course, own. If not, then that explains everything..... :)
Message: Posted by: Dark (Oct 27, 2002 12:27AM)
Hmm, slightly off topic, but how do you usually deal with people who keep reaching for things?

I can usually head them off at the pass so to speak, but I just want to say "HEY MIND YOUR MANNERS!" :hmm:
Message: Posted by: CSStanton (Oct 27, 2002 12:00AM)
Just a few days ago, I was playing with a deck and some coins with some of my friends. I decided to show a gal I didn't know at all a coin bit and she looked like she was some godly creature, muttering 'I've seen that' and 'I've seen better'. So, I polietley told her that I really wasnt the best around, put my coins in my pockets and ordered a Coke. A buddy of mine asked me to do 'The Coin that Falls Up', so I did it. She again butted in, saying 'she'd seen better'. I was at the tip of my frusteration. The time was perfect, so I said 'Me too'. She looked at me puzzled, then realized that I was talking about how she looked. That was the last I saw of her.
Haha.
Maybe not the best idea for everyone. Try it sometime, very funny.
-Casey
Message: Posted by: sethbek (Oct 27, 2002 03:13PM)
I meant- Assuming you are doing it for just TWO people, one who just likes to be annoying. Both people have no idea how the trick is done but to be annoying one screams- ITS IN YOUR HAND!! ITS IN YOUR OTHER HAND!. Im not looking for a slight to get out of this- im looking for some good words to say.
Thank you so far to everyone who has helped!
:pepper: :spinningcoin: :pepper:
Message: Posted by: Chris "linkster" Watson (Oct 28, 2002 05:44AM)
If you really get caught you can always use the line " Well if I could really do this stuff do you think I'd be standing here showing you guys, instead of sunning myself on my own Caribean island being served cocktails by scantily clad women....it's a tough choice I know! Anyway here's another effect you might enjoy" and move on to something else. Usually this gets a Laugh and you haven't actually let on as to whether they got it right or not, all you have done s confirmed you aren't Merlin or Gandalf which hopefully they knew anyway... if they did think you were one of those Magicians then please let me know when you are next performing as I'd love to come and watch.
Hope this helps
Linkster :spinningcoin:
Message: Posted by: Daniel Meadows (Oct 28, 2002 05:54AM)
Anyone who owns "On the Spot" will see Greg nearly get busted a few times but because he is so quick he never had a problem.
At one point he gets spotted putting a coin into his pocket after a false transfer, he simply says, "Oh, I only make it look like it goes in the pocket so that..." and moves on the effect like normal.
This video is a good example of audience management and what to do just in case things don't go quite as you had practiced in front of the mirror.
Message: Posted by: MAGICTOM (Oct 28, 2002 07:54AM)
I had a kid this weekend ask me to open my hand during a coins across routine.. David Stones 4 coins across to a glass.. I heard him start to ask after the first coin traveled... So on the second coin.. I was supposed to have "3 in my left hand and one in the glass" he shouted out.. let me see your hand!!! and I politely told him there were only 3 there.. he insisted.. so I opened my hand and showed him the 3 coins and he was perplexed and confused because he just knew in his heart that I was holding out on him.. *L*

I was supposed to retain a coin in classic palm in the right hand and only dump 2 into my left hand for the second coin to cross..
but I read trouble.. and responded..
I actually put all 3 coins in my left hand and paused for a moment for him to yell it out! and he felt embarrased when he was wrong.. I simply counted the coins one at a time back into my right hand.. tossed them back into my left, retained one in classic palm and proceeded on with the effect with nothing but silence from the little 13 yr old heckler.. I know I should have denied him the access of being able to question how many coins in my hand and let him verify it, because it opens up the doors to let others do so as well.. but in this case it worked very well and the rest of the audience were convinced that I was performing a miracle.. :)
Tom
Message: Posted by: Allan (Oct 28, 2002 01:03PM)
no how long you perform or how seamless your magic is there is always going to be someone that states that they know how its done or that they saw what you did. first & foremost you must not do a trick or slight until it is perfect. second, you must know many ways of doing the same thing or be able to switch to a different trick midstream that relies on another principal. As far as good comebacks, you can lose the respect of the audience by coming back too strong or putting down the person that has made the statement. I usually either completely ignore the person that is interupting. By using this tact, you are not feeding into the duel that has been set up. By staying with the script, you diffuse the person & they will probably not make a comment again. As you continue the trick, both the loudmouth & the audience will realize that the person's comment had no merit. If that does not work, I will usually respond "I'm sure that you think you know, but if you will allow me to continue, I'm sure that not only will you enjoy the trick, but you will soon find out that it's not what you think. I then continue & blow that person as well as the rest of the people away. When the trick is over, don't have any further discussion about the comment. Just continue performing.

By this method, you diffuse the situation & the person. The audience stays on your side & the troublemaker will be afraid to open his mouth again because in the nicest way, you made him feel foolish about his remark. I find that the troublemaker will very often become your best friend & sing you praises. If you put him down. you make an enemy of both him & the audience. Try & stay positive. the idea is to win at your performance & not at the confrontation.
Message: Posted by: sethbek (Oct 28, 2002 01:04PM)
Chris Watson, thanks! that sounds like a great idea!!
:pepper: :spinningcoin: :pepper:
Message: Posted by: Alex W. (Oct 28, 2002 06:08PM)
There's a good page on this exact question at: http://www.cs.wisc.edu/~roy/magictalk-wisdom/discussions/i_know.html

Hope this helps...
Message: Posted by: Jeff Hinchliffe (Oct 28, 2002 06:36PM)
Interesting topic,

I have a couple of ideas. When I'm performing cards, and a kid says "I know how that's done," I lean towards them, and whisper "I know too, it's magic." At the same time, I palm a group of cards, and produce them via a one-handed fan from behind the kid's ear. This gets the kid in a situation he can't explain, and sort of takes the moment away from what the kid did(not) know, and still leaves you performing magic and also doesn't offend anyone.

Now, if the kid is persistent and still says he/she knows how it's done, and possibly blurts out a solution. I normally say something to the effect, "since you appear to be very interested in magic, how about you come up and help me with this next trick." I then do an effect where I take half the cards, and they take half the cards. Shuffle out packets, each selects a card from their own packet, I give him my card, and he gives me his. Then we shuffle our packets, and find eachother's cards. Of course, each of us shows are cards to other people for verification. Now, I don't really give them my card, but I switch it for an indifferent one. Then I replace their card via TILT and false shuffle. So I produce their card via double lift, and then place their(my) card on the table. Then when they continually seem to be unable to find my card, I palm off their card as I spread all the cards on the table and say, "it seems as though my card has vanished. Where'd you put it?" Then I produce the palmed card from the pocket or wallet, turn it over to display their card. Act, confused, then turn over the tabled card to reveal their card. Say, "I don't know how you did that, but I thank you very much for helping me out." This lets the spectator know that you are in charge, and also that you bailed them out of a sticky situation, which will make them more considerate in the future. Also, this is a fun trick for the audience, as there is a lot of spectator involvement, as well as humour.

Hopefully that all makes sense, I feel like I'm starting to ramble...

Jeff
Message: Posted by: sethbek (Oct 28, 2002 06:48PM)
I'm surprised no one suggested bopping them over the head with a mallet. :innocent:

:pepper: :spinningcoin: :pepper:

A magical friend of mine said the he makes the kid come on stage and do it if he "knows how it's done."
:pepper: :spinningcoin: :pepper:
Message: Posted by: Jeff Hinchliffe (Oct 28, 2002 10:07PM)
That approach may work, but it may also work to your disadvantage. If you are embarrasing a kid, people may look at you as pompous or rude. Even though the kid may be a little hellraiser, you are a professional and are being paid as such. You should therefore make every effort to act professional at all times. Of course, there will be extreme situations in which you professional attitude will have to be put aside, but these should be few and far between.

Just my opinon though,

Jeff Hinchliffe
Message: Posted by: twistedace (Oct 28, 2002 10:55PM)
I agree with Jeff
Message: Posted by: TheAmbitiousCard (Oct 29, 2002 01:13AM)
I had some kid this weekend that was smirking and nodding like he knew what was going on and of course he didn't.

When that happens, I tell everybody, "hey, you all need to pay attention like this kid/guy/gal is. He/she knows what's going on"

And then I perform Eddie Fechter's "That's It" or my version of card-to-card-box to that individual.

In both of those effects, it looks like the magician has made a mistake.

And you should see the look on their face when they "know" I've screwed up. What a great feeling to give the jerk all sorts of credit, get their ego flowing and then [b]Wham!!![/b] you nail them, oh, so politely.

That's about the last you'll hear from them during that performance.

Frank
Message: Posted by: Philemon Vanderbeck (Oct 29, 2002 10:50AM)
[quote]
On 2002-10-28 19:48, sethbek wrote:
I'm surprised no one suggested bopping them over the head with a mallet.
[/quote]
I used to do that.

Now, I just drop them through the trapdoor they're standing on into the pool full of sharks (with frickin' laser beams mounted on their heads).

:firedevil:
Message: Posted by: Daniel Faith (Oct 29, 2002 12:38PM)
I have to second what Allan said.
Perfect your work first of all.
You will often get someone trying to showoff for his/her friends. Especially kids in my experience.
Keep right on going!
Good luck!

:magicrabbit:
Message: Posted by: Curtis Kam (Oct 29, 2002 12:45PM)
Some approaches you might want to try at the right time, keeping in mind that I used them only once I had decided that I didn't want to do kid shows anymore:

Kid: "It's in your hand!"

Mage: "Wanna bet a dollar? Really, you want me to stop the show to talk just to you, it'll cost a dollar."

This either dissuades the kid, or becomes a profitable running gag.

Kid: "I know how you did that!"

Mage: "....and your point is?" This works if the kid is old enough to realize that he really doesn't have a point, except to proclaim his superior intellect. Of course, this position is not embarrasing to some people's children.

Kid: "It didn't disappear, it's in your hand!"

Mage: "Great, now tell them there's no Santa Claus and no Tooth fairy, either."

Okay, so I never actually said that, exactly.

Comment that kids (ages 9 - 12) have laughed at, once you've made it clear that yelling out solutions is not really the point: "Cute kid. I'll bet he runs up to the front of movie theaters and yells, (melodramatically) 'Can't you see they're lying to us? Adam Sandler isn't really here, it's just his picture on the wall!'"

Enjoy at your own risk.
Message: Posted by: Dan Watkins (Oct 29, 2002 12:54PM)
[quote]
On 2002-10-29 11:50, Philemon Vanderbeck wrote:
[quote]
On 2002-10-28 19:48, sethbek wrote:
I'm suprised no one suggested bopping them over the head with a mallet.[/quote]

I used to do that.

Now, I just drop them through the trapdoor they're standing on into the pool full of sharks (with frickin' laser beams mounted on their heads).

:firedevil:


[/quote]

Here is the picture to go with the quote...

[img]http://www.coinvanish.com/drevil.jpg[/img]
Message: Posted by: Alan Munro (Oct 30, 2002 10:12AM)
[quote]
On 2002-10-27 01:00, CSStanton wrote:
Just a few days ago, I was playing with a deck and some coins with some of my friends. I decided to show a gal I didn't know at all a coin bit and she looked like she was some godly creature, muttering 'I've seen that' and 'I've seen better'. So, I polietley told her that I really wasnt the best around, put my coins in my pockets and ordered a Coke. A buddy of mine asked me to do 'The Coin that Falls Up', so I did it. She again butted in, saying 'she'd seen better'. I was at the tip of my frusteration. The time was perfect, so I said 'Me too'. She looked at me puzzled, then realized that I was talking about how she looked. That was the last I saw of her.
Haha.
Maybe not the best idea for everyone. Try it sometime, very funny.
-Casey
[/quote]There's not much else to do with a jerk who insists on butting in. She probably started her day with a heaping bowl of "B*tch Flakes", for breakfast.
Message: Posted by: TheAmbitiousCard (Oct 30, 2002 11:03AM)
[quote]
On 2002-10-29 11:50, Philemon Vanderbeck wrote:
I used to do that.

Now, I just drop them through the trapdoor they're standing on into the pool full of sharks (with frickin' laser beams mounted on their heads).

:firedevil:


[/quote]

Hey Philemon ,

Do you have lecture notes for that one? I'm interested. PM me.
Message: Posted by: Philemon Vanderbeck (Oct 30, 2002 11:28AM)
No lecture notes yet...

But I will hopefully soon be coming out with my monograph entitled, "Dr. Evil's Kiddie Magic Show," that will include the laser beam shark effect, the Fraidy Cat Fat B*st*rd, a special version of a Jeff McBride effect (now entitled "Mojo Risin'"), plus many others inspired by the Austin Powers(tm) movies. Right now, I'm just waiting for the requisite permission from Mike Myers.

I will also include a bonus chapter on how to transform Tenyo magic tricks into lethal weapons for world domination.

[img]http://www.coinvanish.com/drevil.jpg[/img]
Message: Posted by: guitarmagic (Sep 7, 2009 02:30PM)
Wonderful thread on audience management. This topic is addressed much too little. Where may I find more concepts on the art of performing for the "guesser" and the "antagonist" to the performance of magic? These people are not all hecklers and some are nothings but hecklers.
Message: Posted by: Mediocre the Great (Sep 7, 2009 03:52PM)
Even the best pianists in the world will hit a wrong note once in a while…However, when a musician makes a small mistake, people don't shout “he hit the wrong note!”. Magic is different from most of the performing arts in that respect, and we have to know how to deal with it. There are three basic kinds of gotcha’s.

1) You really do screw up. (your caught red handed)
2) They’re wise to some of our techniques catch (or even suspect) a move.
3) They just THINK they know how it’s done but they don’t. (kids are good at this)

Recently I had a young lady tell me she knew how a card trick was done because she saw the masked magician explain it on TV - which is ridiculous because the masked magician never explained this particular trick – she probably remembered something like it. Anyway, I moved on without making a big deal of her comment. By the time the show was over, I had totally blown her away. She shook her head, saying “I have no idea how you did that… but I’m going to look it up on the internet and find out”. I told her good luck, and cautioned her that it’s not as easy as it looks. He sister apologized for her.

When dealing with this type of heckling There are four things you can do:

1) Learn from it and make sure it doesn’t happen again (for those times when you really screw up.)
2) have a snappy come back and move on.
3) ignore it and move on.
4) set them up for catching you again but playfully prove them wrong.

When I do respond, I always try to be respectful and playful as possible.

Bottom line, at the end of your show, you will be judged by the preponderance of your ability to mystify and entertain. If your act is solid, any glitches will fade as a distant memory, if they remember them at all.
Message: Posted by: raywitko (Sep 8, 2009 10:39AM)
Some responses you can use. (Kid) I know how yoy do that! (You) So do I. (Kid) I can do that! (You) Yes, but they pay me to do it.
Ray
Message: Posted by: fonda57 (Sep 9, 2009 12:48PM)
If someone says, "I know how you did that," I would walk over to him and say, in a stage whisper, "so do I but we're not going to tell anyone, right?" I would never argue with anyone in an audience.
On a semi unrelated note: I saw George Carlin in concert just a year or so before he passed on, and a guy in the audience kept shouting, "talk about Bush!" Carlin ignored him the first few times, but then he'd had enough. The guy shouted it again and Carlin looked at him and yelled, "!@#$ you!" The crowd cheered loudly.
Message: Posted by: guitarmagic (Sep 9, 2009 06:18PM)
Wish I could get away with Carlin's method!

What are other good lines to use when performing one-on-one. When performing one-on-one the dynamics of interpersonal communication change: no longer do you have peer pressure working for you, etc. etc. etc. Inhibitions of the spectator are not as pronounced.

And when someone just guesses the right method? I have had spectators say they didn't see anything, but they just guessed the solution.

I do love the line,"if I say you are wrong then you will keep guessing, if you are right I will have to lie, so I will let you continue thinking what you are thinking!" Terrific line . . .
Message: Posted by: MickeyPainless (Sep 9, 2009 07:10PM)
I've only had the opportunity to say what I really wanted to say once..... Thanksgiving at the folks house and after dinner my mom always wants to see something so I oblige. 2 years ago my brothers wife (Ivy league know it all) starts whispering to whoever will listen, "Oh, I know how he does that, etc." and without missing a beat I said (without really thinking), "Stu, we're done eating so re muzzle your wife"! It worked out well, it got a good chuckle (nervous but a chuckle non the less) and she and my brother haven't spoke to me since! ;)

I do [b]not[/b] recommend this line for public consumption!

MMc
Message: Posted by: fonda57 (Sep 9, 2009 07:51PM)
One of my favorite lines is, "well, the smarter you are, the easier you are to fool."
Message: Posted by: Bungee (Sep 9, 2009 07:59PM)
[quote]
On 2002-10-29 13:45, Curtis Kam wrote:
Some approaches you might want to try at the right time, keeping in mind that I used them only once I had decided that I didn't want to do kid shows anymore:

Kid: "It's in your hand!"

Mage: "Wanna bet a dollar? Really, you want me to stop the show to talk just to you, it'll cost a dollar."

This either dissuades the kid, or becomes a profitable running gag.

Kid: "I know how you did that!"

Mage: "....and your point is?" This works if the kid is old enough to realize that he really doesn't have a point, except to proclaim his superior intellect. Of course, this position is not embarrasing to some people's children.

Kid: "It didn't disappear, it's in your hand!"

Mage: "Great, now tell them there's no Santa Claus and no Tooth fairy, either."

Okay, so I never actually said that, exactly.

Comment that kids (ages 9 - 12) have laughed at, once you've made it clear that yelling out solutions is not really the point: "Cute kid. I'll bet he runs up to the front of movie theaters and yells, (melodramatically)'Can't you see they're lying to us? Adam Sandler isn't really here, it's just his picture on the wall!'"

Enjoy at your own risk.

[/quote]

Best Response Ever!!!
Message: Posted by: guitarmagic (Sep 14, 2009 04:48PM)
Great responses and oh so helpful.

MickeyPainless: really funny and I will probably find a venue to work the line in my performances! lol Lets hope I don't find the venue! lol

I recall seeing David Copperfield in the theater and a spectator shouted out in the middle of his act, "if you are a real magician make me disappear." David replied, "where do you want to go . . . don't answer that!" Then continued with the show: brilliant.

There are also brilliant spectators who guess the solution and stumble upon the right solution. What are some additional ways to handle the "commentary-spectator" and the intelligent spectator when they spout out the solution?
Message: Posted by: VernonOnCoins (Sep 14, 2009 06:05PM)
When you've done this long enough, it become real easy to shrug off these types of comments.

You're not God....mistakes happen. Sure, you feel bad...but you gotta learn to let it go...and fast. There's a whole roomful of people waiting to see you.
Message: Posted by: guitarmagic (Sep 20, 2009 04:39PM)
Your support is appreciated. I need to put in time working for different people, getting caught, learning from it, etc. etc. etc. Thanks again for the encouragement!
Message: Posted by: gaddy (Sep 20, 2009 05:23PM)
"I guess I can't interest you in joining my cult, then?"
Message: Posted by: lynnef (Sep 21, 2009 08:58PM)
I thought Mediocre's advice was excellent. In music, covering over a mistake is called "playing through". In magic, just go on to the next trick or routine; and promise yourself to improve on the trick that burned.
Message: Posted by: Mb217 (Sep 22, 2009 06:11AM)
Some people can't just enjoy magic, instead they experience it as some sort of test they must pass by trying their best to catch you. These are uptight folks mostly in one way or another and just can't relax. :D When this has happened to me, since specs never know exactly which way you are going with an effect, I simply continue on and lead them down a different path where I leave them scratching their heads. And then I make sure not to ever again do a trick for such a person. There are people at my job that I have only done 1 trick for because they don't know how to simply enjoy magic and I have told some at times to not destroy the moment for others, after the experience. They are usually somewhat perplexed that they mistaked the magic for some sort of test or challenge. Anyway, it's easy enough to just move on from such pitfalls to the greater amounts of people that believe and welcome amazement. :)
Message: Posted by: Kyf (Sep 22, 2009 06:27AM)
Happened to me a week or so ago - took out the endless chain routine and proceeded to make a few £££'s in the process.
Message: Posted by: Nicholas Spade (Sep 22, 2009 10:52PM)
[quote]
On 2009-09-22 07:11, Mb217 wrote:
Some people can't just enjoy magic, instead they experience it as some sort of test they must pass by trying their best to catch you. These are uptight folks mostly in one way or another and just can't relax. :D When this has happened to me, since specs never know exactly which way you are going with an effect, I simply continue on and lead them down a different path where I leave them scratching their heads. And then I make sure not to ever again do a trick for such a person. There are people at my job that I have only done 1 trick for because they don't know how to simply enjoy magic and I have told some at times to not destroy the moment for others, after the experience. They are usually somewhat perplexed that they mistaked the magic for some sort of test or challenge. Anyway, it's easy enough to just move on from such pitfalls to the greater amounts of people that believe and welcome amazement. :)
[/quote]


Dead on man, most people like to be entertained, but there are these types of people.
I ignore them, think it is the best way to deal with them. Especially if they have been drinking. Every time I get one of the these people the rest of the group I am performing for is just as annoyed as me.
Message: Posted by: Mb217 (Sep 23, 2009 06:01AM)
Yet another good reason not to drink. Anything that takes you out of your better sense of reality can't be good for you or others in most cases.

Pardon me while I digress...While saying that, we should also rid our world of smoking as it directly causes cancer and that arrogant, semi-suicide also affects others along the way. If our government wants to do something for us, this would be a great way to save people in spite of themselves. Believe me, when they come to their senses they'll thank you for it, sorta like kids when they gain perspective in life.

On another somewhat relative note, how funny is it to show magic to a guy that's been drinking and he absolutely is amazed by it. :) The alcohol allows him to respond in ways he'd never respond ordinarily. These are great folks to work on your skills, as they miss nearly everything and you can learn from it. :D It's sorta like taking candy from a baby except babies don't drink, right?...Or something like that. :D
Message: Posted by: Mr. Mystoffelees (Sep 23, 2009 07:37AM)
Just pull a Joe Wilson...
Message: Posted by: funsway (Sep 23, 2009 07:48AM)
I performed a show for a Work Center for adults with developmental disabilities. As it was a picnic several of the staff had brought their 'normal' teenage kids. I was working at a lot of spectator involvement with a goal of having each of the sixteen clients involved, nd was pretty slow paced with lots of laugheter in strange places. These teenagers began heckling quite loudly and destrying the fun. Finally one said, "Only a dummy would be fooled by this crap!" I was considering several responses when one of the clients -- a little girl of about 35 stood up and took one boys hand. She said very sincerely,

"I'm sorry you are not enjoying the magic. There is bus stop out front. I can show you." There was silence, then the boy grabbed aways his hand. "You will just miss your show then," and backed away. Another client chimed in, "the magic will be here when she gets back."

The kids left alone -- not having any fun.

..........................................

as a side bar -- a local high school here in Knoxville just elected a girl with Downs Syndrome as Home Coming Queen.
Message: Posted by: Mb217 (Sep 23, 2009 08:59AM)
We are progressing aren't we funsway. ;) Glad to hear of your side bar here... Here in NJ recently they let a kid with the same challenges score a TD in a football game. After watching I felt like I had won something because in that we had all won something. That's real magic and perhaps God above is nodding his approval and knowing exactly how we did that. :)
Message: Posted by: harris (Sep 23, 2009 10:56AM)
F.W. Thanks for the great story and smile.


Harris
I used to collect comic books, now I collect memories.(I still read the comics, except they are called graphic novels and cost a bit more than 12 cents.