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Topic: Magic books and videos for beginners
Message: Posted by: wayman (Nov 24, 2002 06:14PM)
This is a simple list of books and Videos for beginners to get themselves started with.

These are required reading/watching for any-one wanting to learn coin magic.


Coin Magic Books and Videos
-------------------------

Books
------

"NEW Modern Coin Magic".....(Hardback) by J.B.Bobo
"Coin Magic".......................(Hardback) by Richard Kaufman
"Expert Coin Magic".............(Hardback) by David Roth
"Magic by Gosh"..................(Hardback) by Pat Page & Albert Goshman
"Self working Coin Magic".....(Softback) by Karl Fulves


Videos
------

"The complete introduction to coin magic"....(DVD)....by Michael Ammar
"Basic Coin Magic 1 & 2"............................(Video)..by David Stone
"Quick & Casual Close up"..........................(DVD)....by Sol Stone
"Easy to master money miracles"................(Video)..by Micheal Ammar
"Expert Coin Magic videos volumes 1-3 "......(Video)..by David Roth

This list is small, please add to it if you wish so that others can find what they want easily. :evilgrin:
Message: Posted by: Dan Watkins (Nov 24, 2002 07:43PM)
I don't agree with some of your list for beginners.

Coin Magic and Expert Coin Magic books are not for beginners neither is the Easy to Master Money Miracles series. All of those items you need to know the foundations of concealments, fake transfers, etc. or you will be lost. Absolute beginners won't be able to use those books or videos yet until they get the basics.

David Roth's Expert Coin Magic videos volumes 1-3 should be added to the list of videos for beginners.

Related threads to this one you want to read:

http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewtopic.php?topic=4790&forum=3

http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewtopic.php?topic=9632&forum=3

http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewtopic.php?topic=15055&forum=3&11
Message: Posted by: Masilon (Nov 25, 2002 03:10AM)
I would also suggest Brad Burt's "Basics of Expert Coin Technique" video.

Luca
Message: Posted by: johne (Nov 25, 2002 09:46AM)
I enjoyed Bobo's Modern Coin magic very much, and still find myself reading it from time-to-time. I also though Bill Tarr's "Now You See it, Now You Don't" book on Sleight of hand. Although it cover more than coins, I think it is very good reading. Mark Wilson's book on Magic is a very good book for beginners too. It has a section on coins, and has much more to offer as well.

John Eddington
Message: Posted by: wayman (Nov 25, 2002 02:43PM)
Good point Dan,

I jumped in at the deep end myself with sankey material (from a book!) so I know how hard it can be.

I have tried to put the titles in order of learning, J.B.Bobos first in the books and Ammar's CITCM in the videos , but it is a difficult task.

but you must agree that most of the techniques are taught in advance of the routines in the books.

for example,

COIN MAGIC has lots of basic techniques,
ie Retention Pass (2 versions), Palm change, fingertip rest, shuttle pass, edge grip, classic palm (one of a group etc), deep back clip, spider vanish, spellbound (6 simple methods + others), drop switch etc etc etc.

I also found the Easy to master early tapes quite easy to follow, all you had to do was copy and learn.


as I can only comment on items that I have viewed, I am open to all suggestions and have added Roths Videos to the list.

PS. the reason behind this list can be seen [url=http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewtopic.php?topic=15263&forum=40&3]Here[/url]

pps. I have read your essay and think that others should to!. [url=http://www.coinvanish.com/compare.html]LINK[/url] to Essay by Dan
:dance:
Message: Posted by: WilliamWHolcomb (Nov 29, 2002 05:35PM)
I took a look at the esaay by Dan and I wonder why nothing from Rubinstein is mentioned?
Message: Posted by: wayman (Nov 30, 2002 09:05AM)
Only Dan could answer that.

Maybe at the time of compiling his essay Dr.Rubinstein's material wasn't readily available.

But I neglected Dr.Rubinstein because although I think that he has some excellent stuff, his routines are not specifically designed for solely for beginners. That being said, his explanation of sleights could significantly help the learning process for one who is struggling with a book.
Message: Posted by: Dan Watkins (Dec 1, 2002 11:33PM)
Regarding Rubinstein's stuff:

The Knockout Coin magic DVDs are his routines. You need to know the basics before you do any of them. They are not teaching videos for beginners.

His Encyclopedia is great to have a reference for sleights, but I would not recommend an Encyclopedia for the absolute beginner. It is a great reference tool for magicians, but could be a bit too dry for a beginner, sleight after sleight after sleight, variation of a sleight after variation of a sleight, and no routines.

The Roth, Stone, and Ammar tapes are focused on teaching fundamental sleights and routines to use them. I think that is the better mix for a beginner.
Message: Posted by: NachoNut (Dec 2, 2002 02:50PM)
I had just ordered Modern Coin Magic by Bobo as referenced by a good friend and should be getting it very shortly. So as just starting out my coin venture, I'll make sure my beginner status from this book will be known.
:bikes:
Message: Posted by: johne (Dec 2, 2002 03:06PM)
That's a purchase you will not regret. It has taught me moves at my own pace. As I learn new magic, it seems I can go back to that book and find something similar to help me out, that I never knew was in there.
Best of luck with your learning,

John Eddington
Message: Posted by: CoinFreak (Dec 5, 2002 07:49PM)
I HIGHLY HIGH suggest, Jeff McBride's World class Manipulation Series. Volume 1 has MANY MANY MANY coin sleights that are mandatory for beginners, while volumes 2 and 3 have more advanced techniques such as rollouts, passes, jumbo coins, and other flourishes, etc.

If you want to see some of the things I can do, thanks to that those videos go to http://www.geocities.com/coinfreakfos
Message: Posted by: KingStardog (Dec 10, 2002 10:58AM)
If I was starting all over again, knowing what I know now.....
1. Ammar's World of Magic VHS
2. Hampton's Amazing Tricks with Money VHS
3. Ammar's Introduction to Coin Magic VHS
4. Bobo's for a full read.
5. the Ammar and Stone vids in order

I suggest this order so the beginner can pick up some very easy material and have some effects to work with right from the start. The more difficult effects should be
held off for a while so that enough practice time can be done to show them properly without exposing the methods of working professionals.

Just an opinion.
Message: Posted by: Sneakers (Dec 12, 2002 05:15AM)
Consider the 5th volume of the Greater Magic Video Library Teach-In Series from Stevens Magic Emporium. The tape is called "Coin Classics Volume 1" and features the likes of Bobo himself showing multiple ways to vanish a coin. The tape features 13 performers and 14 different effects shown in performance and subsequently clearly explained.

Mike Ammar (back when he *had* hair!), Eugene Burger, Daryl, Jay Marshall, David Regal, Jay Sankey, and a whole host of others.

A real find for the beginner and intermediate coin worker alike!
Message: Posted by: DonB (Dec 12, 2002 10:45AM)
If you're looking for non-card material, I would also include Lewis Ganson's 2 book set of close-up material.

DonB.
Message: Posted by: what (Dec 13, 2002 02:38PM)
As a newcomer to coin magic, I think the list of starting materials should be short. I am using:
Bobo's book "Modern Coin Magic,
Ammar's Video "Complete Introduction to Coin Magic"
and I must say how helpful the http://www.coinvanish.com site has been so far.
Message: Posted by: DA (Dec 15, 2002 12:31PM)
I would like to recommend for the beginners of magic who would like to know the history of magic, effects, and magicians to seek out a copy of T.A. Waters "Encyclopedia of Magic and Magicians."

DA

:spinningcoin:
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (Dec 17, 2002 02:27AM)
[quote]On 2002-11-24 19:14, wayman wrote:
This is a simple list of books...to get themselves started with.[/quote]Nothing like starting at the beginning.

Discoverie of Witchcraft by R Scott (1560)
The Art of Magic by T. Nelson Downs (1909)

Sorry, that was a bit before video. On the other hand these guys did want to communicate so they wrote clearly and plainly. Both are in Dover paperback.
Message: Posted by: deuces (Dec 18, 2002 01:55AM)
I'm at exactly the same position as you! :)

And I feel it's been working great so far. Ammar's DVD was a good hook that gets you interested and Bobo's helps with the fine details as well as the foundations at coinvanish.com[quote]On 2002-12-13 15:38, what wrote:As a newcomer to coin magic, I think the list of starting materials should be short. I am using:Bobo's book "Modern Coin Magic,
Ammar's Video "Complete Introduction to Coin Magic"
and I must say how helpful the http://www.coinvanish.com site has been so far.[/quote]
Message: Posted by: Dan Watkins (Dec 19, 2002 11:38AM)
Since this is a sticky topic that stays at the top of this forum I wanted to post some advice here for new coin magicians.

Along with people posting about new videos and books I often see people make threads asking about topics such as Matrix routines, or the Raven, or _Insert your favorite coin topic here_.

One thing that I recommend for anyone looking for a particular topic. The [url=http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/search.php?begin=1]Search link[/url] at the top of this forum allows you to put in a word or words if you are looking for a specific topic. This can also be done in the [url=http://www.themagiccafe.com/archive1/index.php]archived section[/url] as well.

In many cases threads that have come before will be able to answer your questions. If not you can add to the preexisting thread or start a new one to add upon what has come before.

I find the search tool one of the most helpful features of this website. I use it all the time when I am looking for a specific topic.

Dan
Message: Posted by: Daniel Faith (Dec 21, 2002 05:45AM)
For a beginner. I would suggest nothing other than JB Bobos Modern Coin Magic.
That book has a wealth of material and takes a great deal of time to LEARN the sleights and routines.
Getting too many books only clutters the learning path for the beginner. Focus on the best book for beginners. I believe that is the book.
:magicrabbit:
Message: Posted by: Dan Watkins (Dec 21, 2002 10:12AM)
The quick answer is yes, you can learn coin magic just with Bobo's.

The long answer is, though you can learn it with Bobo's, its not the easiest way to do it - coin magic is very visual and it helps to see what is going on. You do not want to learn the basics wrong, one of these videos will show you the basics properly.

In the long run, I am sure you can do coin magic with only Bobo's but by purposely limiting the resources you view or read on a subject will ulitimately limit your knowledge. The more resources you can use, the greater knowledge you gain on the subject.

Regardless of what you plan on purchasing, definately do get Bobo's. Make sure you get the Hard Bound New Modern Coin Magic, not just the cheap Dover reprint. After you start with Bobo's you can decide if you need or want something more.

Dan
Message: Posted by: Tony (Dec 22, 2002 12:39PM)
That's right. When I first started my first purchase in coin magic was Scotch & Soda, then Bobo's The New Modern Coin Magic book. After reading it for a week, I bought Michael Ammar's Introduction to Coin Magic and then "I got it!" was my reaction. Since coin magic is a very visual trick I didn't know how to present it properly--both book and video forms go very well together. Books usually have a lot more material than videos and in my opinion can give more material once you can actually visualize the trick, routine, patter and presentation in a flowing manner (naturally, presentation and patter would be best if you presented it in your own style, but that comes later once you become comfortable in the routine).
Message: Posted by: Dynamike (Dec 25, 2002 08:50PM)
Beginners should watch a video before reading a book. The tape makes the rountine easier to understand. After the video, change over to books. It will prove the trick can be done, and how.

When I was younger I started the hard way because there were no tapes, only books.
Message: Posted by: Darren Roberts (Dec 26, 2002 10:10PM)
I just this morning bought Bobo's book. As a stone cold beginner in coin magic I can tell you that the very first concealment was pretty tricky. Not that I'm opposed to practice. I bought that book specifically for long term learning. But for beginners looking for "immediate" results, Mark Wilsons Cyclopedia has a very good coin magic section.
Message: Posted by: ELS (Dec 27, 2002 10:33AM)
I personally like the Wilson book. It gives you step by step drawings to walk you through it. I find it great for learning the basics on both coins and cards. I picked up my hardcover book on e-bay, and it was like brand new for around $10.

Ed :wavey:
Message: Posted by: Larry Barnowsky (Dec 29, 2002 10:30AM)
Bobo's text
Roth's video
Ammar's video
Johnny Thomson's Commercial Classics to see a true pro perform coin magic classics
Message: Posted by: Darren Roberts (Jan 11, 2003 10:48AM)
For what it's worth...I have supplemented Bobo's book with Ammar's Complete Introduction to Coin Magic DVD and the coinvanish.com site. I am finding that, for me, it is very helpful to visually see the techniques described in books. I'm getting ideas of what the techniques LOOK like. Of course, I'm basically repeating some things that have been said above :idea:

Hope this may help other beginners.
Message: Posted by: Ozer4 (Feb 15, 2003 04:01PM)
Roth's videos are top notch. Bobo's is the classic work on coin magic, every magician has to have a copy, and for 8 or 9 bucks you can't go wrong. :wavey:
Message: Posted by: frank (Mar 6, 2003 01:25PM)
Flip through a copy of "World's Best
Coin Tricks" by Bob Longe the next time
you're in a book store. I think he's
distilled basic coin magic down pretty
nicely.

Frank
Message: Posted by: Robert Black (Mar 8, 2003 07:07PM)
When I started out in Magic the best thing that could have happened was the Bobo book, Expert Coin Magic (Roth), Coin Magic (Kaufman), All the Roth Tapes. I have to say that for me Rubenstien and Ammar didn't quite cut it. For ME that is. I am a big fan of simple is better and between Bobo and Roth material you can find a lot of low tech utillity sleights that can be very effective. All the exotic palms and placements will come later with practice if you want to use them. I don't, simple is better for me.
Message: Posted by: stuhayner (Mar 11, 2003 04:06AM)
[quote]On 2003-03-06 14:25, frank wrote:
Flip through a copy of "World's Best
Coin Tricks" by Bob Longe the next time
you're in a book store. I think he's
distilled basic coin magic down pretty
nicely.
Frank[/quote]I think even before BoBo's. And I reread BoBos every year. I think we need to give Kids the real tools that they will need to perform magic in the real world. we
should get wayman to edit is first post and add "a good magician/teacher near you" Do you know the publisher? any place that sells it?
Message: Posted by: hkmagic (Mar 21, 2003 04:20PM)
I like Bobo's Modern Coin Magic and Fulves´s self working book
Message: Posted by: DavidKenney (Mar 24, 2003 02:56PM)
1. Mark Wilson’s Complete Course in Magic – Mark Wilson (THE BEST! BY FAR!)

2. Now You See It, Now You Don’t – Bill Tarr
3. Professional Magic for Amateurs – Walter Gibson
4. Self-Working Card Tricks - Fulves
5. Self-Working Mental Magic - Fulves
6. Handkerchief Magic - Hugard
7. Self-Working Handkerchief Magic – Fulves
8. 50 Tricks with a Thumb Tip – Melbourne Christopher
9. Sponge Ball Manipulation - Walsh
10. After The Desert – Martin Gardner
Message: Posted by: Almost Amazing Doug (Mar 30, 2003 05:54PM)
Harry Lorayne's "The Magic Book." My favorite beginner's book, bar none. Although it's 26 years old, I still often read from it.

Available used for just a few bucks, or nicely reprinted by L&L.

Yeah, there are only 9 coin effects in the book. But, Harry starts off assuming you know nothing about coins, and in his inimitable style clearly explains everything you need to know. The 9 effects are *real* routines, such as Four Coins Across and Coins Through Table, with variations!

Plus, when you need a break from coins (some people do, you know) there's the whole rest of the equally wonderful book to pore over.

Thank you, Harry!

Doug
Message: Posted by: net7 (Mar 30, 2003 07:15PM)
"Now you see it, Now you don't" is a good overall magic book for absolute beginners by Bill Tarr.
Message: Posted by: Michael T (Apr 1, 2003 04:22AM)
I can’t believe that the Burt tapes have only been mentioned once. Brad is without doubt the most thorough and clear teacher of coin magic.
Message: Posted by: Socrates (Apr 18, 2003 06:45AM)
'The Magic Book' by Harry Lorayne is a classic and deserves to be on any magician’s shelf as it's full of practical and straightforward advice.

Socrates

'Simplify' - Henry David Thoreau :die:
Message: Posted by: MCUESTA (Apr 23, 2003 03:19AM)
I agree with Dan. Bobo's book is an encyclopedia, not a course in coin magic.
I firmly believe in English, the best one it's Shigeo Futagawa coin book. Give a try.
Message: Posted by: oldguy (Apr 26, 2003 10:01PM)
I'll vote for the Futagawa book, "Introduction to Coin Magic." It has some very interesting ideas and does not seem difficult. - Tom
Message: Posted by: rowdymagi5 (May 2, 2003 01:21PM)
When it comes to videos, I lean toward David Roth. I like Michael Ammar’s videos too. However, (my opinion only!) his tend to get a tad boring to me. David Roth just keeps my attention more.
Message: Posted by: Chris Boyd (May 2, 2003 07:56PM)
Ammar is kind of dorky. No doubt he is good, but the way he speaks, all slow and proper, gets on my nerves a little.

Roth goes at such a fast pace that you have no choice but to keep up, and he performs his sleights so perfectly with such ease that you can't help but be inspired.
Message: Posted by: Mark (May 3, 2003 01:33PM)
Does anyone know of a good source for obtaining Kaufman's Coinmagic? Since it is out of print now I haven't been able to find a copy. I have scoured many of the online retailers for several months without success. I'd prefer a source other than magicfact.com.

Thanks!
:D
Message: Posted by: icedj (May 4, 2003 11:39AM)
Bobo's coin magic is one of the best books on coin magic that I have ever read. I can now do nearly all of the tricks in it and I will look into the other suggestions you made.

thanks :spinningcoin:

ice
Message: Posted by: Capt. Coins (May 16, 2003 11:13AM)
[quote]On 2003-04-01 05:22, Steel wrote:
I can’t believe that the Burt tapes have only been mentioned once. Brad is without doubt the most thorough and clear teacher of coin magic. [/quote]Ditto.
His tapes seem to go into just a bit more detail on many sleights. I have tapes and DVDs from Ammar and Roth as well, but when I watch Burt, it's almost like he's REALLY THERE in the room with me.
Message: Posted by: Fast Eddie P. (May 20, 2003 01:21PM)
I also like the Brad Burt videos. I just wish the production quality was better. His teaching is excellent, but some of his quirks get old real quick, especially when watching the tapes over and over.
Message: Posted by: highmagic (May 22, 2003 05:02AM)
J.B. Bobo - Modern Coin Magic for coins
Tony Corinda - 13 Steps to Mentalism for, guess what, mentalism...
Michael Ammar - Easy to Master Cards miracles for cards (I think it is really easier to learn card sleights from a videos.)
Tom Mullica - Expert Impromptu Magic made easy for everyday objects
Message: Posted by: Alex Ng (May 27, 2003 12:47PM)
For a real beginner, I think videotapes would be more helpful for mastering the basic sleight of hand. I would recommend:

Basic Coin Magic 1 & 2 by David Stone
Expert Coin Magic Made Easy #1-3 by David Roth
Message: Posted by: Zap (Jun 14, 2003 05:33PM)
Best video for beginners: Roth's Expert Coin Magic vol 1-3
Runner Up: Ammar's Intro to Coins

Best book for beginners: Bobo (also best book for experts!)
Runner Up: ? (Not CoinMagic, which is not a beginner book)
Message: Posted by: markkwan (Jun 17, 2003 04:17PM)
Alright. I'm off to the local bookstore to get me a copy of Bobo. Thanks for the advice.
Message: Posted by: icedj (Jun 27, 2003 06:27AM)
Bobo's book is truly awesome and it is probably one of the best and most detailed that I have ever read. The diagrams are superb and it is a book that I definitely recommend to all who intend to start doing coin magic seriously.

Happy reading!!!
Message: Posted by: John Born (Jul 12, 2003 08:25PM)
MARK...

I just bought a second copy of Kaufman's Coin Magic as a gift for a friend. You can get it a U.S. Toy Magic in Kansas City for around $45. They've got about eight left.

John B. Born
Message: Posted by: Mark (Jul 29, 2003 05:00PM)
John,

Thanks so much for the lead! I've been looking for a copy of this book for a very long time. I just placed my order and will hopefully have my copy soon.

Best regards,

Mark[quote]On 2003-07-12 21:25, John Born wrote:MARK...
I just bought a second copy of Kaufman's Coin Magic as a gift for a friend. You can get it a U.S. Toy Magic in Kansas City for around $45. They've got about eight left.
John B. Born[/quote]
Message: Posted by: shanester (Aug 3, 2003 03:40PM)
How about for "not quite absolute beginners?"
I started Bill Tarr after which I decided coins were for me, so I went for Bobo. Then I was amazed by Roth's handling on his Expert Coin Magic made easy 1-3. As I like the stand up side of coin magic and enjoy impromptu magic; “the wander around” restaurant style appeals to me, I got hold of the excellent “Unexpected Visitor” by Doug Brewer.

I have also recently bought “Completely Crowded” from R. Paul Wilson, but that needs a lot more work before I am ready to show it to anyone. I am at a stage where I have a good grounding in the essential slights and have a few routines that I feel are strong.

So where next? I get the feeling that to buy the Ammar DVD would be a lot of repetition. Is this the same with the David Stone tapes?

Would something like Knockout Coin Magic be a good investment? How about Paul Cummins Up In Smoke, I've read some strong reviews of it? Any suggestions for more work of the stand up/ walk around type.
I appreciate your help in my next step forward.
Thanks
Shanester
Message: Posted by: Nikos (Sep 4, 2003 12:22AM)
I think Bobo's is a must.
You can pick and choose which sleight you want to work on and go straight to it without having to rewind a tape or fire up the DVD player and go straight to a chapter.

However, I also like watching the sleight performed on a video because I can get a better idea of what it should like.
Interpreting an explanation of a sleight that you have learned from a book can sometimes be difficult.

The illustration in Bobo's for the CP for example. To me the image implies that the coin is help up high in the hand, just below the fingers. The explanation doesn't go into detail about the exact placement of the coin either. I know that it differs for some people, but it is definitely not held where I initially interpreted it to be. It wasn't until I saw Ammar's Introduction To Coin Magic that I realized where the coin was meant to sit in order to do this effectively.

I feel that for a beginner Bobo's coin book and a video like Ammar's ITCM or Roth's Expert Coin Magic Made Easy Vol. 1 is the ideal training/reference guides to acquiring the proper techniques.

The Video/DVDs compliment the book perfectly. You read the sleight; you practice the sleight; you check the video reference to make sure you are doing it correctly and then you back to practicing.
Message: Posted by: taller8 (Sep 28, 2003 06:22PM)
I'd go with the Expert Coin Magic made easy 1-3 by David Roth. For a beginner, I'd prefer seeing the routines and sleights done by an expert and the DVD's sometimes offer nice tips that a book doesn't. The Bobo book is great but just isn't as motivating to me.
Message: Posted by: TheMagical1 (Nov 12, 2003 02:53PM)
I would strongly recommend Mark wilsons "Course In Magic", because it is 472 pages of magic that covers every genre available, It was also reprinted in June of this year, so it should be fairly readily available for all who wish to purchase it.

Michael A. :patty:
Message: Posted by: Dbzkid999 (Nov 17, 2003 07:54PM)
Is Jay Sankey's Revolutionary Coin Magic recommendable?
Message: Posted by: shanester (Nov 21, 2003 09:13AM)
Definitely.
Get the DVD as it has bonus material and more Sankey is always good
Message: Posted by: cperkins (Dec 5, 2003 04:13PM)
Jay Sankey's Revolutionary Coin Magic is superb...especially if you know some basic sleights with coins. Now on DVD!

Among many sleights, he focuses on a few in particular...flying shuttle pass (beautiful to watch in his hands), Tenkai pinch, direction pointer, some han ping chin..then applies these in lots routines. His coin magic uses both hands together in a very coordinated way. Mr. clean Coins across (3 coins stand up and hand to hand)is the best I've seen of its kind...so is his coin thru the table.

If you like to see and learn new sleights you may not have seen before..you'll like this. Most very doable with a little work.

He also has a Robin Williams aspect to him...funny,off the cuff...a little crazy. Excellent DVD!

good luck!
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Dec 27, 2003 01:47PM)
[quote]On 2002-12-17 03:27, JonTown wrote:
[quote]On 2002-11-24 19:14, wayman wrote:
This is a simple list of books...to get themselves started with.[/quote]Nothing like starting at the beginning.
Discoverie of Witchcraft by R Scott (1560)
The Art of Magic by T. Nelson Downs (1909)
Sorry, that was a bit before video. On the other hand these guys did want to communicate so they wrote clearly and plainly. Both are in Dover paperback.
[/quote]The Discoverie of Witchcraft was written in 1584, not 1560. And it is almost useless as a basic text on the performance of magic. The language is barely understandable to a speaker of modern English. For example, the description of what many feel to be the first explanation of the paddle trick reads:

"Item, a rish through a peece of trencher, having three holes, and at the one side the rish appearing out in the second, at the other side in the third hole, by means of an hollow place made betwixt, them both so as the slight consisteth in turning the peece of trencher."(sic)

This certainly leaves a lot to be desired as far as teaching the jumping peg to a beginning magician.

"Discovery" or, more precisely "Discouerie" was written primarily as an exposure of tricks and witchcraft techniques in order to keep the "jackbooted thugs," witch burners and witch hangers from imprisoning and killing people for "changing a testor into a groat" and practicing herbal remedies on the peasantry.

There were a few mechanical tricks that were exposed enough that they might be reconstructed. And, if you have a good ability to read between the lines, a couple of the coin vanishes and moves might be reconstructible. Jules DeBarros showed me a couple of items he managed to reconstruct from Scot that were perfectly usable today.

"The Art of Jugling" by Sa. Rid (1612) is also of little use to a modern beginner. The explanations are terse and often unclear. And the items in this book are basically taken from the Scot book.

It was in 1634, 50 years after the appearance of Scot's book that "R. Mabb." or "R.M." wrote Hocus Pocus Junior. This was the first illustrated book entirely on magic to appear in the English language. The author's advice on the cups and balls should be read by any serious practitioner of this ancient piece of magic, because it contains the basis of good sleight of hand and audience contact.

Recent research has indicated that the real R. Mabb might have been William Vincent, who was licensed by the government of England to perform magic as Hocus Pocus.

***********
The Ammar videos may seem "dorky" to some, but they are very precise and well produced. You only need to watch a small portion of any video at once to learn a specific thing. I recommend them very highly.

The Brad Burt videos that I have seen are also excellent.

I would recommend the Mark Wilson Course in Magic to ANY beginner. It is well written and easy to understand.

Then The Introduction to Coin Magic by Futagawa and Bobo's New Modern Coin Magic. And Tarbell.

But along with these should be the Henning Nelms book. No need for just sleights and passes if you don't have presentation
Message: Posted by: JHodgeCMI (Dec 31, 2003 03:37AM)
Michael Ammar is great for Coins or cards. Jay Sankey's Revolutionary Coin Magic is also good.

Jay
Message: Posted by: phantomace (Jan 1, 2004 02:07PM)
Got to say it, BOBOs! I still use this today, over 15 years since I originally bought it. There are many moves that have been virtually unexplored that should be.

Also David Roth has some incredible material. The Expert book is great. Got to love the coins through glass table.
Message: Posted by: James Fortune (Jan 8, 2004 04:05AM)
Has anyone seen the new DVD Ultimate Coin Magic Collection 1 by David Roth?

It looks excellent as it also deals with 'standard' gaffs.
Message: Posted by: Liam Jones (Jan 10, 2004 01:13PM)
The Ammar series
Message: Posted by: kerpa (Feb 14, 2004 12:12PM)
As a newbie, I can tell you what I think some of the best, and very basic books and dvds are -

Mark Wilson's Encyclopedia of Magic (I think that is the name). This is the big black book. If it is not still in print, it is not hard to get a used copy. This is a great, great book - the explanations of the basic sleights are very well done, and some good basic beginning tricks are well presented. Truly encyclopedic.

A smaller, but beautifully presented book, often on the remainder tables,is Nicholas Einhorn's Encyclopedia of Magic. Also a fine job done.

For DVD's
- I love Daryl. I just enjoy his personality. His encyclopedia of card sleights is a bit too MUCH material for a beginner, but well done (I have the first 2 volumes). I actually think his revelation series is better for beginners, even though the apparent focus is on the revelation.

- I am just beginning to enjoy Oz's basic introductory card magic DVD. His explanations are really great, with the type of attention to detail that a newbie like me can appreciate. (sorry, the name escapes me right now).

kerpa
a/k/a Mike Miller
Chicago area
Message: Posted by: MrBiddle (Feb 25, 2004 08:53PM)
Gotta be Bobo.

Just picked up a copy. Hopefully I can pick up coin videos in the future.

Any of you guys recommend reading certain pages from Bobo??? I do have stock knowledge on the basic palms or maybe some vanishes already, but what routines from Bobo's do you guys recommend browsing through?

:wavey:
Message: Posted by: MKmagic (Feb 26, 2004 01:15PM)
In my opinion the best way to begin learning coin
magic is from the DVD "The Complete Introduction To Coin Magic" by Michael Ammar.
Message: Posted by: Rob Elliott (Feb 27, 2004 01:49PM)
MrBiddle -
Everything in Bobo's is worth reading. Even if you know the basic palms and vanishes, this book is the Bible of coin magic and is the main source of reference material on the subject. You should know it forward and backward if you want to pursue coin work.
Message: Posted by: johnloon (Feb 28, 2004 05:15PM)
David Stone's coin videos.
Message: Posted by: Liam Jones (Mar 14, 2004 10:38AM)
I would say [i]Modern Coin Magic[/i] should be the first coin magic book to start with all because it has all the basics and slowly works its way up to more advanced
Message: Posted by: jbohn (Mar 16, 2004 10:27AM)
As a relative newbie, Bobo has been an immense help, as has Mark Wilson (and of course Hugard and Braue's Royal Road to Card Magic for the pasteboards). For the absolute beginner, a good stop would be the local public library- I found all three of these there, and it was a great help in deciding which ones would be the most useful to me.


Jeremiah :spinningcoin:
Message: Posted by: Danno12 (Mar 27, 2004 02:45PM)
For some good books go to:
http://www.abebooks.com/
...and enter: coin magic (etc) !!wow!!
Message: Posted by: phread (Apr 17, 2004 07:23AM)
Here is my 2 centavos:

The first magic book I ever owned was sold to me by Phil Thomas when I was a teenager in the late 70's: [i]Tarbell Volume 1[/i]. Every beginner needs some idea of what "magic" is as well as how to do things.

phread
Message: Posted by: cloneman (May 18, 2004 07:41PM)
Rubenstein, Roth, Dean Dill videos.
Message: Posted by: microastro (May 22, 2004 02:42PM)
Royal Road to Card Magic is my fav...
Message: Posted by: JoeHohman (Jun 23, 2004 12:42PM)
Mr. Biddle,

A good "first Bobo routine" is Gadabout Coins. Another is Coins Though the Table, he has several of them, so read them all and then choose your favorite.
Message: Posted by: Magicmaven (Jul 13, 2004 06:12PM)
I think Ammars "The complete introduction to coin magic," is the best video or dvd for a beginner to coin magic, and I suggest if you are starting coin magic, get some sponge balls, they're only $5, and they are great to use to learn all the palms and transfers you are going to use in coin magic. I hope I helped, bye
Message: Posted by: Neznarf (Sep 5, 2004 08:17PM)
Now You See It, Now You Don't #1 & #2 by Bill Tarr.
101 Magic Tricks by Bill Tarr.

I still read my copies once in a while. And I've been at this magic stuff for a while.
Message: Posted by: BullzEyE (Sep 17, 2004 10:27PM)
Thanks for all the suggestions. Now I must check out all these books...see which is best.
Message: Posted by: Tielie (Oct 8, 2004 10:45AM)
If I buy Bobo's book and start practising my ass of... will I ever really need another book on coinmagic to do some amazing tricks? Or is there enough for a lifetime in Bobo?
Message: Posted by: phedonbilek (Oct 27, 2004 06:20AM)
The only advice I'll give you is the following: DON'T START WITH BOBO. Please do not misunderstand, this is a great book. But a beginner starting with a book is something I do not understand, personally. Coin magic is visual, and you need to see how the sleights are performed properly. Learning from a book you'll have great chances to develop bad habits. Watching Ammar/Roth/Stone performing a certain move, you also understand its aim/use/potential. It's after mastering it that you'll -maybe- develop your own variation to better fit your own style.
With a book that's purely impossible.

So I would advise: start with

1. The Complete Introduction to Coin Magic - Michael Ammar
2. Expert Coin Magic Made Easy 1-3 - David Roth

Then, after having mastered the basics (and much more actually), buy Bobo and explore the true potential of this coin magic bible.

That's my own view on the subject though, and I'm sure many disagree. But I'm truly convinced it's the best way to start.

Have fun and welcome in the world of coin magic!
Message: Posted by: Tielie (Oct 29, 2004 03:39AM)
Well I find learning from a book much more fun actually. I'm also somewhat against DVD's because of exposure and stuff.
I also think that many of the greatest coinworkers did not have DVD in their time. So it must be possible to learn from books.
Message: Posted by: phedonbilek (Oct 29, 2004 06:28AM)
Possible, it is. But back then coinworkers didn't have the choice, did they?

My point is: learning from a book is possible; but you're very likely to develop bad habits. For instance: learn the retention pass from a book, and watch Roth or Ammar doing and teaching it. Try to learn the Gallo pitch, the flying shuttle pass, from books etc.

I guarantee you'll have serious problems.

Now, when you know the basics, books are great, since they're not teaching you moves, but routines. They won't teach you how to vanish a coin, they will simply state: "vanish a coin...".

I hope you get my point. But it's only my point, and if you can learn easily with books, then... congratulations!
Message: Posted by: Wal Parker (Nov 22, 2004 04:39AM)
Just a contribution. The Magic of Micah Lasher by Micah Lasher is introductory and has a section on coin and currency magic with good descriptions of palming, shuttle pass, and retention vanish.
Message: Posted by: Cpontz (Dec 26, 2004 04:39PM)
I learned from Bobo when I first started. Of course that was before videos and DVD's. It is difficult, but not impossible if you keep practicing. I would recommend however, that you take advantage of the technology and watch some video's of the moves you want to learn.
Message: Posted by: Matt Graves (Jan 15, 2005 10:15AM)
I've worn out my copy of the Bobo book, had it almost seven years now. What would you consider as the "next step"? I've seen David Roth and Richard Kaufman listed. Would those pretty much be a "repeat" of what I've already learned from Bobo's, or would there be many new things to learn from them?
Message: Posted by: leko (Jan 24, 2005 01:23AM)
As has been said 'Expert Coin Magic' is the best follow-up of Bobo. MANY new ideas, sleights and routines. You cannot do without.
Enjoy it as I did!
Message: Posted by: vlance (Jan 30, 2005 04:55PM)
Michael Amar has very good video teaching series. I learned all from his stuff
Message: Posted by: salamangkero8888 (Feb 22, 2005 09:17PM)
Hello everyone,

This is my first post. I have read thru this thread and would like to add what I think would be very helpful for beginners. Frankly, I'm quite surprised that no one has even mentioned The Amateur Magician's Handbook by Henry Hay (or did I just miss that post?). This was one of the first books I have read. This book is great for beginners since it does assume that whoever is reading it has absolutely no idea about the basics of coin magic, card magic, etc. It also, if I remember right, teaches fundamental theories about magic which the beginner should be familiar with. When it comes to learning coin magic, I would rank this as a notch higher than Bobo's book. I think learning the basics from this book then using the Bobo book as reference to more complicated sleights and routines would be a great way to start out. Am I the only who agrees with this? I would like to hear everyone's opinion about this book.

Salamangkero8888
Message: Posted by: sharingan (Mar 28, 2005 01:02PM)
[quote]
"NEW Modern Coin Magic".....(Hardback) by J.B.Bobo
"Coin Magic".......................(Hardback) by Richard Kaufman
"Expert Coin Magic".............(Hardback) by David Roth
"Magic by Gosh"..................(Hardback) by Pat Page & Albert Goshman
"Self working Coin Magic".....(Softback) by Karl Fulves
[/quote]
Best first coin book is?
Message: Posted by: Bill Ligon (Jun 12, 2005 09:42PM)
You beat me to it, Salamangkero, >The Amateur Magician's Handbook< by "Henry Hay" is my favorite. I, too, am surprised that no one had mentioned it until you did so. It is a book that rekindled my interest in magic after I got involved in other things while in college. To me it was an inspirational book and it is strong on coin magic. Bobo is indispensable for the coin worker, of course.
Message: Posted by: smartie_28 (Jun 24, 2005 07:22PM)
My first coin book was Bobo's book and my first videos were Roth's Expert Coin Magic made easy. I love them.
Message: Posted by: phedonbilek (Jul 18, 2005 09:37PM)
Roth's ECMME and Ammar's Complete Introduction to Coin Magic are both THE tools to start in coin magic. My two -euro-cents.

Phedon
Message: Posted by: Foucault (Aug 5, 2005 05:53PM)
Ammar's Complete Introduction to Coin Magic is a wonderful start, and as someone who usually prefers books, I would strongly recommend Bobo's book as a reference.

For those who haven't come across it, there's a great "study guide" for Bobo here:

http://www.zyworld.com/coinpurse/articles90.htm
Message: Posted by: Larry Barnowsky (Aug 8, 2005 10:19AM)
I've had a number of people ask me if my new book, 21st Century Coin Mechanics would be suitable for a beginner. The answer I've told them is no. This is a book for magicians who have some knowledge of coin magic and basic palms and grips. A beginner could theoretically learn the material in the book, since I leave nothing out in the descriptions and photos, but it wouldn't be easy. It would be like trying to learn Calculus without knowing basic algebra. Start with Bobo, Tarbell, or the Roth or Ammar videos.
Message: Posted by: solidimageartsllc (Aug 24, 2005 10:14AM)
Hi,

I was bitten by the coin magic bug 8 months ago and grabbed all that I could on the subject. Starting with Bobo's Modern Coin Magic immediately wetting my appetite, DVD purchases soon followed. For what its worth, a newbie, I found that I learned a lot (fairly quckly) from Michael Rubinstein's enclopedia of Coin Magic (Vol. 1-3) and David Roth's Expert Coin Magic. Rubinstein may be dry and purely technical, but his explanations were laser clear, allowing me to choose the method that felt most natural to me. Roth had everything: technique, wisdom, showmanship, etc. I also own Jay Sankey - a bit of a loon, but incredibly gifted, explained things well and inspirational for working on more advanced coin work. Then there's Michael Ammar - Complete Introduction to Coin magic, like Roth, offering the graduated buildup of technique, wisdom and showmanship.

All in all, the DVD's proved incredibly invaluable for my continued learning experience. The following list (from those that I've purchased) is my order of preference for learning Coin Magic.

Michael Ammar
Dr. Michael Rubinstein
David Roth
Jay Sankey

-Dan
Message: Posted by: Dougini (Sep 1, 2005 08:09PM)
I absolutely agree with you Dan! And I would not hesitate to also obtain "21st Century Coin Mechanics", by Larry Barnowsky, as you can actually take what you've learned to a new level! There are tools here one will not find elsewhere...FCOP is just one. If you do any type of retention work? ... Well...let's just say I recommend it highly!

:bg:

Doug
Message: Posted by: solidimageartsllc (Sep 2, 2005 12:07AM)
Hi Doug,

Funny that you should mention Larry's book... I just bought it this morning! :) I'm really hooked on learning retention work and have quite a way to go before I'm half as smooth as the senior posters here. I can hardly wait though to read and hopefully put into practice some of Larry's genius coin work.

Cheers!

Dan
Message: Posted by: Dougini (Sep 3, 2005 04:14PM)
Ya know, Dan...

I felt like a beginner as I ran through the book...seeing moves or improvements on moves...plus combinations I've never HEARD of! Oh, to be able to master this stuff...for example...The Lucky Chinese Coin...there's a challenge for ya!

Also, compare Larry's Open Palm Retention Vanish with Rubinstein's Retention Open Palm Steal...then look at variation 2...this is what I'm talking about...you see, this is why owning this book is the perfect companion to Rubinstein's DVD sets. This gives you more variations on these tools.

Since seeing Mickey Silver's SUV (Silver's Ultimate Vanish), I've concentrated on my retention stuff. This book answered a question I've had for years. To wit, the 2nd half of a retention vanish and reappear. Showing both hands "empty", using a variation of The Ramsey Sublety (sp?), and a changeover. It's here in this book...and a lot more. Years of reading and practice!

Long live Count Elmsley! :bg:

Doug
Message: Posted by: cosermann (Sep 13, 2005 09:35AM)
I'll add a question to this topic by way of analogy.

I think most (many) would agree that the Royal Road to Card Magic is a/the "classic" text on card magic. Some also suggest that the Card College series is a bit more modern and easier to learn from.

So, my question is: If Bobo is the "classic" text on coin magic, is there a more modern analogue?

Thanks.
Message: Posted by: evanmartin (Sep 24, 2005 07:55PM)
Just curious, has anyone seen Joe Jesse's Xtreme Koin Magic dvd - and would you suggest this to a newbie? (I have Michael Ammar's complete intro. to coin magic and I love it.) I've tried searching this forum for Joe Jesse and Xtreme Koin Magic, but can't turn up any info regarding how appropriate it is for newbies.

I feel like Ammar's dvd has plenty to keep me busy practicing for a long time, but I would like to get a great second-stage dvd that also has some teaching... and which might help give me a better idea about connecting individual techniques into full routines. I may not be able to do them yet, but seeing more great coin magic would really give me better understanding about what to imagine myself doing with my coins a year from now (if not before :). ...partly for dreaming, partly for extending the teaching/learning in Ammar).

Thanks for your suggestions.
Evan
Message: Posted by: otter606 (Sep 30, 2005 02:19AM)
I've been learning coin magic for about 8 months now, from bobo and DVDs.
I would definitely recommend Ammar's DVD as a first purchase, it contains many
straightforward effects which only depend on a few sleights.
David Stone DVDs, especially no2 is much more involved - many of the routines are designed for a stage type presentation and each routine is pretty challenging.
The Roth videos especially no2 are sublime, very effective but I think technically a little easier than the David Stone routines.
Once you've got the basics. I like Cody Fishers DVD Unforgettable coin magic - it only has 3 routines but they are not technically too hard and are quite clever routines with audience participation - but you will need some g****d coins though.
Message: Posted by: toolman22 (Nov 20, 2005 08:20PM)
I've been studing coin magic for a short time now. I have found Bobo to be more than enough for a begginig magician.
Message: Posted by: vinsmagic (Dec 2, 2005 11:07AM)
Joe Jessies dvd is excellent Thematerial covered is for any level

vinny
Message: Posted by: Bill Citino (Dec 2, 2005 12:44PM)
[quote]
On 2005-09-13 10:35, cosermann wrote:
I'll add a question to this topic by way of analogy.

I think most (many) would agree that the Royal Road to Card Magic is a/the "classic" text on card magic. Some also suggest that the Card College series is a bit more modern and easier to learn from.

So, my question is: If Bobo is the "classic" text on coin magic, is there a more modern analogue?

Thanks.
[/quote]

That's a good question, I'm a coin guy and have never really thought about it. If I had to pick, I'd say the closest probably would be either, Roth's "Expert Coin Magic" or Kaufman's "COINMAGIC." I'd also like to hear what others have to say about this.

-Bill
Message: Posted by: Charlie Justice (Dec 5, 2005 10:11AM)
[quote]
On 2005-12-02 13:44, Bill Citino wrote:
[quote]
On 2005-09-13 10:35, cosermann wrote:
I'll add a question to this topic by way of analogy.

I think most (many) would agree that the Royal Road to Card Magic is a/the "classic" text on card magic. Some also suggest that the Card College series is a bit more modern and easier to learn from.

So, my question is: If Bobo is the "classic" text on coin magic, is there a more modern analogue?

Thanks.
[/quote]

That's a good question, I'm a coin guy and have never really thought about it. If I had to pick, I'd say the closest probably would be either, Roth's "Expert Coin Magic" or Kaufman's "COINMAGIC." I'd also like to hear what others have to say about this.
-Bill
[/quote]

A long time ago in a post far far away....I had brought forth the desire on my part to have a modernized collection of coin magic effects, sleights, and/or routines compiled into one nice big modernized and updated set of volumes called Coin College (aptly named, of course, to be in line with the Card College format).You would have to read the posts in that topic of discussion to believe the responses. While many were for it...some were actually against the idea. Search and enjoy.
Message: Posted by: themaestro (Dec 9, 2005 01:44PM)
I have not read the entire thread, but doing a search through all the pages for "buckley" and not finding it, a book I would think would need to be recommended would be Arthur Buckley's "Principles and Deceptions."

Also there is a new DVD by Eric Evans "The Secret Art of Coin Manipulation" that I would think would be very useful for beginners too; though it certainly is not aimed just at them and has some advanced stuff on it. It not only teaches the most fundamental sleights (French Drop, Downs Palm, CLassic Palm, etc. )in exacting detail, but does so in the context of his stand-up coin routine that shows how to apply them in a way that creates emotional involvement and interaction with your audience. It also has a lot of work on Jumbo Coins that is not available elsehwere, and includes specially manufactured jumbo manip coins that are a more correct size (2 5/8") than normally found (3" coins are too big for most people's hands) and with precision milling on the edges for good grip.

You can read more about it and the special introductory price here: http://www.secretartofmagic.com/secretcoin2.htm

Nowlin
Message: Posted by: themaestro (Dec 12, 2005 03:05PM)
I got word by PM that the above link was not working. The link was right but there was problems with the domain hosting, but it's now working for those who were interested but couldn't get there.

Nowlin
Message: Posted by: rutabaga (Jan 13, 2006 06:24PM)
Here's thought... what if magic videos were available a la carte [choose sleight or routine from a menu for a given price] similar to iPod/iTunes?

Navigate to Magic/Coin Magic/Sankey/RCM, choose "Mr. Clean Coins Across" and pay $3 or whatever.

Could it work? Would that be good for magic, and magicians?
Message: Posted by: KeithP (Feb 23, 2006 06:36PM)
My first sleight of hand book was "Now You See It, Now You Don't" by Bill Tarr. Sometimes good drawings can be better than pictures.

KeithP
Message: Posted by: KeithP (Feb 23, 2006 06:45PM)
About Bobo's Modern Coin Magic,
I agree it is a good choice. It serves more than one purpose. Using it forces you to teach yourself how to turn words into 3 dimentional motion for YOUR hands. That lesson is just as important as the effects themselves. Also remember that a lot of coin effects can be done with sponge balls with a little modification. The effects that require that "clink" might not convert so easily.

KeithP
Message: Posted by: TaylorM (Mar 26, 2006 06:26PM)
I have gone through Bobo's modern coin magic and was wondering what to get next- so I lurked around and found that Roth's "Expert Coin Magic" or Kaufman's "Coin Magic" would be good choices- well I got Kaufman's book and let me tell you, I made a great decision if I say so myself- it was exactly what I was looking for as a next step in my coin magic progression. It gets my highest recommendation!

~Taylor
Message: Posted by: Katterfel22 (Apr 9, 2006 01:30AM)
I would also recommend that if you are going to get Bobo's book you get the hardback version if possible. It has 4 extra chapters not available in the paperback version. I sadly found this out after the fact.:(
Message: Posted by: psyrules510 (Apr 12, 2006 12:23AM)
Is hardback version usually different from the paperback?
Message: Posted by: Katterfel22 (Apr 12, 2006 08:36PM)
Personally, I have only seen the "revised and greatly enlarged" version in hardback. However, there may be a trade paperback version I am unaware of. I found a hardback version on the shelves of this store, http://themagiccorner.com/ the other day. If you are in the area the store is located off US1 in Raleigh. the book was about 40 bucks or so. Hope this helps.
Message: Posted by: RCP (May 22, 2006 12:21PM)
The link for the BoBo study guide no longer works, is there another source for the guide?
Message: Posted by: impossible man (May 26, 2006 09:45AM)
I found a great copy of the revised Bobo used for $15 at Amazon.com.

Now, what should my second book be? The Barnowsky book? Something by David Roth? I want a general book that takes me beyond Bobo.

Then after that I think something by Dan Watkins because I just have to learn "Jumbolaya!"

Anyone?
Message: Posted by: Michael Rubinstein (Jun 1, 2006 09:48PM)
Best book - Coinmagic, by Kaufman. Don't forget to check out Al Schneider on Coins, for some good material. Follow that with the Roth book, and you have some great material. For DVD's, decide if you want to learn from Ammar or Roth for the basics, and then check out my own Encyclopedia of Coin Sleights for a plethora of moves that will expand your knowledge and ability with coins. Then, with all that in hand, you can expand your repetoire with Roth stuff, my own stuff, the New York Coin Magic Seminar Vol one on Coins Across (blatent plug, but it really contains great material, and you will learn more than just a coins across routine...its a whole course on workable coin magic!). Love the Kam DVD's as well, there is a large amount of commercial coin magic. Gallo has a few tapes that are overlooked - DON'T! - you can find them on his website, http://www.newyorkcoinmagic.net . Go to his product page, and pick up that special tape only found through him. You won't regret it. OK, we have set a course. Now you can fill in with McClintock, Dill, Hoosier, Stone (my own thoughts are that these are NOT the ones to learn basic stuff from, but certainly worth a look to study his interesting style and good ideas), and the list goes on.
Last but not least, if you really want to enjoy coin magic, time to check out the New York Coin Magic Seminar FOUR on June 10th, outside of Philadelphia. Six hours of practical coin magic taught by the Masters. In Person. Personal instruction. Free stuff. Pizza.
With a zillion posts on this thread, there are a bunch of good suggestions. Hope my own list has helped in some way.
Message: Posted by: impossible man (Jun 2, 2006 12:20PM)
Wow. That's what I was looking for. It's great to have in-depth advice from someone who really knows their stuff.

Thanks, Dr. Rubinstein.
Message: Posted by: Strangelittleman (Jul 6, 2006 11:47PM)
Well, I'd like to thank everyone for this thread, just brought Roth's first DVD and Bobo's book. Now to sit down and practice lol
Message: Posted by: Eva (Aug 10, 2006 11:31AM)
I don't quite agree with Mike Rubinstein on one point...the David Stone tapes were the first magic tapes I owned, and I learned the basics from them.

Mike's Encyclopedia of Coin Sleights is a FANTASTIC resource if you want to put together your own routines, or change certain parts of existing routines.

Eva
Message: Posted by: Mano (Aug 17, 2006 08:06AM)
Eva,

I agree with you about the David Stone tapes; they were the first one I owned as well, and the one who put me in the world of coin magic almost five year ego, all the routines all practical and no table require;To my mind these two tapes are better than most of the one Michael mentioned, I have those he mentioned and I still prefer the David stone tapes.

My two centavos.

Mano.
Message: Posted by: pdrake99 (Oct 15, 2006 12:47AM)
There are so many resources out there...but if you really get down to the nuts and bolts of beginning coin magic; any $5 book at the bookstore explains palming and fake transfers...and I'd be safe to bet that no one on here has mastered more than 2 or 3 routines directly (not from a tape) from Roth's Expert Coin Magic... a serious study...and difficult to read at times...BOBO is always going to be the only resource you'll ever need...I've made a living with about 5 coin sleights...sure I've experimented with a ton, but in the real world, you don't need more than a few...same with cards...use all of that extra time to work on presentation, not learning a million useless sleights just for the magic club. Good luck all...

patrickdrake.com
Message: Posted by: the fritz (Oct 17, 2006 11:44AM)
Hello all,

I'm new to the Café...this is my first post so I thought this topic would be a good place to start. My two cents for beginners: The Magic Book (Harry Lorayne-book), Mark Wilson's Course in Magic (Mark Wilson-book), and The Complete Introduction to Coin Magic (Michael Ammar-DVD). You could probably make a living using stuff from these three sources. Nice to meet you all.

Brett
Message: Posted by: Mb217 (Oct 17, 2006 07:54PM)
You're very 1st Post, huh...Well, Welcome "the fritz" aka "Brett", :)

There are so many great places to start...In book form, I don't think anything beats out Bobo's New Modern Coin Magic...Been reading back & forth through that thing for 20yrs at least. There are other great books I suppose, but Bobo's is definitely one of them, and the one probably owned by more magicians than any other, and probably for the best price too, about $5-8 bucks. Can't beat it!

As for dvd's, there's a lot of good ones to begin with and I have a few of them, but I happen to really got something out of Ammar's Complete Intro To Coin Magic. He packs quite a bit into that dvd. Also, of course the David Roth Intro dvds are all very good with good teaching and routines. *I would add the latest "New Modern Coin Magic" dvd set too. It's a 4 dvd set, about $40 bucks and presents visually well the stuff that's in Bobo's. So most of that stuff in Bobo's that you just can't visualize, here you have it very well presented, explained, demostrated, etc. It's a good accompaniment to the Bobo book, just a great all-around value.

I'd also say call upon some of the Café Members here about things, as they are a great resource about all things magical of the coin, etc. Specifically, reach out to the Godfather, VinsMagic here, as he is always willing to help. The guy doesn't just point and say "That-a-way," he actually shows you how with his amazing and unending creativity. He's a great guy and you can learn an awful lot from him, and few others maybe like him at the Café. Actually, no one else is quite like him or for that matter the Magis that make up his "La Famiglia." As you adventure here, you'll find out what I mean. ;) Anyway, just tell him "MB" sent'cha.

There's so much more out there and that's the journey of it all, but if you open with these suggestions, you'll be well on your way, with a lot of good practice of course. :) Good luck and enjoy the journey. It's pretty wonderful. And again, Welcome to the Café. -MB :)
Message: Posted by: the fritz (Oct 20, 2006 12:59PM)
Thanks for the welcome Mb217. Good call on the Bobo book. It's great.

Brett
Message: Posted by: GWSchott (Nov 12, 2006 11:19PM)
Magic is visual, and it can be difficult - especially for beginners - to translate written words on a page into properly executed routines. I know this from firsthand experience because I'm going through it right now. Without an accompanying video of some sort just reading Bobo's would have put me in a world of hurt. It would have been too easy for me to fall into bad habits without even knowing it. Just an opinion from the trenches.
Message: Posted by: sirbrad (Jan 22, 2007 09:57PM)
Yes, Modern Coin magic is by far the best DVD for the price and the amount of content you get.

"David Roth's Expert Coin Magic DVD Combo (1,2,3)" are great, as well as "Revolutionary Coin Magic by Jay Sankey." Then after you have honed your skills, you might want to get "David Roth's Ultimate Coin Magic Collection," which is indeed "ultimate."



"David Roth's Expert Coin Magic DVD Combo (1,2,3)"

Volume One-Basic Coin Magic

Personalized, detailed instruction from the greatest coin manipulator in the world. Here's everything you need to know to start on the wonderful road of coin magic! Volume One provides a solid working knowledge of the basics of sleight-of-hand with coins; and David then teaches you some of the greatest "classics of coin magic" ever created.

The Classic Palm
The Finger Palm
The Thumb Palm
Classic Palm Vanish
Finger Palm Vanish
Thumb Palm Vanish
Palm Finesses
Palm Transfers
Fingertip Rest Position
The Utility Switch
The Shuttle Pass
Loads & Productions
Coin Switches
Vanish & Reproduction
Winged Silver
Copper & Silver
Coin Change
Chink-a-Chink
French Drop & Variations
The Vernon Load
Ramsay Subtlety
L'Masque Load
Kaps Subtlety
Power of the Magic Wand
Benzais Friction Palm
The Bobo Switch

Volume Two-Basic to Intermediate Coin Magic

Now that you know the basics of expert coin magic, Volume Two furthers your schooling with intermediate sleights, moves, tips, subtleties, finesses and more classics of coin magic. David strives to impart all of his knowledge on each and every item, giving you the special tips and insights that took him decades to learn and devise.

The Retention Pass
The Click Pass
The Curl Palm
Hanging Coins
Multiple Coin Production
Wild Coin
Coins to Cup
Coin through Hand
Coins Through the Hole
Spellbound
One-Handed Spellbound Change

Volume Three-Intermediate to Advanced Coin Magic

After mastering the material David teaches on Volumes One and Two, you'll truly be able to call yourself a "coin man." You'll also be ready to learn still more advanced sleights and routines, including effects devised by some of the top coin magicians in the world. Together, all three volumes form a lifetime of valuable reference material to always be cherished.

The Cardini Steal
Metamorphosis Change
Advanced Chink-a-Chink
Milliken's Transposition
Tenkai Pennies
Silver/Copper Extraction
The Magical Filtration
One-Coin Routine
Advanced Copper & Silver
T.V. Surprise
Advanced Coins Through the Table
David Roth's Purse & Glass

You could then also look into "Michael Ammar's Easy To Master Money Miracles."

Also "Coin Magic Made Easy Roth"

Volume One-Basic Coin Magic
Personalized, detailed instruction from the greatest coin manipulator in the world. Here's everything you need to know to start on the wonderful road of coin magic! Volume One provides a solid working knowledge of the basics of sleight-of-hand with coins; and David then teaches you some of the greatest "classics of coin magic" ever created.

The Classic Palm
The Finger Palm
The Thumb Palm
Classic Palm Vanish
Finger Palm Vanish
Thumb Palm Vanish
Palm Finesses
Palm Transfers
Fingertip Rest Position
The Utility Switch
The Shuttle Pass
Loads & Productions
Coin Switches
Vanish & Reproduction
Winged Silver
Copper & Silver
Coin Change
Chink-a-Chink
French Drop & Variations
The Vernon Load
Ramsay Subtlety
L'Masque Load
Kaps Subtlety
Power of the Magic Wand
Benzais Friction Palm
The Bobo Switch

"The Encyclopedia of Coin Sleights 1,2,3" After all these, you should never want to see another coin again.
Message: Posted by: WoodRat (Jan 23, 2007 02:14PM)
Just a thought on books vs videos...

I was fortunate when I began learning coin magic. I still had a local shop to visit. That's where I bought Bobo's "New Modern Coin Magic." I would read and learn and practice moves, then try them out at the shop. The shop was called "The Magic Touch" and it was run by a guy named Steve Dawson. I learned a lot by watching watching Steve demo various coin gaffs and effects and watching the other customers perform for each other.

These days, it's harder to find a local shop, so DVDs and tapes are definitely a great aid. As I started to think about routining I bought and watched David Roth's "expert Coin Magic series and Michael Ammar's "Easy to Master Money Miracles" These tapes did a lot to help cement the idea of presentation and timing in my mind. I eventually built a folding, 3-way mirror for practicing - something I think every coin worker should do.

Overall, I think videos are a great way to start, along with Bobo's book. Eventually, after you have some basic sleights learned, I think books again become the way to go. Much more bang for the buck..

Cheers,
WoodRat
Message: Posted by: aiturran (Mar 13, 2007 08:54PM)
I guess this is an old topic.
I started learning coin magic using Bobo's Modern Coin Magic, as most of you say it includes all the basic sleights and many more, and has very classic routines. It's an enciclopedia and a bible for the coin worker.
At the moment, I'm trying to improve more on coin magic, so I'm studying Roth's Expert Coin Magic Made Easy videos, learning the way David Roth does them (as I think is the most natural and flawless technically speaking of coin workers).
And adding that, I'm reading Expert Coin Magic from Kaufman, because I think books are the first source you should go when learning magic.

Videos should be used to see mostly the techniques and subtleties, which can help you in a routine.

That's my 2 pesos (as I'm in Chile)
Take care,
Antonio
Message: Posted by: football2136 (Mar 14, 2007 05:05PM)
In the beginning there were coins is a good beginner video. the stuff is taught by jay noblezada. it is available at penguinmagic.com
Message: Posted by: CDKconjurations (Apr 2, 2007 04:51PM)
The DVD by Noblezada is very good. The quality and style of the videography should definitely catch and hold the attention of aspiring young magicians. I love books, but learning from them as a beginner can be challenging and the results discouraging. That is why I would recommend "In the Beginning there were Coins" to a younger newcomer to the field of coin magic.

I would also recommend Reed McClintock's "Classic Palming with Coins" DVD. In it, McClintock teaches a system for learning to classic palm several coins (and drop them out of the palm one-by-one as needed) which is different from anything I have seen or read.

My recommendations would, of course, also include those classics which have been mentioned for page after page, so I will not waste more space listing them yet again.
Message: Posted by: newbie2magic (May 21, 2007 11:18PM)
Figured I'd let people know of a place to get all these books and videos free. I already got Bobo, RRTCM, the Ammar videos, etc...for free. Not trying to get off easy but hey, when life gives you lemons... PM me if you would like to know how to get these videos and books.
Message: Posted by: mc_magi (May 22, 2007 12:44AM)
[quote]
On 2007-05-22 00:18, newbie2magic wrote:
Figured I'd let people know of a place to get all these books and videos free. I already got Bobo, RRTCM, the Ammar videos, etc...for free. Not trying to get off easy but hey, when life gives you lemons... PM me if you would like to know how to get these videos and books.
[/quote]

May I come into your house and take whatever I like because life game me lemons?

I didn't think so....
Message: Posted by: Fingers (May 22, 2007 07:16AM)
Those items you mentioned aren't free newbie2magic, they cost you your integrity. Personally I think its too much of a price to pay, I prefer to use cash.....
Message: Posted by: t-aldehyde (May 26, 2007 03:55PM)
I began to study coin magic reading Shigeo Futagawa's Book.
(It's written in Japanese, but I heared English translated version was also published internationally. In above, MCUESTA and oldguy recommend it.)

When I began to read English magic book, I bought Bobo's "Modern Coin Magic" reprinted by Dover.

In comparing, Futagawa's book contains less routines and sleights than Bobo's.
But I feel this book is easily understandable because it describes basic sleights and routines in more detail with many pictures.
If its English version can be available still now, I strongly recommend it as the first book. (And I recommend Bobo's book as the second book should be read.)

He published another good Japanese coin magic book for beginners last year.
This consists of his serial lectures on Japanese Magic Magazine in a decade ago and several newly added lectures.

When I heared him, he doesn't have any plan to publishing English version, but it's very good book. (I hope someone to translate this some day in the future.)

By the way, about Bobo's "Modern Coin Magic", now I'm finding "New Modern Coin Magic". Does anyone knows the paperback edition from New Dawn Press (not Dover) on Dec 2004 is whether "New Modern Coin Magic" or not? (This edition is a little bit easy to purchase via Amazon Japan.)
http://www.amazon.com/Modern-Coin-Magic-J-B-Bobo/dp/1845570693/ref=sr_1_1/102-3153856-4960950?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1180212353&sr=1-1
Message: Posted by: maiglesias (May 26, 2007 10:25PM)
I, too, began with Shigeo Futagawa's Book and found it to be a great place to start. The illustrations were very helpful. Ammar's introduction to coin magic has also been very helpful. I am going to look at David Stone's set next, since I really enjoy his other work.
Message: Posted by: Ryan_B_Magic (Jun 25, 2007 01:24PM)
Bobo modern coin magic is the best for coins I was really good at coin magic before I read that book now that I read it I am better
Message: Posted by: jbk2006 (Jul 6, 2007 10:19PM)
Ok here's what I've found

In the begining there were coins(dvd)
Michael ammmar's complete introduction to money magic dvd's(1-3)
Jeff McBrides coin manipulation dvd
Michael Ammar's coin magic dvd
Modern coin magic dvd's(1-4)
Coin sleights by Michael rubenstein(4 I believe)
Knock out coin magic dvd by kranzo
Jay sankey's Rev. coin magic dvd
Gary Ouellet - Close Up Illusions book.

Those were the one's off the top of my head.

jbk
Expert coin magic dvd by david roth(1-3)
Ultimate coin magic dvd by david roth
Coin magic book by richard kaufman
Al Schinder on coins book
Bill tarr's now you see it now you don't book
JB BOBO's modern coin magic book
The amature magician's handbook by henry hay
Message: Posted by: Fastlife (Jul 8, 2007 07:54AM)
If you can find a copy, "The Stars of Magic" has excellent classic coin (and other) material. All of the tricks in this book have spawned countless variations. The coin material breaks down as follows (descriptions are from the book):

John Scarne's Silver And Copper Trick:
A silver coin in the spectator's hand changes place magically with a copper coin in the hand of the performer. This is followed by a beautiful penetration effect of the coin passing through the trousers pocket. For many years magicians were under the impression that Scarne used gimmicked coins. Now, Scarne shows that he does it with ordinary coins and gives you his exact method.

Dai Vernon's Spellbound:
Dai Vernon reveals a cherished routine which has been one of his pet mysteries for many years. The effect involves a series of remarkable and inexplicable changes of two coins of the same size but minted from different metals, such as a half dollar and an English penny. It utilizes a very old sleight originally employed by English swindlers at county fairs and carnivals. Until now this routine has been guarded, and consequently it is practically unknown to the magic fraternity. Although the effect appears extremely difficult to perform, its simplicity will intrigue you.

Dai Vernon's Kangaroo Coins:
This is Dai Vernon's original method of passing our coins, one at a time, through a table into a glass. The sleights utilized in this effect appear very natural and are easy to do. By adding superb misdirection and subtleties to natural movements, Dai Vernon has created a magnificent routine. After practicing and mastering this routine you will have an effect which will establish you as a superlative sleight-of-hand performer.

Francis Carlyle's Wrist Watch Steal:
The spectator puts an identifying mark on a copper and silver coin. One coin is placed in a handkerchief which is held by the spectator. The performer holds the other coin. At his command, the coin held by him vanishes and a resounding clink is heard. Mysteriously the performer's coin has joined the one in the handkerchief held by the spectator. Upon examination, the coins are found to be the ones originally marked by the spectator. This effect is an excellent one in and of itself. It impresses the spectator with your ability to do miracles with coins. Psychologically, this makes him easy prey for the main effect. Mr. Carlyle causes the spectator to believe he is going to see another coin trick which is even more impossible than the previous one. He is thus able to gain possession of the spectator's wrist watch without his knowledge. This is made easy because the spectator's mind is concerned solely upon seeing a coin miracle and he never suspects that his watch is to be stolen. The mechanics of the steal itself are simple, and are timed exactly to coincide with the distractions.

Slydini's Flyaway Coin Routine:
The performer shows a coin to a spectator and causes it to vanish. The spectator finds that the coin has traveled to his breast pocket. He thinks that he was caught by surprise and always requests the performer to repeat the effect. Although the spectator is on his guard, the performer successfully causes the coin to reappear four times in the spectator's pocket. This effect differs from other coin routines in that its dramatic strength lies in the repetition. By continually challenging the keenness of the spectator, the effect is greatly enhanced and built up into a bewildering and highly entertaining routine.

Slydini's The Art of Using the Lap as a Servante:
Tony Slydini has mystified hundreds of magicians by utilizing this stratagem and has literally "floored" them with apparently impossible effects. Of course he has developed his own style, perfected the misdirection and timing to such a degree that one can say that he has brought this system of deception up to a high artistic level. It took considerable persuasion to have him permit the publication of the fine details of lapping as interpreted by him in a new and modernized form.

Ross Bertram On Coins:
Rubdown: Performer places his right hand on a half-dollar and rubs it on the table with a circular motion. After a few moments the rubbing motion is stopped, the right hand is lifted, and the coin is gone. The left hand, which has been resting on the table, is then lifted, revealing the coin under it. Again the performer starts rubbing the half-dollar on the table with his right hand. Personally a dime makes its appearance from under the fingers in place of the half-dollar. Upon raising his left hand, he finds the missing forty cents under it--a quarter, a dime and a nickel.

Double-Cross: Two contrasting coins are shown at the fingertips--one in each hand. The hands are then closed and held far apart. When they are opened again, the coins are seen to have changed places. Performer offers to repeat the effect. This time, just before opening the hands, the left hand drops the coin it held originally to show nothing has happened as yet. Instead of the coins being transposed, which is what the spectators expect to see, the coin in the right hand has traveled over to join the coin in the left.

Passing The Half-Bucks: Four coins are counted slowly into the left hand. One coin is commanded to pass into the right hand. When the hands are opened, three coins are in the left hand and one in the right. This is repeated with the second and third coins. The performer then states that he will cause the fourth coin to join the three in the right hand; but something goes wrong and the coin fails to pass. When the right hand is opened, it is unexpectedly found to be empty and all four coins have surprisingly arrived in the left hand.

The Porous Paw: A coin is caused to penetrate the hand.

Coin Assembly: Four quarters and two playing cards are used. The coins are laid out in a square on a cloth covered table, about one foot apart. The two outer coins are covered with the cards. The two uncovered coins are vanished in succession, and join the quarter under the right-hand card. Finally, the coin under the left-hand card vanishes, leaving all four coins magically assembled under the right hand card.

Nate Leipzig's Pride:
The stack of coins was undoubtedly Nate Leipzig's favorite magical problem. He guarded it jealously, and would never perform it when other magicians were present. There was a good reason, for in his hands it was a masterpiece.

Max Malini's Favorite!:
Malini would ask a spectator to watch a coin as closely as possible as he tossed it from hand to hand. The coin landed head up in one hand, tail up in the other. This was done a few times, Malini asking the spectator to guess whether the coin was going to land head or rail. Finally he seemed to toss it into the left hand as the left hand closed on it. The spectator was asked which way the coin hand landed, head up or tail up. No matter what the answer was, Malini would open his left hand and reveal that the coin had completely vanished. The right hand was empty too. The effect in Malini's hands was that the coin melted away!

You can not go wrong with this book!
Message: Posted by: Mb217 (Jul 14, 2007 08:59AM)
Great and prolific offering here Fastlife...Thanks for the post. I'm sure folks will find it helpful. And again, welcome to the Café, Sean. :) -MB
Message: Posted by: jmuscold (Aug 13, 2007 10:05PM)
Mark Wilson CCIM, this is a great book for a newbie.

This book is very good, one of the illusions (I think its the mystery mummy) was actually performed on a cruise ship I was on. This big magic show on a ship with 1200 passengers, and the idea comes from a 12.95 book, amazing!
Message: Posted by: Darby (Aug 16, 2007 03:57PM)
Fastlife,

Thanks for the list in "Stars of Magic" That looks like great material for expanding coin skills in new areas (but probably not for beginners).
Message: Posted by: eidanyoson (Oct 12, 2007 12:45PM)
"Monedas in Crescendo" of Manuel Cuesta.
"Monedas, monedas, monedas" of Juan Tamariz.
"La catapulta" of Joaquin Navajas (this is outstanding, but not for beginners)
Sorry, but are in spanish.

Bobo and Kauffmans are very very good too.
Message: Posted by: Wal (Dec 19, 2007 03:36AM)
Of course Bobo and Stars of Magic are wonderful. I note, however, that Bill Severn's Complete Book of Magic contains his book Magic with Coins and Bills. This is most useful as a beginners supplement to any of the above. Any more comments on Bill Severn?
Message: Posted by: Curtis Kam (Mar 21, 2008 11:10PM)
Sorry to butt in, this is not about Bill Severn. Just wanted to let you know that the little book some are calling the "user's guide" to Bobo's Modern Coin Magic has just been released. In my biased opinion, this little book is essential if you're starting out and want to avoid some of the pitfalls inherent in learning coin magic from MCM. It's also got a pretty extensive bibliography of coin magic titles, and scads of advice for any coin worker. Check out the adver-tainment at:

http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewtopic.php?topic=250782&forum=218&17

New Bobophiles are also invited to check out my column on MCM here at the Café, called "A Hundreth Pleasant Conciepts". I'll finish it one day, but for now there's some info you might find interesteing.
Message: Posted by: mballen11502 (Mar 23, 2008 07:13PM)
I just picked up Bobo's and Kam's book - should be plenty of great magic for me to learn from these books.
Message: Posted by: holo (Jul 6, 2008 09:44AM)
Also, if oyu are having trouble with following directions in a book, go to youtube or revver or whatever you want and search for a performance of it. Then you can use the book combined with the video to peice it together.
Message: Posted by: Sammy J. (Aug 12, 2008 09:41PM)
Don't forget Bill Tarr's "Now You See It, Now You Don't". A great book, and the first I ever bought.
Message: Posted by: critter (Aug 20, 2008 05:44PM)
The Bill Tarr book was my first too. Then I went through the bibliography and decided to get Bobo.
Message: Posted by: Wes65 (Aug 20, 2008 06:15PM)
Yes "Now you See it Now you Don't" got me started too. That was followed by the second "Now You See it.....". Unfortunately those were follow by years of being in and out of magic and buying tricks (instead of developing sleight of hand skill).
Message: Posted by: CamisBoss (Aug 31, 2008 10:29PM)
This book looks really interesting. I think I'll pick it up next time I get some cash...
Message: Posted by: Mb217 (Sep 1, 2008 06:50AM)
Just thought I'd make all aware of a great deal I came across on the "Modern Coin Magic 4-dvd set" that mirrors the great Bobo Coin Magic book. A great offering at 50-60% off. You can't beat it and this is offered by the magi, Ben Salinas (a Café member here) that actually presented the work. The set is very well produced and just a wonderful coin magic reference. :) Enjoy!

[quote]
On 2008-08-28 19:52, BenSalinas wrote:
I've received so many wonderful comment on my Modern Coin Magic DVD set from the Café coin magicians that I'd like to give something back.

The Modern Coin Magic 4-DVD set normally sells for around $70-$80. It's the perfect companion to J.B. Bobo's classic book. Now you can SEE what you've been missing for all these years. And it's perfect for the beginner.

I'm offering a limited number of my personal stock of these 4-DVD sets at just $35 for Café members. Here's the link to order your set today.

http://www.salinasmagic.com/moderncoin.html The discount is applied when you Add to Cart.

Thank you for all your support!
Ben S
[/quote]
Message: Posted by: Curtis Kam (Oct 10, 2008 04:12PM)
Just a quick note to second (or third) the excellent suggestion that "Stars of Magic" should be one of the first books one should read. It just so happens that there's a new reprint of "Stars" being sold widely, so there's no time like the present.

Oh, and in case anyone's wondering, here's a suggestion from a fellow Café member and coin magician who's saving money by reading The Pocketbook by the warm glow of enlightenment:

::::::::::::

Upon advise of competent counsel, I ordered The Pocketbook and read it. From this point on, should anyone inquire as to how to start in Coin Magic, I'm telling them "First buy and read Curtis Kam's "The Pocketbook", then follow what it says.

Best information from a top coin man on how to learn and practice coins I've ever read.

:::::::::::::
Message: Posted by: kcquinn50 (Oct 26, 2008 08:31PM)
Since the title of this thread is Magic books and videos for beginners, I have another suggestion. (Bobo's is an absolute must, of course.)
Another good book, for BEGINNERS, is "World's best coin tricks" by Bob Longe.
Message: Posted by: Lawrence O (Apr 28, 2009 02:04PM)
I would suggest to learn from DVDs and here is why

I agree with Marion that anyone starting with Ben Salinas' DVD set on Bobo will not get discouraged and save a lot of time (over the same book) but furthermore his subsequent study of books will be far more rewarding.

It's not always easy to visualize from a book, even with the nice Nelson Hahne's drawings how a sleight should look like.

Also some of the description in Bobo are obsolete either due to poor description I would mention the French Drop which is surprising knowing Bobo's origins (check The Vernon Touch in the Professor's book introduction; His getting into the Thumb Palm has disqualified this beautiful sleight from several generations of performers. Presto Change O: if you do it as described it is a catastrophe, do it as performed properly by Mike Gallo it's a miracle

In some other instances it's the choice of sleights that, in Bobo, would be obsolete like the click passes described in MCM, which go inwards. There are many better click passes than these ones.

There are also sleights which appeared later than Bobo's book like the Slydini's Imp-Pass, his Revolve Vanish, the Gallo Pitch, several Okito box moves, the use of the topit, the Muscle Pass...

Bobo is unarguably very valuable for routines but a student gets a faster understanding of the impact of effects by seeing them performed: admittedly he should see several variants of the same effect (and Bobo actually describes alternative routines.) A variety of style is not as well described as demonstrated by seeing different performers on the same effect.

I would recommend to start with Al Schneider's first two DVDs, then view Ben Salinas DVDs which supply a solid basic ground to build on but, every time you learn a new move, check the alternatives with Michael Rubinstein Encyclopedia of Coin Sleights which for most of it is very accessible and with David Roth Expert Coin Magic. At this stage learn the Classic Palm from Reed McLintock. Do a check point with Al Schneider's DVD to see where you got carried away with technical feats. Then get into Kaufman's Coin Magic which is a gem, Johnny Thompson Classics and Scott Guinn who will allow you to be very original without having to become fancy. Then view David Stone's routines (which contrary to a post do require a table for lots of them) and go into Mike Gallo and the New York Coin Seminar clan. Try and find COINvention Inaugural Collection. From there on you can check Troy Hooser's ideas. Then you will be able to appreciate Curtis Kam and Kainoa Harbottle's subtleties and apply them to David Neighbors ideas. Ross Bertram, Rocco Silano, Carl Cloutier, Fred Kaps, Bob Fitch, Bobby Bernard, Dan Watkins, Homer Liwag, Chris Kenner, Derek Dingle, Michael Vincent, Marion Boykin, Vinny Marini, Joe Rindfleisch, Eric Jones will then also be studied with great pleasure. Apocalypse will also supply its rich source of very interesting ideas and variations.

At that stage, it will be useful to compare routines to start making your own combination before starting to learn about scripting and acting. The series World Greatest Tricks by The World Greatest Magicians will come as a precious imagination and memory trigger for designing personal routines.

If one wanted to do this only with books (supposing he could) it would take him at least five years where here a dedicated student could become advanced in less than two years. An additional advantage, if the student is smart, is that he could pick up a great effect from a dull performer (the exist even amongst the skillful magicians) and make it a master piece or at least a reputation maker through showmanship and presentation. Now for what makes magic more than sleights and routines, just make sure you read Juan Tamariz (The Magic Way and 5 points in Magic) as well as Darwin Ortiz (Designing Miracles and Strong Magic) and Gary Kurtz (Leading with your head) before you commit yourself to any specific routine, and apply what these book teach you (that no DVD ever will).

I suggest my peers (in terms of age) not to consider the pleasure they had in discovering sleights or routines in books, but to reconsider their own habits and pleasure to supply the young generations with proper advice (without rationalizations).

Young magicians, you are luckier than we were, you have more information, more choice of routines and sleights and easier medias: soak in and learn as much as you can in the fastest possible time. Then however don't think that you know: design a first routine (eliminating any challenging gesture or text), write a script for it, and perform it on and on polishing your patter along the way.

Then come and show us that we are old dogs. Mickey Silver and Armando Lucero did it and several others as well. We love it but we have a trained eye, quiet moves, quick fingers and a big, big memory.
Message: Posted by: lorenwade (Jul 1, 2009 12:59PM)
Lawrence O, I agree with you and Mb both. When I started doing coin magic in High School, I started with Bobo's book. I loved coins but I eventually gave up because I was so discouraged from being able to understand what the book was explaining. For the most part I had things down like they were supposed to be. However, I missed out on some vital details that my eye learned from Ben Salinas' Modern Coin Magic. Now I have had to go back and perfect some of the sleights that I didn't have just right.

For a beginner: Give them Bobo's Modern Coin Magic book and Ben Salinas' Modern Coin Magic DVDs to accompany the book... and they cannot go wrong. This, in my opinion, is the absolute perfect combination for beginners. I have grown leaps and bounds by watching and reading these, rather than just reading.
Message: Posted by: gilttrip (Jul 8, 2009 10:05PM)
I do own Bobo's expanded edition in white paperback. I guess they were available at one time.
Message: Posted by: Jia Truong (Aug 27, 2009 04:22AM)
I just start coin magic and I can tell you that Ammar's Complete Introduction to Coin Magic has been very useful to me. I also own Bobo's book but I believe it is unclear in some areas.
Message: Posted by: mrehula (Aug 27, 2009 04:03PM)
I'm amazed by Diverting Coin Magic by Andrew Galloway every time I open it up. It's not a good first book, but it's full of essential 'workers' that are not difficult.

I do agree with some who have posted that, in general, it's better to learn coin magic through DVD, augmented by books, rather than the other way around.
Message: Posted by: Mb217 (Aug 30, 2009 01:33PM)
Yes, Ammar's Intro to Coin Magic is a pretty good deal, I remember it well and learned an awful lot from it. And he covers the basics well then gives you the tools as to simple enough effects to practice with. It all works well.

Bobo's is great but can be a bit confusing I agree but stick with it as it's a treasure chest that you don't really get up front...But it comes to mean a lot down the road apiece. ;)

There are many great books out there on this stuff, some more appropriate than others depending on where you're at as to skill and understanding. I think they are all meant to jumpstart your mind to trying things for yourself...At least that's what it did for me and many others that took us all from pretty much the same starting points but then off in many different directions and destinations.

The DVDs I think have been a tremendous help in the better understanding of this stuff. To me it's the difference between a staircase and an escalator. :D It's all in the name of progress and make no mistake about it, it works. Books are still great and DVDs I think help to make them even greater.

*Oh and don't forget about coin magic "Downloads" (My preference of the lot)...Many times they are cheaper than books or dvds, and give you not only a manuscript but also packs a video presentation & explanation for an effect(s). It's another one of those real progresses made gigantically possible thanks to the internet. The immediacy of instant downloads brings this stuff right to you in a flash...You can learn a lot from them as well. :) Welcome to the Café and enjoy the journey, it is one of continuous wonder. :) -Mb
Message: Posted by: DN777 (Oct 19, 2009 03:31PM)
I learned from Ammar, Bobo, Roth and Sankey. Ammar has some really easy stuff. Sankey revolutionary coin magic can be very difficult.
Message: Posted by: octave (May 9, 2010 10:13AM)
The article at CoinVanish comparing Ammar's, Roth's and David Stone's beginner DVDs was really helpful. I just placed an order for David Roth's Expert Coin Magic (3 DVD set).
Message: Posted by: keerin (Jul 5, 2010 05:19AM)
I've never studied any type of magic before but have decided to pick up coin magic. This website was one of the first I found where people speak like adults and professionals. I'd just like to say this thread was an incredible help to me.

I started off buying Bobo without reading this website as it was recommended by Neil Gaiman in his book "American Gods", where the lead character learns coin magic while in jail. Neil had to study coin magic in order to write it convincingly and thus mentions Bobo's Modern Coin Magic.

I recently ordered MB's One Coin Jammy as I like routines and performances that don't use gaffed coins or props and can be performed impromptu. I was blown away with how awesome his presentation was firstly, but secondly I realised what I was missing! Of course, I'm talking about video.

I've picked up Ammar's Complete Introduction and instantly, techniques in Bobo's that I couldn't visualise or get to work through the description alone such as Mulholland's slide vanish, the drop vanish or the illusive coin pass became clear. His magical vernacular is much more accessible than Bobo's, which is understandable since Bobo was writing in 1910.

For those who suggested Kauffman for beginners I would wholeheartedly disagree. I've been practicing and studying for around 3 months, in which time I have a decent (but un-performable) grasp on basic sleights (minus backpalms, that's just plain tricky for me) and a few switches and passes I can play with in the mirror. Kauffman's Coin Magic builds on the basics and I feel like I would be able to tackle the material in there a year from now. I will still feel like a beginner a year from now but at least I'll have a had a year's practice!

My Bobo is heavy with bookmarks and sits beside a diary in which I make notes on sleights and misdirections that I enjoy watching or playing with. For other beginners out there, I would advise this approach as it really helps me stay focused on learning useful and workable material rather than "collecting" sleights on a whim.

[i]Short version:[/i] cheers for your help, I am no longer a lurker. I have followed a similar progression path to the suggested path in this thread. You are all wonderful people.
Message: Posted by: Mb217 (Sep 15, 2010 10:41AM)
Just seeing this but WELCOME Keerin. :) Seems like you have gotten off to a good start here. Hope all is well and let me know if myself or anyone from La Famiglia Magic can be of any help to you on your journey. :) Appreciate your post here.

-Mb
Message: Posted by: PAUL K (Sep 20, 2010 08:13PM)
I would have to say for someone just getting started in Coin Magic.THE MODERN
COIN MAGIC 4 DVD set is great!!!! More than 170 Sleights & Tricks very easy to
learn.

Paul
Message: Posted by: ScottieKrause (Nov 9, 2010 11:19PM)
Bobo's coin magic was my first book
I find that I learn better with dvds so the Modern coin Magic dvd set is also very good and Ben does a great job at showing some of the sleights I didn't get from the book.

Also I agree with otave. Dan Watkins has a great article at coinvanish.com that Helped me decide where to start as well. It helped me decide on buying David Roth's expert coin magic made easy vol 1-3 which penguin magic has on sale for about $37.50. now we play the waiting game!

Scottie K.
Message: Posted by: ScottieKrause (Nov 10, 2010 02:38PM)
Oh and I just noticed Amazon seems to have a sale on The modern coin magic 4 dvd set for $29.99 USD atm.
Message: Posted by: shamsiel (Dec 7, 2010 11:09PM)
I know I am a fumbling apprentice at the moment but the stickies are sometimes craaaaaazy looooong! Can we update the Stickies like, lets say, once every 2 years or so? What would the consensus be today Dec 8, 2010 on what a starters kit for a total beginner, like me, should look like?
Imagine you where to sell a 2010 beginners coin magic course in a box. What would it contain(Under $50) A la Blasckstone's?

Shamsiel
Message: Posted by: John Long (Dec 9, 2010 08:24PM)
[quote]
On 2010-12-08 00:09, shamsiel wrote:
I know I am a fumbling apprentice at the moment but the stickies are sometimes craaaaaazy looooong! Can we update the Stickies like, lets say, once every 2 years or so? What would the consensus be today Dec 8, 2010 on what a starters kit for a total beginner, like me, should look like?
Imagine you where to sell a 2010 beginners coin magic course in a box. What would it contain(Under $50) A la Blasckstone's?

Shamsiel
[/quote]

I'm not clear what you are referring to with the "stickies" or "Blackstone's". Yet, I think that there is not a single place to start with coin magic, and there are already some great resources. For my money, to learn sleights, a single DVD would be Ammar's Complete Intro to Coin Magic. If the person didn't want to start with sleight of hand, a book, like those by Fulves, may be good (but I don't have his SW Coin Magic).
Or, if someone just wanted to learn a few things about coin magic, they could start with Wilson's Complete Course, and have a lot of other magic to work with too.
Message: Posted by: mtb (Dec 10, 2010 12:32PM)
[quote]
On 2010-12-09 21:24, John Long wrote:
[quote]
On 2010-12-08 00:09, shamsiel wrote:
I know I am a fumbling apprentice at the moment but the stickies are sometimes craaaaaazy looooong! Can we update the Stickies like, lets say, once every 2 years or so? What would the consensus be today Dec 8, 2010 on what a starters kit for a total beginner, like me, should look like?
Imagine you where to sell a 2010 beginners coin magic course in a box. What would it contain(Under $50) A la Blasckstone's?

Shamsiel
[/quote]

I'm not clear what you are referring to with the "stickies" or "Blackstone's". Yet, I think that there is not a single place to start with coin magic, and there are already some great resources. For my money, to learn sleights, a single DVD would be Ammar's Complete Intro to Coin Magic. If the person didn't want to start with sleight of hand, a book, like those by Fulves, may be good (but I don't have his SW Coin Magic).
Or, if someone just wanted to learn a few things about coin magic, they could start with Wilson's Complete Course, and have a lot of other magic to work with too.
[/quote]

Not sure about Blackstone's, but stickies refers to sticky threads. This one is over six pages long for example, so I can see what you mean shamsiel. A collection of stuff currently available as good beginner material may be useful.

I do not have enough experience to say what such a kit should contain, but Bobo and Kaufman's books have been quite helpful to me thus far, aided by looking on youtube for actual demos of some moves. Most of which are not great, but they do offer some insight.

Not having a credit card makes online purchases difficult, so I can offer no help on DVD's which I have found are difficult to find in South Africa. At least the more specialised coin ones.
Message: Posted by: shamsiel (Dec 10, 2010 01:39PM)
Some of you might remember the Blackstone Magic Kit from the 80's and other similar products. My question was, if any of you where to create a -beginers coin worker's magic kit- for under $50 bucks, what would you include inside? Bobo's book obviously...what else?

Respects,
Shamsiel
Message: Posted by: Mb217 (Dec 10, 2010 02:16PM)
Bobo's IS the "Beginners" Coin Magic Kit for under $50, way under $50. :D

Seriously, of course Bobo's would be in the kit and perhaps a few gaffed effects to keep you interested as you futz through the better understanding of the sleight of hand stuff...Like perhaps Scotch & Soda, A C/S coin and maybe 4-5 regular half dollar coins and an English penny or two...And perhaps a half dollar shell. I think these few pieces would give you a real good start in coin magic. S&S and the C/S coin will give you some immediate satisfaction where the magic happens for you. The regular coins would help in the deeper learning of all sorts of stuff in Bobo's where the magic happens much more fruitfully through you. :)

For the record, a good Beginners coin workers magic kit would be to get IMHO, the Bobo's book (about $10) + The Modern Coin Magic 4 DVD set (mirrors the famous book, about $20) + 5 half dollars, 1-2 English pennies, 1 dollar-size coin (about $5) + and maybe a half dollar expanded shell OR a C/S Coin (each about $15). Great use of the $50 kit to start and fly hundreds of miles forward in this stuff.

Of course you provide the time & effort and enjoy the journey! :)
Message: Posted by: BanzaiMagic (Dec 10, 2010 07:45PM)
I would second Marion (MB217's) thoughts on the Bobo book being a kit in and of itself, but I would save up and throw in an extra $10 and get the hardbound book (New Modern Coin Magic) rather than the softbound Dover edition (Modern Coin Magic) - the hardbound contains all of the softbound edition, plus much more. You will use it now and ten years from now and will never outgrow it.

As for video, if you haven't already perfected your CP, you might ask Marion sweetly and if you are lucky, you may receive from him out of the (substantial) goodness of his heart his classic p*** video - which will give you an incredible head start on that basic building block of coin magic (and, IMHO improve your existing CP even if you can already do it).

Regards,

Alan
Message: Posted by: shamsiel (Dec 10, 2010 11:46PM)
Marion, Mb217 you have made my day! Thank you. I love the shiny things and I have a copy of Bobo's (my third book on magic) already. Got about ten half-dollars, and about 12-15 dollars (I had forgotten how big these things were!).

I will build
-Shamsiel's Essential beginners coin magic kit- (my first act of misdirection because in reality it is [b]"Marion's Essential beginners Coin Magic kit"):[/b]
It Contains: (after Im done shopping)
1. Bobo's "New Modern Coin Magic"
2.Modern Coin Magic on DVD
3. Scotch and Soda
4. 2 english pennies
5. 5 half-dollars
6. 1 dollar-size coin
7. Half-Dollar expanded shell
8. C/S coin

Again, lots of thanks!
Respects,
Shamsiel.
Message: Posted by: rsylvester (Feb 27, 2011 12:02AM)
[quote]
On 2002-11-25 10:46, johne wrote:
I enjoyed Bobo's Modern Coin magic very much, and still find myself reading it from time-to-time. I also though Bill Tarr's "Now You See it, Now You Don't" book on Sleight of hand. Although it cover more than coins, I think it is very good reading. Mark Wilson's book on Magic is a very good book for beginners too. It has a section on coins, and has much more to offer as well.

John Eddington
[/quote]

I saw a lecture by Bobo -- it's got to be 30-ome years ago -- and when I recently got back into magic, I walked into the shop and asked for the book to brush up and get me started again. It's a great introduction to coin effects and kind of encyclopedia.
Message: Posted by: vinsmagic (Apr 22, 2011 11:25AM)
Hey Wayman where did you go
have you noticed how many of the earlier posters are no longer posting,
don't know what happened to them
the godfather
Message: Posted by: Merc Man (Apr 25, 2011 07:29AM)
I'd recommend Harry Lorayne's 'The Magic Book' for any beginner to coin magic - even before the delights of Bobo are enjoyed.

It's certainly the book that initially got me interested in coins; albeit it at a very young/inexperienced age.

I only wish Harry would write a coin book - he could revisit the material from the aforementioned title and add an additional raft of coin magic from the 20 wonderful years of Apocalypse.

I did make this additional suggestion when Harry asked via the Magic Café for the 1970's books that people wanted to see included within the Classic Collection (Vol 2/3?) but I think it fell on deaf ears as he didn't comment.

A great shame - as, in my view, there is no better magical author.
Message: Posted by: bCoin (Jun 5, 2011 05:48PM)
I'm completely new to coin magic, but a few years back I tried learning strictly from Bobo. I stuck with it for a while but eventually hit a wall because there was so much information to take in and I felt overwhelmed and didn't know where to start or what exactly I should be practicing.

I just decided to get back into it and recently started using David Roth's Expert Coin Magic videos and it's made it a lot easier for me to learn one sleight at a time and concentrate on acquiring that skill before trying to move on to the next one. Obviously Bobo's MCM is a great resource with a ton of information, but I think it's best to use it as a secondary resource instead of trying to learn everything strictly through text.
Message: Posted by: leaycraft (Jul 8, 2011 04:37PM)
If your working with Bobo I can't recommend the Ben Salinas 4 DVD set on MCM. IMHO the book should be packaged with Ben"s superb handling of the material. Read Bobo watch the video its working for me.

john
Message: Posted by: Wouter (Sep 5, 2011 08:51AM)
The first coin trick I tried to learn, I picked it up from from the internet, used the backpalm. That's the first sleight I learned and it was not the best way to start with coin magic. I even went to a coin shop to buy a propper sized coin. At that time I was thinking about the possibility that there might be a book covering the subject. I searched on internet and accidental bought Modern Coin Magic from Bobo. That book was all I'm looking for.

With Bobo's book Modern Coin Magic and David Roth's Coin Magic Made Easy dvd I think you have a realy good start.

Wouter
Message: Posted by: khuzhai (Sep 29, 2011 05:37AM)
I started coin magic about 6 months ago using these 2 dvds:

Jay Noblezada - In the beginning there were coins
Eric Jones - Metal

I like Jay Noblezada explanation on the retention vanish and I like Eric's routines in his dvd better. However I'm not sure what I should proceed to right now.

Currently the only trick I can do with normal coins is possibly a one coin routine comprising of:
a) ponta the smith coin production
b) retention vanish
c) wither vanish (im not sure by who but I saw Shoot Ogawa perform this)
d) french drop
e) end similarly to ponta's one coin routine producing a jumbo coin at the end.

I'm looking towards learning 3 fly and some matrixes but Im really stumped on where to proceed actually. I ended up learning to muscle pass after about 2.5 months of practice and it jumps about 10cms, not sure how well I'm doing this.

Any recommendations on where to go from here?
Message: Posted by: Atom3339 (Sep 29, 2011 11:37AM)
Khuzhai, Since you like DVDs, check out David Roth's series, Ben Salinas' Modern Coin Magic set and the New York Coin Magic Seminar Volumes (Mike Rubinstein posts here and can give you more info). Also Rubinstein's Encyclopedia Of Coin Sleights (3 Volumes) is good.
Message: Posted by: ottphd (Jan 20, 2012 11:14AM)
By far one of the best DVDs I have seen is Coin Man Walking by Dan Watkins. It is a few steps past beginner coin magic but, his teaching of each routine is just excellent. Dan demonstrates not just once but a couple of times each move and just how to do it. Working with coins for a while, I learned more in a short period of time just watching his presentations. I wish Dan would come out with a DVD on many of the basic moves, his teaching style is far beyond that of many of the DVDs out there.
Just my thoughts!
Message: Posted by: ottphd (Feb 23, 2012 04:56PM)
Not sure if I over looked this or not but, one publication that pre-dates BOBO is Magic Without Apparatus by Camille Gaultier (1945). Has some classic coin sleights.
Message: Posted by: ibraa (Feb 24, 2012 05:48PM)
[quote]
On 2011-09-05 09:51, Wouter wrote:
The first coin trick I tried to learn, I picked it up from from the internet, used the backpalm. That's the first sleight I learned and it was not the best way to start with coin magic. I even went to a coin shop to buy a propper sized coin. At that time I was thinking about the possibility that there might be a book covering the subject. I searched on internet and accidental bought Modern Coin Magic from Bobo. That book was all I'm looking for.

With Bobo's book Modern Coin Magic and David Roth's Coin Magic Made Easy dvd I think you have a realy good start.

Wouter
[/quote]

I agree!
Message: Posted by: LeoC-Coins (Jul 2, 2012 03:12PM)
If coin magic is what you're after the best book in the whole world has got to be "modern coin magic by J.B Bobo" and the best dvd in my opinion is "metal 1 by Eric Jones"
Message: Posted by: germanmagician (Aug 30, 2012 07:28PM)
Modern Coinmagic is also my Favorite Book of Coinmagic and Eric Jones
is one of my Favorite DVD's.
Message: Posted by: arizona (Dec 2, 2012 09:36PM)
If I was to get payed to teach someones kid magic, a total layman beginner, I would get him Michael Ammars intro to coins which teaches many sleight of hand techniques and touches on other areas like theory, patter and tips on performing. Most of the material are from legends like bobo, roth, ramsey and other great minds in magic and properly cited. I watched this when I was a newbie and some if not most the tricks taught in it fooled me. After they are familiar with sleights using coins and sponges, then I will finally get them to learn a cups and ball routine or a sponge ball routine. At the same time his home work would be practicing some card forces, false shuffles and controls. No magic props or tricks till graduation, that includes the TT. lol
Message: Posted by: John Locke (Dec 23, 2012 01:33PM)
Once you have learned some basic moves (including palming), you can begin to add to your repertoire. The book that my colleagues and I have produced contains some simple methods of acquiring additional basic to intermediate skills in the Cool Moves section.

The remainder of the book details more than a dozen performance pieces which vary from fairly easy to those which require more practice.

I suggest this book is a great starting point for those who have an interest in learning how to transform basic moves into entertaining magic.

See more details about it at http://www.lybrary.com/goldfinger-stand-up-coin-mysteries-p-245846.html

John McLachlan
Message: Posted by: Mb217 (Mar 15, 2013 05:25PM)
^ And since the great philosopher, John Locke is here, and being that reading is fundamental... :)

[i]Without books the development of civilization would have been impossible [That would include Coin Magic]. They are the engines of change, windows on the world, 'Lighthouses' as the poet said 'erected in the sea of time.' They are companions, teachers, magicians, bankers of the treasures of the mind. Books are humanity in print. [/i]

-Arthur Schopenhauer
Message: Posted by: hp (Feb 2, 2014 07:20AM)
I pulled out my old VHS tapes and have been looking at them. If any newbie is searching for it, let me note that I disagree with Luca's comment (more than 10 years ago) about recommending Bill Tarr's Basic Coin Technique video. Bill teaches the basic material well, but he tries to do too much material he can't do well and there should be more emphasis on entertainment value.

Howard
Message: Posted by: DeanW (Mar 16, 2014 01:36PM)
Just going to add my beginners opinion here, working my way through David Roth’s ECM, and it has brought me along leaps and bounds and quicker than expected. So I highly recommend this to any beginner in coin magic.

Dean
Message: Posted by: gregg webb (Mar 19, 2014 04:43PM)
Magic Without Apparatus by Camille Gaultier is a great book with a coin section. Regards, Gregg Webb
Message: Posted by: DallasFrank (Mar 30, 2014 08:33PM)
Here is my list for beginners
1) Amateur magicians handbook by Henry Hay.This book will lay a strong foundation for all magic including coins.
2) New Modern Coin Magic by JB Bobo. I consider this more of a compilation as opposed to a teaching book but it is invaluable.
3) Expert Coin Magic by Richard Kaufman and David Roth. This where you begin to make the leap to more advanced coin magic.
I would also suggest getting the video companions to New Modern Coin Magic which is Modern Coin Magic 4 DVD set and Expert Coin Magic which is Expert Coin Magic Made Easy 3 DVD set.I suggest reading the books then watching the videos.
Following this advice in this order should make you a pretty accomplished Coin Manipulator.
Also...get the hardbound versions of these books as there more material in them and you will continue to refer to them throughout your magical career.
Frank
Message: Posted by: Will Leiva (Jul 20, 2015 01:18PM)
Hi, Im completely new to magic. I was wondering is there a book that is specifically for coin magic beginners.
Or am I going to have to purchase books and video's that will teach me the basics that I will need to know for coin magic? Any and all help is welcomed :)
Message: Posted by: RatdeLabo (Aug 7, 2015 04:58AM)
Hi,

Read the 6 pages before ;), all answers are here!
Message: Posted by: ColtonRaelund (Jan 31, 2016 04:43AM)
You cant beat Bobo! You will never regret buying NMCM! :)
Message: Posted by: FrankHorng (Jul 31, 2016 01:54AM)
I learned from David Roth's Expert coin magic made easy 1-3.
Trust me, that's enough to fool lots of people!
Message: Posted by: BrotherJeffrey (Oct 17, 2017 01:44PM)
I really still think Bobo's is number one. You can start there as a beginner and learn so much. Because the descriptions are short you get you use your imagination and develop on your own. But you can come back years later and still find good stuff and understand those trick and sleight descriptions even better on a 3rd or 4th read after years of practice. I think the book continues to offer and challenge.
Message: Posted by: Mb217 (Feb 10, 2018 11:23AM)
Another wonderful book to get started with is [b]Now You See It, Now You Don't[/b] by Bill Tarr & Illustrated by Barry Ross. 🎩

This is a marvelous magic book, simply written and that has remarkable drawings of all the moves. And while it is more of a general closeup magic book, covering cards, cups & balls, ropes, etc., it also has a nice coin magic section, and a great bibliography pointing the way to other good magic books, like J.B. Bobo's New Modern Coin Magic. 😏

For some reason, the book is not often spoken of and even forgotten largely, but it shouldn't be, as it is quite complete as to beginner closeup magic. I still do some things from the book and continue to refer to it time and again. Excitingly, it also is a larger size book and comes across like a workbook of magic. It truly walks you through the beginning and even into some intermediate routines and effects. It's remarkably well laid out and written, and introduces you to all sorts of fine magic, [I]including coins[/I]. ;) There's even a 2nd big book as to it, but start at the beginning with this one first and you'll be so happy you did. :)

Myself and so many others have learned a lot from Tarr's magical offerings, and I'm sure you will too. What a fun, gem of a book! Go find it and unlock its treasures. :)

*Highly Recommended! ★★★★★
Message: Posted by: iccemann101 (Mar 6, 2018 09:10AM)
I would need to agree that the Now You See it, Now You Don't By Bill Tarr is a great book.
That is the first Magic Book I got when I first started in magic.
Message: Posted by: Will Leiva (Mar 6, 2018 09:23AM)
Last time I posted it was in July of 2015.

I would like to say that now, 2 years later, I consider myself an intermediate coin magician. I have read Bobo's and would have to agree that is the place to start for coin magic. I've gone through Coin Magic by Kaufman and Expert Coin by Roth. I would say that you need to be comfortable with Bobo's first before moving into those books. As far as Dvds I think Encyclopedia of coin magic is good for beginners that are reading Bobo's. It is good as a reference and as a "here is what to expect".
Message: Posted by: Dr Rick (Jul 4, 2018 08:22AM)
Has anyone come across Jay Sankeys crash course in coin magic DVD

I believe he divides opinion but I like his teaching style

Any thoughts?
Message: Posted by: Passmore610 (Aug 14, 2018 05:09PM)
Hi there, I'm brand new here and am trying to work my way through Bobo's book - I'm finding it quite difficult to understand the tricks from the confusing (to me) drawings & language

I realise that it's basically the bible of coin magic so don't want to skip it - is there some sort of video companion to the book available (in the UK)?
Message: Posted by: Passmore610 (Aug 14, 2018 07:05PM)
[quote]On Aug 14, 2018, Passmore610 wrote:
Hi there, I'm brand new here and am trying to work my way through Bobo's book - I'm finding it quite difficult to understand the tricks from the confusing (to me) drawings & language

I realise that it's basically the bible of coin magic so don't want to skip it - is there some sort of video companion to the book available (in the UK)? [/quote]

Sorry - did more googling and found the video companion, but read reviews that said the performance wasn't so good on the Salinas DVDs

Thinking about going for Eric Jones' Metal and Jay Noblezada's in the beginning there were coins instead.
Message: Posted by: Michael Rubinstein (Aug 16, 2018 07:03PM)
What do you want to learn...moves, or routines?
Message: Posted by: magic.42 (Sep 15, 2018 12:42AM)
My opinion is-If were talking about guiding a beginner in the right direction using a book as the vehicle The Amateur Magicians Handbook would be the only book I would recommend, to start. This book contains coin vanishes, coin switches, coin routines, and so much more. To do magic, beginners need an over all understanding of what is needed to perform, communicate, and entertain their audience. The Amateur Magicians Handbook has all these teaching and more. For the average beginner (the young), money is tight and a copy of this book can be purchased for a few dollars or borrowed from the average library for free. This is the book I started with and most times when I see a copy in a used book store , I buy it. I like to keep spare copies around because I enjoy giving them to people that come up to me and are sincere about learning to perform magic to entertain others. I love starting people in magic for the right reason - in the right way. I totally argree that just about all the books the other members have recommended will teach moves and routines, but what can a beginner hope do with this information without having at least some understanding as to how everything goes together to work properly. While this is a strong opinion, it is my opinion.......P. S. - if you see a copy with Enjoy - Mr. O written on the inside cover, it was one of my copies.
Message: Posted by: Mb217 (Nov 27, 2018 12:51PM)
[quote]On Feb 10, 2018, Mb217 wrote:
Another wonderful book to get started with is [b]Now You See It, Now You Don't[/b] by Bill Tarr & Illustrated by Barry Ross. 🎩

This is a marvelous magic book, simply written and that has remarkable drawings of all the moves. And while it is more of a general closeup magic book, covering cards, cups & balls, ropes, etc., it also has a nice coin magic section, and a great bibliography pointing the way to other good magic books, like J.B. Bobo's New Modern Coin Magic. 😏

For some reason, the book is not often spoken of and even forgotten largely, but it shouldn't be, as it is quite complete as to beginner closeup magic. I still do some things from the book and continue to refer to it time and again. Excitingly, it also is a larger size book and comes across like a workbook of magic. It truly walks you through the beginning and even into some intermediate routines and effects. It's remarkably well laid out and written, and introduces you to all sorts of fine magic, [I]including coins[/I]. ;) There's even a 2nd big book as to it, but start at the beginning with this one first and you'll be so happy you did. :)

Myself and so many others have learned a lot from Tarr's magical offerings, and I'm sure you will too. What a fun, gem of a book! Go find it and unlock its treasures. :)

*Highly Recommended! ★★★★★ [/quote]


Just wanted to say a bit further here now, that [b]The Second Now You See It, Now You Don't[/b] big book is everywhere as good as the first one, with much more stuff to keep pushing you forward, and it still includes has a real nice coin section for all you coin guys. ;) Just as well laid-out with all the wonderful step-by-step sketches and limited wording as to written instructions. *PLUS, these books can be found for dirt cheap now. ;)

Whenever now I gift a book to a deserving student, it is one of these books because they are just so well done, inclusive of all types of magic, and with varying levels of wonderful effects to learn, practice, and present. I dare you to pick up one of these and tell me that they are not more than well-worth it to keep for yourself or to share with someone starting their magical journey. :)

Treat yourself or perhaps someone else starting out in magic with these wonderful books. :)

*And again here...*Highly Recommended! ★★★★★ ;)