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Topic: Best Guitar solos of all time
Message: Posted by: DomKabala (Feb 28, 2006 03:20PM)
I was listening to my local progressive radio station 95.9 FM Pirate Rock and Led Zeppelin's "Dazed & Confused" from their first album ('68) blasted on air waves! Absolutely the best guitar solo by "The Extrordinaire Jimmy Page" hands down! It ranks up there with Jimi Hendrix' "Voodoo Child" from the "Electric LadyLand" album!
So what is you favorite rock guitar solo(s)?
<<<KRaZy4kardz>>>
Message: Posted by: Lambertmoon (Feb 28, 2006 03:36PM)
Too many to choose.....Okay...Freebird.
Message: Posted by: Vandy Grift (Feb 28, 2006 03:40PM)
Way too many. But for starters, I like the twin solos by Duane Allman/Dickey Betts in "Blue Sky" by the Allman Brothers.
Message: Posted by: dpe666 (Feb 28, 2006 04:00PM)
Eyes Of A Stranger by Queensryche and Hotel California by The Eagles :devilish:
Message: Posted by: mstick85 (Feb 28, 2006 07:20PM)
You guys have obviously never heard me play! Oh, wait, you're talking PROFESSIONAL. Well, I did do the Browns team picnic one year. Got paid a fried bologna sandwich and a signed 8x10 of Reggie Rucker...I'm kidding...

Where would you even start to begin with a question like that? Hotel California...More Than a Feeling...Kenny G's Songbird....

It's all good...
Message: Posted by: Eric Buss (Feb 28, 2006 07:47PM)
Eric Johnson "Cliffs of Dover"
Message: Posted by: cardone (Feb 28, 2006 08:33PM)
Iron Maiden ... "Number of the Beast"
Janes Addiction ,... "Three Days"
Message: Posted by: Leland Stone (Feb 28, 2006 09:35PM)
Oh, come on, am I the only here who fondly recalls "Classical Gas" by Mason Williams?
Message: Posted by: Samuel Catoe (Feb 28, 2006 10:24PM)
Hendrix's Star Spangled Banner.
Message: Posted by: Justin R (Feb 28, 2006 10:32PM)
"Rumble" by Link Wray.
Message: Posted by: Glenn Godsey (Feb 28, 2006 11:06PM)
Django Reinhardt...."Nuages"
Message: Posted by: Vincent (Feb 28, 2006 11:20PM)
Classical Gas Was And Still Is A Great Piece Of Music.

Almost Anything Played By Studio/Solo Artist Brent Mason.

Howard Roberts On Anything From The 50's, 60's 70's etc.

Tommy Tedesco Who Was A Monster Player And Recorded Some Of The Best Solos For TV And Films.

Grant Green, Johnny Smith, That George Benson Kid...

... And Of Course I Cannot Forget The Beloved Wes On Everything.

I Guess You Get My Point.

God Blessed All Of These Individuals With A Beautiful Gift.

Any Guitar Solo They Played Was Their Best.

Thanks,

Vincent :die: :magicrabbit: :die:
Message: Posted by: jezza (Mar 1, 2006 11:28AM)
The cures guitaring is so underated and underheard Check out Robert smiths minimal but tasteful work on Disintegration album with Fender 6
amazing
Message: Posted by: revlovejoy (Mar 1, 2006 11:35AM)
Anything that comes from Warren Haynes. If you love rock guitar, and do not yet know the genius that is Warren, you are severely out of the loop. You may not dig the styles of some bands he's in (recently The Dead and The Allman Brothers Band simultaneously) - but his own band Gov't Mule is beynod amazing. Any time Warren gets to let loose, it's slide rock heaven. Add the voice of a true bluesman, and wow. After years of touring and hundreds of concerts, the only band that can get me away from my toddler for a night now, would be the Mule.

I also have to give props to Comfortably Numb by Pink Floyd.

And OK, I'm a nerd, but the solo in Phish's "Maze" by Trey Anastasio is the best sequence of building tension and release I've ever heard.

But come on, all these posts and no love for Frampton? Do you feel like we do. All 14 minutes. OK, the last 5.

Guitar Magazine did a "50 worst solos" a while ago. Maybe it was 100. All I can tell you is this: Ace Frehley ranked many times.
Message: Posted by: jgravelle (Mar 1, 2006 12:12PM)
The introduction to B. B. King's performance of "Night Life" live on Austin City Limits. I [i]think[/i] it's from this performance, but I can't be certain:
http://www.pbs.org/klru/austin/artists/program88.html

Our local college station played it one afternoon on my drive home. I had to pull over, because my eyes were welling up with tears. So I cried like a girl, so what? Shut up.


Regards,

-jjg
Message: Posted by: pkg (Mar 1, 2006 01:39PM)
Shine on you crazy diamond, pink floyd!!
Message: Posted by: Jondalawyer (Mar 1, 2006 01:43PM)
I haven't heard Classical Gas in a long time. A friend used to play it.

Hotel California always brings back memories.
Message: Posted by: mike89 (Mar 1, 2006 07:07PM)
Anything Thin Lizzy....
Message: Posted by: Corey Harris (Mar 1, 2006 08:50PM)
Love Gun - by Kiss
Message: Posted by: Patrick Differ (Mar 1, 2006 10:54PM)
Band - Blue Oyster Cult
Albumn - Some Enchanted Evening (Live in Atlanta)
Song - Astronomy
Guitarist - Donald "Buck Dharma" Roeser.
Message: Posted by: Big Jeff (Mar 2, 2006 01:19AM)
Wipe Out
Message: Posted by: DomKabala (Mar 2, 2006 06:29AM)
How about Duane Allman's slide guitar on Derek & the Dominoes "Layla"? I saw the Allman Bro.s 3 times starting in summer of '69 and when they broke into "Dreams" I freaked. "In Memory of Elizabeth Reed" has a killer guitar too.
<<<KRaZy4kardz>>>
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (Mar 2, 2006 06:48AM)
Any Neil Young fans here?
Message: Posted by: DomKabala (Mar 2, 2006 07:58AM)
Yes, "Southern Man" brings back memories.
<<<KRaZy4kardz>>>
Message: Posted by: abc (Mar 2, 2006 08:07AM)
More a style than a solo I love Stevie Ray Vaughan.
First solo I ever learned to play was Guns n Roses Knockin on heavens door the first solo Slash plays on the song. Not the best of all times but it brings back memories for me.
My favorite vote though has to go to BB King. Just the touch I like. Maybe I am just getting old cause if you asked me this question 5 or more years ago I would have said "anything by Eddie van Halen or Kirk Hammett." How things have changed.
Message: Posted by: elmago (Mar 2, 2006 01:35PM)
Awe man, where do I start?
The Master of Puppets solo/ duet by Metallica is so sweet.
Stairway to Heaven by Led Zepplin solo at the end is memorable.
Sweet Child O' Mine solo by Guns n' Roses is an education. The intro aint bad either.
Hotel California is a given. Its the solo/ duet even non guitar players can hum.
Comfortably Numb by Pink Floyd is very soulful.
Steve Vai's solo ("played" by Ralph Macchio) from the movie Crossroads is inspiring.
Round and Round by Ratt is awesome. I sometimes fast forward the song just to hear the solo.
Epic by Faith No More. An example of how the right notes at the right time can hit the spot perfectly without flashy playing.
Let's Go Crazy by Prince. That solo at the end rules!
Message: Posted by: MoonBeam (Mar 2, 2006 06:07PM)
Clapton.
Message: Posted by: revlovejoy (Mar 2, 2006 11:36PM)
Jonathan, I fall just short of worshipping Neil Young. I've had the pleasure of seeing him acoustic once, and electric once. I was born in 1972, so I missed the early years obviously, but the man never stops. He truly is a fine wine that gets better with age.

What is genius about his acoustic playing, is that it is simple enough to be played by most players/fans, but still unique enough that when you hear it, you know it's a Neil song. On electric, I give him credit with originating grunge music before most teen angst'ers could find Seattle on a map. Yet, I don't think of too many "solos" when I think Neil. I think songs. But for solos, digging deep, I'd say Like a Hurricane, and Cortez the Killer. The most amazing cover of this song was done by the aforementioned Gov't Mule, and they did it more than justice.

Hearing Neil get feedback on an organ in concert, was more intense than any other guitar solo.
Message: Posted by: revlovejoy (Mar 2, 2006 11:40PM)
Elmago, we need to have some beers together.

I thought I would be the only person in the world to put Prince and Floyd on the same list with Faith no More. That whole list is gold. I'm not so with you on the Ratt thing, but back in my headbanger days, I would have agreed. The GnR fan in me will never die though! Use Your Illusion I and II, epics. Simply epics.

Now here's the test for total eclectic coolness:

Living Color "Cult of Personality."

Vernon Reid was/is a visionary genius on the instrument. The song overall was powerful enough to hit the mainstream, but the modalities or scales he used in the solos on that song were unlike anything pop radio had ever played before.
Message: Posted by: vinsmagic (Mar 2, 2006 11:42PM)
Django Reinhart was probaly the greatist jazz guirtist that ever lived.
His Hot clubof france was one of thel time best also sphanGrapelli was partof the group
and get this he only had three fingers.........
he was a violinist but had a accident a
He died at a very yourn age...
the godfather
Message: Posted by: kihei kid (Mar 3, 2006 02:57AM)
The Outlaws: Stick Around for Rock & Roll (live version) recorded in 1978, I have yet to hear it's equal.

The Outlaws: Green Grass & High Tides (studio version) recorded in 1975, Close 2nd.
Message: Posted by: Partizan (Mar 3, 2006 03:56AM)
I'd have too say Eddie Van Halen's Eruption is one of the best modern examples.
Steve Vai and yngwie j malmsteen have done some good work.

They say Django lost his fingers in a duel with the devil, Django won!
Message: Posted by: Brad Burt (Mar 3, 2006 04:19PM)
Anything by Stevie Ray Vaughn. All the guitar work in In Memory of Elizebeth Reed by the Alman Brothers. Regards,
Message: Posted by: cgscpa (Mar 3, 2006 07:03PM)
Chicago - [i]25 or 6 to 4[/i]
Message: Posted by: abc (Mar 3, 2006 11:36PM)
I know we are not supposed to change our minds but it will be an injustice if I do not Django to my list.
What an extraordinary person and player. If anybody that is reading this have not heard any of his music do yourself a favor and buy it. Listen to it first before you consider that he lost some fingers in an accident. I didn't know this when I listened to it the first time and was even more amazed when I found out.
Message: Posted by: Magicman101uk (Mar 5, 2006 03:14PM)
I have to echo a few people here with Django, truly amazing. Also someone mentioned Eric Johnson (Cliffs of Dover) which is an absolute blinding tune. If you havent heard it get the Ah Via Musicom album. Stunning. Also on my list (I cant pick one)

Bohemian Rhapsody - Queen
For The Love Of God - Steve Vai
Summer Song - Joe Satriani
Hotel California - The Eagles
Get The Funk Out - Extreme
These Are The Days Of Our Lives - Queen

My list goes on and on and on, so I wont bore you with it

Cheers

Paul

http://www.paul-humphreys.com
Message: Posted by: Review King (Mar 11, 2006 08:43AM)
[quote]
On 2006-03-03 00:42, vinsmagic wrote:
Django Reinhart was probaly the greatist jazz guirtist that ever lived.
His Hot clubof france was one of thel time best also sphanGrapelli was partof the group
and get this he only had three fingers.........
he was a violinist but had a accident a
He died at a very yourn age...
the godfather
[/quote]

He had all his fingers, but two were seared in a fire. He devolped a style that was unique. He was the greatest guitarist of all time, IMHO.

Modern day, Eric Clapton's "Crossroads" still gives me chills.
Message: Posted by: bitterman (Mar 11, 2006 09:29AM)
Lowell George "20 Million Things" The heighth of pathos.
Message: Posted by: GlenD (Mar 11, 2006 09:27PM)
ZZ Top... many to choose from.

Anyone else hear ever heard of Phil Keaggy ?? One of the best in the world alive today!


GlenD
Message: Posted by: thePyramidWithin (Mar 15, 2006 07:17PM)
Best guitar solo:
kind of a solo but I would have to say "schism"by tool.
such a deep sadness to it.
Message: Posted by: Hawkan (Mar 17, 2006 07:58AM)
Steve Lukather... "English eyes" or "Without your love" from live video

Håkan
:wavey:
Message: Posted by: taller8 (Apr 7, 2006 06:03PM)
I've always got chills from David Gilmor's solo on 'Money', and Claptons solo in 'While My Guitar Gently Weeps". Guitar solo's have never been about speed or chops for me, but always about the emotional impact. I've played with technical players before, and I do respect their agility, but I'd quickly get bored.

Eric Johnson and Jeff Beck play some tasty stuff, as does Stuart Smith who is now in the Eagles touring band.
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Apr 7, 2006 08:26PM)
Tony Iommi's in "Heaven and Hell" would be along those (Taller8's) lines for me.
Message: Posted by: prospero (Apr 8, 2006 01:33AM)
Eruption, Van Halen

White Room, Eric Clapton

La Grange, Billy Gibbons

And pretty much anything by Tal Farlow.
Message: Posted by: Cody Fisher (Apr 8, 2006 09:27AM)
Freebird.

Any Yngwie Malmsteen fans here? He is absolutely incredible.
Message: Posted by: Poliphilo (Apr 8, 2006 09:50AM)
Wow this is like asking whats the best food or drink, its all down to personal taste.

As I have an extremely eclectic taste in music, and an equally large collection of CD's this is extremely difficult for me to provide an answer.

Django Reinhardt plays some aweseom Jazz guitar, a mean feat considering he has a disabled fretting hand. Stevie Ray Vaughan plays some mean blues for a white man, I love all his work. Jimi Hendrix was extemely powerful for his time, and people like Malmsteen and Vai are fast, fluid but rarely get my heart pumping. But for me the icing on the cake has to be the legendary Pink Floyd. Watch them live and you will experience possibly the best band of all time.

Comfortably numb has a heart twisting solo that any dedicated guitarist wants to learn but should refuse to unless they can perfect it.
Message: Posted by: irossall (Apr 8, 2006 04:26PM)
Some of the finest noodleing you'll ever hear comes out of Frank Zappa.
With that said, I agree with most of the poster's choices above.

There are many great guitarists that have never made the "Big Time" just as there are plenty of mediocre players who have made it. Talent and Fame don't always go hand in hand.
Iven :patty:
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Apr 8, 2006 04:41PM)
I like Yngwie. And Jeff Scott Soto and Joe Lynn Turner, who did some phenomenal vocals for him.
Message: Posted by: DomKabala (Apr 8, 2006 10:00PM)
Here's some more from memory lane (if you're old enough to remember)....
Alvin Lee from 10Yrs After>>>I'm Going Home on the Woodstock Album Vol I.
Jeff Beck>>> Beck's Bolero.
Robin Trower>>>Whisky Train, Shine On Brightly (Procul Harum) & the entire "Bridge Of Sighs" album.
Randy California>>>Mechanical World, Fresh Garbage and Uncle Jack (Spirit's 1st Album). Natures Way on their "12 Dreams of Dr. Sardonicus" album.
Duane Allman & Dicky Betts>>>In Memory of Elizabeth Reed, Whipping Post, Statesboro Blues and Dreams on their 1st album.
Rory Gallagher of Taste>>> Blister on The Moon, The Devil Made Me Do It.
Mike Pinera>>>Ride Captain Ride.
Mark Farner GFR>>>Closer to Home....
To name afew...
:rockandroll: :righton:
:hypnodisk: KRaZy4kardz: :hypnodisk:
Message: Posted by: TheAmbitiousCard (Apr 10, 2006 01:30PM)
Samba Pa Ti - by Santana is one of my favorites
Message: Posted by: prospero (Apr 10, 2006 07:25PM)
[quote]
Steve Vai's solo ("played" by Ralph Macchio) from the movie Crossroads is inspiring.
[/quote]

Ralph Macchio's solo is Ry Cooder. Steve Vai is the other guy.
Message: Posted by: Scruffy the Clown (Apr 12, 2006 05:16AM)
Django... Truly of of the greats.
Anything by Chet Atkins
Cream: White Room
Free: Anthing Paul Kossof played
Anything Mike Bloomfield Played
This is a hard one! I have favorite solos by about every guitarist. I guess Twenty-seven years as a musician can make this a hard topic to nail down!!
Message: Posted by: vash (Apr 12, 2006 11:34PM)
Iron man, black sabbath
where are you, my lady peace
Message: Posted by: onebark (May 22, 2006 02:03PM)
[quote]
On 2006-03-02 07:48, Jonathan Townsend wrote:
Any Neil Young fans here?
[/quote]

I credit Neil Young with the greatest "one-note" guitar solo of all time in [i]Cinnamon Girl[/i]
Message: Posted by: Hayre (Aug 26, 2006 01:08PM)
Derek and the Dominos' 'Layla' gets the nod because two of the all-time heavyweights both played MEMORABLE lead licks on the same song. Clapton played the signature lick while the the 'Layla' vocals were sung, and Duane Allman finished it off with one of the greatest slide passages ever....all on the same 7 minutes of recorded bliss. Funny thing - it is rumored that Clapton could never play the lead riffs and sing this song at the same time.

But, like it or hate it, Eddie's 'Eruption' changed everything.
Message: Posted by: kregg (Aug 26, 2006 02:04PM)
Hotel California is excellent! I understand that it was arranged by the sound engineer after a week, or so, of multiple takes performed by Felder and Walsh.

Comfortably Numb is superb; Gilmour's melodic style is hard to beat. Likewise, Shine on Crazy Diamond is on of my favorites to perform- the song runs just over eleven minutes- it's all about technique and finesse.

Just about everything Hendrix played had a touch of magic and experimentation to it. But, the intros to Hey Baby, Castles Made of Sand, and Little Wing are all killer.

Angus' (AC/DC) heavy blues solo on Night Prowler is amazing.

I could go on all day, for my list is long. What's really hard to believe is how much musical talent was unleashed from musicians during the 40's to our current time. Wow!
Message: Posted by: Mike T (Aug 26, 2006 02:55PM)
Don't think anybody's mentioned Frank Zappa, Johnny A or Jeff Healey yet
Any fans¿
Message: Posted by: drhackenbush (Aug 26, 2006 04:07PM)
The late Michael Hedges. Before he walked out on stage, I heard the lead guitar, the bass and the rhythm guitar and waited for the three of them to hit the stage. Then out came Michael by himself. "Because It's There" on his harp guitar is a show-stopper.

Also got to see Vernon Reid when Living Colour played at University of Maryland in the mid 80's, pretty much standing right below him - his hands were a blur and I almost felt like I was getting to see an inkling of what people saw when they watched Hendrix. Reid used to speak of the "WTF Factor" and that is exactly what I said when he started playing. It was unreal.

What was really neat is that these fellows weren't playing fast for the sake of playing fast, they were actually paintng with sound and everything they played came out crisp and clear and it was like the solos contained exactly what they should and never got extraneous.
Message: Posted by: Noel D (Aug 28, 2006 08:19PM)
Behold what may be the only decent band churned out during the MTV era.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_BuaMHjQgSw

The video is...

... Well, just don't watch it and you won't have to worry about it. The solo at the end is breathtaking though, and I have not heard one to match it yet.
Message: Posted by: Patrick Differ (Aug 28, 2006 09:37PM)
Whoops.
I forgot Rush.
Darn near everything Alex Lifeson put his hands on caught fire.
Out of them all, I'll go with [i]La Villa Strangiato[/i].
Message: Posted by: Carrie Sue (Aug 31, 2006 08:18AM)
Hello,

I can't believe nobody has mentioned Doyle Dykes yet!

The two best guitar solos around are:

1. Wabash Cannonball
2. (tie) U2 Medley
3. White Rose for Heidi

If you don't have them, get them!

Carrie
Message: Posted by: Marvello (Aug 31, 2006 08:21AM)
[quote]
On 2006-08-26 15:55, Mike T wrote:
Don't think anybody's mentioned Frank Zappa, Johnny A or Jeff Healey yet
Any fans¿
[/quote]
I vote for Frank Zappa - "Muffin Man" live on "Bongo Fury" - his solo at the end BLISTERS. I don't know if it is the best solo ever, but it has always been one of my favorites.
Message: Posted by: ptigue (Mar 6, 2008 01:20PM)
I gotta back Marvello on this one. At one point he's flying so fast it sounds like his fingers get tied. Classic tune.


"....Goodnight Austin, Texas wherever you are!"
Message: Posted by: Johnnie Blaze (Mar 6, 2008 03:38PM)
Lita Ford looks the best doing any solo
malmsteen rocks
stevie ray rocked
Jeff Healey RIP brilliant
Randy Bachman he could make that guitar talk
Satriani
just to name a few
John
also a not so very well known David Blaze Pine brilliant guitarist prior to his accident played with crosby stills nash and young, RIP Pine
Message: Posted by: Tom Fenton (Mar 6, 2008 03:48PM)
"Crossroads" by Cream
"Samba Pa Ti" by Santana
"Laundromat" by Rory Gallagher
"Someday after a while" by Eric Clapton
Message: Posted by: Magnus Eisengrim (Mar 6, 2008 04:18PM)
While van Halen's "Eruption" is technically brilliant, the piece itself is a bit lacking in musical interest (at least for me).

Both solos on "Comfortably Numb" are as nearly perfect as anything I can imagine. The first is desperate, and the second is frightened and angry. Beautiful playing by David Gilmour.

"I Could Have Lied" by the Red Hot Chili Peppers also contains two fabulous solos. Rhythmically challenging, and thematically very strong.

John

Day 6
Message: Posted by: Al Angello (Mar 6, 2008 04:28PM)
Duane Allman live at the Philmore, or any of the early Allman Brother albums he was the best guitar player that ever lived. There is a bridge in my home town that says on it in spray paint Duane Allman lives, and there is nothing else left to say.
Message: Posted by: Rimbaud (Mar 6, 2008 04:44PM)
[quote]
On 2008-03-06 17:28, Al Angello wrote:
Duane Allman live at the Philmore, or any of the early Allman Brother albums he was the best guitar player that ever lived. There is a bridge in my home town that says on it in spray paint Duane Allman lives, and there is nothing else left to say.
[/quote]

It's funny, I was just about to post my two favs. They are both Duane's and both from that album.

First, in Mountain Jam, at about the 30 minute mark, he launches into this incredible, sweet, sad solo--an almost heartbreaking riff on "Will The Circle Be Unbroken", that is just the most lovely thing I've ever heard. Then, they finish up this amazing 33 minute instrumental, he introduces the band, and then he walks off stage...for the last time ever...

The second is from Stormy Monday. He does this wonderful, long solo that has all these subtle microtonal bends in it. I spent my '30s in a totally fruitless attempt to learn to play guitar. (I was awful. I mean AWFUL.) I spent months trying to learn that solo, playing it off of tab and never could get it right. Never could come close. After I gave it up, I was having dinner with my then-girlfriend and some friends. That solo came on and I remarked that I had spent months trying to learn it, but never could, my girlfriend looked over at me with wide eyes and said "THAT was what you were trying to play?! You sucked!"

Dan
Day 6
Message: Posted by: Big Jeff (Mar 6, 2008 04:54PM)
You're ALL WRONG!!!!!

Ted Nugent---Great White Buffalo
Message: Posted by: Yola Sol (Mar 6, 2008 05:08PM)
Probably something by Chris Rea, although nearly everything mentioned before deserves at least a second place.
Message: Posted by: Rimbaud (Mar 6, 2008 06:26PM)
[quote]
On 2008-03-06 17:54, Big Jeff wrote:
You're ALL WRONG!!!!!

Ted Nugent---Great White Buffalo
[/quote]

It's funny, I saw Nugent open for Skynyrd a few years back (early 90's). Before he got more famous for his politics. He hadn't been in Saint Louis for ages. He comes out, and plays Stranglehold at about 180db and pretty much destroys the crowd.

Then, he stepped to the microphone and said his first words to the audience: "Admit it...you MISSED ME!"

It was a nice little rock and roll moment...

Dan
Day 6
Message: Posted by: Barry Gitelson (Mar 6, 2008 07:05PM)
I was just watching the Crossroads DVD from the 2007 concert and there is so much incredible guitar playing on there ...Eric Clapton,Stevie Winwood, Jeff Beck. B.B. King, Robert Cray..... and lots more.
Message: Posted by: ClintonMagus (Mar 6, 2008 08:07PM)
Rhapsody of Fire's "Thunder's Mighty Roar".
Message: Posted by: cardone (Mar 7, 2008 10:47AM)
Rhapsody has many great solos......

what about Carl Logan from MANOWAR ....listen to "King of Kings " on their new album "Gods of War".....
Message: Posted by: hou_dini (Mar 7, 2008 06:00PM)
It's interesting that some name musicians and some name songs. But I'd like to go with players and differentiate between electric and acoustic. Electric (in no particular order)-Hendrix, Clapton, Rory Gallagher, Sonny Landreth, Alvin Lee, Albert King, Lowell George, Martin Barre to name a few. Acoustic (again no specific order)-Ian Anderson, Cat Stevens, Leo Kottke, Keb'Mo, John Prine to name a few. There are myriad others but these pop readily to mind.
Message: Posted by: magicgeorge (Mar 7, 2008 07:45PM)
Ha, this is such a boys topic! Most of my favourites have been mentioned.

I'm putting another vote in for "Shine on you Crazy Diamond". It's just so beautiful.

Zappa was a good call by Marvello.

George
Message: Posted by: Pit Boss (Mar 7, 2008 08:38PM)
As an avid Nuge fan, let me respectfully add "Stranglehold" to the list.

It's a shame that over time his politics have overshadowed his musicianship and turned some against him. During the mid to late 70's no one was more captivating on stage than Nugent.

And 35 years later he can still bring it.
Message: Posted by: trickytrav (Mar 8, 2008 12:50PM)
All along the watchtower by Hendrix
Message: Posted by: Tom Fenton (Mar 8, 2008 01:42PM)
I forgot to mention "Country Boy" by Albert Lee.
Message: Posted by: Al Angello (Mar 10, 2008 07:48AM)
Does Steve Winwood play the guitar? If you are old enough you might remember "the wood choppers ball" by Alvin Lee and ten years after, or Steve Mariott with Humble pie doing 30 days in the whole, and I did mourn the death of Lowell George, but all in all Duane Allman was the best who ever lived. IMHO
Message: Posted by: Tony Chris (Jul 17, 2008 07:38PM)
O.K. Here is one of my picks.

The guitar solo from Comfortably Numb by Pink Floyd. You have to experience this song live as it is etheral and mesmorizing. One of the best solo's I ever heard and learned how to play.

Still one of the best concerts I have ever seen live.
Message: Posted by: Dr. Delusion (Jul 18, 2008 12:23AM)
For my taste I'll go with just about any song Jeff Beck played on, The Stray Cats, Rock This Town, with Brian Setzer, and maybe something Chet Atkins played on.
Bob.
Message: Posted by: Mike Baxter (Jul 20, 2008 03:14PM)
[quote]
On 2008-07-18 01:23, Dr. Delusion wrote:
and maybe something Chet Atkins played on.
[/quote]
Did Chet do many tunes ;) ;)

In addition to the aforementioned Albert Lee, don't forget Jerry Reed (who unfortunately is VERY sick now).

And Ralph Mooney is king of the pedal steel guitar.
Message: Posted by: Dr. Delusion (Jul 20, 2008 08:33PM)
Hi Mike, I'm sure your kidding about if Chet played many tunes. Besides putting out dozens of his own albums, I think in his day, he played with just about everyone who was anyone in country music. That's the first I heard about Jerry Reed being Ill. You right, he's a heck of a guitar player. As a couple of wild card great guitar players for country music I think I might toss in Roy Clark and Glen Campbell.
Bob.
Message: Posted by: Mike Baxter (Jul 21, 2008 09:44PM)
Yes, Dr. D. I have virtually all Chet's music. I first saw Chet introducing a young Jerry Reed in Saratoga Springs, NY back in 1969 when Chet was touring with Floyd Cramer and Boots Randolph. And since then I've been trying to (not too successfully) pick guitar like Reed.

http://video.aol.com/video-detail/amvets-honors-country-legend-jerry-reed/4014081509 shows Jerry Reed at home receiving the silver helmet award from a veteran's organization. Be prepared it's very emotional.
Message: Posted by: Dr. Delusion (Jul 23, 2008 09:40AM)
Hi Mike. Wow !, Just watched the video, your right, very touching. Looked like he was having a real tough time breathing, I hope he can finish the album. That must of been a heck of a show back in 69. Chet's always been amazing, and it would be pretty hard to find a better Sax player than Boots. My son and I are huge Paul Revere and the Raiders fans. Paul just turned 70, and he's still out touring. He also does a ton of stuff for the veterans. They have several CD's, and DVD's they sell after thier shows and they donate every penny to various veteran's groups. They have a great web site, check it out sometime.
Thanks much, Bob.
Message: Posted by: Tony Iacoviello (Jul 23, 2008 09:58AM)
Almost anything off of Cool as a Cumcuber by Earl Klugh.
Message: Posted by: pepka (Jul 24, 2008 05:26AM)
One word, Buckethead! If you don't know who this guy is look on youtube. Nevermind the goofy mask and bucket he wears, he's a prodigy.

I'm shocked no one has mentioned November Rain.
Message: Posted by: irossall (Jul 26, 2008 09:45AM)
[quote]
On 2008-03-08 13:50, trickytrav wrote:
All along the watchtower by Hendrix
[/quote]

Bob Dylan gave the highest praise to Jimi Hendrix when he made the statement that he prefered the Hendrix version over his own.
Iven :patty:
Message: Posted by: Jordini (Jul 26, 2008 02:17PM)
Everything John Petrucci!!!
Message: Posted by: Tom Bartlett (Jul 26, 2008 06:06PM)
If you are going to list guitar players, one of the very best is GLEN CAMPBELL.
Message: Posted by: T. Sebastian (Jul 26, 2008 11:31PM)
Frank Zappa-
Muffin Man-
You Can't Do That On Stage Anymore Vol.6 Disc 1-

Blows me away every time.
The hair on my arm stands up.

Long Live Zappa. ... What?! He's DEAD?!

NNNNOOOOOOOOO!!?!?!!?!!?!?!!
Message: Posted by: Lambertmoon (Jul 27, 2008 10:32AM)
[quote]
On 2008-07-27 00:31, T. Sebastian wrote:
Frank Zappa-
Muffin Man-
You Can't Do That On Stage Anymore Vol.6 Disc 1-

Blows me away every time.
The hair on my arm stands up.

Long Live Zappa. ... What?! He's DEAD?!

NNNNOOOOOOOOO!!?!?!!?!!?!?!!
[/quote]

I saw Zappa in the early 80's on Halloween at the Palladium in NYC. Incredible show!!
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Jul 27, 2008 11:53AM)
[quote]
On 2008-07-27 00:31, T. Sebastian wrote:
Frank Zappa-
Muffin Man-
You Can't Do That On Stage Anymore Vol.6 Disc 1-

Blows me away every time.
The hair on my arm stands up.

Long Live Zappa. ... What?! He's DEAD?!

NNNNOOOOOOOOO!!?!?!!?!!?!?!!
[/quote]

Did you catch Dweezil's "Zappa Plays Zappa" tour?
Message: Posted by: T. Sebastian (Jul 27, 2008 03:56PM)
Didn't catch it.
Wish I could've.

Zappa is my hero.
I wish he was still around so we could get his take on current events.
I would be very interested to hear what he would say about our leadership.

And what a guitarist!
WOW!

Baby Snakes.
Message: Posted by: Mike Baxter (Sep 1, 2008 10:01PM)
[quote]
On 2008-07-20 16:14, Mike Baxter wrote:
don't forget Jerry Reed (who is VERY sick now).[/quote]

Unfortunately Jerry passed away yesterday.

- as per friend and fellow musician Paul Yandell on the Chet Atkins forum.
http://www.misterguitar.us/cgi-bin/chetboard.pl?read=80456
Message: Posted by: Elliott Hodges (Jan 2, 2009 05:47AM)
No-none has mentioned Dire Straits and M Knopfler?

He provided me with the best two hours of my life back in May last year.

Sultans of Swing does it for me.
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Jan 2, 2009 06:44AM)
I could write a 20 page essay on the following clip:

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=ATub40Npxik

Somehow it reminds me of some of those magic exposure tutorials.


:jump:
Message: Posted by: whoton (Mar 5, 2009 06:17AM)
Anything by RHCP's John Frusciante.
Message: Posted by: critter (Mar 5, 2009 10:21AM)
Cemetary Gates by Pantera. Solo by Dimebag Darrel. No other solo can touch it.
Message: Posted by: critter (Mar 5, 2009 10:22AM)
Steve Vai was Macchio's intructor for the film, according to the book; "Heavy Metal Guitar."

[quote]
On 2006-04-10 20:25, prospero wrote:
[quote]
Steve Vai's solo ("played" by Ralph Macchio) from the movie Crossroads is inspiring.
[/quote]

Ralph Macchio's solo is Ry Cooder. Steve Vai is the other guy.
[/quote]
Message: Posted by: TCsteinberg (Mar 5, 2009 11:14AM)
Anything and EVERYTHING from THE MASTER.....
Ritchie Blackmore!

My 3 favorites;
Highway Star (Live Version, Made in Japan)
Child in Time (Studio version, In Rock)
Gates of Babylon (Long Live Rock & Roll)

many of the guitarists already mentioned (most notably Yngwie Malmsteen) are total Ritchie influenced, and credit him as the "Guitar G-d"
Message: Posted by: mamutrance (Mar 19, 2009 11:43AM)
You have to put Slash up there, so many well thought out memorable rock solos.....

I have to strongly agree on the Zappa front, one of the most underated guitarists ever, listning to him and studying and transcribing his music almost ruined me socially!! Just try playing the Black Page #2....

If he were still alive, what would he make of things like the internet, and Obama? :)
Message: Posted by: Review King (Mar 19, 2009 03:53PM)
Not sure if anyone will remember this, but in the 70's Roy Clark gusted on the show "The Odd Couple".

There's a final scene ( which gets cut out in re-runs ) of him sitting and doing a piece ( a Malagueña ). It's the best solo I've ever seen/heard.

Here's it is:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aWj5UqOTUzg
Message: Posted by: Fresh (Mar 19, 2009 09:58PM)
Pink Floyd - Time (better than Comfortably Numb?)
Pink Floyd - Comfortably Numb
Pink Floyd - Sorrow
Pink Floyd - Shine On You Crazy Diamond
Pink Floyd - Have a Cigar
Black Sabbath - A Bit of Finger / Sleeping Village / Warning (The 14 minute jam session from their first album. About half of it is amazing guitar).
Black Sabbath - Dirty Women


Shredding:
Megadeth - Hangar 18
Slayer - Captor of Sin
Kreator - People of the Lie
Malmsteen - Black Star
Malmsteen - You Don't Remember, I'll Never Forget (The song itself is incredibly cheesy, but the solo is pretty emotional).
Mercyful Fate - Evil

That covers my tastes well.
Message: Posted by: Magnus Eisengrim (Mar 20, 2009 10:30AM)
Jazz--How about Wes Montgomery on "Four on Six"?

John
Message: Posted by: mamutrance (Mar 20, 2009 11:29AM)
It's quite a subjective topic, because genre and style is a big part of it. Generally people associate a best guitar solos discussion with rock music, but there's so much more out there!

Wes was one of the best players EVER, such a unique style for ther day, thumbing plenty of notes, and his use of octaves on solos was revolutionary, Four on Six is a great example of this. Id also put Charlie Christian, Bireli Lagrene, Django, and a host of others up there tho, and that's just in the jazz genre.

I just have trouble picking one great solo above the others from any of them.

Oh and loveed that Roy Clarke Clip BTW!
Message: Posted by: magicfish (Jul 18, 2015 11:21PM)
Texas Flood. Stevie Ray
Message: Posted by: magicfish (Jul 18, 2015 11:46PM)
The Thrill is Gone. BB King
Message: Posted by: funsway (Jul 19, 2015 04:32AM)
I could offer an opinion -- for each type of guitar and musical genre, but the "of all time" throws me.

The responses all seem to be "of those recorded" which includes only a couple of decades, and of those who wished to be recorded.

I'd like to hear the guitar solo Blind Willie McTell performed to persuade the Governor to commute his murder conviction. Had to be "the best."
Message: Posted by: arthur stead (Jul 19, 2015 01:24PM)
There is a big difference between a live concert guitar solo (where all your mistakes are recorded), and soloing on a studio album (where you can do multiple takes and edit the best bits together). So my vote would be for Jorma Kaukonen's guitar solo with Jefferson Airplane on "The Other Side Of This Life" from their their live 1969 album, "Bless Its Pointed Little Head."

It's not the most technically gifted playing, but the spontaneous communication between Kaukonen, with Jack Cassidy on bass, Paul Kantner on rhythm guitar, and drummer Spencer Dryden is incredible. It just feels like the whole band is on the same wavelength. Which leads me to believe it must have been one of those moments when the right combination of drugs all kicked in at the same time.

I'll try to post a video here ... but if I don't succeed, here's a link:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ltyjNjsz8UU

(youtube)ltyjNjsz8UU(/youtube)

[youtube]ltyjNjsz8UU[/youtube]
Message: Posted by: Magnus Eisengrim (Jul 19, 2015 04:29PM)
Whoever played the solo on the Stones' Sympathy for the Devil created a thing of terrible beauty. It still gives me chills.

FWIW, I don't think any guitarist has truly made his guitar gently weep. Most make it scream or cry, but gentle weeping is a deep challenge. Those who make it wail miss the point of the song.

Clapton came close.


But perhaps the song works best with no solo playing.

[youtube]kpsL58Yto4I[/youtube]
Message: Posted by: arthur stead (Jul 19, 2015 06:06PM)
Here's Frampton's version, from a PBS Soundstage show in 2007. The song starts at about 1 hr. 40 minutes. And yes, that's me on keyboards (plus guitar & vocals on other tracks).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KYaopKDAunc

[youtube]KYaopKDAunc[/youtube]
Message: Posted by: RogerTheShrubber (Jul 20, 2015 02:20AM)
Gary Moore, "End of the World." Specifically, the solo that starts the song. Absolutely jaw-dropping.
Message: Posted by: Slim King (Jul 21, 2015 12:59AM)
I think that Eddie Van Halen's ERUPTION changed the face of (pop) rock!!!!!!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z_lwocmL9dQ
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Jul 21, 2015 09:10AM)
Again and again people say that no one ever changes their minds or learns anything in this forum.

Not true.

Arthur has taught me more about music than I can possibly repay.

Thanks, Arthur!

On another note: I am so cryptic in my posts sometimes that I can't even remember myself what I was thinking when posting. The link I gave above was too cryptic. Sorry.

On yet another note: start watching around the four minute mark:


[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=InG6RAZ0KWs[/youtube]


On yet a third note: Arthur, why does Peter switch to the LP Custom for the version of Gently Weeps? Could you tell us a bit about his taste for which-guitar-which-song? And what about yourself? Which-guitar-which-keyboard-which-song?
Message: Posted by: Magnus Eisengrim (Jul 21, 2015 09:52AM)
[quote]On Jul 21, 2015, stoneunhinged wrote:
Again and again people say that no one ever changes their minds or learns anything in this forum.

Not true.

Arthur has taught me more about music than I can possibly repay.

Thanks, Arthur!

On another note: I am so cryptic in my posts sometimes that I can't even remember myself what I was thinking when posting. The link I gave above was too cryptic. Sorry.

On yet another note: start watching around the four minute mark:


[youtube]InG6RAZ0KWs[/youtube]

[/quote]

this should play now.
Message: Posted by: Magnus Eisengrim (Jul 21, 2015 10:03AM)
[quote]On Jul 19, 2015, arthur stead wrote:
Here's Frampton's version, from a PBS Soundstage show in 2007. The song starts at about 1 hr. 40 minutes. And yes, that's me on keyboards (plus guitar & vocals on other tracks).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KYaopKDAunc

[youtube]KYaopKDAunc[/youtube] [/quote]

I liked that. It's a nice take on the song. Still not gently weeping, but neither is it screaming its woes into the night sky.
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Jul 21, 2015 10:52AM)
I'm too stupid to post videos, but I'll try again.

Here's Phil, well-dressed ( :) ) and playing naughty music:

[youtube]oJgdNCYt_tA[/youtube]
Message: Posted by: Daryl -the other brother (Jul 21, 2015 11:02AM)
Peter's version is nice but I miss the slide guitar. I think slide lends itself better to the feel of the song and without it, it's just another lead.
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Jul 21, 2015 11:06AM)
Oh, and I have a Phil Keaggy story, which would serve as a counterpart to Arthur's lifestyle around the same era.

My best friend John and I were HUGE Keaggy fans, and he was playing somewhere in the Virginia Beach area, so we bought tickets for him and me and my girlfriend. To get permission I had to make an appointment with the Dean of Men at Liberty University (where I was studying at the time) to convince him that seeing Phil would be a spiritually uplifting and edifying experience which would justify leaving the campus with a girl in the car (!) and returning after curfew (!!).

Strangely enough, he gave me permission.

So we drove to the area (Suffolk, I think) and went to some high school auditorium, ran to get front-row seats (but only got third row), and watched Phil live.

There was a bit of a quiet moment, so my friend John yelled, "Hey, Phil, where's your middle finger?".

To this day, I sometimes yell, for no reason at all, "Hey, Phil, where's your middle finger?"

We got back to campus around 2:00 AM: John, my girlfriend and me. The security guards were very skeptical of our early morning threesome, but I showed the signed piece of paper from the dean and they let us in.

So for me the music was naughty and the lifestyle was not. For Arthur, the music wasn't very naughty, but the lifestyle...?
Message: Posted by: arthur stead (Jul 21, 2015 01:17PM)
[quote]On Jul 21, 2015, stoneunhinged wrote:
Again and again people say that no one ever changes their minds or learns anything in this forum.

Not true.

Arthur has taught me more about music than I can possibly repay.

Thanks, Arthur!

[/quote]

Thanks for the compliment, Stoneunhinged.
Message: Posted by: arthur stead (Jul 21, 2015 01:24PM)
I don't know how to do a double quote, so I'll just type this out:

Regarding Frampton's solo on While My Guitar Gently Weeps, Magnus commented: "Still not gently weeping, but neither is it screaming its woes into the night sky."

And Daryl said: "Peter's version is nice but I miss the slide guitar. I think slide lends itself better to the feel of the song and without it, it's just another lead."

I agree, Magnus and Daryl. There's nothing like a slide guitar to suggest that "weepy" feeling! To be fair, Peter's solos were different every time we played, and due to an argument we had just prior to the show, I don't think any of us played particularly well that night.
Message: Posted by: arthur stead (Jul 21, 2015 01:42PM)
[quote]On Jul 21, 2015, stoneunhinged wrote:

So for me the music was naughty and the lifestyle was not. For Arthur, the music wasn't very naughty, but the lifestyle...? [/quote]

Haha, Stoneunhinged! Let's just say the lifestyle was surrealistic. Excess pushed beyond any limits. In truth, most of our shenanigans -- if done today -- would land us in prison. But back then we were encouraged to behave outrageously, and some of us took that to the extreme.
Message: Posted by: arthur stead (Jul 21, 2015 01:43PM)
[quote]On Jul 21, 2015, stoneunhinged wrote:
Arthur, why does Peter switch to the LP Custom for the version of Gently Weeps? Could you tell us a bit about his taste for which-guitar-which-song? And what about yourself? Which-guitar-which-keyboard-which-song? [/quote]

Wow, now you've opened up a can of worms! I hope replying to your questions won't seem too indulgent to other NVMS contributors. But here goes ...

For myself, I much preferred "the old days" in the 1980's when I had 5 keyboards onstage: Yamaha CP-80 Baby Grand Piano, Fender Rhodes electric piano, Hammond B-3 organ, Moog Prophet 5 and a Hohner Clavinet. For my more recent tours with Peter I used only one keyboard! A Korg Trinity Pro 88-Keys Workstation, for which I programmed specific settings for each song. To enhance those sounds, the keyboard was midi'd to a stack of rack-mount Roland, Yamaha and Korg sound modules. So by splitting the keyboard I could have piano on the lower range and organ on the higher range. Or by layering the keyboard and using a volume pedal, I could introduce strings beneath the acoustic or electric piano sound (e.g. Lines On My Face, Can't Take That Away, and Nassau, which is the brief instrumental introduction to Baby I Love Your Way).

When playing guitar, I always preferred my own Fender Telecaster (since 1981 an identical replacement for the original one that was lost in a plane crash). But for certain songs I also used some of Peter's Les Pauls (which I loved to play ... check out Black Hole Sun and I Don't Need No Doctor on the PBS Soundstage video), or his Martin 6-string acoustic and Ovation 12-string (the latter used in open tuning for Show Me The Way). However, during the 2005 - 2007 tour he liked me to use his white Telecaster for that song.

In all honesty, I really preferred it when we were a four-piece. I doubled on guitar more often, and it allowed for more musical spontaneity and communication between the musicians. But prior to the PBS special, we had just recorded the instrumental "Fingerprints" CD, which featured some other celebrity guitarists. So Peter wanted to add another guitarist, so we could perform some of the songs off that CD. I have nothing against the extra guitarist ... I just didn't like being shunted off to the side and playing less of a role in the band.

As regards Peter's taste in guitars, I never asked him why he preferred certain ones for certain songs. All I know is that his ever-evolving amplification and effects set-up took years to develop, and is an investment worth several million dollars. Every setting (i.e. delays, choruses, distortion, echoes, rotary, voice box, etc.) is pre-programmed and triggered from the multiple foot-button panel on the floor near his mike stand.
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Jul 21, 2015 03:14PM)
Wow. I mean, wow.

Thank you.

Your post is gold in my heart.
Message: Posted by: arthur stead (Jul 22, 2015 01:01AM)
Here's a great guitar solo by Deep Purple's Ritchie Blackmore on the song Child in Time (starts at about 3:30).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PfAWReBmxEs

[youtube]PfAWReBmxEs[/youtube]
Message: Posted by: Gregor Von G. (Jul 22, 2015 01:57AM)
John Lennon's madman solo on "Yer Blues" from the Beatles "White Album"
Message: Posted by: Gregor Von G. (Jul 22, 2015 02:04AM)
Marc Ribot's solo on Tow Waits "Jockey Full Of Bourbon" from the album "Raindogs",
The song is also in the first sequence of the fantastic Jim Jarmusch's movie "Down by Law"

I love the Ribot's style, a crooked mix of latin, surf, gipsy and jazz
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Jul 22, 2015 03:53AM)
[quote]On Jul 22, 2015, Gregor Von G. wrote:

I love the Ribot's style, a crooked mix of latin, surf, gipsy and jazz [/quote]

I, too, love Ribot.
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Jul 22, 2015 06:45AM)
Here's one for Arthur.

First, the context: this is from a faculty talent show at Grove City College around 1991 or 1992. Me, the vice president of the college, and another professor (of business, I think; he's the one singing). The drummer and the bass player are sons. We got together and practiced a couple of times, then performed at the talent show.

I was around 30 years old and had never performed music in front of an audience.

So, the auditorium was packed--standing room only--with, I dunno, maybe 1500 or so. Mostly students. And we play a song, and then we start a version of Pretty Woman. (It's around the 3:10 or 3:15 mark). The crowd was enthusiastic. Anyway, I start a solo around 4:20 or so, and when the crowd realized I was actually playing a solo they went NUTS, and all of the hair on my legs and arms stood up, and there was this weird surge of electricity, and I couldn't hardly even play anymore because of the size of the rush. And I thought, "Is this what rock stars feel everyday?" It was like being God for thirty seconds. Indescribable.

For me, rock stars are indeed Gods. Naughty Gods, but Gods nonetheless.

Anyway, I'm embarrassed to post this. It is definitely NOT one of the best solos of all time. But it made the hair on my arms and legs stand up. At least when I played it. :)

(I'm the skinny guy with the Strat)

[youtube]OXoPEQmGFGQ[/youtube]
Message: Posted by: arthur stead (Jul 22, 2015 11:37AM)
Very nice, Jeff! A lot better than most amateur bands I've heard out there!

Yes, that rush of adrenalin from playing live is intense. The incredible flow of energy to and from a live audience is visceral, and spurs your creativity and boosts your spirit to new heights. Plus, when you add the "naughty element" (for example pretty girls flashing their boobs), you are always inspired to kick it up another notch!
Message: Posted by: arthur stead (Jul 22, 2015 11:37AM)
Very nice, Jeff! A lot better than most amateur bands I've heard out there!

Yes, that rush of adrenalin from playing live is intense. The incredible flow of energy to and from a live audience is visceral, and spurs your creativity and boosts your spirit to new heights. Plus, when you add the "naughty element" (for example pretty girls flashing their boobs), you are always inspired to kick it up another notch!
Message: Posted by: Magnus Eisengrim (Jul 22, 2015 12:01PM)
Very fun Jeff. Thanks for posting that.

Getting back to an earlier thought. I'm not sure if I'm the only one who's interested, but here goes.

I think everyone (or almost everyone) agrees that David Gilmour's solos on Comfortably Numb are brilliant, and form an integral part of the song. What happens to comfortably numb when you remove the solos? Is it even possible?

What if Roger Waters' vocals are performed by Dar Williams and Ani DiFranco?

[youtube]SqQFWXWVBNA[/youtube]
Message: Posted by: Silvert0ne (Jul 22, 2015 01:11PM)
I love so much of the music posted already in this thread. I'd like to add a few more:

Frank Zappa - "What's New In Baltimore" from the 'Meets the Mothers of Prevention' album in 1984. The 3 minute long solo (after starting out all synth) is amazing. It's much more melodic than he usually played but it also has many of his signature techniques. It goes from blues to rock to gospel to who-knows-what beautifully.

Maggot Brain by P-Funk. So many great versions out there, probably one of the most covered solos since it's totally open to improvisation. (full disclosure: I have my own version, but it's not even in the top 1000).

Here's an obscure one from one of my favorite all-time guitar players - Mickey from Ween (aka Dean Ween). Skip to 2:30 if you just want the solo: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0yIFWtFa8os
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Jul 22, 2015 02:23PM)
I really enjoyed that, SilvertOne. Thanks.

Laurie (as ever) brought me down to earth for a moment.

I'm not gonna link to Scotty Moore. We should just bow our heads and pray.
Message: Posted by: arthur stead (Jul 22, 2015 03:18PM)
Check out the tasteful guitar playing by Larry Carlton on the track Layas by French composer Michel Colombier.

Larry plays a "visible" but supportive role underneath the melodic statement, then lays back for Michael Brecker's sax solo, before taking a solo of his own. His relaxed approach is really impressive, and I LOVE the way he lets one single note sustain and feed back for at least 4 bars before launching into his solo. Throughout, he never loses sight of the fundamental riff of the song, often "quoting" it in different ways and different ranges. I also really appreciate the way the solo begins slowly, gradually builds, gets crazy, and then tapers down at the conclusion.

By the way, that's Jaco Pastorius on bass, Steve Gadd on drums, and Herbie Hancock on Fender Rhodes.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pFzMYsLkuxI

[youtube]pFzMYsLkuxI[/youtube]
Message: Posted by: arthur stead (Jul 27, 2015 05:27PM)
[quote]On Jul 22, 2015, stoneunhinged wrote:
Here's one for Arthur.

First, the context: this is from a faculty talent show at Grove City College around 1991 or 1992. Me, the vice president of the college, and another professor (of business, I think; he's the one singing). The drummer and the bass player are sons. We got together and practiced a couple of times, then performed at the talent show.

I was around 30 years old and had never performed music in front of an audience.

So, the auditorium was packed--standing room only--with, I dunno, maybe 1500 or so. Mostly students. And we play a song, and then we start a version of Pretty Woman. (It's around the 3:10 or 3:15 mark). The crowd was enthusiastic. Anyway, I start a solo around 4:20 or so, and when the crowd realized I was actually playing a solo they went NUTS, and all of the hair on my legs and arms stood up, and there was this weird surge of electricity, and I couldn't hardly even play anymore because of the size of the rush. And I thought, "Is this what rock stars feel everyday?" It was like being God for thirty seconds. Indescribable.

For me, rock stars are indeed Gods. Naughty Gods, but Gods nonetheless.

Anyway, I'm embarrassed to post this. It is definitely NOT one of the best solos of all time. But it made the hair on my arms and legs stand up. At least when I played it. :)

(I'm the skinny guy with the Strat)

[youtube]OXoPEQmGFGQ[/youtube] [/quote]

Hey Jeff,

I forgot to mention I liked your choice of material!

Made me long to fulfill a dream of mine ... to one day put together a band which plays some old favorites from the 60's. Especially early songs by Brit bands like the Stones, Kinks, Hollies, Troggs, Yardbirds, Them, Pretty Things, Zombies, etc.

Alas, due to life's circumstances, that dream will never become a reality.
Message: Posted by: MGordonB (Jul 27, 2015 07:15PM)
So subjective, but here goes...
1 - Duane Allman, anything from Filmore East
2 - Lonnie Mack, Stop
3 - Carlos Santana, His version of Little Wing with Joe Cocker
4 - Bill Frisell, Shenandoah
5 - The Edge, pretty much anything from Unforgettable Fire
6 - Jeff Healy, The entire See the Light album
7 - Phil Manzanera (Roxy Music), Like a Hurricane ( Niel Young's original version is very good too )
8 - Buddy Guy, Luther Allison, Jimmy Dawkins ( pretty much any fine Chicago bluesman for that matter )