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Topic: Kevin James Instant Magician
Message: Posted by: Tom Trix (Nov 29, 2002 06:00PM)
Hi !
I have just got the Instant Magician, I think the effect is a great winner for the children shows. Are you guys using this in yours shows ? I will like to hear about your ideas and presentation.
Regards
Tom Trix
Message: Posted by: kenscott (Nov 29, 2002 07:11PM)
Yes, it has been in my show for 10 years. If you have watched Kevin's video then you saw me doing my effects with my coat. I too sell the coat, however it is a real tux coat that can fit a child or adult.

All my ideas are on his video. It really is my number one requested routine.

Good luck
Ken Scott
Message: Posted by: Dennis Michael (Nov 30, 2002 01:37AM)
I also got Kevin's and then saw Ken Scott's at the Kidabra Convention. Of the two, Ken's looks like a magician's outfit. Kevin's looks like cheap rayon cloth. If given a choice, get Ken Scott's.

I still haven't "perfected" a funny routine with it yet. Still working on that. Tried it at my son's birthday party and found out it requires practice to do it blind! (You really can't see what you're doing.) But I do like what Ken has to say about it.

It an opportunity to play with the junk magic that just sits in a drawer. It doesn't require deep thought on routine development. It is just funny playing with those little used tricks in an instant magician outfit.
Message: Posted by: p.b.jones (Nov 30, 2002 05:25AM)
Do you have a web site with your products Ken?
Phillip
Message: Posted by: Dennis Michael (Nov 30, 2002 10:13AM)
Ken Scott has a website:

[url=http://www.kenscottmagic.com/][b]http://www.kenscottmagic.com/[/b][/url] but it is for his business and I didn't see any products on it.

He should because he has some really great stuff for sale.

I got his lecture notes, "Ken Scott Presents Making the Birthday Dough" which was worth the price. I also go his video with the same name which shows his instant magician routine and complements his lecture notes.

He also does an un-gimmicked 20th Century Birthday routine which he also sells.

He has a couple of really good products which should be listed on a website somewhere.

I can't get his version of The Wandering CD routine out of my mind. It has a picture of the birthday child on it and it vanishes only to appear on the back of the birthday child. It can be revised easily to be included in corporate gigs or fire safety message (Smoke Detectors).

I sure hope he does get a product listing on his website.
Message: Posted by: kenscott (Nov 30, 2002 05:29PM)
THanks Dennis & Phillip:

I am working as we speak to get my products on my web page. I am really not a BIG dealer I am a worker first and dealer second.

But give me a couple of weeks and I should have something up. Thanks again Dennis, nice comments.

Dennis what is your email? I sent you a email the other day and don't know if you got it.

Best,
Ken
Message: Posted by: DanTheMagicMan (Nov 30, 2002 09:56PM)
I've seen the Instant Magician done to music. Anybody use it with patter instead of music?
Message: Posted by: Dennis Michael (Nov 30, 2002 11:27PM)
Ken,

Yes I got your email. Hope you do well with your products. Good Luck.

Maybe some day our paths will cross again.

Magically,
Den
Message: Posted by: The Great Smartini (Jun 14, 2004 12:03AM)
Dennis,

I'm not sure that I agree with your post on the Instant Magician that it doesn't require deep thought on routining...what makes you think so?
Message: Posted by: NJJ (Jun 14, 2004 01:25AM)
I think Dennis was implying that Instant Magician is doesn't require deep thought because almost ANYTHING you do is funny with this costume!

Some hints for people doing this routine.

1) If using music, create specific moves to the music or do an existing dance rather then just doing tricks with music in the background.

2) Break down the separation between the hands and body so it LOOKS like the hands below to the spec. E.g. take off hat, rub tummy, pick nose....(maybe not)

3) If using music that YOU control, put a ten second pause at the start so you have time to get into position.

4) Make sure you pick a child who is happy to do it. (nothing worse the an upset kid who doesn't smile but you can't see them!)
Message: Posted by: Frank Tougas (Jun 16, 2004 11:02AM)
I would have thought there might be problems with parents as it requires magician and child to be in close contact. These days people can get very suspicious of motives, even the best of them. It has always been a funny bit whether seen at blue and gold banquets or in the movies. Non costume versions of the bit are frequent on "whose Line is it Anyway".
Message: Posted by: kenscott (Jun 16, 2004 12:28PM)
Yes, I have seen it a lot on Whose Line Is It Anyway.

The routine, I think, does take some practice and some thought. Sure the magic is the easy junk magic but to make it look great with your hands in front can be really hard at times.

But it is a signature piece in my show that has gotten me lots of work.

Again, never had a problem with the parents saying I am too close. Most of the time I use an older child or an adult.

Ken
Message: Posted by: TheMagicApple (Jun 16, 2004 01:51PM)
I have never even seen the routine...I have heard of it though. Is there a site where I can see it performed. Or can someone break it down for me!?
Message: Posted by: kenscott (Jun 16, 2004 05:26PM)
Basically, you put a tux coat on someone from the audience and then put your arms through the coat and it looks like them. You do tricks like vanishing a hank, appearing cane, making a balloon sculpture and so on.

Ken
Message: Posted by: Jeff Alan (Jun 16, 2004 06:05PM)
Hey Ken!

I have seen Ken perform this at a magic theatre I use to run, it is a show-stopper! And Ken is right, my first question was how he did all the tricks without being able to look, including balloon twisting, etc.

It is so hard to do, in fact, that Ken says, don't bother, leave it to him!
Message: Posted by: TrickyRicky (Jun 16, 2004 09:08PM)
[quote]
On 2004-06-16 12:02, Frank Tougas wrote:
I would have thought there might be problems with parents as it requires magician and child to be in close contact. These days people can get very suspicious of motives, even the best of them. It has always been a funny bit whether seen at blue and gold banquets or in the movies. Non costume versions of the bit are frequent on "whose Line is it Anyway".
[/quote]
I quite agree with you. This is one trick I will stay away from, you're asking for trouble putting your hand around a child like that.

All you need is some idiot mother making false claims that you did something improper while your hand was around the her child.

Not worth the risk, there wre too many good tricks out there.

Richard (Tricky Ricky)
Message: Posted by: Emazdad (Jun 17, 2004 03:48AM)
We discussed this before last year after Blackpool, and Richard & Frank are right, in this compensation age, and with the added paranoia about peda-perverts it's not worth the risk.

Contact with the children should be limited to shaking hands or holding shy kids hands for a while, but all done with you keeping both hands and your body in view at all times. Even when a kid comes up to give me a hug after the show I always turn side on and ensure both my hands are in full view at all times, if there is no other adult around I don't even let them get that close.

With this trick you're in a position to be accused of rubbing yourself against the child's back during the trick. And even if you're innocent, mud sticks - end of magic career.

Just because it's not happened so far, doesn't mean it couldn't happen.
Message: Posted by: kenscott (Jun 17, 2004 06:08AM)
Again Emazdad you are letting this day and time get the best of you.

I see your point and I think we have discussed this before. I think one has to know his or her surroundings. I have been at this long enough that there is a bit of confidence built up.

After shows, a lot of times kids come up an wrap their arms around me for a hug. Am I to say sorry kids you cannot do that?

I will tell you I am NOT going to let paranoia about peda-perverts get the best of me. If you do that you are saying perverts you win and the KIDS lose.

This is a very touchy subject but again this mud will not stick.

ken
Message: Posted by: Emazdad (Jun 17, 2004 06:19AM)
I agree Ken it is hard to say "no" to the kids, however, better safe than sorry in my book and you only need one paronoid or money-hungry parent to end your career.

I think I'll stay as I am playing it safe. I'd hate to have to give this up and actually get a job. uuurrrgh
Message: Posted by: TheMagicApple (Jun 17, 2004 01:02PM)
OHHH! I have seen that! Very funny...and endless possibilities!
Message: Posted by: TrickyRicky (Jun 17, 2004 01:57PM)
Well, let me say this. I guarantee that in due time it will happen if you keep doing that trick.

I've been doing magic for children for over 45 years, times were different then. Today we have so many loony parents who are looking to get money even if it means using their own children to do so.

Some years ago in Toronto, a very famous children's entertainer was arrested and sued for sexually touching a child during one of his shows. After many years in court and not to mention the mount of money that it cost, charges were dropped.

His reputation was damaged and he was never the same.

In my opinion, the Instant Magician is not a good trick for children - sooner or later it will happen.

I do not allow children to put their arms around me for any reason even if the mother is present. You just never know who you're dealing with, I have to protect my reputation and what I do for a living.

Richard Lyn
Message: Posted by: kenscott (Jun 17, 2004 04:20PM)
Richard, I am sure everyone has their own way of thinking. My thinking is, without a doubt, different from yours. If the day comes when a kid wants to give me hug and I have to stop it then I will get out of the business. I have three kids of my own.

In the kid's eyes, we are stars to them.

I guess we should call up Mickey Mouse and tell him he cannot touch the kids??

Ken
Message: Posted by: Donald Dunphy (Jun 17, 2004 04:34PM)
I worked in childcare for 10+ years, as well as doing shows. We had to be careful how we hugged children. We were encouraged to hug around the shoulders, hug sideways, etc. Keep your hands open, on the shoulders (not lower), do not embrace too long, etc. We were never told not to return a hug, though. This was training for professionals specifically in the child care profession (after school programs and early childhood education).

Everything needs to be done in the presence of witnesses (other adults). As a performer, it is more appropriate to let the child initiate the hug, etc.

It is most likely that if you are a good and funny childrens' entertainer, the children will want to show you their affection by hugging you. Try to accept it graciously, but yet with intelligence as to what is appropriate.

- Donald.

P.S. I've had customers, not kids, who gave me a big hug, and a peck on the cheek. They also did the same to my wife. I've never been kissed by a child though, nor would do something like that back.
Message: Posted by: mslj (Jun 17, 2004 05:13PM)
Human beings, including children are naturally tactile. It is in our makeup to have human contact. After making emotional contact with a child during a show it is a extension of that contact for a child to offer a hug if they so choose. In my opinion the response needs to be appropriate and with the consent of the adults present.

I have seen more children who are damaged by the lack of human contact than by it.

As appropriate adults it is our responsibility to interact with children in a healthy positive manner and not create an environment where human contact is to be seen as something to be avoided.
Message: Posted by: Emazdad (Jun 17, 2004 05:46PM)
[quote]I guess we should call up Mickey Mouse and tell him he cannot touch the kids??[/quote]

While I was in Florida at Easter, Tigger (I think it was him - it was one of the pooh characters), got arrested for child abuse! It was on the news etc. Apparently the kid's mum thought what he did was a bit inappropriate.

Maybe he was a pervert maybe he wasn't I don't know. But he won't be working in Disney or with kids again, his name was splashed all over the news..

The number one priority is protecting yourself. If a child is initiating a hug or something, you have to ensure that any reaction on your part cannot in anyway be misunderstood or twisted.

If the parents are with them you let the kid carry on, but you keep your hands in full view, turning slightly sideways is another safeguard. If the kid wants to kiss you, as long as the parents or someone is there watching you can let them peck you on the cheek. But you must never kiss them.

[quote]I will tell you I am NOT going to let paranoia about peda-perverts get the best of me. If you do that you are saying perverts you win and the KIDS lose.[/quote]

I understand what you're saying, but I don't see it as giving in. it's cause and effect. Because of these perverts anyone dealing with kids has to be whiter than white. It's for your own protection. My contract says there has to be another adult in the room at all times, this isn't to protect the kids, they're safe with me, it's to protect me.

When you're sat at home looking through the job vacancies in the paper - it's no good moaning, "I can't understand it, I've done it for years, hundreds of times and never had a problem before". Innocent until proven guilty does not apply to things like this.
Message: Posted by: kenscott (Jun 17, 2004 08:22PM)
Finaly MJlF , I am not alone.

Ken
Message: Posted by: Christopher (Jun 18, 2004 09:03AM)
Ken,

The interesting thing is that this seems to only ever be brought up by other performers that do not perform the routine. In the hundres of times I've performed "instant magician" I have never once had any audience member or parent ever express any concern. Of course, I don't open with this effect and throughout the show the trust builds between me and the audience. If you are concerned, use a high back chair as the child's stage and this puts a barrier between you and the volunteer. Occasionally, I have fellow ring members attend one of my public shows, and if they mention the "instat routine" and having any issues with closeness, I always ask if they perform the routine and I have never once had anyone that has ever actually tried it with an adult, much less a child.

Quite frankly, I'm always glad to read these concerns from other performers, that means that they aren't doing the routine...much better for me.

Just a followup, after talking about this issue with other club members today I was reminded of concerns about other effects.

When I started my restaurant work I was warned by fellow newsgroup members not to do CMH (you could snap someone's eye), anything with a ring (everyone is looking to pull off the ever popular switched ring scam), spongeballs with children (should never touch a child's hand), as well as any rope routine involving scissors. Not quite sure what was going to be left. Maybe some performers are a little too paranoid...ya think?
Message: Posted by: Jeff Alan (Jun 18, 2004 06:59PM)
Christopher,
Rumor has it some magician from Denver got a rope burn on his little finger doing professor's nightmare...stay away from it!
Message: Posted by: Christopher (Jun 18, 2004 07:05PM)
Jeff,

I guess I will just have to stick with the bullet catch and razor blade illusions.
Message: Posted by: magicbytodd (Jun 19, 2004 10:32PM)
I, too, have been concerned about using the effect for the reasons mentioned earlier but was wondering about having the assistant sit in a chair rather than standing. My thinking is that the chair would create a safety barrier. What do you think? Would this even work with the effect?
Message: Posted by: The Great Smartini (Jun 20, 2004 11:31PM)
Its always best to be comfortable in your dealings with people both big and little...it is more than a little sad that we even have to engage in this kind of discussion and that it is an issue...i'm with ken scott on this issue...i have two kids and have been a primary educator and as such can see all sides...still, I will do the instant magician...one could always ask pre-show are you okay with your son/daughter being the magician?...here's what it looks like...hopefully the adult booked me because they feel comfortable with me as a performer

Jeff Christensen
aka The Great Smartini
Message: Posted by: Christopher (Jun 21, 2004 11:41AM)
Remind me never to work in the U.K. I thought people here in Amish country were tough.
Message: Posted by: Rupert Bair (Jun 21, 2004 11:56AM)
Uk aint that bad, just sum parts of the country like any are'nt so good.
Matt
Message: Posted by: Emazdad (Jun 21, 2004 01:57PM)
Jeff has a good point, If you are going to do such a trick, ask the bookers permission first. Over here if the local paper turns up at an event they wont even take a childs picture until they's asked the parents permission.

Parents have been banned from taking photo's of their kids at school events unless they have written permission from all the other parents giving their permission for their kid to be in a photographed.

I dress a kid up in a balloon outfit, it involves me getting quite close to the kid as I put the stuff on. I take great care to ensure that my hands never go out of site behind the kid at any time.

True Story:-

a few years ago a magician mate of mine had a mum complain to him that he hadn't picked her little angel to help in the show, (it was when he used to use a live rabbit), A couple of days later out of the blue the RSPCA turned up because someone had phoned saying he was cruel to his rabbit during the show. After discussions with the booker it turned out to be this Mum had done it because her kid didn't get picked.

Obviously on examination they went away happy that the rabbit was well looked after, but imagine what ammunition this woman would have had if he'd done the instant magician. It wouldn't have been the RSPCA knocking at the door.
[
Message: Posted by: The Great Smartini (Jun 21, 2004 02:12PM)
Unfortunately, people can say almost anything they want and seemingly without any recourse...all we can do is to do what we do and to do so with care and with integrity...when we perform we need to do so with an attitude of respect, wonder and joy as we share our magic...see Juan Tamariz's book The Five Points in Magic where he describes the performer presenting themselves in a way and creating a space/setting/atmosphere where spectators want to share...as it has been said "Do what you love and love what you do." (Source?)

Jeff Christensen
aka The Great Smartini
Message: Posted by: Frank Tougas (Jun 22, 2004 04:02PM)
In spite of the fact Christopher chooses to make light of this subject, the fact remains each performer has to make up his/her own mind and be in their own comfort zone. That's what makes us unique. It would be awful if we were all doing the same tricks, the same way and using the same costumes...hey, I think I've just described most of the Vegas magic acts.

Anyhoo, it wasn't all that long ago that a very well known magician, specializing in kid shows, who wrote several wonderful books on the subject and many articles was arrested and convicted of child molestation.

Just being magicians does not mean the percentages of odd or perverted people does not exist in our ranks the same as in the general population and stories like that are remembered.

Just my opinion, but I believe it to be a valid one.

Frank
Message: Posted by: Christopher (Jun 23, 2004 10:59AM)
Frank,

I agree. There are some performers whose personality and presentations would make no sense at a kid's party at all, let alone with such a routine. It is all in how the audience accepts you. I've seen Ken several times, and I know my own act, I believe the audience is more than accepting.
Message: Posted by: Emazdad (Jun 24, 2004 04:17AM)
Even though I'm a young good looking sexy 44 I still wouldn't do it myself. I think if your a young guy, you probably have a good chance of performing this trick with no problems, an older guy playing around behind the kids may find a different reaction, The Public see most peada-perverts as dirty old men.
Message: Posted by: Christopher (Jun 24, 2004 07:51AM)
After double checking your avatar, I agree, maybe you should stick with something else...lol
Message: Posted by: Magic.J.Manuel (Aug 2, 2004 09:45PM)
Boy I remember doing something like this at Boy Scout talent shows with a poncho and the front guy has boots on his arms, looks like a short hiker. And we had several very funny routines set up between the front guy and the hands. But we did it with two similar aged scouts, so I agree that an adult getting behind a strangers child would be somewhat questionable, like someone said Even though nothing is going on, the appearance of impropriety is sufficient to raise suspicion and reason enough to avoid the situation.

Now how about making Daddy the Instant Magician? Or the Pack Leader. And give them a short script ahead of time to make it extra funny? The person can read the Disappearing Bandanna instructions and you grab the wrong prop...pie eating contest...blow nose...
Message: Posted by: Paul G (Aug 3, 2004 04:46AM)
I have Ken's version. It's great. It gets an overwhelming reaction from the audiences.

I think using an male adult lends the routine to more comedy than with a kid, and it eliminates many of the issues posted above. Choosing the right adult is key to getting the great audience reactions; you want someone who's not afraid to play it up a bit.

I would vote against giving the participant a script ahead of time. As Scott recommends, before I turn the music on I just tell the adult to follow my instructions during the trick. If you've chosen someone who's willing to live it up a bit, and tell them what to do in real time, you'll probably get a funnier, less inhibited routine out of it.

I'd also say that it's not so much the tricks you do but the hand movements, dancing, etc that make the trick great.

This is a great routine!
Message: Posted by: Jimeuax (Aug 3, 2004 11:48PM)
This may be only tangentially relevant---but ---when a kid comes up to you and starts to begin to hug you, you can extend your palm and say "give me five"--(yeah I know it is "passe")----and they will usually forget about hugging you and just slap the fire out of your hand---lol-----I work in the public schools and this works 9 out of 10 times---how this helps---Jimeuax
Message: Posted by: Decomposed (Aug 4, 2004 03:05AM)
What if the mother wants to kiss you on the cheek?
Message: Posted by: magicbyswh (Aug 16, 2004 07:51AM)
I have Ken's Instant Magician and it is a great effect. When you do magic there are times you are touching people that help you on the stage or in a parlor situation or even when doing close up. If you are afraid to touch someone when you do magic then you maybe in the wrong business. If the getting close bothers you that much maybe you can pre-arrange with some of the parents prior to the show and explain the effect you are going to do and let them know you have to have your arms around their helper. Just try to get permission. Most of the birthday shows I do, I know some of the parents and kids there anyway. I think people make to big a deal out of this. Also if it still bothers you then use a DAD at the show. Its just as funny with and adult as with a child. I will tell the adult that he will basically have a coat on and my arms arm going to be around him and doing the magic for him. I have never had a problem with this effect and don't think I ever will.
Ken thanks for coming out with a great product and I will also say that Ken's version is 100 times better than Kevin James version. As stated earlier above Ken's is a real tux and Kevin's is a cheap material. Plus they are about the same cost.
Steve
Message: Posted by: Howie Diddot (Mar 30, 2015 10:58AM)
[quote]On Jun 17, 2004, Emazdad wrote:
I agree Ken it is hard to say "no" to the kids, however, better safe than sorry in my book and you only need one paronoid or money-hungry parent to end your career.

I think I'll stay as I am playing it safe. I'd hate to have to give this up and actually get a job. uuurrrgh [/quote]

[quote]On Jun 17, 2004, TrickyRicky wrote:
Well, let me say this. I guarantee that in due time it will happen if you keep doing that trick.

I've been doing magic for children for over 45 years, times were different then. Today we have so many loony parents who are looking to get money even if it means using their own children to do so.

In my opinion, the Instant Magician is not a good trick for children - sooner or later it will happen.

I do not allow children to put their arms around me for any reason even if the mother is present. You just never know who you're dealing with, I have to protect my reputation and what I do for a living.

[/quote]

[quote]On Jun 19, 2004, magicbytodd wrote:
I, too, have been concerned about using the effect for the reasons mentioned earlier but was wondering about having the assistant sit in a chair rather than standing. My thinking is that the chair would create a safety barrier. What do you think? Would this even work with the effect?

[/quote]

Smoky Mountain Magic has provided a prop to solve the problem

Here is the answer to the members here that want to perform the routine; it also makes for great photos

http://www.smmagic.com/?p=206
Message: Posted by: TheAmbitiousCard (Mar 30, 2015 02:49PM)
I'm not sure that actually solves the problem.
If you have a parent that is psychotic, they will see what they want to see.
Message: Posted by: Howie Diddot (Mar 30, 2015 10:57PM)
[quote]On Mar 30, 2015, Frank Starsini wrote:
I'm not sure that actually solves the problem.
If you have a parent that is psychotic, they will see what they want to see.

[/quote]

Hi Frank;

I'm still wanting to meet up with you and have lunch but my kids shows have really taken off and my corporate weekday shows have increased preventing me from taking a day off so I haven't had time to visit Sacramento in awhile.

To reply to your question, what the stage does do is solve the basic problem by providing a barrier between the magician and the child volunteer.

I don't know of any method of solving the potential problems of a psychotic parent attending a party. I just finished reading a post here on the Café where a magician posted that the day after a show one of the ladies wrote to him that some parents were offended by his actions; he posted that she pretty much implied that he was sexist because he picked three boys and did not pick a girl as a volunteer during his show.

In my research to decide weather I will perform fantasy magician I read every thread on the Café concerning the fantasy magician routine; through the years there have been many threads.

In every thread, not one magician that actually performs fantasy magician had posted to report a problem, actual or perceived; in fact every magician that performs the routine posted that it is among the most popular of routines they do perform; the only negative comments posted on the Café were by members that has never performed the routine, or even practiced it.

There was a magician that did stop performing the routine and it was not because he had a compliant from a parent, he posted the reason he pulled fantasy magician from his show was because he became scared after reading the negative posts from members on the Café that had never performed the routine.

In my opinion, Fantasy Magician has many possibilities as a routine; in addition the Fantasy Magician Stage provides a wonderful background to the routine, a fantastic photo opportunity for the parents to photograph their child on stage, in addition to a solid barrier between the magician and the child to appease the psychotic parent.
Message: Posted by: Jonty (Mar 31, 2015 02:28AM)
I think that's an excellent solution to those who may have worries about the Instant Magician. You can't do any more to provide a barrier between you and the child, if any parent decide to make an issue out of that then in my opinion they only booked a magician in the first place with the intent of finding any reason they could to sue them. Job well done in my mind! :thumbsup:
Message: Posted by: Skip Way (Mar 31, 2015 07:45AM)
Howie hit this nail on the head. In over eight years of performing Ken's remarkable effect at hundreds - if not thousands - of fairs, festivals, parties, banquets, and corporate events WITH KIDS, I have never had a single hint of a complaint. The only complaints I have seen have appeared on this site and others like it - from magicians who are overthinking this hilarious bit. A full suit of armor with a thrice padlocked codpiece will not protect you from a psychotic overprotective mother - knowing your audience and your volunteer and avoiding that kid might.

That said, I LOVE Howie's Fantasy Magician stage prop - not for the "protective value" - but, because it frames the entire routine and puts the focus on the volunteer - where it belongs. It is colorful, compact, easy to transport and set up, and it is VERY eye-catching. This prop - like Ken's Fantasy Magician - is worth every penny and more.

Skip
Message: Posted by: Howie Diddot (Mar 31, 2015 09:13AM)
Skip, Thanks for the positive replies.

I'm very happy with the setup and folding of the stage; no screws, bolts or tools to set it up, you just lift it up and it's ready to go; it's colorful and as you wrote, eye-catching resulting in a wonderful presentation on a performance stage that goes along with the Jeff Jones Backdrop I set up behind the Fantasy Magicians Stage if the stage has no curtains.

I purchased the stage because it looked so good during the routine and takes the focus off of me as I stand behind the curtain with arm slits that is behind the volunteer; the clincher was as Jonty pointed out, is the added protective barrier to fend off the evil eye :comply: of the psychotic parent
Message: Posted by: Howie Diddot (Mar 31, 2015 10:01AM)
Jonty;

Thanks for the reply to my post.

In my experience, I have never worried about the parent that booked me because they only booked a magician with the intent of finding any reason sue me.

My concern is the psychotic parent I have never spoken with that comes to the party and stays for the performance not because they want to enjoy the show, but because out of fear, they never leave the child alone anywhere and will over react by anyone going near or touching their child.

I have not very often, but occasionally witnessed this type of parent standing in the back of the room staring at the children the whole time and not enjoying the party.