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Topic: What effects for an unknown place?
Message: Posted by: KiKi (Jul 19, 2006 03:14AM)
Sorry, I don`t know where to post this!
how do you prepare for a show where you don`t know exactly how the place, where you perform, looks like? I mean, if you can`t check the place beforehand, for example, a small private partie outside in the backyard or whatever in another city, and you don`t know
how much space you have, or if some spectators are standing where they can see too much `what you are trying to hide`, so you can`t do the effect you wanted!
kiki
Message: Posted by: Stephan Therien (Jul 19, 2006 09:56AM)
Hi Kiki,
Im doing corporates shows for over 17 years now, so I have that "problem" every time I go perform, the ultimate solution I end up whit, is to built a corporate show that fits any kind off audience and emplacement a "one size fits all show".
Sorry I have no miracle solution but best advise is be ready for everything.
Message: Posted by: KiKi (Jul 20, 2006 01:03AM)
Thank you stephan!
kiki
Message: Posted by: the levitator (Jul 20, 2006 01:42AM)
When I used to perform a full stage illusion show, I got into the habit of asking for an actual floorplan when making the actual booking. Even though I don't do that kind of show anymore, I still ask for a floorplan, or at least a good description. Even when doing strolling shows, it's good to know the table layout and their proximity to each other, how many are seated at each table, where the VIP's of the event will be seated, where the high traffic areas are to avoid bumping into waitstaff, etc. I would just make this part of your closing routine when booking the venue. It will always assure you of knowing the layout beforehand and it also shows more professionalism, as I'm sure many entertainers don't bother to get these type of details when booking a show.
Message: Posted by: Carlos the Great (Jul 26, 2006 05:55PM)
Excellent ideas. Something that was mentioned that I find very important is simply arriving to the venue before any guests. This will allow you to do any preshow work (envelopes under chairs, etc.), determine where you will pull volunteers from (and how you will get to and from the performing area), and so forth. However, generally my performances are formed such that venue generally doesn't matter.

-Carlos