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Topic: Making your own special coins
Message: Posted by: myname1960 (Dec 20, 2002 03:40AM)
Is there a book or site that will show you how you can machine your own special coins.
I work in a machine shop and have access to cnc lathes and mills.
I thought it would be interesting to try to make my own.
Thanks,
Chris
Message: Posted by: vovin (Dec 20, 2002 07:17AM)
It depends on how much time and resources you want to put into it. I own a machine shop and I have tried to make shells. It isn't easy at all. It can be done, but I would rather just shuck out 12 bucks for a Johnson. Also, trying to make the scotch and soda is almost impossible. The precision has to be perfect or it won't stay together, or worse, it won't come apart. I am not saying it can't be done. It depends on the quality of your equipment. But since you can buy these items rather cheap I don't see why you would want to make 'em.
Message: Posted by: Larry Davidson (Dec 20, 2002 09:05AM)
Sounds like it would be fun to try. Not having the equipment or the talent, instead of trying to make my own special coins I make my own special phone call to Todd Lassen. By the way, if you try to make your own special coins, don't start off with clad. Good luck.
Message: Posted by: RiserMagic (Dec 20, 2002 10:34AM)
What kind of coins did you plan on making?
Jim
Message: Posted by: KingStardog (Dec 20, 2002 11:35AM)
Unless you have a specific gaff that is not available...don't waste your time. I have two gaff coins of my own design that are not available through dealers. One was a poor design and cost about $65 and is a complete failure. The other cost $125 and is so special it will never make it out of my hands, or be shown openly, as the idea is just too good to get out. But then again it's only one effect so what's that really worth?

Also not included in the cost was a box of good coins that got scrapped, or all of the machine labor.

Call Todd or one of the other guys.
Message: Posted by: nitram (Dec 21, 2002 03:28AM)
Hi, my friend makes coin shells, cig-thru-coin, etc., here in the UK. He makes batches of them to make them cost efficient, but he has lots of failures too. 1 Coin can be made from several others plus there is a good chance along the way that even though you take care, it could be destroyed by one mistake. The other problem is that all coins are different in size eg. not all 2 coins are the same diameter. You could spend a lot of time making a shell only to find that it does not fit other coins.

Regards Martin UK

:spinningcoin:
Message: Posted by: myname1960 (Dec 21, 2002 04:26AM)
The reasons I would like to get into making or trying to make my own coins is 1) I collect coins as a hobby and I like all kinds, especially the older varieties, 2) I am interested in coin magic very much, 3) I am in a unique situation working where I work. I have precision machines at my disposal.
I know it won't be easy or even worth my time most of the time, but many people have seen coin magic mostly with the same types of coins. It would be a neat twist to come up with different coins doing some of the same effects or maybe a new way of doing the old favorites.
I would love to experiment with different coins and different effects. Maybe even come up with a combination that is new to everyone.
If everyone thought it was too hard or expensive, would we have some of the superior coin magic we have now?
This isn't a commercial venture for me but just taking my love for coins to hopefully a new level.
Later,
Chris
Message: Posted by: Daniel Faith (Dec 21, 2002 05:51AM)
I would leave that to Johnson.
Message: Posted by: nitram (Dec 21, 2002 05:58AM)
If you are prepared to go to these lengths, then any engineer will tell you that it is he who works out the tolerances and order of manufacture. Most enginners keep these secrets to themselves because there is very little profit in making these coins. They do not publicize these secrets because they are taking the bread out of their own mouths. I am afraid that if it is to be it is up to me is the order of the day.

Regards Nitram UK

:spinningcoin:
Message: Posted by: Dynamike (Dec 22, 2002 10:43PM)
I would first consider working for one of the coin makers before trying to make one. But yes it can be done. Sasco succeded. You may be next. If you do reach your goal, I will be your first customer.

Now, go turn off that machine and start celebrating Chrismas.

:xmastree:
Message: Posted by: Dan Watkins (Dec 23, 2002 08:23AM)
That's open for debate.
Message: Posted by: RiserMagic (Dec 23, 2002 10:16AM)
Dan;
Perhaps this depends upon your definition of "succeded". :huh:
Jim
Message: Posted by: yoey2000 (Dec 24, 2002 10:16AM)
I agree that if you can find it in a store, buy it. If you can't, then if You REALLY, REALLY want it, then try to make it, although you will need the best of luck.
Message: Posted by: RiserMagic (Dec 24, 2002 02:04PM)
yoey2000;
I do not think "luck" will help much. Having the correct equipment and knowing how to use it is more dependable than "luck".

I posted this link in another thread; but you may not have seen it - so I'll post it again here:
http://www.jamesriser.com/SmSacCoins/Machining.html

The lathe shown on this link has its runout measured in millionths of an inch. When making close fitting coin gimmicks, this type of accuracy is nice.

As you will be able to see, "luck" has nothing to do with the process. And the coin shown is one of the easier types to make.
Jim
Message: Posted by: Andrew E. Miller (Dec 24, 2002 02:20PM)
I have a friend (I won't say any names), that has invented a tool to make all your own coin gaffs. He is currently seeking funding for this, but it might be released this year depending on whether or not he gets the support he needs. With the tool and some power tools you already most likely have at home you can make good quality coin gaffs. He let me borrow his copy and I made some sweet-looking copper/silver coins. I showed them to Ben Schwartz. Ask him... they look just like the ones you buy from Johnson!
You can look for that this year!
:spinningcoin: :spinningcoin:
Message: Posted by: BenSchwartz (Dec 24, 2002 06:03PM)
Ya... I didn't believe that he made 'em.. They look friggin sweet.
Message: Posted by: Dynamike (Dec 24, 2002 07:30PM)
Regal, If your friend accomplishes his mission let me know. I might be his first customer.
Message: Posted by: tootall (Oct 5, 2005 08:41PM)
[quote]
On 2002-12-24 15:20, Andrew E. Miller wrote:
I have a friend (I won't say any names), that has invented a tool to make all your own coin gaffs. He is currently seeking funding for this, but it might be released this year depending on whether or not he gets the support he needs. With the tool and some power tools you already most likely have at home you can make good quality coin gaffs. He let me borrow his copy and I made some sweet-looking copper/silver coins. I showed them to Ben Schwartz. Ask him... they look just like the ones you buy from Johnson!
You can look for that this year!
:spinningcoin: :spinningcoin:
[/quote]

Hello,

I know this was written three years ago but do you have any updates on this 'tool'? I would be very interested in it. Thanks
Message: Posted by: Dan LeFay (Oct 6, 2005 03:36AM)
It was a Magic Wand.
Message: Posted by: Larry Davidson (Oct 6, 2005 08:11AM)
Actually, I think it was a
[b]B[/b]alanced [b]U[/b]nique [b]L[/b]aboratory [b]L[/b]athe [b]S[/b]equential [b]H[/b]eated [b]I[/b]nductive [b]T[/b]ool
Message: Posted by: tootall (Oct 6, 2005 08:48AM)
LOL, afater I read through more posts and found out that Andrew E. Miller had been banned I realized that it was in fact the afore mention tool. Sorry to bring this post back up.
Message: Posted by: BobGreaves (Oct 9, 2005 06:54AM)
I think that if I could make realistic gaffs then I could make realistic coins. If I could make realistic coins then good-bye magic, good-bye work. I'd be off to the South of France and living in luxury (and I certainly wouldn't let on to anyone).
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Oct 10, 2005 06:46PM)
Most of the time it's not worth the money or effort to make the special gaffs. The only exception I would say would be when you can't get what you need anywhere. I made some gaffed coins a long time ago. I broke a lot of jeweler's saw blades. But I had a f****** quarter that would fit where no other one would.
Message: Posted by: Aaron Moring (Oct 11, 2005 09:17AM)
If you get your kicks from making stuff, go for it, even if you never make a dime on it. I found instructions for making hoo coins and keys while searching some old Genii's the other day. I've already got some, but as soon as I can make a trip to Home Depot, I will be making some more, for the sheer joy of it. If you never come up with some "breakthrough idea," or never use them in performance, I think that making your own gaffs will give you an appreciation of the ones you do use, as well as for the inventors thereof.
Aaron
Message: Posted by: PennyMagic4U (Oct 13, 2005 10:07AM)
If you get lucky enough to actually be good at it - let us all know. It is easier to buy what you need - and a lot cheaper.

JCPENNY
Simply Magic
Message: Posted by: Gislain (Oct 23, 2005 05:51AM)
I tried to find a machinist that could help me make some canadian coins and they are not thrilled with the idea of playing with money. Unless you have your own machinery it will cost you an arm and leg.
Message: Posted by: Kihei (Oct 23, 2005 10:04AM)
I have made gimlets (Karate coins) out of the nickel clad as well as silver halfs and dollars with some success. I had a friend make the hole and used my wifes tools (she makes jewelry) to clean up the edges. I'm sure it doesn't compare to quality of professional gaffers but I haven't had any problems with presentation to laymen. I don't think I could pull off any other gaffs though. Drilling a hole and filing the edges does not require much craftmanship.
Message: Posted by: John Bowlin (Oct 24, 2005 04:22AM)
Good luck and keep remembering..I'm doing this for fun and not profit! BTW..If you want a great karate coin..shoot a liberty with a 7mm from 100 yds.