(Close Window)
Topic: Spelling Mistakes
Message: Posted by: Mike T (Sep 2, 2006 12:21PM)
Everybody has a slip up now and again (whether mental or physical) but I recently shared a tip (by PM) with a user who was getting slated for his spelling. My tip seems to have made a difference so I thought I'd share it around.
After typing a post I cut and paste it into an email and then spell check it, amend if necessary and then cut and paste it back. I know there's loads of programs that will check grammar as well so that would be even better but everyone's got email spell check and hey, it's a start.
The best thing is that it takes seconds to do.

Regards to all, Mike
Message: Posted by: pradell (Sep 3, 2006 04:20PM)
I do the same thing as Mike T except that I put longer posts into a Microsoft Word document and perform spell check. Also, after posting I always hit the "edit" button and look at the post one more time from the point of view of the reader for spelling and format purposes. Are paragraphs placed properly? Did the emoticon I typed in show up in the right place? Are any links properly highlighted? Does it look like it is ready for everyone to see? This is also a good tip for anyone who emails to others: review, spell check, and/or print the email out and look at it before hitting the "send" button.

:magicrabbit:
Message: Posted by: TannerJade (Sep 3, 2006 07:15PM)
Good advice :)

Also, I recommend the GOOGLE toolbar, which has a button on it called "Check" and it is a GREAT spell check that will take the writing right off of what you are typing on the Café, so there is no need for copying and pasting.

Tanner
Message: Posted by: Muckey Spleen (Sep 29, 2006 02:49AM)
[quote]
On 2006-09-03 20:15, TannerJade wrote:
Good advice :)

Also, I recommend the GOOGLE toolbar, which has a button on it called "Check" and it is a GREAT spell check, that will take the writing write of what you are typing ON the Café, so there is not need for copying and pasting...

Tanner
[/quote]

Of course, as long as what you misspelled is still a word (just the wrong one), spellcheck programs will give it the nod, as demonstrated in the above post. ;)
Nothing beats a careful proofread.
Message: Posted by: calamari (Nov 1, 2006 12:54PM)
I claim that words were mispelled by the originators and I am just fixing them.
Rich
Message: Posted by: The Great Cartago (Nov 29, 2006 05:28AM)
Hi, Mike T. Really I am interested in improve my spelling (among many other things) Please recommend me one of the emails I can use for this purpose.

Would the creator of this wondeful forum be able to include the "Check" option when you post a reply?

Thank you very much.

Cartago.

P.S. I prefer not to instal the Google toolbar althought is not a bad idea.
Message: Posted by: Mike T (Nov 30, 2006 04:04AM)
PMd you :)
Message: Posted by: SteveTheMagician (Dec 9, 2006 07:05PM)
Y3s, @l$0 P13@$3 @v0Id3 L33T

(yes, also please avoid leet)

:-D
Message: Posted by: Don Becker (Dec 11, 2006 02:06PM)
I have various published pieces to my credit, and I still can't spell . . . Always want to put double letters where only a single should be (i.e., usuall). And sometimes I just plain botch it. But then no lesser light than Thomas Jefferson is credited with having said that "it was a *** poor man (sic) who couldn't think of two or three ways to spell a word." The use of and email or word processing program that has spell check is a good idea. Just remember spellcheck doesn't know the difference between too, two, or to. So it can foil you, uh, too.

Most of us can produce a very readable piece by simply taking our time a bit.

(This is my first post! Nice to be here. Just think, Six munce agoe I cond't spel magcician, and now I ARE one!)
Message: Posted by: mimagicman (Dec 11, 2006 10:15PM)
[quote]
On 2006-11-01 13:54, calamari wrote:
I claim that words were mispelled by the originators and I am just fixing them.
Rich
[/quote]

HA! I love it!
Message: Posted by: Daegs (Dec 15, 2006 06:30AM)
I can't believe this hasn't been mentioned, but the latest version of Firefox, v. 2.0 , has a spell-checker built in for things like Café post, emails and whatnot.

If you aren't using firefox, you really should be!
Message: Posted by: DStachowiak (Dec 26, 2006 02:04PM)
Odldy, a reecnt epxemiriment demeonrtsatd taht the barin is cpabale of inrettrepnig the snese of amoltst any wrod in Egnislh if the fsrit and lsat lteetrs are cecrrot
Message: Posted by: Carrie Sue (Dec 29, 2006 08:23AM)
I believe that story to be apocrophal, because my brain still has to do some double-quick thinking to understand what is trying to be communicated with the letters all mixed up.

Carrie
Message: Posted by: DStachowiak (Dec 29, 2006 08:55AM)
[quote]
On 2006-12-29 09:23, Carrie Sue wrote:
I believe that story to be apocrophal, because my brain still has to do some double-quick thinking to understand what is trying to be communicated with the letters all mixed up.

Carrie
[/quote]Really? I was amazed at how clear that sentence was when someone emailed it to me, but it may be that it's just the way some peoples' brains are wired, or it may be like the ability to roll your tounge, possibly hereditary or even a right brain-left brain thing.
Then again, maybe its just a learnable skill, and I may have picked it up somewhere along the way
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Dec 30, 2006 06:32PM)
The e-mail that many of us got about the alleged Cambridge university experiments in language may or may not be apocryphal. Cambridge University denied its validity a while back, but now the University of Edinburgh may be working on a similar problem.

I've written often about bad spelling. Why we can't spell the names of people like Hofzinser, Thurston, and Robert-Houdin correctly is beyond me.

The other problem is people who use the wrong "to." There is a difference in meaning between the following two sentences.

Too much of the class singing can be fun.

To much of the class singing can be fun.

It's and its are also problematic. It's means it is. Its means belonging to it.

Since these are all legitimate spellings, a simple spell-checker won't catch the error. A grammar checker generally will, though.

This illustrates much of the problem.
http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewtopic.php?topic=127345&forum=171&5
Message: Posted by: Michael Baker (Jan 1, 2007 02:22PM)
[quote]
On 2006-12-30 19:32, Bill Palmer wrote:


I've written often about bad spelling. Why we can't spell the names of people like Hofzinser, Thurston, and Robert-Houdin correctly is beyond me.
[/quote]

As an odd side note, and not as a contradiction, there is a family here in Birmingham with an altered spelling of the name Thurston (which I won't divulge out of respect for their privacy), yet they are related to Howard Thurston. I have seen documentation to that effect, including letters from Thurston to the family's ancestor(s) inquiring about certain necessities for the levitation.

~michael
Message: Posted by: Darkwing (Jan 2, 2007 10:26AM)
Thank goodness for spell check. I would look like an idiot without it.
Message: Posted by: magicfish (Jan 2, 2007 04:48PM)
You mean you people honestly can't spell? What on earth is a "spell check" ?
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (Jan 2, 2007 05:18PM)
http://www.eispell.com gets you a free and well behaved spell checker for your browser.

:)
Message: Posted by: kregg (Jan 2, 2007 08:08PM)
What's worse is when I read a best selling novel or my sons text books loaded with *-ups.
Message: Posted by: George Ledo (Jan 2, 2007 10:01PM)
I used to have this problem now and then too (I'm a hunt-and-peck typist), but what really brought it home it for me was that now and then I would hit "Submit" and something would get hung up somewhere and I'd lose the entire post. So I started writing my posts (and especially my columns) in Word and then copying and pasting them into the reply box. That way I can spell-check, grammar-check, and so forth before I hit the commit button.

Even so, I still occasionally hit the "Edit" button and correct an oops.
Message: Posted by: Darkwing (Jan 6, 2007 02:30PM)
[quote]
On 2007-01-02 17:48, magicfish wrote:
You mean you people honestly can't spell? What on earth is a "spell check" ?
[/quote]
Yes, magicfish there are some of us who are dyslexic.
Message: Posted by: KerryJK (Feb 27, 2007 12:30PM)
The too-vs-to problem is often less to do with bad grammar than a simple typo; when typing at speed, it's easy to hit the "o" key in such a way that the two seperate keyhits don't register. I've done this myself on many occasions and only noticed later when reading back the post (at which point I'll correct it if the "edit" option is still on).

One word though that is commonly mispelled is "ridiculous". This is particularly fun to see in the context of heated flame posts in which the poster is getting on their intellectual high-horse berating another poster for their "rediculous" point of view. Some even hit the jackpot and criticise people for their "rediculous" spelling.

A feature I do miss on this forum that exists on others is the ability to preview your post before posting. Reading a lengthy post through in the entry box is OK but seeing the text all set out as it will appear makes it much easier to revise the overall tone of the post (and so change anything that may come across the wrong way) and to immediately correct any obvious typos and spelling errors.
Message: Posted by: jlevey (Mar 23, 2007 10:00PM)
:confused:

Before the google spellcheck...

"Regaurding thee gooogle spillcheck, leets c iff it werks..."

After the google spellcheck...

"Regarding thee google spellcheck, leets c if it works." :bawl:
Message: Posted by: Hostile18 (Apr 11, 2007 10:51AM)
Can I just use this thread to say that every time someone writes about "slight-of-hand" I physically wince.

It does make me wonder how many alleged magicians have actually never read a book about magic. Or been to school.
Message: Posted by: Doug Higley (May 2, 2007 03:25PM)
A favorite on the forums is "Please see my 'sight' for information."

Site as in building site...as in I am on a site about magic. :)
Message: Posted by: Josh Riel (May 26, 2007 02:24AM)
I have a lot of slight of hands on my sight.

Posted: May 26, 2007 3:30am
Quote:


On 2007-03-23 23:00, jlevey wrote:


Before the google spellcheck...

"Regaurding thee gooogle spillcheck, leets c iff it werks..."

After the google spellcheck...

"Regarding thee google spellcheck, leets c if it works."


Hmmm. Google always capitalizes it's own name by default.

"Thee" is a correctly spelled word "c" won't get checked and words like "hap4py" are ignored because of the stupid "OMG's" and crap that is common with the retarded public school taught common vernacular.

So either we proof read as well as spell check, or we sound as stupid as I do while doing both.
Message: Posted by: geemack (May 31, 2007 07:26PM)
Spell Chequer

Eye halve a spelling chequer
It came with my pea sea
It plainly marques four my revue
Miss steaks eye kin knot sea.

Eye strike a key and type a word
And weight four it two say
Weather eye am wrong oar write
It shows me strait a weigh.

As soon as a mist ache is maid
It nose bee fore two long
And eye can put the error rite
Its rarely ever wrong.

Eye have run this poem threw it
I am shore your pleased two no
Its letter perfect in it's weigh
My chequer tolled me sew.

- Martha Snow
Message: Posted by: Otterish (Jul 8, 2007 07:21AM)
[quote]
On 2006-12-26 15:04, DStachowiak wrote:
Odldy, a reecnt epxemiriment demeonrtsatd taht the barin is cpabale of inrettrepnig the snese of amoltst any wrod in Egnislh if the fsrit and lsat lteetrs are cecrrot
[/quote]

Ow! Great way to give a headache to a dyslexic.
Message: Posted by: darkdean (Aug 18, 2007 07:09AM)
Thank you for the tip and I will spell check my posts from now on.

Dean
Message: Posted by: JRob (Sep 2, 2007 09:20PM)
Another irritation misspelling is that of "congratulations". Ever some store manager cooked up the idea of congratulating graduates, I get all kinds of mail, email and IMs with people wishing to "congradulate [sic]" me
Message: Posted by: princehal (Sep 4, 2007 04:18PM)
If you use Firefox, there is a spelling add-on that will check spelling as you type, and underline misspelled words.
Message: Posted by: kosmoshiva (Sep 12, 2007 10:34PM)
The Electronic Blindfold - no matter what you type, the moment you post it or print it an error will creep in.
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Sep 15, 2007 12:40PM)
[quote]
On 2006-11-01 13:54, calamari wrote:
I claim that words were mispelled by the originators and I am just fixing them.
Rich
[/quote]

*misspelled.



The one I see most often on the internet is "definately" instead of "definitely."
Message: Posted by: BlackShadow (Oct 6, 2007 05:52PM)
Use the Firefox spell-check thing and you won't have a problem.

It doesn't recognise the word "Firefox" though, unless you add it to the dictionary!

Personally, I don't really care if people make spelling mistakes, as long as I can understand the post.
Message: Posted by: Mr. Mystoffelees (Nov 14, 2007 08:30PM)
[quote]
On 2007-01-02 18:18, Jonathan Townsend wrote:
http://www.eispell.com gets you a free and well behaved spell checker for your browser.

:)
[/quote]

Great! God forbid we should actually learn english. Is there a "magic checker" 'cause I am having trouble with that two?
Message: Posted by: tommy (Nov 18, 2007 07:04AM)
Is that an American spell checker or an English one?
Message: Posted by: DStachowiak (Dec 29, 2007 12:06PM)
The biggest problem I find with spell checkers is that, as long as the word you type is an actual word, the spell checker will approve of it, even if it is the wrong word.
There are far two many ways this can lead too problems. I can think of at least to of them right now.
Message: Posted by: spcarlson (Jan 12, 2008 11:05AM)
Olny srmat poelpe can raed tihs. _I cdnuolt blveiee taht I cluod aulaclty uesdnatnrd waht I was rdanieg. The phaonmneal pweor of the hmuan mnid, aoccdrnig to a rscheearch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it deosn't mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoatnt tihng is taht the frist and lsat ltteer be in the rgh it pclae. The rset can be a taotl mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit a porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe. Amzanig huh? yaeh and I awlyas tghuhot slpeling was ipmorantt! if you can raed tihs psas it on !!

But then I guess all the correct letters have to be there in the first place. ;o)

LOL, speaking of spellcheckers I think I just burned mine out with this post!

Sevten
Message: Posted by: Bill (Jan 13, 2008 05:17PM)
If you're using IE Explorer, then there is a great spell checker available free. You just type in what you want, right click your mouse, and select Check Spelling. If you're interested go here to download it:

http://www.iespell.com/download.php
Message: Posted by: Steve_Mollett (Mar 28, 2008 05:38PM)
I'm always amused by the troll who calls another poster a "looser."
Message: Posted by: Mysterious (Dec 14, 2008 05:35PM)
Word
Message: Posted by: Terry Veckey (Feb 17, 2009 04:51AM)
[quote]
On 2006-12-26 15:04, DStachowiak wrote:
Odldy, a reecnt epxemiriment demeonrtsatd taht the barin is cpabale of inrettrepnig the snese of amoltst any wrod in Egnislh if the fsrit and lsat lteetrs are cecrrot
[/quote]

This sounds really cool when you read it out loud. But use a Stephen Hawking automated accent.
Message: Posted by: Alex Palombo (Mar 25, 2009 08:02PM)
I do it all the time.
Message: Posted by: mtpascoe (Apr 9, 2009 08:17PM)
[quote]
On 2006-12-11 15:06, Don Becker wrote:
I have various published pieces to my credit, and I still can't spell . . . Always want to put double letters where only a single should be (i.e., usuall). And sometimes I just plain botch it. But then no lesser light than Thomas Jefferson is credited with having said that "it was a *** poor man (sic) who couldn't think of two or three ways to spell a word." The use of and email or word processing program that has spell check is a good idea. Just remember spellcheck doesn't know the difference between too, two, or to. So it can foil you, uh, too.

Most of us can produce a very readable piece by simply taking our time a bit.

(This is my first post! Nice to be here. Just think, Six munce agoe I cond't spel magcician, and now I ARE one!)


[/quote]

Do you mean: "I don't give a *** for a man that can only spell a word one way." If so, it was Mark Twain, not Thomas Jefferson.
Message: Posted by: funsway (Jun 20, 2009 06:56AM)
In the late 80's I was part of a forum hosted by 'Ma Bell' on the impact of the "personal use" of computers before PC's were taken seriously. One item of discussion was the new "SpellChecker" available with some software. I predicted that its widespread use would tend to limit useful vocabulary, with a dilution of distinctions of meaning and an increase in message confusion. This notion was laughed down. I hate it when I am a seer.
Message: Posted by: Lawrence O (Jul 8, 2009 12:12AM)
The 19 century scientists decided to search the rules beneath everything. It was the discovery that our universe is not only infinite in terms of time/space but is also infinitely organized. Then human beings started confusing, to paraphrase the Chinese proverb, the star and the finger of the wise men which points at it. If we need to benchmark things to able to ensure that we are progressing and measure how we do it, the benchmark is not life, it's how fast we evolve that is marking life. We have no other clinical way to tell about life and death than movement: brain and heart. Spelling is not here to freeze a language, killing it, but to observe how it evolves: rules are not an aim, they're a mean; rules are made "for the guidance of the wise and the obedience of the fools". They're points in time to depart from not to get to...
IMHO and I was born only babbling in French: thus maybe I'm totally wrong?!
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Jul 11, 2009 11:03AM)
[quote]
On 2008-01-12 12:05, spcarlson wrote:
Olny srmat poelpe can raed tihs. _I cdnuolt blveiee taht I cluod aulaclty uesdnatnrd waht I was rdanieg. The phaonmneal pweor of the hmuan mnid, aoccdrnig to a rscheearch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it deosn't mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoatnt tihng is taht the frist and lsat ltteer be in the rgh it pclae. The rset can be a taotl mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit a porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe. Amzanig huh? yaeh and I awlyas tghuhot slpeling was ipmorantt! if you can raed tihs psas it on !!

But then I guess all the correct letters have to be there in the first place. ;o)

LOL, speaking of spellcheckers I think I just burned mine out with this post!

Sevten
[/quote]

This is an urban legend that ran through our e-mail inboxes starting roughly September of 2003. There is no evidence that Cambridge University ever did such a study.
Message: Posted by: RodHousley (Jul 21, 2009 03:15PM)
Spelling is an important skill, and one many find difficult. Good spellers tend to look straight ahead. Taught by Robert Dilts strategy. They visualize the word as they spell it, then look down to check with their feeling that they got it right.
People who spell poorly usually try to sound out the word.
A phonetic system cannot even spell its own title correctly.
Wun wunders why foenick spelling methuds arr stil tort in skools..

This visual strategy has been taught and used with much success on children that have been labeled as dyslexic. Often these children are more auditory or kinesthetic than other children.

If you know someone who is a great speller ask them to spell something tough and watch their eyes. If they look forward or slightly up they are most likely visualizing the word. Good spelling is a capability.
Message: Posted by: Josh Riel (Sep 16, 2009 11:06PM)
I decided to post here.
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Sep 21, 2009 02:24AM)
And Josh, we're darn glad you did.

I've always wanted to post in a sticky. Kind of weird up here.

On topic: I read the word "advice" misspelled nearly every day. And a spell checker will not catch it--no no--because the word people are using, "advise", is spelled correctly.

But WAIT...then it's not a spelling mistake, properly speaking. But it remains a crime against the English language, whatever it should be called.
Message: Posted by: ed rhodes (Oct 3, 2009 06:39PM)
[quote]
On 2007-04-11 11:51, Hostile18 wrote:

Can I just use this thread to say that every time someone writes about "slight-of-hand" I physically wince.

It does make me wonder how many alleged magicians have actually never read a book about magic. Or been to school.
[/quote]

The one that gets me is "straight jacket," and no spell checker in the world would correct it!
Message: Posted by: sweetypie2019 (Nov 4, 2009 12:07PM)
My pet peeve is when people mix up their and there. I mean, seriously...is it that difficult to know the difference?
Message: Posted by: Davit Sicseek (Jan 22, 2010 04:31PM)
I don't give a monkeys about my spelling. Not on a forum anyway. Being understood is key.
Message: Posted by: MAKMagic (Feb 3, 2010 08:38AM)
[quote]
On 2010-01-22 17:31, Davit Sicseek wrote:
I don't give a monkeys about my spelling. Not on a forum anyway. Being understood is key.
[/quote]

Or grammar, or punctuation, or inserting all the words for the sentence for that matter.
Message: Posted by: Ireland (Feb 15, 2010 08:40PM)
Improper spelling and punctuation is a distraction to the message in the post you are trying to share......it conveys a lazy and imprecise mind.....an exception is the word 'diaorhea'...I've never been able to spell that word and no one should be expected to.....that is the only word one should be able to spell however one wishes.
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Feb 15, 2010 10:26PM)
My pet peeve is, "Between you and I..."
Message: Posted by: Al Angello (Feb 22, 2010 07:54PM)
I was a terrible speller until I became a magic Café grammar host. After becoming a grammar host many members here at the Café made fun of my spelling which helped me learn really quick.
Message: Posted by: Josh Chaikin (Apr 27, 2010 03:06PM)
[quote]
On 2010-02-22 20:54, Al Angello wrote:
I was a terrible speller until I became a magic Café Grammar Host. After becoming a grammar host, many members here at the Café made fun of my spelling - which helped me learn really quick!
[/quote]

Corrections have been made above, Mr. Grammar Host. ;)
Message: Posted by: ed rhodes (May 11, 2010 01:02PM)
I always liked the woman in "Are You Being Served" who, if she was very adamant about something would state; "And I am unanimous (?) in this!"
Message: Posted by: Al Angello (May 14, 2010 11:17AM)
Josh Chaikin
I am no longer a Grammar Host, but I still have nice people anxious to help me with my spelling, and punctuation. Perhaps you should volunteer for the Grammar Host position, you seem to be very interested in correcting people.
Message: Posted by: jazzy snazzy (May 14, 2010 11:23AM)
[quote]
On 2009-11-04 13:07, sweetypie2019 wrote:
My pet peeve is when people mix up their and there. I mean, seriously...is it that difficult to know the difference?
[/quote]
They're just not paying attention.
Message: Posted by: Josh Chaikin (May 15, 2010 02:08PM)
[quote]
On 2010-05-14 12:17, Al Angello wrote:
Josh Chaikin
I am no longer a Grammar Host, but I still have nice people anxious to help me with my spelling, and punctuation. Perhaps you should volunteer for the Grammar Host position, you seem to be very interested in correcting people.
[/quote]

My apologies if I offended you, it wasn't my intent. I was trying to be ironic more than anything, sorry if it didn't come off that way.
Message: Posted by: Al Angello (Jun 15, 2010 01:28PM)
Josh
Irony is a great source of humor. Perhaps I should not be so easily offended.
Message: Posted by: gnosis (Jun 16, 2010 05:11PM)
Some of my pet peeves:

wrong: Your wrong.
right: You're wrong.

Using the word "your" instead of "you're" is probably the most common spelling
mistake there is. All you have to remember is that "you're" is a contraction of "you
are" (think of the apostrophe as keeping the two words apart), and "your" is
the possessive (as in "your mom!").

wrong: What a waist of time.
right: What a waste of time.

The "waist" is the anatomical feature of your body around which your pants hang.

wrong: It's handle is broken.
right: Its handle is broken.

wrong: Its broken.
right: It's broken.

"Its" is the possessive. "It's" is a contraction of "it is".
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Jun 29, 2010 07:02PM)
Lately I've noticed a number of people throwing in superfluous apostrophes; in particular, there seems to be a strong contingent who believe that plurals deserve apostrophes.

Example: "I did a show a couple of day's ago."

Odd.

([i]It's[/i], by the way, can also be a contraction of [i]it has[/i]; e.g., [i]It's been fun[/i].)

"Would of", "could of", and "should of" are also bizarre (instead of "would've", "could've", and "should've", respectively). I understand that the sound is correct, but functionally "of" makes no sense in those constructions.
Message: Posted by: Thom Bliss (Jul 7, 2010 12:58PM)
Here’s some hints I have been given:

‘To,’ ‘two,’ ‘too.’
‘To’ can be pronounced as ‘Ta’ or ‘Tah;’ the other two can’t.
‘Two’ is the name of a number.
If it isn’t a number and it can’t be pronounced ‘tah,’ then it’s ‘too.’
“Would it be too much tah ask for you tah go the market tah buy two dozen eggs and maybe some ham, too!”

‘It’s,’ ‘its.’
‘It’s’ is a contraction. Contractions always have an apostrophe.
‘Its’ is a possessive pronoun. Possessive pronouns (e.g., ‘his,’ ‘her,’ ‘our,’ ‘ours,’ ‘their,’ ‘mine’) never have apostrophes.
“He’s [He is] in the driver’s [possessive noun] seat but it’s [it is] her [possessive pronoun] car.”
Message: Posted by: gnosis (Jul 17, 2010 07:53AM)
I really hate it when people use the word "to" when they should be using the word "too". It's like nails on a chalkboard.

wrong: "... to much", "... to heavy"
right: "... too much", "... too heavy"

wrong: "I liked it to."
right: "I liked it too."

This is a really common error in the Magic Café forums. I see it [b]all the time[/b]. I want to jump in and correct the misspelling, but correcting someone's spelling is considered rude and often taken as if it was meant to be a personal insult, even if (and especially if) the correction is correct. No wonder so many people spell so poorly. They could easily be taught to spell well, but everyone's too polite to help them.

Here's another relatively common spelling mistake I saw again recently: using "add" instead of "ad". The word "add" describes the act of adding (think of "addition"), such as adding two numbers together. The word "ad" is short for "advertisement".

wrong: "Did you see the add on tv last night?"
right: "Did you see the ad on tv last night?"

wrong: "Please ad two and two."
right: "Please add two and two."

Another typical example, in reference to someone adding you to their friends list (typically on MySpace):

wrong: "Thanks for the ad."
right: "Thanks for the add."

It's an addition to a friends list, not an advertisement.
Message: Posted by: ralphs007 (Jul 17, 2010 02:02PM)
[quote]
On 2010-07-07 13:58, Thom Bliss wrote:
Here’s some hints I have been given:

‘To,’ ‘two,’ ‘too.’
‘To’ can be pronounced as ‘Ta’ or ‘Tah;’ the other two can’t.
‘Two’ is the name of a number.
If it isn’t a number and it can’t be pronounced ‘tah,’ then it’s ‘too.’
“Would it be too much tah ask for you tah go the market tah buy two dozen eggs and maybe some ham, too!”[/quote]

Thanks,very helpful!
Message: Posted by: Dave Scribner (Jul 17, 2010 03:25PM)
I was always taught that when using "to" "two" and "too", substitute the word also. If it fits, then the word is "too".
Message: Posted by: gnosis (Jul 17, 2010 04:36PM)
[quote]
On 2010-07-17 16:25, Dave Scribner wrote:
I was always taught that when using "to" "two" and "too", substitute the word also. If it fits, then the word is "too".
[/quote]

It could also mean "very", as in "too cool!" (which means "very cool!", not "also cool!"), or "too much" (which means "very much", not "also much").
Message: Posted by: gnosis (Jul 18, 2010 02:11AM)
[quote]
On 2010-07-17 17:36, gnosis wrote:
It could also mean "very", as in "too cool!" (which means "very cool!", not "also cool!"), or "too much" (which means "very much", not "also much").
[/quote]

Actually, that should be "overly" or "excessively", not "very". A subtle difference, but enough of one for a pedant like me. :)
Message: Posted by: Dave Scribner (Jul 18, 2010 07:54AM)
There's always an exception to the rule in the English language. I don't think many will use "overly" in place of too or very but you are correct in the absolute.
Message: Posted by: Al Angello (Jul 18, 2010 10:52AM)
With all due respect, as a poor speller I am bothored by people who make posts only to criticize your spelling, or punctuation when you are on a roll. I am beyond help, but my thoughts are clear, and this is not a school teachers forum.
Message: Posted by: gnosis (Jul 18, 2010 03:30PM)
When I make a mistake in spelling (and I've made plenty in my time, believe me.. English is my second language) I am very grateful, assuming they're not doing it in a condescending manner or acting like I'm stupid just because I spelled something wrong. We all make mistakes, and that's fine. But I just enjoy learning and improving, and if someone can help me do that then I am thankful.
Message: Posted by: Al Angello (Jul 19, 2010 10:38AM)
English is my first language, but I spell like it is my second language. LOL
Message: Posted by: Dennis Michael (Jul 28, 2010 05:03PM)
To help, use Firefox browser, it has a spell checker built into it.
Message: Posted by: magicfish (Jul 29, 2010 08:57AM)
[quote]
On 2006-09-02 13:21, Mike T wrote:
Everybody has a slip up now and again (whether mental or physical) but I recently shared a tip (by PM) with a user who was getting slated for his spelling. My tip seems to have made a difference so I thought I'd share it around.
After typing a post I cut and paste it into an email and then spell check it, amend if necessary and then cut and paste it back. I know there's loads of programs that will check grammar as well so that would be even better but everyone's got email spell check and hey, it's a start.
The best thing is that it takes seconds to do.

Regards to all, Mike
[/quote]
I guess the grammatical error in the OP slipped by the old spell check!
Message: Posted by: magicfish (Jul 29, 2010 09:10AM)
I've never understood poor spelling. When I was in elementary school I used to enter spelling competitions. I think I won four or five over the years. Even as a child I couldn't understand why some couldn't spell. All I had to do when asked to spell a word is see the picture of the written word in my head as my eyes had seen many times while reading. I would simply "look" at the word in my head and then say it for the judges to hear. I didn't understand why everyone didn't do the same. When you read, you see the words written out on paper. Is it not a simple matter to just remember what the word looks like and then reproduce it? Perhaps this is not the case for everyone. Believe me, I don't think I'm smarter than others because I can spell well, I just don't really know how it's possible to be a poor speller provided english is your first language and you know how to read. Can any of you poor spellers enlighten me?
Genuinely curious, Rodney.
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Jul 29, 2010 12:07PM)
[quote]
On 2010-07-29 09:57, magicfish wrote:
[quote]
On 2006-09-02 13:21, Mike T wrote:
Everybody has a slip up now and again (whether mental or physical) but I recently shared a tip (by PM) with a user who was getting slated for his spelling. My tip seems to have made a difference so I thought I'd share it around.
After typing a post I cut and paste it into an email and then spell check it, amend if necessary and then cut and paste it back. I know there's loads of programs that will check grammar as well so that would be even better but everyone's got email spell check and hey, it's a start.
The best thing is that it takes seconds to do.

Regards to all, Mike
[/quote]
I guess the grammatical error in the OP slipped by the old spell check!
[/quote]

Post of the year!
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Jul 29, 2010 12:18PM)
[quote]
On 2010-07-29 10:10, magicfish wrote:
I've never understood poor spelling. When I was in elementary school I used to enter spelling competitions. I think I won four or five over the years. Even as a child I couldn't understand why some couldn't spell. All I had to do when asked to spell a word is see the picture of the written word in my head as my eyes had seen many times while reading. I would simply "look" at the word in my head and then say it for the judges to hear. I didn't understand why everyone didn't do the same. When you read, you see the words written out on paper. Is it not a simple matter to just remember what the word looks like and then reproduce it? Perhaps this is not the case for everyone. Believe me, I don't think I'm smarter than others because I can spell well, I just don't really know how it's possible to be a poor speller provided english is your first language and you know how to read. Can any of you poor spellers enlighten me?
Genuinely curious, Rodney.
[/quote]

Disclaimer: I'm not a poor speller. I'm not a perfect speller, but I'm not a poor one. That being said:

I think there's a correlation between one's spelling accuracy and the quantity of reading one does. It's not just about "knowing how" to read; it's about doing a lot of it. I know that I've always been a voracious reader, and I've always spelled pretty well. In my case, most misspelled words just look wrong, because I've read so much and seen them written correctly so often that the correct spellings have become internalized. Ditto grammar (at least in my case).


Grammar contribution (unrelated to spelling):

Right: Cindy doesn't like my singing in the shower.
Wrong: Cindy doesn't like me singing in the shower.

In this example (though not in all usages), the verb form ending in ING is a gerund. Gerunds function as nouns; thus, the possessive "my" is appropriate, for the same reason it would be correct to say, "Cindy doesn't like my car."
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Jul 29, 2010 12:21PM)
[quote]
On 2010-07-18 16:30, gnosis wrote:
When I make a mistake in spelling (and I've made plenty in my time, believe me.. English is my second language) I am very grateful, assuming they're not doing it in a condescending manner or acting like I'm stupid just because I spelled something wrong. We all make mistakes, and that's fine. But I just enjoy learning and improving, and if someone can help me do that then I am thankful.
[/quote]

As a lover of the language, I say, "Thank God for non-native speakers!" They seem to care a lot more about grammar than the natives do.
Message: Posted by: magicfish (Jul 29, 2010 01:30PM)
I agree, Lobo. I've always been a reader. I find those who don't spell well don't read very much.

Ps. Some horrendous errors that I don't understand:
- "I could care less!". This statement means you actually do care. The correct statement is, "I couldn't care less".

- Putting an apostrophe on a plural. Eg, " Kitten's for sale"

- "I have more then you". The difference between then and than is night and day.

- "could of, would of". It is could have or would have.

- " If I would've read the instructions It would be done by now". This might be the one that gets me most. It should read, "If I had've read the instructions it would be done by now".

Of course there are many more.

Rod
Message: Posted by: gnosis (Jul 30, 2010 08:58AM)
[quote]
- " If I would've read the instructions It would be done by now". This might be the one that gets me most. It should read, "If I had've read the instructions it would be done by now".
[/quote]

"had've"? Is that a mistake? Shouldn't it be, "if I [b]had[/b] read the instructions it would be done by now"?

[quote]
On 2010-07-29 10:10, magicfish wrote:
I've never understood poor spelling. When I was in elementary school I used to enter spelling competitions. I think I won four or five over the years. Even as a child I couldn't understand why some couldn't spell. All I had to do when asked to spell a word is see the picture of the written word in my head as my eyes had seen many times while reading. I would simply "look" at the word in my head and then say it for the judges to hear. I didn't understand why everyone didn't do the same. When you read, you see the words written out on paper. Is it not a simple matter to just remember what the word looks like and then reproduce it? Perhaps this is not the case for everyone. Believe me, I don't think I'm smarter than others because I can spell well, I just don't really know how it's possible to be a poor speller provided english is your first language and you know how to read. Can any of you poor spellers enlighten me?
Genuinely curious, Rodney.
[/quote]

I'm not a perfect speller by any means. I still make mistakes on some relatively common words, and there are probably tens of thousands of obscure words I'd have no clue about. If you can see words in your mind's eye and simply read how they're spelled, you are really gifted with both a fantastic memory and a very impressive imagination.

Even for a simple word like "and", I can't actually see it [b]at all[/b] in my mind's eye, and certainly not to the extent that I can actually read it as if I was reading a word that I see in the real world with my ordinary eyes. My own ability to spell words correctly is pretty mysterious to me... I just "know" how they're spelled, and they just look wrong when spelled incorrectly. It's more of a feeling rather a matter of visualizing the word in your mind and simply reading it, as is the case with you.
Message: Posted by: magicfish (Jul 30, 2010 09:30PM)
You're right about my sample sentence above, Gnosis, it was a weak attempt at trying to use a pet peeve of mine. It really gets to me when people say, "would of" instaead of "would have", or, "had of" instead of "had have".
Anyway, interesting. post above. Funny how minds work differently. I always took it for granted that everyone could recall information from their mind's eye the way I could.
Rod
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Aug 27, 2010 03:34AM)
[quote]
On 2010-07-29 13:18, LobowolfXXX wrote:

Grammar contribution (unrelated to spelling):

Right: Cindy doesn't like my singing in the shower.
Wrong: Cindy doesn't like me singing in the shower.


[/quote]

Sorry Lobo. BOTH are correct.

A third would also be correct:

Right: Cindy doesn't like me to sing in the shower.

Lets try another sentence:

Right: Cindy caught me lying about where I spent the night.
Right: Cindy caught my lying about where I spent the night.
Wrong: Cindy caught me to lie about where I spent the night.


The verb "like" can be followed by either an infinitive or gerund.

The verb "caught" can only be followed by a gerund.

Just for fun, let's use a verb that can only be followed by an infinitive...

Right: Cindy taught me to use better grammar.
Wrong: Cindy taught me using better grammar.

...and then ask the question of whether we can we say the following:

???: Cindy taught my to use better grammar.

Obviously not. And it all becomes clear: the [i]only[/i] reason that using "my" is correct in your first sentence is that a gerund can be possessed, which is accidental to what is actually occurring grammatically. Because if you really get down to it, it's odd. My "singing in the shower" is only vaguely and abstractly the same as my car in terms of my owning it; I'm not going to fill it up, change its oil, or wash and wax it. Nor will I sell it to a neighbor or put an ad in the paper about it. "Singing in the shower" is only [i]grammatically[/i] something to be possessed.

That's my analysis this morning, at least, after a very hard night. You know, they shouldn't give grammar teaching jobs to philosophers. They tend to over-analyze things.
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Aug 27, 2010 11:15AM)
[quote]
On 2010-08-27 04:34, stoneunhinged wrote:
[quote]
On 2010-07-29 13:18, LobowolfXXX wrote:

Grammar contribution (unrelated to spelling):

Right: Cindy doesn't like my singing in the shower.
Wrong: Cindy doesn't like me singing in the shower.


[/quote]

Sorry Lobo. BOTH are correct.

A third would also be correct:

Right: Cindy doesn't like me to sing in the shower.

Lets try another sentence:

Right: Cindy caught me lying about where I spent the night.
Right: Cindy caught my lying about where I spent the night.
Wrong: Cindy caught me to lie about where I spent the night.


The verb "like" can be followed by either an infinitive or gerund.

The verb "caught" can only be followed by a gerund.

Just for fun, let's use a verb that can only be followed by an infinitive...

Right: Cindy taught me to use better grammar.
Wrong: Cindy taught me using better grammar.

...and then ask the question of whether we can we say the following:

???: Cindy taught my to use better grammar.

Obviously not. And it all becomes clear: the [i]only[/i] reason that using "my" is correct in your first sentence is that a gerund can be possessed, which is accidental to what is actually occurring grammatically. Because if you really get down to it, it's odd. My "singing in the shower" is only vaguely and abstractly the same as my car in terms of my owning it; I'm not going to fill it up, change its oil, or wash and wax it. Nor will I sell it to a neighbor or put an ad in the paper about it. "Singing in the shower" is only [i]grammatically[/i] something to be possessed.

That's my analysis this morning, at least, after a very hard night. You know, they shouldn't give grammar teaching jobs to philosophers. They tend to over-analyze things.
[/quote]

"Singing" (as a gerund) may be an intangible thing, but it's still a thing, like my love or my happiness. I disagree that the grammar creates a trick that implies possession. The possession is inherent in the semantics, and the grammar catches it. "Bob's dancing" might be funny, but "Jim's" might not. There's a unique ownership there. It's "my" singing in the shower, not singing in general, or anyone else's singing. Gerunds refer to inherently (albeit intangibly) occurring nouns.

I'm not sure why you're saying that "me singing" would be correct, because you focus more on the infinitive than the participle, but if it's because "sing" is in essence a verb, you also have to explain why the objective "me" is acceptable for the subject of the verb.

Me reasoning (surely not, but how is it diffferent?) is that my "wrong" version is still wrong, but I'm open to (a more persuasive) argument or authority.
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Aug 27, 2010 01:23PM)
[quote]
On 2010-08-27 12:15, LobowolfXXX wrote:
I disagree that the grammar creates a trick that implies possession. The possession is inherent in the semantics, and the grammar catches it.
[/quote]

I didn't mean a "trick" (you magician, you!). I meant that since one can potentially mean possession that coincidentally the grammars plays along.

Let's go back to your example:

Cindy doesn't like my singing in the shower.

I read this to mean: Cindy doesn't like the singing which I do in the shower.

The (wrong!?) alternative:

Cindy doesn't like me singing in the shower.

I read this to mean: Cindy doesn't like it for me to sing in the shower.

Now, before I start digging into my books (which I need to do due to the new job and all; this may be mostly in fun, but I need to elevate my understanding of this stuff, and SOON!), why don't you deal with my counter example of Cindy catching me lying?

Can we agree that the following are incorrect?

wrong: Cindy taught my to use better grammar.
wrong: Cindy taught my using better grammar

If they are incorrect, then using your argument that a gerund--being a gerund--can (always) be "possessed" by a subject is simply wrong. (Note: no, you didn't say "always", but I think you understand why I had to add it...though without prejudice to your position.)

My position is that the fundamental issue here is whether a specific verb takes the infinitive or gerund or neither or both, and not the issue of the possessive pronoun, which in this case provides misdirection.

But of course, you were an English major, and I wasn't. So you might get the better of me in this duel. Still, I must stay the course, fight the fight, play till the last whistle blows at the end of the last inning, and all that with beer in hand and love in my heart.
Message: Posted by: Josh Chaikin (Aug 27, 2010 08:10PM)
I would have to agree with Jeff on this one. I do see both to be correct, for the reasons that Jeff gave. By adding "ing," yes, singing does become a tangible. Let's noun another verb, shall we (and let's not talk about why using noun as a verb is wrong...I know). "Mom doesn't like me running with scissors." Naturally read to mean "Mom doesn't like it when I run with scissors," or it could go like this "Mom doesn't like me, Running With Scissors," the latter being a proper name. ;)
Message: Posted by: Andrew Zuber (Nov 12, 2010 12:54PM)
I felt the need to bring this one back up after seeing all kinds of errors in a thread in the illusions section.
Maybe it's because I come from a long line of educators. Perhaps it's the fact that I read a lot. Maybe I'm just crazy. Regardless of what it is, I find that I don't take a post here as seriously if it's full of spelling and grammatical errors, or if The Poster Does This With Every Word For No Reason. I find this to be true with many magicians. It's laziness and it makes you look bad. If you can't spell a word, Google it. Quite simple, really. We're not a bunch of idiots; we can learn to spell.

A typo here and there happens. We've all experienced it. It's the posts filled with them that drive me crazy. I read my posts before I click 'Submit Reply' because I want it to be evident that I actually care about what I'm saying; I'm not just letting my fingers fly across the keyboard. You wouldn't perform a routine without rehearsing it first. Read your post before you submit it for the world to see.
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Jan 29, 2011 06:40AM)
Lobo, I just happened to have the chance of asking a linguist about the Cindy example. He agreed with me that "Cindy doesn't like me singing in the shower" is grammatically correct. His explanation is that "me singing in the shower" is a gerund phrase in the accusative case. It does make perfect sense to me that one can take the same phrase and make it either accusative or genetive by simply changing the determiner, so maybe it will make sense to you, too. Maybe not. Maybe the linguist I asked was also wrong.
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Jan 29, 2011 11:58AM)
Call back to an interesting discussion, and one I'd forgotten about. I'll think about this one some more.
Message: Posted by: landmark (Feb 2, 2011 07:48AM)
And of course, "I don't like Junior crossing the tracks; in fact I don't like Junior."
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Feb 2, 2011 10:01AM)
I'd write, "I don't like Junior's crossing the tracks..."
Message: Posted by: critter (Mar 29, 2011 05:53PM)
"I can't shop in the juniors' department."

If you've ever used the word "pedantic," you probably are. :)
Message: Posted by: rjs (Apr 28, 2011 12:09PM)
The most commonly mis-spelt town in England is Middlesborough.
It's actually spelt Middlesbrough.
Daft information, but you can at least win a drink in a bar bet.
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Apr 28, 2011 01:30PM)
Around here, most people seem to think that Tijuana is Tiajuana, and Westminster is Westminister.
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Jun 24, 2011 08:55PM)
[quote]On 2011-04-28 14:30, LobowolfXXX wrote:
Around here, most people seem to think that Tijuana is Tiajuana, and Westminster is Westminister.[/quote]
In [i]Vernon[/i]'s [b][i]Cutting the Aces[/i][/b] in [b]Stars of Magic[/b], the former is two words: [i]Tia Juana[/i].
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Jun 24, 2011 09:10PM)
[quote]On 2010-07-29 13:18, LobowolfXXX wrote:
I think there's a correlation between one's spelling accuracy and the quantity of reading one does. It's not just about "knowing how" to read; it's about doing a lot of it.[/quote]
It depends on what you read.

My mom used to be an excellent speller. Then she started teaching art history at Dominquez Hills College. After many years of reading term papers that were filled with spelling errors, her skill at spelling deteriorated considerably. She believes - as you do - that if you read good writing in quantity, your brain remembers how a word looks when it's spelled correctly, but that if you read poor writing in quantity, your memory of the correct spelling begins to erode, to be replaced with memories of incorrect spellings.

I'd love to see a long-term study done on this, but I'd hate to be the person forced to read poor spelling. Of course, these days it would be relatively easy: have the subjects read the posts on internet fora.
Message: Posted by: rjs (Aug 20, 2011 02:01PM)
Spellcheckers won't spot the mistake that mentalists sometimes make: confusing 'peeking' with 'peaking'.
eg Simon Edwards Mind Kontrol p.8 (2010)
Message: Posted by: Michael Daniels (Oct 31, 2011 11:01AM)
I remember many years ago reading an exam script on a question I had set my students about the developmental psychologist Jean Piaget. Throughout the answer, the student kept referring to "PRJ" - obviously he'd been to my lectures but never bothered to read anything. I guess my English West Country accent must have been much stronger in those days!

Mike
Message: Posted by: MobilityBundle (Oct 31, 2011 12:03PM)
Similarly to your story, Mike, there's a French mathematician named Lebesgue. Math students often encounter his name when they read about the Lebesgue integral. His name is pronounced "le BEG." (To be sure, I have no idea how his name is [i]supposed[/i] to be pronounced. What I mean is that his name is, [i]in practice[/i], pronounced that way.)

You can always spot a student who has done some reading ahead, because he'll ask questions about the "le BEZ gue" integral. Or in the reverse direction, I once figured out fellow student of mine never read any books, because he referred to Lebesgue integration as "the big integration."
Message: Posted by: Thom Bliss (Nov 3, 2011 05:04PM)
Does Cindy like your singing when you're not in the shower?

Does Cindy like you when you're not singing in the shower?

Does she like you when you're in the shower but not singing?

My first philosophy instructor said he once had a student who wrote about the philosophy of Harris Tuttle. I'm not sure if that was true or not, because he also told us Newton's friends called him "Fig."

Thom
.
Message: Posted by: critter (Feb 6, 2012 06:35PM)
"20 Common Grammar Mistakes that (Almost) Everyone Makes" -LitReactor:
http://litreactor.com/columns/20-common-grammar-mistakes-that-almost-everyone-gets-wrong
Message: Posted by: Bill Hilly (Apr 28, 2012 05:51PM)
There ain't nothing no sadder than to look into someone's writin' room and see a brand new, never opened, 10 year old Strunk & White.
Message: Posted by: Jim Sparx (May 20, 2012 03:11PM)
[quote]
On 2011-11-03 18:04, Thom Bliss wrote:


My first philosophy instructor said he once had a student who wrote about the philosophy of Harris Tuttle. I'm not sure if that was true or not, because he also told us Newton's friends called him "Fig."

Thom
.
[/quote]

Mark Twain had a step brother named, Choo Choo. He was a bongo player in a Cuban dance band in Chattanooga, Tenn.
Would I lie?
Message: Posted by: Frankie (Oct 26, 2012 03:12PM)
Making fun of grammar rules: :hysteric:

[url]http://youtu.be/N4vf8N6GpdM[/url]
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Oct 31, 2012 04:07AM)
[quote]On 2011-10-31 13:03, MobilityBundle wrote:
His name is pronounced "le BEG." (To be sure, I have no idea how his name is [i]supposed[/i] to be pronounced. What I mean is that his name is, [i]in practice[/i], pronounced that way.)[/quote]
It's supposed to be closer to <luh bayg>. (It's difficult to find an English cognate to the pronunciation of the French "Le"; it's not exactly <le>, and not exactly <luh>, but, maybe, something in between. The vowel in the second syllable is closer to a long "a" than a short "e".) I write this as something of an authority: although I speak precious little French, I'm assured by people who speak French natively that, when I do, I speak it with a perfect, Parisian accent. I can only credit my French professor with that one.
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Oct 31, 2012 04:10AM)
[quote]On 2011-10-31 12:01, Michael Daniels wrote:
I remember many years ago reading an exam script on a question I had set my students about the developmental psychologist Jean Piaget. Throughout the answer, the student kept referring to "PRJ" - obviously he'd been to my lectures but never bothered to read anything. I guess my English West Country accent must have been much stronger in those days![/quote]
That's hilarious!
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Oct 31, 2012 04:15AM)
[quote]On 2011-04-28 14:30, LobowolfXXX wrote:
Around here, most people seem to think that Tijuana is Tiajuana, and Westminster is Westminister.[/quote]
In a similar vein, in Orange, CA, most people seem to think that the main N/S street near the 57 Freeway is Tustin Avenue. In fact, it's Tustin [i]Street[/i]. It's Tustin Avenue in Santa Ana (just to the South of Orange), and Tustin Avenue in Anaheim (just to the North of Orange), but in Orange it's [i]Street[/i]. When I was in high school I'd have won a free lunch at KFC (which was Kentucky Fried Chicken back then) if the girl working the counter had had faith in her convictions.
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (May 4, 2013 11:30PM)
Restauranteur.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (May 7, 2013 01:02PM)
Pet peeves- Magicians who spell "sleight" as "slight" and everyone who writes "loose" when they mean "lose."
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (May 7, 2013 01:09PM)
Yeah, "loose" grates on me, too. I still say the most common one in wide use is "definately."

Not a spelling issue, but more and more I'm seeing a widespread phenomenon where verb phrases are disappearing. For instance, I've seen things like "The dog needs walked" instead of "the dog needs to be walked."
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (May 7, 2013 06:12PM)
Haven't heard that yet, but will listen for it.

Notice how many people write "per say" instead of "per se?"
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (May 15, 2013 02:51PM)
Just today I found three instances (right here on the Café) of people writing "momento" instead of "memento."

Arggh!
Message: Posted by: critter (Jul 10, 2013 12:38PM)
[quote]
On 2013-05-07 14:09, LobowolfXXX wrote:
Yeah, "loose" grates on me, too. I still say the most common one in wide use is "definately."

Not a spelling issue, but more and more I'm seeing a widespread phenomenon where verb phrases are disappearing. For instance, I've seen things like "The dog needs walked" instead of "the dog needs to be walked."
[/quote]

One year and seven minutes between this post and the one above it. It's an omen!
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Jul 11, 2013 11:02AM)
Ummmmm I don't get it. The seven minutes, yeah, but the year?!
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Jul 12, 2013 09:09PM)
Critter- Yes. The omen means "check your reading glasses." Both posts were written on the same day, seven minutes apart.
Message: Posted by: foreva.infiniti (Jul 21, 2013 07:03PM)
My spelling mistakes are never mental! Hell I've won my school's 5th AND 6th spelling bee though I lost in the regionals fairly ealry on... Its just that my mind has so many thoughts racing at once. Im thinking about one thing and having as conversation about another thing, which should be imposible for a human! I will spellcheck when Im on tha CPU but please forgive me if I speak in txt speak because I only access tha magic Café thru my phone which isn't smart.
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (Jul 28, 2013 06:06PM)
Thanks for clarifying that foreva, I've really wondered sometimes whether you were for real or not. You are forgiven. At least by me anyway. I can't vouch for the rest of this bunch. :)
Message: Posted by: foreva.infiniti (Jul 28, 2013 06:32PM)
Ah so this is what you were talking about last nite!
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (Jul 28, 2013 08:17PM)
[quote]
On 2013-07-28 19:32, foreva.infiniti wrote:
Ah so this is what you were talking about last nite!
[/quote]
Not sure which thread you are talking about. :)
Message: Posted by: InstantMagicBen (Aug 4, 2013 10:31AM)
Thanks for the tip, it sweems to work ok :)
Message: Posted by: Andrew Zuber (Sep 5, 2013 10:28PM)
I often access the Café from my phone. That said I've never found using the phone as an excuse for poor spelling. You can read through and correct your post if you really care.
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Oct 25, 2013 05:02PM)
Although I find it annoying to see people insert superfluous apostrophes in plurals, it's just plain weird when they write a single sentence with more that one plural, some of which contain the offending punctuation, and others of which don't.
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Oct 25, 2013 05:06PM)
Recently on the radio I've heard a commercial for a plumber in which the spokeswoman (probably an actress portraying a woman with a clogged drain, not an actual clogged-drain-owner) wonders aloud why she can't get a pumber to quote her a price for clearing her drain over the phone.

I wasn't even aware one [b][i]could[/i][/b] clear a drain over the phone. I should think it would be quite expensive.
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Oct 25, 2013 07:24PM)
[quote]
On 2013-10-25 18:06, S2000magician wrote:
Recently on the radio I've heard a commercial for a plumber in which the spokeswoman (probably an actress portraying a woman with a clogged drain, not an actual clogged-drain-owner) wonders aloud why she can't get a pumber to quote her a price for clearing her drain over the phone.

I wasn't even aware one [b][i]could[/i][/b] clear a drain over the phone. I should think it would be quite expensive.
[/quote]

Lol!
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Oct 25, 2013 07:25PM)
[quote]
On 2013-10-25 18:02, S2000magician wrote:
Although I find it annoying to see people insert superfluous apostrophes in plurals, it's just plain weird when they write a single sentence with more that one plural, some of which contain the offending punctuation, and others of which don't.
[/quote]

There's a store on Chapman advertising two products, both of which appears twice on the store's sign. One has the apostrophe (twice), and the other doesn't. No apparent reason.
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Nov 1, 2013 11:44AM)
Then there is the nonsensical turn-of-phrase; for example, "for all [b][i]intensive[/i][/b] purposes".

I have an acquaintance who oft says, "every [b][i]so[/i][/b] once in a while".

And the ubiquitous "would [b][i]of[/i][/b]", "could [b][i]of[/i][/b]", and "should [b][i]of[/i][/b]".

I just encountered a new one: "once [b][i]and[/i][/b] a while".
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Nov 1, 2013 07:37PM)
I still get annoyed at "irregardless."
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Nov 4, 2013 02:17PM)
[quote]On 2013-11-01 20:37, mastermindreader wrote:
I still get annoyed at "irregardless."[/quote]
Merriam-Webster claims that that's a "humorous euphemism for 'regardless'."

Humorous, indeed!
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Nov 6, 2013 11:24AM)
Here's one I see nearly every day on the Café- posters writing "preformed" when they mean "performed."

Do they consider themselves to be preformers? And, if so, does that mean they do a lot of pre-show work?
Message: Posted by: wulfiesmith (Nov 9, 2013 01:18PM)
I always dreamed of being a whriter ... now I are one ...
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Dec 16, 2013 08:09PM)
Just saw another post in which the writer refers to a point made earlier as being "mute."

That's one I see a lot. Since I doubt that things will change, my objection is probably moot.
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (Dec 17, 2013 02:39AM)
A mute point? I'm dumbfounded.
Message: Posted by: slowkneenuh (Dec 22, 2013 10:09AM)
Would everyone prefer no communication rather than one with grandma and spelling errors?
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (Dec 22, 2013 07:42PM)
I loved my grandma and was more than willing to endure her spelling errors.
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Mar 11, 2014 09:07PM)
Recently I've come across a lot of examples of "everyday" when the writer means "every day".

I also got a notification from Facebook recently that one of my friends posted a snapshot of this:

[i]A [b]best friend[/b] won't
agree with you to make
you happy. If anything,
they'll say what needs
to be said, no matter if
you wan[b]'[/b]t to hear it or
not.[/i]

Sigh.
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Mar 12, 2014 12:33AM)
I'm more dismayed by the subject-pronoun disagreement than the apostrophe. :)
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Mar 12, 2014 08:37AM)
Surely you wouldn't prefer [i]he'll/she'll[/i].
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Mar 12, 2014 11:09AM)
True, but there are alternatives.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Mar 12, 2014 11:31AM)
I'd just pick either "he'll" or "she'll." But "he'll/she'll," though awkward, would still be correct. (It would be nice if we had a neutral singular pronoun other than "it.")
Message: Posted by: Garbo (Mar 21, 2014 11:22AM)
Could you be more pacific...?
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (May 29, 2014 11:45AM)
When did "never mind" become one word?

Similarly for "a lot".
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (May 31, 2014 11:43PM)
And, apparently, "at least".
Message: Posted by: Michael Baker (Jun 1, 2014 02:29AM)
Theiyr're
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Jun 20, 2014 07:54PM)
A serious question (I know: utterly out of character for me, but try to get past that):

I'm a moderator on another forum whose constituency comprises a lot of people who are not native English speakers and who, because of the nature of the forum, ask a lot of technical questions and, therefore, proffer a lot of technical answers.

When I find that someone has made a serious error in their writing - using a homonym, for example, or egregious misspelling - is it appropriate to use my superpowers to edit their posts, or is that overstepping my bounds?

(Then, alas, there's the native English speaker who wrote that, "<a particular organization> never [b][i]seizes[/i][/b] to amaze me." Sigh.)
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Jun 21, 2014 12:15AM)
[quote]On Jun 20, 2014, S2000magician wrote:
When I find that someone has made a serious error in their writing - using a homonym, for example, or egregious misspelling - is it appropriate to use my superpowers to edit their posts, or is that overstepping my bounds?
[/quote]

I think you should leave the posts as they are, even though changing them would clearly not alter their meaning, for all intensive purposes.
Message: Posted by: landmark (Jun 23, 2014 08:09AM)
Not a peeve, more like something I always wondered about: curious/curiosity. I'm curious why curiosity drops the u. Are there any analogous examples?
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Jun 23, 2014 10:42AM)
Viscous/viscosity
Luminous/luminosity
Voluminous/voluminosity
Message: Posted by: Devious (Jun 23, 2014 11:42AM)
[quote]On Jun 20, 2014, S2000magician wrote:
(Then, alas, there's the native English speaker who wrote that, "<a particular organization> never [b][i]seizes[/i][/b] to amaze me." Sigh.) [/quote]

This had me in hysterics...thanks for the chuckle, you serious gentleman you!
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Jun 24, 2014 05:10PM)
[quote]On Jun 23, 2014, LobowolfXXX wrote:
Viscous/viscosity
Luminous/luminosity
Voluminous/voluminosity[/quote]
Monstrous/monstrosity
Pompous/pomposity
Message: Posted by: MobilityBundle (Jun 24, 2014 11:23PM)
Porous / Porosity

Along the same lines, judge / judgment (drops the e)

But not Devious / Deviosity. :)
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Jun 25, 2014 09:12AM)
Humorous/humorosity
Glamorous/glamorosity
Ridiculous/ridiculosity
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Jun 26, 2014 04:40PM)
Here's one I'd not seen before: [i]gratitudity[/i].
Message: Posted by: Devious (Jun 26, 2014 08:11PM)
That doesn't even sound correct.
Try to use that in a sentence please?
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Jun 27, 2014 11:33AM)
A [i]gratitudity[/i] of 18% will be added to bills for all parties of 10 or more.
Message: Posted by: Devious (Jun 29, 2014 01:57AM)
Platitude/platitudity
(No shizz?) that's a new one for me.

"The platypuss' nudity was fraught with platitudity."
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Jun 29, 2014 01:10PM)
[quote]On Jun 29, 2014, Devious wrote:
Platitude/platitudity
(No shizz?) that's a new one for me.

"The platypuss' nudity was fraught with platitudity."[/quote]
On the subject of [i]spelling mistakes[/i] . . . [i]platypus[b]s[/b][/i]?
Message: Posted by: Devious (Jun 30, 2014 04:25AM)
Ha-ha...I'm blaming my phone's spell check for this one.
Kudos for the correction.
Message: Posted by: Devious (Jun 30, 2014 11:31AM)
I read this in the comments section of an article on
stem cell research discussing the growing back of lost
teeth from urine samples.

"I would like to [b]voluntear[/b] for this study.
I have bin wading a long time for sumthing like this."

[b]Volunteer[/b], although I can see why he is in tears
after losing some teeth.
:goodluck:
Message: Posted by: Dave Scribner (Jul 1, 2014 05:50PM)
Ispell is a free program for spell checking. With it downloaded, you just need to type your message, click on tools at the top of the page. Ispell will open a window showing each misspelled word which you can change.
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Jul 15, 2014 06:59PM)
[b][i]Offly[/i][/b].

As in, [i]You're [b]offly[/b] sensitive today.[/i]
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Jul 15, 2014 11:24PM)
[quote]On Jul 1, 2014, Dave Scribner wrote:
Ispell is a free program for spell checking. With it downloaded, you just need to type your message, click on tools at the top of the page. Ispell will open a window showing each misspelled word which you can change. [/quote]

Or just use a browser (like Firefox) that automatically checks your spelling as you type. In Firefox you can select this in options>advanced in the tools menu.
Message: Posted by: wulfiesmith (Jul 17, 2014 11:25PM)
You should always try to improve one's vocabillary ...
Message: Posted by: Steve Friedberg (Dec 7, 2014 12:05AM)
Bob,
Then we get into the spellchecker mistakes that are auto-generated on your smartphone. I'm guilty of those. Actually, my phone's guilty; I've just failed to proofread.
Message: Posted by: funsway (Dec 8, 2014 07:44AM)
In Al Schneider's wonderful "The Theory and Practice of Magic Deception" he has the line, "the thundering heard invests more in what they say ..."

I wrote this off as a foible of Spellcheck, but chuckled at the inadvertent pun. I even felt somewhat excused for similar errors passed over in self-editing some of my eBooks.

but later in the book the same replacement of "heard" for "herd" was made -- and I now wonder.

Di the first acceptance of the phrase by the software make it seem natural the next time around? If so, it supports AL's theory about how the human mind "routers" information.

Did Al do this deliberately to use the pun as re-enforcement of the concept of our visual blindness?

Did he do it deliberately to test our intellectual laziness?

Three options (maybe more) that all support in a different way why magic works.

....

and I just realized the pun works the other way -- "the politician herd our requests"
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Dec 8, 2014 06:39PM)
What about the obvious explanation that Al simply misspelled the word?
Message: Posted by: funsway (Dec 8, 2014 07:40PM)
[quote]On Dec 8, 2014, mastermindreader wrote:
What about the obvious explanation that Al simply misspelled the word? [/quote]


Twice? That is what Spellcheck is for isn't it? To catch spelling errors and offer alternatives. Isn't that what editors are for?

It is also possible that Al doesn't know the difference between the words or assumes the reader does not.

None of those options are "obvious" to me.

Based on conversations I have had with Al I suspect he knows and deliberately left it in - whether the first error was intentional or not is unknown.

Regardless, it is my opinion that the way our mind deals with errors and puns is similar to how we deal with magic effects.

If someone actually reads my mind or just pretends to I can be equally astonished.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Dec 9, 2014 01:04PM)
Occam's Razor- the simplest explanation is the most likely. Also note that Schneider's book was released in 1998. It may be a mistake to assume that he used spell check or even a computer when he wrote it.
Message: Posted by: 0pus (Dec 9, 2014 01:27PM)
Actually, I am not entirely sure a 1998 spell checker would identify "heard" as a misspelling. It is a perfectly legitimate word.

Spell checkers often fail to identify homonyms as errors: There/Their; There's/theirs; It's/Its, etc.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Dec 9, 2014 04:43PM)
Exactly.
Message: Posted by: funsway (Dec 10, 2014 01:19AM)
[quote]On Dec 9, 2014, mastermindreader wrote:
Occam's Razor- the simplest explanation is the most likely. Also note that Schneider's book was released in 1998. It may be a mistake to assume that he used spell check or even a computer when he wrote it. [/quote]


Spellcheck came out as an feature of Wordstar in the late 1980's. Both words would certainly have been in there.

SInce computer users back then knew of its limitations they would have had someone else edit their work.

Al says he used a computer and even wrote the program to translate his writings into a book printable format.

No "mistake" -- I just read what he wrote in his book. Besides the book was edited and printed by a publishing company paid to edit it.

Things are overlooked. Even twice. They can also be deliberate, as in doing a magic trick. The book is about deception and assumptions.

Instead of attacking my guess or conclusion, what not enjoy the humorous pun aspects of the event?
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Dec 10, 2014 01:32AM)
Who's attacking anything, Ken? All I'm saying that Al obviously made a mistake that his editor, if he had one, didn't pick up. Wordstar wouldn't have picked it up either, because that simply checked its internal dictionary and didn't distinguish homonyms.
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Jan 20, 2015 08:53PM)
When did [i]alot[/i] and [i]atleast[/i] each become one word?
Message: Posted by: 0pus (Jan 21, 2015 01:31PM)
Probably around the same time as "all right" became "a'ight."
Message: Posted by: Josh Riel (May 24, 2015 04:13AM)
Don't worry Homes, I'm here. I can explain things to lesser beings.
Message: Posted by: magicfish (Nov 25, 2015 01:47PM)
I could of been a contender.
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Dec 12, 2015 10:42PM)
[quote]On Nov 25, 2015, magicfish wrote:
I could of been a contender.[/quote]
An e-mail from one of my (university) accounting students:

[i]Would I be able to take [the exam I missed] to see what I would of got, I think it would really help me.[/i]

Sigh.
Message: Posted by: magicfish (Dec 15, 2015 08:30PM)
[quote]On Dec 12, 2015, S2000magician wrote:
[quote]On Nov 25, 2015, magicfish wrote:
I could of been a contender.[/quote]
An e-mail from one of my (university) accounting students:

[i]Would I be able to take [the exam I missed] to see what I would of got, I think it would really help me.[/i]

Sigh. [/quote]
This is the one I simply cannot comprehend.
We learn should've, would've, could've, in grade 3? Maybe 4?
I cannot fathom how anybody can write, "If I would of turned left this wouldn't of happened."
Did they drop out of elementary school?
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Jan 2, 2016 04:01PM)
[quote]On Dec 15, 2015, magicfish wrote:
[quote]On Dec 12, 2015, S2000magician wrote:
[quote]On Nov 25, 2015, magicfish wrote:
I could of been a contender.[/quote]
An e-mail from one of my (university) accounting students:

[i]Would I be able to take [the exam I missed] to see what I would of got, I think it would really help me.[/i]

Sigh. [/quote]
This is the one I simply cannot comprehend.
We learn should've, would've, could've, in grade 3? Maybe 4?
I cannot fathom how anybody can write, "If I would of turned left this wouldn't of happened."
Did they drop out of elementary school? [/quote]

magicfish, I understand your confusion, but is easily explained. English is not written phonetically, yet people have the need to write what they hear, regardless of what they learned in school.

"Could have" is, in everyday speech, "could'v". "Could'v" is phonetically identical to "could of", so people get confused. (To use IPA transcription: /kʊd hæv/ is usually pronounced as /kʊdəv/. )

No one (except Bill, maybe) actlually says, "could have", so the mistake is quite understandable.
Message: Posted by: magicfish (Jan 22, 2016 07:11AM)
It is not understandable to me because even though it may sound phonetically like "could of"
my grade 3 education and my memory of seeing the contraction written in the books I read allows me to write the correct, "could've".
knife sounds phonetically like nife. But because of basic english literacy, I'm able to read and write and comprehend "knife".
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Jan 26, 2016 01:40AM)
Education isn't what it used to be, magicfish.
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Jan 29, 2016 11:37AM)
Apparently (at least, according to another forum I frequent, populated by ostensibly well-educated people), "goodluck" is now one word.

Sigh.
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Jan 29, 2016 11:43AM)
[quote]On Jan 2, 2016, stoneunhinged wrote:
[quote]On Dec 15, 2015, magicfish wrote:
[quote]On Dec 12, 2015, S2000magician wrote:
[quote]On Nov 25, 2015, magicfish wrote:
I could of been a contender.[/quote]
An e-mail from one of my (university) accounting students:

[i]Would I be able to take [the exam I missed] to see what I would of got, I think it would really help me.[/i]

Sigh.[/quote]
This is the one I simply cannot comprehend.
We learn should've, would've, could've, in grade 3? Maybe 4?
I cannot fathom how anybody can write, "If I would of turned left this wouldn't of happened."
Did they drop out of elementary school?[/quote]
magicfish, I understand your confusion, but is easily explained. English is not written phonetically, yet people have the need to write what they hear, regardless of what they learned in school.

"Could have" is, in everyday speech, "could'v". "Could'v" is phonetically identical to "could of", so people get confused. (To use IPA transcription: /kʊd hæv/ is usually pronounced as /kʊdəv/. )

No one (except Bill, maybe) actlually says, "could have", so the mistake is quite understandable.[/quote]
Nevertheless, "could of" makes no sense. Nobody (I hope!) would ever say, "could [b][i]from[/i][/b]".

The problem, I think, is that people don't [b][i]think[/i][/b] about what they say (or write); it's reflex.

(For the record, I do say, "could've", "would've", and "should've"; but I know what I'm eliding.)
Message: Posted by: Josh Riel (May 14, 2016 12:02AM)
[quote]On May 26, 2007, Josh Riel wrote:
I have a lot of slight of hands on my sight.

Posted: May 26, 2007 3:30am
Quote:


On 2007-03-23 23:00, jlevey wrote:


Before the google spellcheck...

"Regaurding thee gooogle spillcheck, leets c iff it werks..."

After the google spellcheck...

"Regarding thee google spellcheck, leets c if it works."


Hmmm. Google always capitalizes it's own name by default.

"Thee" is a correctly spelled word "c" won't get checked and words like "hap4py" are ignored because of the stupid "OMG's" and crap that is common with the retarded public school taught common vernacular.

So either we proof read as well as spell check, or we sound as stupid as I do while doing both. [/quote]

That was like 9 years ago, I'm su8rprised I'm not dead... now what else about spelling?
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (May 22, 2016 07:46PM)
[quote]On Jan 29, 2016, S2000magician wrote:
Apparently (at least, according to another forum I frequent, populated by ostensibly well-educated people), "goodluck" is now one word.

Sigh. [/quote]

Not surprising, really. It's also a Christian name, as in Goodluck Jonathan, the former President of Nigeria.
Message: Posted by: George Ledo (Jul 7, 2016 11:16AM)
I have to (want to) think this was an honest typo, but still...

On another forum, someone mentioned she was getting a teaching job in the United Arab Emeritus. The post didn't say it had been sent from a phone or pad, and it had a very long signature, so I'm guessing she didn't dictate it to a voice recognition system.

This was a high school teacher with many years of experience.
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Jul 9, 2016 10:57PM)
[quote]On Jul 7, 2016, George Ledo wrote:
On another forum, someone mentioned she was getting a teaching job in the United Arab Emeritus.[/quote]
A prestigious little country, that one.
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Oct 29, 2016 03:41PM)
In my accounting classes, my students seem to have a very difficult time with:

[list][*][i]Receivable[/i] (even when it's correctly spelled in the question they're answering): usually "ie" instead of "ei"
[*][i]Assessment[/i]: usually missing the fourth "s"
[/list]
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Sep 4, 2017 12:28PM)
Here's a spelling mistake I often make:

English: address
German: Adresse

Uh...that's the way I thkink it is. Maybe I'm wrong. Living nearly a quarter of a century with another language messes you up.
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Sep 10, 2017 11:22PM)
[quote]On Sep 4, 2017, stoneunhinged wrote:
German: Adre[b][i]ss[/i][/b]e[/quote]
Not [i]eszett[/i]?
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Nov 8, 2017 05:23AM)
No, not ß.

The rules have changed, Bill, and the ß isn't what it used to be.

Adresse, not Adreße.
Message: Posted by: magicfish (Feb 23, 2018 09:15PM)
How are there people roaming the planet who don't know that the word 'than' exists. Even during a digital exchange when they are reading the word, they continue to use 'then'. It drives me crazy.
Message: Posted by: Dynamike (Jun 7, 2018 12:05AM)
I beleive basicly people mispell becauze they are writeing to fast. I remeber thee other day I suprised myself what I misplelled in thee sentince I occured. People thougt I was a foriegner. Unfortunatly I realy embarassed myself. Tommorow the neccessary time from begining too end I will put in more time so I will acheive and bee succesful with my buisness.
Message: Posted by: magicfish (Jun 7, 2018 02:17PM)
Another one that people get wrong a lot is "it's"
When it should be "its".
The dog shook its head.
The bear licked its wounds.
The snake shed its skin.
"It's" is not possessive but rather a contraction for "it is".
If confused, think of How little sense it would make to say, "the snake shed it is skin".
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Jun 12, 2018 01:39AM)
Yeah, that's a confusing use of the apostrophe. The apostrophe indicates both genitives and contractions: but the word "it" needs to be both genitivized and contracted, so there is a problem.

Have we talked about dessert and desert?

It, too, is confusing, and for good reason: the spelling rules we learned in school don't apply. Why not?

I blame French.
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Jun 15, 2018 02:11AM)
[quote]On Jun 7, 2018, magicfish wrote:
"It's" is not possessive but rather a contraction for "it is".[/quote]
Or "it has".
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Jun 15, 2018 02:12AM)
[quote]On Jun 12, 2018, stoneunhinged wrote:
Yeah, that's a confusing use of the apostrophe. The apostrophe indicates both genitives and contractions: but the word "it" needs to be both genitivized and contracted, so there is a problem.[/quote]
In English, possessive pronouns haven't apostrophes.
Message: Posted by: magicfish (Jun 24, 2018 07:23PM)
[quote]On Jun 15, 2018, S2000magician wrote:
[quote]On Jun 7, 2018, magicfish wrote:
"It's" is not possessive but rather a contraction for "it is".[/quote]
Or "it has". [/quote]
Correct sir.
Message: Posted by: magicfish (Jun 24, 2018 07:24PM)
Or is it, "Correct, sir."?
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Jun 25, 2018 01:37AM)
[quote]On Jun 15, 2018, S2000magician wrote:
In English, possessive pronouns haven't apostrophes. [/quote]

True. But what other pronouns are ever contracted orthographically?

The problem, as I see it, is that the spelling rules we learned in school were *both* phonological AND grammatical, and there is orthographical tension between the two.

Grammar, phonology, orthography: these things blend--or fail to blend--too much for people to get all huffed up and persnickety. Yet we do. I do, too.

I myself blame not only the French, but Willm Shakspere.
Message: Posted by: dave_matkin (Jul 16, 2018 03:38PM)
[quote]On Sep 3, 2006, pradell wrote:
I Did the emoticon I typed in show up in the right place? Are any links properly highlighted? Does it look like it is ready for everyone to see? This is also a good tip for anyone who emails to others: review, spell check, and/or print the email out and look at it before hitting the "send" button.

:magicrabbit: [/quote]


No the emoticon isn't working... Unless you intended it that way. ;)
Message: Posted by: dave_matkin (Jul 16, 2018 03:46PM)
[quote]On Sep 29, 2006, Muckey Spleen wrote:
[quote]
On 2006-09-03 20:15, TannerJade wrote:
Good advice :)

Also, I recommend the GOOGLE toolbar, which has a button on it called "Check" and it is a GREAT spell check, that will take the writing write of what you are typing ON the Café, so there is not need for copying and pasting...

Tanner
[/quote]


Of course, as long as what you misspelled is still a word (just the wrong one), spellcheck programs will give it the nod, as demonstrated in the above post. ;)
Nothing beats a careful proofread. [/quote]

I can do "careful proofread"ing until the cows come home. I will still probably miss my own errors. It's part of my dyslexia. When I'm on my PC I have access to Text Help Read and Write Gold which will read it back to me, allow me to check for homophones and then read it to me again. It's a great tool, it also lets me put a digital coloured filter up on my screen to help with my Irlen syndrome too! It's not a cheap program though. I have a similar app on my iPad ... It's not as easy to use as the PC version.

Thanks for all the ideas everyone.