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Topic: Am I alone in this?
Message: Posted by: Margarette (Sep 7, 2006 08:31PM)
I am having extreme difficulty in dealing with the upcoming five-year anniversary of the events of September 11, 2001. Am I the only one having difficulty dealing with this anniversary? I've already warned my co-workers and bosses that Monday will be extremely difficult for me. Just keep the co-worker that I will be traveling with on Monday in your thoughts and prayers!

Margarette
Message: Posted by: rossmacrae (Sep 7, 2006 09:10PM)
You gots ta TRAVEL on 9/11? I feel for you - you might want to consider preparing by drinking heavily.

Different people react to traumatic events differently - never be ashamed that you know yourself well enough to anticipate this reaction (which IMO is well within the normal range). Your suffering is real, though of course you should do your best to keep to a reasonable level the amount of it you dump on your colleague. Act like an adult about it, and then make no apologies at all for whatever amount exceeds your efforts to keep your composure.
Message: Posted by: RandyStewart (Sep 7, 2006 09:28PM)
Margaret, I wouldn't worry about it. To the cowards responsible, an anniversary means nothing.

So it happened to the day this coming 9/11 but what about the last and the one before? To such a terrorist mind, any, and most days are good days for their activity.

They also act on the unsuspecting during unsuspected times. Anniversaries just aren’t low alert times and too many people focused on scrutinizing suspicious activity.

I'd rather fly on such an anniversary.
Message: Posted by: Chessmann (Sep 7, 2006 11:05PM)
Why do you suppose that it is hitting you so hard, Margarette?
Message: Posted by: Cliffg37 (Sep 8, 2006 08:08AM)
I am with you lass.

Speaking as a New Yorker, who watched those towers being built, speaking as one who used to work in tower two, I also get hit hard by the anniversary.

I think it is normal to feel something when the country you love and care about gets raped, and 3000 some innocent people are slaughtered for a madman to prove some point that I can't fathom.

It is normal Margarette, just work though it as best you can. That is what I am doing.
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (Sep 8, 2006 08:20AM)
[quote]
On 2006-09-07 21:31, Margarette wrote:
I am having extreme difficulty in dealing with the upcoming five-year anniversary of the events of September 11, 2001. ...[/quote]

You are not alone. Our media are pushing this reminder of a tragedy as an "anniversary" and "potential threat" day.
Message: Posted by: Margarette (Sep 8, 2006 08:48AM)
[quote]
On 2006-09-08 00:05, Chessmann wrote:
Why do you suppose that it is hitting you so hard, Margarette?
[/quote]

I'm not sure why this anniversary is hitting me so hard...the others didn't affect me like this. But then, it might be because I made a trip to NYC last year. I didn't visit Ground Zero because of a personal choice, but I did see the changed skyline of Manhattan from the Staten Island Ferry. It might be that because until I actually saw it for myself, the full effect of the events of that day weren't "real". Yes, I know the events did happen, and I know I lost two cousins in the Towers, but until I saw the skyline for myself, real and in person, I may have tried to keep telling myself that it was all just a bad dream.

Margarette
Message: Posted by: rossmacrae (Sep 8, 2006 09:54AM)
Sometimes I surprise myself - usually I can deal with negative events and still tend to the necessities-of-the-moment without getting stalled (heck, SOMEBODY still has to pay the bills and get the kids to school) - my wife thinks I'm a bit heartless because her family flies into a tizzy whenever a second-cousin visits the hospital. But when I see a pre-9/11 movie, and there's the New York skyline with the towers still standing, I get a chill I just don't get at other times.

I live about 2 miles from the Pentagon, and on 9/11 I was recovering from a stroke and unfit to drive ... my older son was in school about half a mile from the Pentagon. It took a lot of convincing to get me to stay home and not get the car to the school somehow. I don't feel entitled to feel "shellshocked" because others were faqr more directly involved. Also, our tragedy in DC took far fewer lives and the rescuers here weren't killed as they were in New York.

Here, the geopolitical meaning of the Pentagon attack overshadows the human toll we suffered on 9/11, especially because we have a large number of high-ranking military families nearby, and we often get distracted from the thought of any local danger - every time there's something in the news, we are reminded that the fathers and mothers we see weekly at Cub Scout meetings might be on the battlefront at a moment's notice. Even before 9/11, it was an unnerving feeling to visit the Pentagon as I was called upon to do several times, and pass through the open center area - there's a little vending kiosk exactly in the middle, and I just couldn't shake the thought, "I'm standing on the exact spot where more than one missile is targeted."

Like you, I'd feel awfully uneasy about flying on any September 11th. Our experience here makes me uneasy several times a day wondering whether that surveillance helicopter passing low overhead is on a routine flight, or alerted to some current threat - or wondering exactly what is in the back of that unmarked panel truck just ahead of me on the bridge into the city.

I'll tell you, Margarette, what we all have to keep telling each other: have courage.
Message: Posted by: Leland Stone (Sep 8, 2006 10:57AM)
My concern is not that Margarette -- and others like her -- have such profound feelings regarding this date, but rather that so many do not.

In the aftermath of 9/11, I discussed with another Magician the events of the day, calling them a watershed moment in our Nation's history (on par with Pearl Harbour, for example). He dismissed this notion, saying that the event was unlikely to remain in our collective consciousness for very long at all.

It seems that I must reluctlantly agree with that dismal assessment. In our MTV culture we have traded away a sense of history for tabloid trivia; the Greatest Generation was followed by the Pepsi generation who in turn brought along Generation X. What in previous times would have galvanised our citizenry into a greater sense of patriotism and unity has instead disintegrated into little more than a passing thought.

There are pockets of deep remembrance, of course, where moment and gravity are solemnly acknowledged; where the sacrifices of those who offered "the last full measure of devotion" are afforded due yet still inadequate reverence; where the cost of liberty is reckoned as very high indeed. But elsewhere, hype is prevalent, and looking behind it -- the television movies, the Capitol wrangling, the whining of a former President -- what substance is found there? What lasting sense of "we," as in "We the people," and "E Pluribus Unum," has this most horrific terrorist attack on America's soil inspired in Americans?

Leland
Message: Posted by: Payne (Sep 8, 2006 12:04PM)
Being on the other side of the country I was not emotionally effected by the tragedy of 9-11. It is easy to keep the situation contained as an abstract as I had no Friends or relatives that were killed or injured in the mishap. Much like many of the people in this country look at the victims of the recent Tsunami. Horrible yes, but something that happened far, far away to people we didn't know.
I am more horrified by the after effects of 9-11 than I was the tragedy itself. But since political discourse is not allowed on these boards I will have to refrain from elucidating further.
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (Sep 8, 2006 12:35PM)
A friend's family lived and continues to live just a few blocks away.

Three weeks after the event, I saw the space where the towers stood from the highway in New Jersey. I saw the on-site lighting illuminate the column of smoke creating what looked like a ghostly image in the place where the world trade center was. My friend told me the place was still burning.

That Thanksgiving extended family who teach at Stuyvesant High School told stories about the area and its coat of ash which finally washed away in the fall rains.

Now FINALLY stories about the air quality issues are coming out in the media.

I will not make political comment about our government or those who believed such an act was in any way useful.

I will decry the use of our media to create unease in our society.
Message: Posted by: Doug Higley (Sep 8, 2006 12:56PM)
"I am more horrified by the after effects of 9-11 than I was the tragedy itself."

It is statements like that that are the reason political arguments are not allowed on the forum. Though that one line was enough I'm sure to get some dander up on more than a few here. grrrrrrrrrr.
Message: Posted by: irossall (Sep 8, 2006 02:52PM)
[quote]
On 2006-09-08 13:56, Doug Higley wrote:
"I am more horrified by the after effects of 9-11 than I was the tragedy itself."

It is statements like that that are the reason political arguments are not allowed on the forum. Though that one line was enough I'm sure to get some dander up on more than a few here. grrrrrrrrrr.
[/quote]

I think what Payne is saying is 9/11 is being used as an excuse by the powers to be, to take away our own freedoms here in the U.S.A. and to be honest, I agree with Payne (please correct me Payne if I am wrong).
Nobody in their right mind could think that 9/11 was anything less than tragic.
Iven :patty:
Message: Posted by: Vandy Grift (Sep 8, 2006 03:09PM)
I'm pretty sure we know what Payne is saying.

Besides the hassles at the airport, what rights have you lost? And are they worth the price to protect you and your fellow citizens?

A lot of the talk of "lost rights" is hysterical nonsense. In many cases it's the painting of a false picture by the same people that accuse the Government of painting a false picture of the terror threat.

What I'm saying is that not a lot of people can honestly claim that their rights have been trampled upon. Yes all our lives have changed. However, there is no doubt about what went down on 9/11. The threat of terror attacks is not a percieved threat. It's very real, we have been seeing it for years. And, apparently, even 9/11 has not proven to be enough of a wake up call. Maybe it's easier to rail against what isn't than actually face up to, and rail against, what really is. I guess it's just easier to fight a straw man than a real enemy.

NOTE TO MODS; If you must delete my post, that's fine. Please don't punish Margarette by deleting the entire thread. I took it here, noone else.
Message: Posted by: Doug Higley (Sep 8, 2006 03:18PM)
Bingo Vandy. And goodbye thread.
Message: Posted by: Jaz (Sep 8, 2006 04:33PM)
It's something I can't forget.
My company was about to close in a week or so.
The printing presses were quiet and a few of us sat around discussing what we might do.
A fellow comes by and mentions that a plane hit a tower.
First thoughts were a small plane.
A coworker and I decided to go to a place called Rifle Camp Park on Garrett Mountain.
There were many cars and at the panoramic viewpoint we could see the smoking tower.
The police chased us all but as we walked through the Nature Center there was a TV.
The announcer sounded shocked and as we looked we saw the first tower collapse.
Fright, saddness, confusion was on every face.
An seeming impossible danger had appeared in our back yard. What was next??

Between being put out of work and this nightmare I felt my imagination run wild and that the world had been pulled out from beneath me.

Later, looking out at NYC skyline without the WTC, it felt like someone had turned back time.
Message: Posted by: kregg (Sep 8, 2006 05:01PM)
Aside from the senselessness of the act; instead of sadness, think of the way people around the world united in an eruption of compassion. Remember the brave and the heroic, the countless stories of sacrifice and the generosity. This is the true part of the human spirit, even the meek showed strength.
Sadly, some retreated to political corners much too soon, too often supplanting their pain with denial.
Yet, as a true blue american - I wouldn't want it any other way , for my rights are still firmly in place.

Remember, the best of the human spirit was revealed on that day and the days following September 11.
Message: Posted by: Lambertmoon (Sep 8, 2006 05:31PM)
My brother-in-law is NYFD and was called in before the collapse. Watching the buildings collapse and not being able to contact anyone in the area (all circuits were down) was painful. The feeling of helplessness was overwhelming. It wasn't until late that night we were able to talk and be assured he was okay. He lost a lot of buddies that day and went to more funerals then you can imagine.

I met my wife when she worked at the WTC and I think all New Yorkers had or have ties to the WTC in some way. It was a horrible day and every time I see a clear clear blue sky, I think of that day.

I heard CNN was going to replay the events that occured that day in real-time. Is anyone really interested in watching that over again?
Message: Posted by: RandyStewart (Sep 8, 2006 06:55PM)
Well since the topic is still alive, I have an incredible (coincidental?) story of a dear friend. She is a Russian gal who's father owned a major mortgage company in Dallas. Three months before the assault on 9/11, she sold the company to re-open in, you guessed it, the Twin Towers. Being from Russia and now a die-hard American she said it would be the new home of her business. As long as she could remember, images of the Statue of Liberty and Twin Towers mean't most to her.

We had a going away party for her a week before boarding the private flight and she promised me the royal tour of her new office and the Towers.

She was closer to another friend of mine who talked to her a couple of times a week. I usually got word about her through him.

I didn't think I'd ever be dialing the number but I frantically called her office number while hearing of the event on the car radio. No answer and left a message for her to call ASAP and tell me she was OK.

I knew she started her business day very early in the morning and worked late.

Where was Anna that morning? She was lying in bed taking HER FIRST WORKDAY OFF. The night before, she’d had too much to drink and was hung over and feeling sickly. She was to meet with a client at her office and decided to call and reschedule him the next day. He said it wasn't a problem as he was in New York for a week. While on the phone with her, he said he was just a couple of blocks from the towers and was going to tour the building anyway.

He was later counted among the dead.

His last words to her were "See ya Wednesday morning darlin!"....
Message: Posted by: Keairao (Sep 8, 2006 07:04PM)
It was a horrible day. I woke up to the first tower falling. I made two calls at that point. One to my father, and one to the Red Cross. My father is a Toronto Fire Fighter. He was one of the first to sign up to go to NYC to help out. I wanted to know if he could bring me. I'm an Emergency First Responder and ambulance attendant. Although niether of us knew any of the people who lost their lives that day, we felt as if we lost our brothers and sisters. I've never seen my father cry, but he was *** close that day, and afterwards. Niether of us were selected to go, but our thoughts and prayers were with everyone there.

The above posters are right. Out of this tragic event shone the greatest parts of the human spirit. For once it was okay to cry, to mourn and to show love for your fellow man. It's something that we should do more often (and not just when something horrific happens). I remember walking around that day, everyone was in a daze, strangers spoke openly with each other and shared hugs and support. I don't think any of us will ever forget this tragic event.

It's natural that the anniversary will bring up old fears, and open old wounds. Margarette, You're not alone in feeling the way you do. Try to take some time to allow yourself to feel (instead of putting on the brave face all day) Just take 5 mins when you can be alone and have a good cry. Call a loved one and tell them how you're feeling and how much they mean to you.

And know that many of us will be doing the same thing. Either at a public memorial or in our own personal way, we will remember what happened, and pray that the world can find some way to live in peace and tolerance and love.
Message: Posted by: Sylver Fyre (Sep 8, 2006 10:15PM)
9/11 was a very surreal day for me. I had just spent 12 days in the hospital with fatal pneumonia. The doctors would not let me leave till my fever was gone. I had numerous complications and secondary afflictions. Needless to say it was the hardest and scariest thing that has happened to me. Finally the Doctors let me go home, instead of starting my fourth year of college at school, I went home to my parent's house to be nursed a bit before attempting to finish moving my things into my new place at school and try to have some sort of life. I woke, the first morning of my week visit at my parent's place... and there on the news at around 9am I saw it. It was literally the first thing I saw after opening my sleeping eyes (because I couldn't lay down, I slept in the recliner in the tv room) I watched the whole thing for days straight since I had nothing to entertain me but the T.V. I watched it, second by second, unable to do anything. I was useless.
During this time I was also going through personal relationship hardships. It was a really bad time in my life with not many people to help me get through. I don't like remembering it, so to be honest I've turned myself "off" to the whole 9/11 thing. I have walls around my feelings of that time and they are what keep me from getting emotional about it. It's not the best approach but it's been working for me. I know others are having a hard time and I sort of look the other way. I'm just not ready to take that step in healing. But sharing this in a way is a baby step.
Message: Posted by: ed rhodes (Sep 9, 2006 10:47AM)
[quote]
On 2006-09-08 09:08, Cliffg37 wrote:
I am with you lass.

Speaking as a New Yorker, who watched those towers being built, speaking as one who used to work in tower two, I also get hit hard by the anniversary.
[/quote]

As a transplanted New Yorker, I remember going to the Towers on several occassions. Once was a normal touristy thing and I was stunned at what you could see from up there. You could see individuals in the park in Greenwich Village!

Another time, my wife and I went up and I actually went out of the observation deck and onto the roof itself. Do you realize how WEIRD it was to see the TOP of the other Tower?

The last time, it should have been closed. It was overcast and the Towers were covered in clouds. That had a strange upside as well as it was like being in a huge white room! In the corner, where the two Towers were closest, you could see the clouds streaming through the gap between the two Towers!

Thanks for letting me share!
Message: Posted by: Margarette (Sep 10, 2006 10:16AM)
Thank you for sharing your stories and experiences with me. It has helped. And thanks for not turning this thread into too much of a political discussion. All of my co-workers have been prepared that Monday will be difficult for me. I did tell the co-worker I'll be traveling with (and we are traveling by car...business trip to Mufreesboro, AR) that it will be a difficult day for me, and exactly why. I've also got a friend from Little Rock willing to travel to where I'll be to make sure I'll be okay once we go "off the clock."

Margarette
Message: Posted by: Sylver Fyre (Sep 10, 2006 01:58PM)
Travel safe Margarette!
Message: Posted by: hoodrat (Sep 10, 2006 03:01PM)
[quote]
Besides the hassles at the airport, what rights have you lost? And are they worth the price to protect you and your fellow citizens?

A lot of the talk of "lost rights" is hysterical nonsense. In many cases it's the painting of a false picture by the same people that accuse the Government of painting a false picture of the terror threat.

What I'm saying is that not a lot of people can honestly claim that their rights have been trampled upon. Yes all our lives have changed. However, there is no doubt about what went down on 9/11. The threat of terror attacks is not a percieved threat. It's very real, we have been seeing it for years. And, apparently, even 9/11 has not proven to be enough of a wake up call. Maybe it's easier to rail against what isn't than actually face up to, and rail against, what really is. I guess it's just easier to fight a straw man than a real enemy.

[/quote]

My 48 year-old sister and her husband just flew last week from Pittsburgh to Las Vegas non-stop for a mini-vacation. At the airport, my sister inadvertently left a tube of lipstick in her purse. It was NEVER noticed or confiscated by airport security, and she ended up inadvertently taking it on to the plane.

Are we really safer these days with all the new restrictions regarding liquids, gels, sprays, etc.? Probably not....
Message: Posted by: ed rhodes (Sep 16, 2006 11:00AM)
[quote]
On 2006-09-10 11:16, Margarette wrote:
Thank you for sharing your stories and experiences with me. It has helped. And thanks for not turning this thread into too much of a political discussion. All of my co-workers have been prepared that Monday will be difficult for me. I did tell the co-worker I'll be traveling with (and we are traveling by car...business trip to Mufreesboro, AR) that it will be a difficult day for me, and exactly why. I've also got a friend from Little Rock willing to travel to where I'll be to make sure I'll be okay once we go "off the clock."
[/quote]

You're welcome. Didn't mention the fact that my wife is EXTREMELY ackrophobic (sp?). She didn't care as long as we were encased with nice thick glass walls, but once we got up on the roof, she spent the entire time spooned into my back, gripping my coat for safety!
Message: Posted by: hkwiles (Sep 16, 2006 11:47AM)
Just got back from a holiday in Marmaris, Turkey.The week before I went Kurdish Terror groups let off bombs in Marmaris killing a number of tourists. It didn't stop me going..if you do that then you have "thrown in the towel"
We now live in a totally different World...bombs could be let off anywhere at any time..life goes on.I would be more worried about travelling on the underground..at least there are plenty of security checks on plane passengers.

Howard
Message: Posted by: hkwiles (Sep 16, 2006 05:18PM)
Oh....and my son actually flew to Las Vegas 0n the 11th September..he is still there now.

Howard
Message: Posted by: Margarette (Sep 16, 2006 11:58PM)
I handled the day fairly well. I wasn't my normal talkative self at work. Everyone knew the reasons I was rather subdued that day. When my co-worker and I got to our destination, my friend did visit to make sure I was okay.

Margarette