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Topic: This time of year. . .
Message: Posted by: Mark Rough (Sep 28, 2006 09:46AM)
The leaves starting to change, the nip in the air, the tang of a cold glass of cider, smoke from the sacrificial fires. . . Can it get any better?

Raven
Message: Posted by: Doug Higley (Sep 28, 2006 10:04AM)
Ain't it the TRUTH??? I live for this time of year...leaves don't change here but air is definately Fall and Halloween stuff is everywhere.
I just did a neat Halloween Prop for a Peppers Ghost Illusion being built by Owen Magic for Illusionist David Seebach. (See it on my front page) It sure got me in the mood!!!

Happy Fall Ravin an all...this is 'the goods'.
Message: Posted by: Mark Rough (Sep 28, 2006 10:08AM)
Oooh Doug. Very cool!
Message: Posted by: Mystician (Sep 28, 2006 08:28PM)
Yep, 'tis the season !

I guess I'm a dreamer:
*Favorite time of year: Autumn
*Favorite time of day: Twilight/dusk
Message: Posted by: Regan (Sep 28, 2006 08:36PM)
I have had "the feeling" for a few weeks now. I live in a cool climate and it has felt like Autumn in the air for a while. I get excited around this time of year. I can feel my....."transformation" already starting to take place........

Regan
Message: Posted by: Eddie Garland (Sep 28, 2006 08:55PM)
This time of year always reminds me of Ray Bradbury....

"First of all it was October, a rare month for boys. Not that all months aren't rare. But there be bad and good, as the pirates say. Take September, a bad month: school begins. Consider August, a good month: school hasn't begun yet. July, well, July's really fine: there's no chance in the world for school. June, no doubting it, June's best of all, for the school doors spring wide and September's a billion years away.

But you take October now. School's been on a month and you're riding easier in the reins, jogging along. You got time to think of the garbage you'll dump on old man Prickett's porch, or the hairy-ape costume you'll wear to the YMCA the last night of the month. And if it's around October twentieth and everything smoky-smelling and the sky orange and ash gray at twilight, it seems Halloween will never come in a fall of broomsticks and a soft flap of bedsheets around corners."
Message: Posted by: VeritasNoir (Sep 28, 2006 09:03PM)
I have been waiting for this all summer!
Message: Posted by: Rory Raven (Sep 28, 2006 09:35PM)
I dare say I have you all beat -- autumn in New England is truly magical! Walking the same streets as Poe and Lovecraft, as colorful dry leaves scatter in the cool wind ... wonderful.

Happy autumn, one and all!

Rory

(no relation to Mark -- that I know!)
Message: Posted by: John Nesbit (Sep 28, 2006 10:56PM)
Yes New England is full of lore and rich with atmosphere of legends, where I live. Sleepy Hollow not far from here. Autumn in the Berkshires (Western Massachusetts) is glorious with fall colors, ripe with stories of ghosts and witches in Salem, Mass. It doesn't get any better for magic and mystery in these parts. Old houses, spooky hills, country roads. Tales of the supernatural are everywhere. Especially with a cultural background of the history of the country's origins. Both Revolutionary, and the French and Indian Wars. Not to mention Civil War training campsites all around. The old graveyards dating back to 300 years are still found everywhere.
That's just for starters..
Message: Posted by: Mark Rough (Sep 29, 2006 06:00AM)
Nah, I grew up in New England. I can miss a little fall color to avoid those @#$#@ "leaf peepers" and those hellacious winters, thanks. Besides, I can walk same streets that Poe walked here. He attended UVA briefly before he was unceremoniously expelled for gambling and excessive drinking. It's funny UVA has his room glassed in for the tourists. They have a great stuffed raven on his bed post. So much for historical accuracy. Plus, I live on property that was once owned by Merriweather Lewis, about 100 yards from his house. He's buried in the church yard about 1/4 a mile from my house. And, if you want Civil War history, you can't beat Virginia. Talk about ghosts!

Raven

PS the tourism board is paying me, but perhaps they should
Message: Posted by: Bill Ligon (Sep 29, 2006 08:36AM)
Sheesh, give me hot weather, high humidity, the threat of hurricanes, and the lightning capital of the United States any day.

Sweatily,

Bill (Keep yer dang snow!)
Message: Posted by: Gede Nibo (Sep 29, 2006 08:49AM)
WITH ALL the DEAD leaves, DEAD flowers, DEAD grass, and the BATS flying about, seeking their final meals for the season---one would THINK I would love it--but nay, I prefer the summer's sun, being from the FAR EAST and all...

then again, this time o' year caueseth my woman to snuggle up--a bit closer :) (compassionate loving Baba)

Baba
Message: Posted by: gsidhe (Sep 29, 2006 09:48AM)
Snow sucks, but I love the prelude of fall.
Perfect temperatures, bizarre weather shifts...I love sitting outside with a cup of hot chocolate or tea watching the world as it dies around me. The wind in the trees no longer swishes through leaves but knocks branch against branch. The graveyards become more unkempt and there is almost never complete silence. Things rattle and creak and a running mouse can make as much noise running as a bear.
Everything starts to smell like smoke and leaf mold, but there is a certain cleanness to it all.
Fall is good...Winter is simply depressing.
Gwyd
Message: Posted by: Gede Nibo (Sep 29, 2006 09:50AM)
THAT WAS...........BEAUTIFUL :) SERIOUSLY...TRUTH TRUTH...
Message: Posted by: John Nesbit (Sep 29, 2006 12:40PM)
Boy, things really did turn "Bizarre" here on this thread over night ! Did I say something wrong about Massachusetts ? I love the warm weather too, but I was just only romanticizing about what will be left, (Before) the winter hits. Mark Raven, sorry if I pushed a button dude... Geesh ! ;)
Message: Posted by: Eddie Garland (Sep 29, 2006 01:02PM)
SO yeah John, My family makes a trip to Sleepy Hollow most every year around Halloween...we go to the Halloween festivities at Philipsburg Manor, Late 17th century Manor house and farm. It's too cool to watch the Headless Horseman in full gallop across the fields.

It's also a great time of year up there to tour Washington Irving's house on the Hudson. Not to be missed.
Message: Posted by: Mark Rough (Sep 29, 2006 01:22PM)
[quote]
On 2006-09-29 13:40, johnjnesbit wrote:
Boy, things really did turn "Bizarre" here on this thread over night ! Did I say something wrong about Massachusetts ? I love the warm weather too, but I was just only romanticizing about what will be left, (Before) the winter hits. Mark Raven, sorry if I pushed a button dude... Geesh ! ;)
[/quote]

Man, not sure where that was coming from. . . I was only responding with fun in my heart, friend.

Raven
Message: Posted by: abrell (Sep 29, 2006 01:31PM)
It is getting foggy outside. Must leave now and prepare my photo slide projector with some ghost pictures. In the days of camera obscura that was no problem, now you only need an accumulator and a low voltage bulb inside. And I have enough time until the midnight show...and I like the spectators faces when seeing ghosts - a real good mood setter for bizarre magick.
Message: Posted by: John Nesbit (Sep 29, 2006 03:06PM)
[quote]

Man, not sure where that was coming from. . . I was only responding with fun in my heart, friend.

Raven
[/quote]

Mark, the same here. Fun in my heart too, as always ! :)


Abrell, I would like to hear more about your ghost prjections.
Message: Posted by: Doug Higley (Sep 29, 2006 03:38PM)
Snow sucks, but I love the prelude of fall.
Perfect temperatures, bizarre weather shifts...I love sitting outside with a cup of hot chocolate or tea watching the world as it dies around me. The wind in the trees no longer swishes through leaves but knocks branch against branch. The graveyards become more unkempt and there is almost never complete silence. Things rattle and creak and a running mouse can make as much noise running as a bear.
Everything starts to smell like smoke and leaf mold, but there is a certain cleanness to it all.
Fall is good...Winter is simply depressing.
Gwyd


You can say that again. ( :) )
Message: Posted by: sibbie (Sep 29, 2006 04:34PM)
[quote]
On 2006-09-28 22:35, Rory Raven wrote:


I dare say I have you all beat -- autumn in New England is truly magical! Walking the same streets as Poe and Lovecraft, as colorful dry leaves scatter in the cool wind ... wonderful.

Happy autumn, one and all!

Rory

(no relation to Mark -- that I know!)

[/quote]

Rory makes me sad and wishes I was in New England. :cry:
Message: Posted by: Rory Raven (Sep 29, 2006 05:06PM)
Chin up! Visit anytime and I'll be happy to walk you around -- I'll put a ticlet to my walking tour, the Providence Ghost Walk, aside for you.

See you soon,

Rory
Message: Posted by: coupcoupdaddy (Sep 29, 2006 06:21PM)
Magick
Message: Posted by: sparks (Sep 29, 2006 09:26PM)
An Adirondack autumn is nothing short of a yearly miracle (to me). I live for this time year -- the crisp cool air, the changing of the leaves, and the gentleness of an October moon upon the lake. The transition of summer into winter renews me it always has, it always will.

Doug, you put it into words perfectly.
Message: Posted by: John Nesbit (Sep 29, 2006 09:38PM)
I live about an hour and a half from Lake George, it's awesome up there !
Message: Posted by: Tony Iacoviello (Sep 29, 2006 09:54PM)
I live just outside of Boston, pretty crappy here.

Dead leaves littering the ground, squirrels falling out of trees, tourists running about with cameras, blinding those squirrels that are still in the trees, they stumble back to where there were leaves the day before, but alas, they are gone now, fallen to the ground like the poor blind squirrel, and the tourists click on.

Fall in New England is the signal to many natives that it is time to pack up and head to Florida.
Message: Posted by: Tony Iacoviello (Sep 29, 2006 10:12PM)
I live just outside of Boston, pretty crappy here.

Dead leaves littering the ground, squirrels falling out of trees, tourists running about with cameras, blinding those squirrels that are still in the trees, they stumble back to where there were leaves the day before, but alas, they are gone now, fallen to the ground like the poor blind squirrel, and the tourists click on.

Fall in New England is the signal to many natives that it is time to pack up and head to Florida.

:angelflying:
Message: Posted by: coupcoupdaddy (Sep 30, 2006 04:00PM)
"There was much of the beautiful, much of the wanton, much of the bizzare, something of the terrible, and not a little of that which might have excited disgust."?
Message: Posted by: Rory Raven (Sep 30, 2006 04:02PM)
Nice one, Lucia.

Rory
Message: Posted by: Nicholas (Sep 30, 2006 04:37PM)
I live in the last of the Pennsylvania Appalachian counties to the north. The Riverside Inn, about 18 miles north of where I live (but still in the same county), is quite quaint and very haunted. It's a wonderful place to spend some time, especially this time of year, if only for their Sunday afternoon buffet and a roam around the various sitting rooms that are always open to the public. Being so far north, we don't usually get any creepy stuff coming out of the foothills. But, around this time of year, activity increases and we generally end up with at least a couple of individuals, usually out-of-towners, that have experiences that just can't be explained. Once all the leaves have fallen, everything pretty much settles down again. To top it all off, my wife was born on October 31. To say the least, she's a treat all year long. (Hope I made some points on that last comment.) Ha!
Message: Posted by: coupcoupdaddy (Sep 30, 2006 05:07PM)
Thank Edgar Bergundy Poe, Rory, and Nicholas, Isso's synchronistically been sending Corona and Z< Pennsylvania nightime Civil War battlefield shots teeming with spiritual phenomena manifested by the O'Brien Sisters. My lovely partner, Isso and I celebrate our 30+ wedding anniversery Oct. 31!