(Close Window)
Topic: Beginner in cards
Message: Posted by: rafiki121 (Apr 4, 2007 10:37PM)
Hi Im a beginner in magic tricks and I like to learn how to do card tricks. Ive seen many of them and I know how some of them are done, just that I cant perform them. Like in the other post "card magic skills: learning by order of impotence" Can anyone recommend me a beginners book to learning how to do these skills. My main focus is cards.
Message: Posted by: DanielSkahen (Apr 4, 2007 11:41PM)
I'll be the first out of a dozen to recommend Royal Road to Card Magic. I truly can't think of any better introduction.

Other goodies after that: Scarne on Card Tricks; Now You See It, Now You Don't; Expert Card Technique (relatively in that order)

Remember, focus on the foundations. Don't be lured into learning quick tricks at the expense of more in depth knowledge. Take the time necessary to master the basics, and you'll be rewarded long-term. Have fun with it!
Message: Posted by: rafiki121 (Apr 5, 2007 12:00AM)
Ive searched for the book and I get like three books with the same name. Can you please post a link for the correct one!
Message: Posted by: Andy the cardician (Apr 5, 2007 01:16AM)
There are many posts on this issue - please use the search engine.

Also have a look at this

http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewtopic.php?topic=89&forum=41

Andy
Message: Posted by: DomKabala (Apr 5, 2007 03:52AM)
Here is a good legitimate company that should have this book in stock...
http://themagicwarehouse.com/cgi-bin/findit.pl?x_name=Royal-Road-To-Card-Magic&x_item=BK8077
If you are a complete beginner in cards this is a good start and it's not expensive. If you have a Barnes & Nobles in your home town, chances are they may have this book on the shelves. Also keep an eye out for Mark Wilson's book "The Complete Course in Magic" which has a large chapter on basic card skills and tricks associated with them. The cost is around $20 and change. As you progress deeper in card magic you will be advised by many veteran cardicians to invest in the "Card College" (by Roberto Giobbi series Vol.I - IV). This is by far the most complete course in card sleight of hand up to this date, and a wise investment. This series will set you back $150 or more (for the whole set) depending where you purchase it. Welcome to the Café and Andy has given you an excellent link to deciding what is best for you. Good luck and always have fun!
Cardamagically,
<<<KRaZy4KaRdZ>>> :) :bwink:
Message: Posted by: atucci (Apr 5, 2007 08:07AM)
Rafiki - some wise words from Andy and KRZ4kardz. As written earlier I'm just getting back into magic with a focus on close-up / cards and have asked many ofthe same questions you are asking or will be asking.

Fortunately you have the resources of the Café which can be invaluable. I invite you to visit my blog, http://www.poolside-reflections.blogspot.com as I keep a running diary on my studies and the challenges and successes I'm experiencing.

Good luck!
Message: Posted by: Mark Wilden (Apr 5, 2007 10:41AM)
I hate to sound like a broken record, but beginners should at least consider starting with "easy" self-working tricks. That way, they (or, rather, we) can start learning how to perform quickly.

///ark
Message: Posted by: abc (Apr 5, 2007 11:01AM)
When I started all I wanted to learn was cool moves and sleights. The amount of self working effects I do now is actually scary. Maybe I got lazy. Good advice though. Try some self working effects and get them looking good.
Message: Posted by: MagiClyde (Apr 6, 2007 12:27AM)
[quote]Remember, focus on the foundations. Don't be lured into learning quick tricks at the expense of more in depth knowledge. Take the time necessary to master the basics, and you'll be rewarded long-term. Have fun with it![/quote]

Personally, I would start with some self-working or easy sleight card tricks to at least accomplish two goals. The first is to get over the nerves of performing in front of an audience. The second is to be able to work on presentation. But just like their sleight driven cousins, don't forget to practice them before performing in front of anyone. Even the easy stuff can go wrong without at least a little personal prep.

As for Giobbi's Card College, it is now up to 5 volumes and I do believe there may be a sixth now in publication. Personally, I would start with just the first one to the hang of doing some of the basic sleight work.

As for royal road, one source publisher is Dover press at http://www.doverpublishing.com . They have quite a few magic books. Not only Royal Road to Card Magic, but all of Karl Fulves' books. Look on their website and you'll be amazed at how many they have.
Message: Posted by: Mark Wilden (Apr 6, 2007 10:46AM)
The sixth volume of [i]Card College[/i] is called [i]Card College Light[/i] and was actually written before [i]Card College[/i]. The choice of the new title is essentially a marketing move. It's a book of tricks and doesn't specifically teach magic.

I think it's an excellent choice for a new card magician:[list]
[*] The tricks are strong.
[*] They're arranged into routines, where one trick can set up the next trick.
[*] They're accompanied by notes explaining how to incorporate sleights (when you're ready). In this way, you can learn sleights to improve specific tricks, instead of for their own sake.
[/list]///ark
Message: Posted by: MagiCanada (Apr 9, 2007 08:34PM)
Go for Card College Light by Roberto Giobbi. If you're REALLY new you may also want to simply get an general book like Wilson's Complete Course in Magic. It's got some of everything but gives a good base and understanding of card magic. You can't fail with either of these.
Message: Posted by: mikaelmrotek (Apr 10, 2007 03:11AM)
Mainly just take a deck with you everywhere and get used to the feel while practicing
D lifts/shuffling and get card college aka listen to magianada
Message: Posted by: dazzler (Apr 11, 2007 05:52PM)
Hi there
I have recently been bitten by the Magic bug and am excitedly buying all sorts of tricks online with various magic shops. I have worked out though that what I need to do, for now anyway is stop buying gimmick style tricks and instead learn from dvd's or books and as I learn best visually I think dvd's are probably best.
I have at the moment started with Michael Maxwells self working card trick dvd's and have also got Michael Ammar's complete introduction to coins dvd. Is this a good start and can anyone reccomend other dvd's that cover self working type card tricks or does this series sum up all the best, also does the book Card College Light offer different tricks.
I would also like reccomendations on any dvd's that cover the basics of starting out in Magic or would a book be better, many people on this forum seem to reccomend Mark Wilson or Tarbell but have also heard good things about Michael Ammar Amazing Magic dvd.
I have been put off for the moment buying the Royal Road dvd's mainly because I am having fun with the self working tricks and possibly a bit worried about compex card sleights as even my rifle shuffle leaves a lot to be desired, but I know that I should as it is the most reccomended. Does this teach you things like how to hanle a deck of cards properly e.g my rifle shuffle or is there another resource.
I know this is a lot of questions at once but would be very grateful for any advice.

Darrell
Message: Posted by: Bande (Apr 11, 2007 07:05PM)
I really liked the Mark Wilson book because it is just a nice overview of magic. Card tricks, coin tricks, ropes, scarves and even rubberbands and stage tricks. basic moves are in there as well for cards and coins etc. I would start there, then see what things you seem to gravitate to. If cards, then the forum has lots of reccomendations, same with coins etc.

For me the key is finding something I think is really cool, then figuring out the best version and then who can teach it to me. For instance, I have recently become enthralled by Coin Matrix versions -- dunno why, just seems like "real" magic I guess. I am playing around with gimmicked and un gimmicked versions -- having a blast so doesn't really feel like practice.

For what it's worth other effects I seem to really enjoy are PK ring effects and making things vanish (arguable similar to some extent). researching Topit vs. Raven vs Black Widow vs Bat vs. Subterfuge vs. Trabucco etc. is a really fun way for me to spend some time. Not saying these will be the same for you, but just suggesting you find the things that cause you to think "man I want to be able to do that" and use that as a basis for what to study.

Hope that helps/makes sense
Message: Posted by: MagiClyde (Apr 11, 2007 10:05PM)
[quote]I have recently been bitten by the Magic bug and am excitedly buying all sorts of tricks online with various magic shops. I have worked out though that what I need to do, for now anyway is stop buying gimmick style tricks and instead learn from dvd's or books and as I learn best visually I think dvd's are probably best. [/quote]

Excellent beginning, Dazzler. You have learned early that buying "one-trick-ponies" (as I call them) can be the most expensive way to learn magic. Concentrating on a good set of books and DVDs is really the way to go.

[quote]I would also like reccomendations on any dvd's that cover the basics of starting out in Magic or would a book be better, many people on this forum seem to reccomend Mark Wilson or Tarbell but have also heard good things about Michael Ammar Amazing Magic dvd. [/quote]

[i]Mark Wilson's Complete Course in Magic[/i] is an excellent choice for beginners. It covers quite a variety of magic disciplines and the drawings are very easy to follow. Even many of the pros swear by this book. It has started many magic careers, just as the Tarbell series has. Best of all, the smaller [i]Cyclopedia of Magic[/i] can be had for as little as $10 retail. Definitely a bargain in this day and age.

As for Michael Ammar, his [i]Easy to Master[/i] series, whether it be in coins, cards, or anything else is quite good.

One advantage to books over DVDs, though, is price. A single DVD (or set) can cost you anywhere from $20 and go up from there. Usually, these only have a few effects on them. A book, on the other hand, can cost as little as $8 and have at least 50 tricks in it, depending on which ones you buy.

[quote]I have been put off for the moment buying the Royal Road dvd's mainly because I am having fun with the self working tricks and possibly a bit worried about compex card sleights as even my rifle shuffle leaves a lot to be desired, but I know that I should as it is the most reccomended. Does this teach you things like how to hanle a deck of cards properly e.g my rifle shuffle or is there another resource.
I know this is a lot of questions at once but would be very grateful for any advice. [/quote]

Both the [i]Royal Road to Card Magic[/i] and Roberto Giobbi's [i]Card College Volume 1[/i] are excellent books for beginners in card magic who want to learn basic sleight of hand.

Hope this advice is helpful to you. If you have any more questions, please feel free to ask. That's what we're all here for, to learn from each other.
Message: Posted by: Wes65 (Apr 11, 2007 10:32PM)
I work mostly with coins and packet card tricks. I've been wanting to get more in to deck tricks so I posted a similar question to your. You can read the tread here: http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewtopic.php?topic=202088&forum=41&17

I bought the Royal Road and I am reading through it doing most of the tricks as I go and marking the ones that I feel like I may want to use. In the beginning I was only marking a few but as I get further into the book I am marking almost every one I read as a keeper.
Message: Posted by: The Conjuror (Apr 12, 2007 09:46PM)
Royal Road to Card Magic is definitely recommended for the cards. But if you are a beiginner and are interested in other types of magic as well, I highly recommend Mark Wilson's Complete Course in Magic first. It will teach you ALL the basics.
Message: Posted by: Mark Wilden (Apr 12, 2007 10:11PM)
[quote]
On 2007-04-11 23:32, Wes65 wrote:I bought the Royal Road and I am reading through it doing most of the tricks as I go and marking the ones that I feel like I may want to use.[/quote]
Don't mark 'em - learn 'em! Perform 'em!

You may be like me. I spend far too much time reading about magic (or writing about it) when I should be practicing and rehearsing.

On the other hand, you may not be like me. :)

///ark
Message: Posted by: GWSchott (Apr 15, 2007 03:40PM)
I like Oz Pearlman's DVD 'Born to Perform Card Magic', but it's not really a video for absolute beginners. Royal Road to Card Magic gets my vote for that.
Message: Posted by: dazzler (Apr 27, 2007 01:06PM)
Thanks for all the good advice especially Clynim. I have just ordered myself a copy of Mark Wilsons Complete Course in Magic which should be here within a couple of days. Can anyone suggest another reference for Selfworking or Impromptu Card tricks, I have started out with Michael Maxwell, but wonder if this set covers everything. I have heard of Card College Light, does this have tricks not found on Michael Maxwells DVD's.

Darrell
Message: Posted by: Josh the Superfluous (Apr 27, 2007 01:48PM)
" Can anyone suggest another reference for Selfworking or Impromptu Card tricks, I have started out with Michael Maxwell, but wonder if this set covers everything."

Nothing covers everything. Quantity is way over rated. Learn a few tricks well. Slowly add one trick at a time. Years will give you quantity. You could make a career by doing half of the effects in Royal Road. If you learn structure and psychology, you could have many careers with the material in Card Collage series.
Message: Posted by: Josh Riel (Apr 27, 2007 02:34PM)
Josh (Other Josh) I never thought about a "Card Collage". I don't know what kind of career you would have, but the collage itself would be pretty.
Message: Posted by: munkywrench (Apr 27, 2007 03:12PM)
First off never use the words can't. Yon may not be able to go to the moon, but you can if you have the money. Magic as I see it is a learning experience. Practise is all it takes. Sure you might not be the next Marlo...but, you probably aren't an Elway, Eistien, Jordan etc. My only response, get to the nearest club/ring and watch others. That is the best way to learn IMHO. Books are great but, there is so much digital info. Stear clear of youtube and such. Invest in Vernon, Skinner, Marlo etc. This is your best bet. Don't get me wrong I have Royal Road, Expert Card Technique, and Erdnase. My best growth has been through being saturated by others in the physical sense, as well as Video/DVD. You can be a great card magician and you will...just keep on keeping on. The first trick I learned was how to pick cards up with my toes. (got tired of bending over to pick up miss shuffles and such) lol.
Message: Posted by: Josh the Superfluous (Apr 27, 2007 08:39PM)
Josh (lesser Josh) that was a typing error. Of course I meant "Curd Collage".
Message: Posted by: Josh Riel (Apr 28, 2007 01:24AM)
[quote]
On 2007-04-27 16:12, munkywrench wrote:
Yon may not be able to go to the moon, but you can if you have the money.
[/quote]

Who the hell is "Yon"?

Josh, I may be the "Lesser" Josh, but you'll always be the "Other". That's what makes us unique, also we both have two heads, one of which is enormous, yours is quite small..... I have heard

Sorry Mr. Wrench, Becuse my words ar usuly perfict, I cin mak fun of Y'all
That's anuther reason I an eunuch.... Unique, rather.
Message: Posted by: Josh Riel (Apr 28, 2007 02:08AM)
I would like to apologize for my wife's, under the visage of the other Josh, using my Café account to spew my own words (Which I must now admit are mostly mine).

rafiki121, learn a few tricks, perfect them, make them more than just card tricks.

It doesn't have to be religious awakenings just something worth watching.
When you can make 1-3 tricks seem more than just a "goofy kid with a deck" thing, that's when you build.

Believe me when I say the magic is important, the method is important, the trick is important, but without interest is irrelevant. If you can make the 21 card trick worth watching, do it. Then add to it.

If you can do the most impressive sleights and come across as an uninteresting person with uninteresting magic, no one will care. Make what magic you have worth watching. Michael Finney seems apologetic at times for the simplicity of his magic. I would rather watch him perform than many of the more renowned magicians.
Message: Posted by: MagiClyde (Apr 28, 2007 05:43PM)
[quote]Can anyone suggest another reference for Selfworking or Impromptu Card tricks [/quote]

A great source for self-working card tricks is Karl Fulves. He has at least three books on self-working card magic, plus a whole slew of other self-working books covering coins, silks, table (ordinary objects), paper, etc. You can find all of his books at http://www.doverpublishing.com .

A great impromptu book that I just purchased is Aldo Colombini's [i]Simply Impromp2 [/i]. This book is a collection of simple, but powerful, card effects collected from a variety of magicians. I've just learned Child's Play and ROM from this book and expect to learn more as time goes on.

One thing I cannot stress strongly enough is to PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE!!! It is especially important that, as a beginner, you only learn a few tricks and keep a written list of them. Then practice each one at least a few times each day. Not only will this help you to improve your presentation, but it will help you to remember how to perform each one. Believe me, it's amazing how quickly you can forget a trick that you've just learned by NOT practicing it, even after just a few days.
Message: Posted by: Joker63 (May 12, 2007 07:31AM)
[quote]
Believe me, it's amazing how quickly you can forget a trick that you've just learned by NOT practicing it, even after just a few days.
[/quote]

We can probably all relate to that. I just spent some time with my son doing 'bicycle built for five, had to revisit the notes to show him, and I thought I knew the routine.

I consider myself a learner, but past some of the pitfalls most of us go through. I think Giobbi's books are fantastic. Volume One got me handling the cards, teaching really basic stuff - how to hold a deck. All worthwhile though. I particularly liked Volume Two with its discussion on magic theory.

I've moved to DVDs a bit now, so I can see presentation, but still refer to Giobbi for learning sleights.

hope this helps.
Message: Posted by: jmuscold (Aug 5, 2007 08:10PM)
If you want some quick hitting tricks get oz pearlman's born to perform. If you want to learn more things and are patient then get the royal road to card magic dvd.