(Close Window)
Topic: Soft coins, anyone?
Message: Posted by: WhiteAngel (Apr 25, 2007 03:52PM)
Is there are way to make your coins "soft"? Or are these something that simply has to be purchased?
Message: Posted by: TheAmbitiousCard (Apr 25, 2007 05:42PM)
I'll bet if you search for "soft coins" you'll see the posts that discuss it.
Message: Posted by: Justin Style (Apr 30, 2007 06:19PM)
What do you mean by soft? I'm just going to guess Pure Silver to be the softest? But I'm not sure?
Message: Posted by: WhiteAngel (Apr 30, 2007 07:02PM)
Frank, no offense, but I'd bet if someone like me who knew computers as well as I do did a Café search, I would too. But I'll bet if I wanted live feed back in which I could reply and respond in an active thread, I'd post a new thread. I didn't ask how to get old threads. If you don't want to answer, don't. But please don't clutter threads I post with a reply as useless as you are implying my question was. If we didn't ask quesions, thisplace wouldn't be a forum anymore, it'd be one big archive, no wouldn't it?

Justin: Soft coins are coins that are worn down in such a way to make them significantly quieter when they touch. Usually shops make them and sell them.
Message: Posted by: close-up (Apr 30, 2007 07:21PM)
Well said WhiteAngel. This is a forum. In Forums we speak to each other.
Message: Posted by: ShawnB (Apr 30, 2007 08:48PM)
White angel... You can sand them with sandpaper or you could use a Dremel Tool..

Either way it is a waste of time... I have tried it with no success, just buy natural soft coins they handle better...

If you are interested, I can sell you the soft coins I made. They just sit in my drawer...

I will sell them to you for the cost of the coins themselves...

PM me...
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (May 1, 2007 07:17AM)
I guess it's tough to decide which is more important;

The need for knowledge as requested

or the need for attention.

If you want the knowlege... yes it's there accessible via the search.

BTW as Shawn noted there seems to be something about how coins wear over time and getting pitted/grimy and soft edged that is not the same as what you can get using base sanding methods. I too simply went and got some well worn half crowns. Others have gone to using Barber Half dollars or similar.
Message: Posted by: enginemagic (May 1, 2007 07:31AM)
I take it you don't want rough edges on them? ,after light sanding you can buff them with a cloth wheel on a grinder mandrel using a fine buffing compound
Message: Posted by: Justin Style (May 1, 2007 10:14AM)
[quote]
On 2007-04-30 20:02, WhiteAngel wrote:

Justin: Soft coins are coins that are worn down in such a way to make them significantly quieter when they touch. Usually shops make them and sell them.
[/quote]

Wow, I never knew that? I always thought Morgans were soft. But do you mean that you can take Morgans to a shop and they can be made softer? But if it's to make them smoother, would you consider slugs? They would not only be smoother but thinner as well.
Message: Posted by: WhiteAngel (May 1, 2007 02:34PM)
Jonathan, It's just that I would rather have live people who I can talk to in case I have questions on their replies. And I did a search, and found most topics older and between then and now new techniques could have been developed. It's just frustrating seeing the answers all the time that are just things like "do a search" or "you don't want to do that". People keep giving answers to topics that don't answer the question at all. Imagine the doctor telling you you have a cold, and when you ask him what it is and how to treat it, he tells you to "look it up"!!!
Bill Palmer even wrote an article about this thing, I'm pretty sure.
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (May 1, 2007 02:39PM)
Funny thing is that if you actually LOOK at the coins you can see most of the places where they hit and so the rest is tooling. No small feat though as you will likely need a lathe etc. Other folks have simply gone to re-mill the edges on old worn coins to make them easier to handle. Word is still out on whether a rock tumbler will do the job reliably.

Most of us are in it for the long haul and we can usually post to older threads when pertinent findings come to light.

:)
Message: Posted by: WhiteAngel (May 1, 2007 03:05PM)
A rock tumbler....I'll have to try that one, think those ones at walmart for kids would work?
Message: Posted by: enginemagic (May 2, 2007 07:05AM)
You can smooth them out while you walk ,jog or work. my keys are smoothed out after years of carrying them in my pocket ,I work on many things alwase moving so the keys rub on each other constantly.coins will do the same thing.the rock tumbler with the right medium will do a great job to .the gun shops have a vibrating cleaner for cartriges works by slowly churning the medium & shells in a tub simular to a top loader washing machine
Message: Posted by: Shufton (May 2, 2007 04:29PM)
The easiest way to get soft coins is from a coin dealer, or off of Ebay. What you want is JUNK silver. Silver coins that are so old and worn that they offer no additional value to a collector. I'm talking about walking liberties, etc. If you want soft coins from Kennedy halves, you will have a bit more of a problem Originally, they did make these out of silver, so you might be able to find some worn ones that work fine. Modern coins, however, are made out of a harder metal than silver, and I don't think they will ever get as soft as you would like - they will always be a wee bit noisier.

Best of luck!

-Steve
Message: Posted by: ithomson (May 4, 2007 05:51AM)
WhiteAngel

Clear nail varnish.

Apply thin layers to the faces of the coin (avoid the milled edges). Use as many layers as you wish to get the right effect.

In my experience, this produces a much softer coin than physical methods. Also, you keep the milling (which is a problem with a rock tumbler), you don't lose definition on the coin, and you can adjust the softness to your own requirements.

The smell lingers, but if you leave your treated coins in the open air for a while, that goes away. Also, the handling and feel takes a little getting used to, but that also goes away with time.

Hope that helps.

Ian
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (May 4, 2007 06:54AM)
If you do what Ian suggests above you can get the lacquer to fill in the coin so it's almost flat. Then it's pretty much like handling a plain poker chip but you still have the milled edges. Great for parlor/stage.
Message: Posted by: ithomson (May 4, 2007 08:18AM)
[quote]
On 2007-05-04 07:54, Jonathan Townsend wrote:
If you do what Ian suggests above you can get the lacquer to fill in the coin so it's almost flat. Then it's pretty much like handling a plain poker chip but you still have the milled edges. Great for parlor/stage.
[/quote]

Jonathan's absolutely right, as usual. The softening works by raising the troughs of the coins sculpture, rather than lowering the peaks by wearing them down.

The parlor/stage bit is interesting. I use my chemically-soft coins for a formal close-up/stand-up set. Customers have handled them once or twice, and the only comment I've had (once) was; "They're warm" (which I'm sure relates to the metal's conductivity being cut down by the varnish). So I'm not sure the treatment wouldn't also work for close-up softness (if you get my drift).

Anyway. At the very least, when you need to rehearse (and don't we all?), this is a cheap way of starting out.

Hope this all helps.

Ian
Message: Posted by: enginemagic (May 6, 2007 09:13PM)
I was thinking that really smooth coins can be hard to palm or clip? especally with the type of hands I have from working on machinery ,the callous makes it more difficult to hold the coins ,I do use hand cream to soften my hands,but not to oily so the coins slide around,I find it helpful if theres a sharp edge on the coins to get a good hold. smooth Sacagawea can be a little hard to manipulate,I find a half dollar coin works comfortable in my hands,and I have been trying many other things to hold in Classic palm like mower parts I use at work,kinda fun plus gives me Ideas for some fun routines
Chuck
Message: Posted by: WhiteAngel (May 6, 2007 09:51PM)
I think I'll try some of the nail polish and see how that does..
Message: Posted by: enginemagic (May 8, 2007 07:12AM)
Nail polish might make them too slipery ,I discovered that rough surface is the best. While classic plaming 2 rusty John Deere mower blade adapter washers.I could still hold them with my hand almost flat! I`ll work on some sand paper type finishes on coins ,be great for people starting out
Message: Posted by: ithomson (May 8, 2007 09:23AM)
[quote]
On 2007-05-08 08:12, enginemagic wrote:
Nail polish might make them too slipery ...
[/quote]

Other way around. It actually makes them a little "clingy", if anything.

Ian
Message: Posted by: giobbi1 (May 8, 2007 11:53AM)
[quote]
On 2007-04-25 16:52, WhiteAngel wrote:
Is there are way to make your coins "soft"? Or are these something that simply has to be purchased?
[/quote]

The easiest and maybe even cheaper method is what someone suggested below. Go to any relatively large coin dealer and tell him you want to see his junk coins. They usually keep them in a box under the counter. You should find a large selection and be able to match dates, wear amount, etc. That is how I got mine and I think paid under $10.00 each. The edges still had plenty of grip, but the faces were very soft. Good luck.
Message: Posted by: WhiteAngel (May 8, 2007 05:59PM)
Yeah, Nail Polish made them too sticky for me, anyway.
Message: Posted by: ithomson (May 9, 2007 03:31AM)
[quote]
On 2007-05-08 18:59, WhiteAngel wrote:
Yeah, Nail Polish made them too sticky for me, anyway.
[/quote]

Leave them to dry for longer.

I'm not going to evangelise about this any more, but having seen many people work with slicks, and having worked with them myself, I much prefer this chemical method even though it took me a little while to get used to the handling. You get softer coins for less money and less hassle; you can treat ordinary, everyday coins to switch for borrowed coins without suspicion (this works great for £2 coins, for all UK people reading); you can even spend them when you're done.

And don't forget this process leaves the coins looking like coins. Not tiny discs of polished metal.

But, as always, please feel free to disagree. That leaves the market open for me, after all.

Cheers

Ian
Message: Posted by: jimmyj (May 9, 2007 10:00AM)
Hello,
I'm surprised-or either I missed it-about using a wet stone. These can be picked up at hardware stores. They're used for sharpening knives and other grinding tasks. You should also buy some wet stone oil. Water will also do. I learned this from a DVD. The gentlemen said it was a tip from Dai Vernon, to make your coins "soft" The same gentlemen-I don't know if I'm at liberty to say who- also spoke, apparently, to a man who grinds lenses. Anyway, here's the tip:

Buy a circular wet stone, with oil, preferably.
Get the finest grit possible. Too harsh a grit will ruin them. You can also pick up a finishing stone. They're usually white in color, with a very, very fine grit.
Lay the coin unto the surface and rub in a figure 8 pattern. This is the info from the lens maker. If you just rub in a circular motion, one edge of the coin will become concave, the other edge will become convex. So figure 8 only.
Be careful. Experiment on coins you don't care about, initially, until you get the feel for what you're doing. Don't forget. Clad coins will eventually show the copper underneath.

I've done it. On my Morgans. Mind you, I didn't go crazy and rub the relief off of the coins, and I was very, very careful.And I finished up with a very, very fine Finishing stone. So slick, you couldn't even tell anything was happening. They came out softer. Still not completely noiseless, but since my first kick at the can was successful, and no damage was done to the Morgans, I can always go back for "round two".
By the way, I tried this on clad Kennedy halfs, and it ruined them. It didn't surpise me though.

Just a tip. Experiment at you own risk. Be careful and start with junk.
Jim.
Message: Posted by: enginemagic (May 10, 2007 09:42PM)
I took your advice(below) & went to a local coin dealer at our mall in fort wayne IN.The store is called Z-Z coins & stamps,Inc.they had some small boxes with really soft(more like liquid!!!)coins LOL.
some were almost smooth where you couldn't tell what they were,the price ranged from $5 to $6.95 each I bought 2. walking liberty halfs & 2. 1842 large pennys(just a little smaller than the half dollar.
I was suprised how well I handled them in the popular holds[quote]
On 2007-05-08 12:53, giobbi1 wrote:
[quote]
On 2007-04-25 16:52, WhiteAngel wrote:
Is there are way to make your coins "soft"? Or are these something that simply has to be purchased?
[/quote]

The easiest and maybe even cheaper method is what someone suggested below. Go to any relatively large coin dealer and tell him you want to see his junk coins. They usually keep them in a box under the counter. You should find a large selection and be able to match dates, wear amount, etc. That is how I got mine and I think paid under $10.00 each. The edges still had plenty of grip, but the faces were very soft. Good luck.
[/quote]
Message: Posted by: mystre71 (May 14, 2007 09:04PM)
[quote]
On 2007-05-01 16:05, WhiteAngel wrote:
A rock tumbler....I'll have to try that one, think those ones at walmart for kids would work?
[/quote]

I've tried this with a Walmart tumbler, awhile ago. the coins started to get pitted pretty bad, but shinny, I think if I would have left them in longer it would have worked fine, but I gave up and just got some soft coins from a coin shop.

Best,
Joe
Message: Posted by: munkywrench (May 14, 2007 09:56PM)
You asked and unlike the many hater you shall recieve. Use a Dremel. The cordless version is the right speed. Use the purple, gray, and black polishing tips.(kinda like steel wool). Hope this helps. I tried othe methods and many coin guys are impressed at how I got mine soft without messing up the features of the coins. By the way you will invest plenty of time doing this.
Message: Posted by: mkiger (May 15, 2007 08:36PM)
Check the wet/dry sandpaper in the automotive parts store. It has grit fine enough to put a mirror finish on the coins (1200-6000).
Message: Posted by: enginemagic (May 26, 2007 07:35PM)
Another fine grit to use is lapping powder for the faces of the spring pack seals on many machines will do well.theres hundreds of ways to acheive a smooth soft coin ,getting creative will do the job
Message: Posted by: enginemagic (May 28, 2007 09:11AM)
I forgot to mention another source for soft coins,I repair ,and scrap out appliances sometimes theres coind trapped in the inner & outer tubs of washing machines,or they are in the pump below the moving action of the tub & impeller wears the milling off them ,I will save them next time I come across them.
Chuck