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Topic: Favorites in "Scarne on Card Tricks"?
Message: Posted by: cristo (Aug 23, 2007 03:20PM)
The title says it all.
Message: Posted by: Ace of $pades (Aug 25, 2007 09:59AM)
What is Scarne on Card Tricks?
Message: Posted by: Hideo Kato (Aug 25, 2007 11:01AM)
It is a card magic book Scarne authored.

Hideo Kato
Message: Posted by: closeupcardician (Aug 25, 2007 10:54PM)
And a great one at that.
Message: Posted by: rayg1952 (Aug 25, 2007 11:48PM)
I think I use to have that book.
Message: Posted by: Hideo Kato (Aug 25, 2007 11:55PM)
You should regret you don't have it now.

Hideo Kato
Message: Posted by: rayg1952 (Aug 26, 2007 01:09PM)
LOL
Message: Posted by: John Nesbit (Aug 26, 2007 02:11PM)
No one wants to talk about their "Favorites" in this book ?
Message: Posted by: Hideo Kato (Aug 26, 2007 11:18PM)
Becasue all are my favourites.

Hideo Kato
Message: Posted by: cristo (Aug 27, 2007 03:42PM)
[quote]
On 2007-08-26 15:11, johnjnesbit wrote:
No one wants to talk about their "Favorites" in this book ?
[/quote]

My sentiments exactly. Maybe I was mistaken about it being well liked, but I thought I saw that in some thread around here.
Message: Posted by: mrehula (Aug 28, 2007 08:57AM)
It's a great book. My favorite is probably Braude's Mental Card Trick. It uses a simple but deceptive key card principle. I've reworked the handling a little, but it's a nice direct effect.
Message: Posted by: cristo (Aug 28, 2007 10:25AM)
I'll have to check that one again. I think it was one I liked as well...

I particularly liked "Buckle Up" - not much to it, and it is (to me) a completely novel method of locating a reversed card without looking.
Message: Posted by: the fritz (Aug 28, 2007 03:42PM)
Cristo,

I really love the Francis Carlyle effect where both spectator and magician select cards and replace their cards in each other's respective halves. The cards are them placed together face up packet between two face down packets. The deck is spread and everything proves to face the right way except the two selections. I don't remember the title! I think it may be "The Upside-Down Cards" or something of that nature.

I also loved "Cardini's Color Discernment" the second I read it.

There is a Dai Vernon effect that I love. The only way I can describe it is it resembles an Ambitious-Card-meets-Oil-and-Water-style routine in which three cards of the same value are interlaced between three indifferent cards with the entire six-card packet placed on top of the deck. When the cards are dealt face-up the three of the same value are seen to have "melted" back to the top. Again, I don't recall the name!
Message: Posted by: Hideo Kato (Aug 28, 2007 11:00PM)
[quote]On 2007-08-27 00:18, Hideo Kato wrote:
Becasue all are my favourites.[/quote]
This was not a joke. There are many good tricks in the book. I recommend to read all, you won't regret it.

If you don't read all tricks, it is posssible you miss very good ones because nobody knows all of your favourites.

Hideo Kato
Message: Posted by: serge storms (Aug 29, 2007 10:58AM)
Check out "Future Deck" and "Miraskill". Miraskill is a great impromptu effect with anyones deck anytime anywhere type thing (as long as its a full deck) and Future Deck is great though it takes a one time lengthy set up but once done its ready to go.
I've used them both over the years and get great reactions. Worth a look.
Message: Posted by: apple123 (Aug 30, 2007 07:45AM)
I have always liked The Quickie Card Trick.
Message: Posted by: cristo (Aug 30, 2007 01:19PM)
[quote]
On 2007-08-28 16:42, the fritz wrote:
...There is a Dai Vernon effect that I love. The only way I can describe it is it resembles an Ambitious-Card-meets-Oil-and-Water-style routine in which three cards of the same value are interlaced between three indifferent cards with the entire six-card packet placed on top of the deck. When the cards are dealt face-up the three of the same value are seen to have "melted" back to the top. Again, I don't recall the name!
[/quote]

That one's Vernon's 3 card assembly.

Interesting, on first read through, that one seemed *completely* uninmpressive. It seemed so obvious since you show all the cards except the one that makes it work. But clearly Vernon knows a wee bit more about card magic than me... : )

I guess one of my biggest difficulties is trying to judge which effects will be good ones (and thus which ones to learn and practice.) When you know "the secret," some of them seem so ridiculously obvious that anyone could see right through them. This is one that fell into that category for me. I thought "that one is so simple and obvious it wouldn't fool anyone."
Message: Posted by: the fritz (Aug 30, 2007 03:28PM)
Cristo,

Yes, I've had the same thoughts before. I tried the trick a few times and the response everytime was "Wait a minute, do that again," which I can only assume means it was NOT easy to see through. It is really difficult to know how a trick will appear until you try it. This was one of those for me.
Message: Posted by: Steve Haynes (Aug 30, 2007 09:58PM)
Drunken poker deal is a hard hitting scam that is very nice and quite diferent than any other gambling routine out there.
If there was an award for sucker tricks, this would be in the running.
Message: Posted by: Andy the cardician (Sep 6, 2007 08:08AM)
It is a great book. A lot sounds simple, but packs big
Message: Posted by: Eric Fry (Sep 11, 2007 06:45PM)
There is a clever variation, attributed to Cardini, on the usual spelling trick. It's not impromptu. But after the spectator mentally chooses from among six cards, the spectator can shuffle the deck, yet the card will still spell out.

As with a lot of the tricks in the book, if you know sleight of hand you can heighten the trick. For example, a false shuffle and use of the riffle force to break the deck at the six-card stack gives the impression that the six cards were chosen at random. And remember, don't ever look at the faces of the cards.

I thought I read once that Scarne didn't actually write the book. Anyone know anything about that?
Message: Posted by: ScotDeerie (Sep 13, 2007 08:22AM)
Hi everyone,
I'm new to the list and to magic. I'm trying to get together a library and some simple tricks together to teach my nephew (age 11). Would this be a good book for us to look at? We have the basic magic books on order and will start there, of course, but is this one I should bookmark for later? Can it be used fairly early on by a beginner or is it best left to experienced folks?

Thx,
ScotDeerie
Message: Posted by: the fritz (Sep 13, 2007 04:23PM)
Yes, Scott. This book is aimed at beginners because all the sleights have been removed from the tricks in the book. I would suggest this be one of the first books you purchase... and it's pretty inexpensive! I've always thought that if I had to choose only five books to keep with me for the rest of my life, this would be one of them (along with a Bible, The Royal Road to Card Magic, The Magic Book by Harry Lorayne, and one other one... perhaps The Card Magic of Nick Trost?). I digress-- you'll do just fine purchasing a copy of this book. Highly recommended for anyone into magic, but especially for beginners. I'm sure you'll get lots of seconds from others in this thread. Good luck Scott!
Message: Posted by: magicupclose (Sep 13, 2007 07:48PM)
I agree with the poker deal, laymen are amazed & simple to perform, just build it up with presentation & people won't play cards with you!
Message: Posted by: Picard (Sep 14, 2007 06:13AM)
[quote]
On 2007-09-13 17:23, the fritz wrote:
Yes, Scott. This book is aimed at beginners because all the sleights have been removed from the tricks in the book. I would suggest this be one of the first books you purchase... and it's pretty inexpensive! I've always thought that if I had to choose only five books to keep with me for the rest of my life, this would be one of them (along with a Bible, The Royal Road to Card Magic, The Magic Book by Harry Lorayne, and one other one... perhaps The Card Magic of Nick Trost?). I digress-- you'll do just fine purchasing a copy of this book. Highly recommended for anyone into magic, but especially for beginners. I'm sure you'll get lots of seconds from others in this thread. Good luck Scott!
[/quote]
I must say I do not agree with you. Even though this book does seem as it's for beginners, I found that most of the effects are not impressive at all if performed exactly as written in a book. (and that's how beginners will perform them)
I did find that book has some nice ideas that could be integrated in a more deceptive routine but that does require knowledge of at least some basic sleights and even more importantly the ability to create - and that's something that beginners lack.
There are of course few really good effects that could (almost) stand alone nicely but with some sleights (or at least some false shuffles, cuts etc.) they become even more impressive.
Let's not forget that Scarne's goal in writing this book was to make it as sleightless as possible and that meant eliminating even the most basic sleights which every card magician should know.
I don't use this book to learn new effects, I just read it from time to time as an inspiration.
Message: Posted by: cristo (Sep 14, 2007 08:50AM)
[quote]
On 2007-09-14 07:13, Picard wrote:
[quote]
On 2007-09-13 17:23, the fritz wrote:
Yes, Scott. This book is aimed at beginners because all the sleights have been removed from the tricks in the book. I would suggest this be one of the first books you purchase... and it's pretty inexpensive! I've always thought that if I had to choose only five books to keep with me for the rest of my life, this would be one of them (along with a Bible, The Royal Road to Card Magic, The Magic Book by Harry Lorayne, and one other one... perhaps The Card Magic of Nick Trost?). I digress-- you'll do just fine purchasing a copy of this book. Highly recommended for anyone into magic, but especially for beginners. I'm sure you'll get lots of seconds from others in this thread. Good luck Scott!
[/quote]
I must say I do not agree with you. Even though this book does seem as it's for beginners, I found that most of the effects are not impressive at all if performed exactly as written in a book. (and that's how beginners will perform them)
I did find that book has some nice ideas that could be integrated in a more deceptive routine but that does require knowledge of at least some basic sleights and even more importantly the ability to create - and that's something that beginners lack.
There are of course few really good effects that could (almost) stand alone nicely but with some sleights (or at least some false shuffles, cuts etc.) they become even more impressive.
Let's not forget that Scarne's goal in writing this book was to make it as sleightless as possible and that meant eliminating even the most basic sleights which every card magician should know.
I don't use this book to learn new effects, I just read it from time to time as an inspiration.
[/quote]

That's an interesting viewpoint.

I guess the elimination of sleights and requirements for greater skill may in fact have "watered down" the power of some of the effects.

But it is that very lack of sleights in the book which makes it beginner suitable - beginners can't do all that stuff!

So, the result may well be that beginners can't do effects that are as impressive as ones that contain sleights - but that shouldn't be a surprise, should it?
Message: Posted by: the fritz (Sep 14, 2007 03:21PM)
Picard,

I respect your opinion, however I still believe the book is aimed at beginners.

One reason I believe this book is for beginner's comes from Scarne's introduction to the book. In my opinion, advice like "Never reveal how a trick is done" or "never repeat a trick for the same audience" is clearly directed toward someone new to performing card tricks. Scarne knew, as well as the rest of us who have performed before, that the temptation to reveal a secret or repeat a trick because people are dying to know how you did it can be overwhelming. Seasoned performers know why Scarne gives this advice.

Another reason I believe this book was originally intended for beginners is because Scarne mentions in his introduction, that he deliberately placed the simpler tricks at the beginning of the book and the more advanced ones near the end. Hugard and Braue also use this technique in their "Royal Road to Card Magic" because they know it is the most efficient way for a beginner to progress toward becoming an expert technician in card magic. This tells me Scarne had beginning card magicians or just someone interested in performing card tricks in mind when he wrote the book. He even quotes a statistic about people who've played card games before attempting a trick with cards.

Finally, as far as performing the tricks competently goes, Scarne talks about including "stories" to go along with the tricks, urging the performer to present the patter as written. In my mind, this book is definitely aimed at beginners.
Message: Posted by: Picard (Sep 14, 2007 06:32PM)
[quote]
On 2007-09-14 09:50, cristo wrote:
So, the result may well be that beginners can't do effects that are as impressive as ones that contain sleights - but that shouldn't be a surprise, should it?
[/quote]
I think they can, but you won't find that kind of material in Scarne's book.
It was one of my first magic books, in fact I already knew some moves when I first started reading it. I was skipping through many stacked card effects (since I wasn't even able to pull off a decent false shuffle at the time) and those few impromptu ones that caught my attention - well they didn't go to well. I performed them perfectly in a technical sense but they looked very automatic and boring in my hands and it's simply because I did them exactly as written there. Now that I know more (and I don't mean more about sleight of hand only but generally more about magic and how it should be presented) I have found it much easier to spot weak spots of the effects in the book and cover them with some sleights or at least some kind of misdirection (including more interesting and more convincing patter than the one suggested in book).
So yes, I still stand behind my opinion: some of the effects in the book do have potential but ONLY in the hands of at least a bit more experienced card handler then the average amateur. The effects in the book are generally NOT strong, actually some of them are very weak but it's ideas that make this book valuable to me. I am not sure what makes it valuable to complete beginners... And I think that being beginner does not excuse somebody for performing unimpressive and weak magic.
Message: Posted by: the fritz (Sep 14, 2007 11:08PM)
Picard,

I definitely agree that many (if not all) of the tricks in the book can be made better with some appropriately used sleight-of-hand. I also think your opinion that experienced performers will do the material more justice than beginners is right on the money.

Unfortunately, beginners have to start somewhere (as you and I have) and that somewhere is always the inexcusable place of "performing unimpressive and weak magic." I think that's part of the learning experience. That being said, I'd rather have the unimpressive and weak magic be from a beginner's book instead of being something involving sleight-of-hand in which the performer unwittingly gives away secrets by performing poorly. Just out of curiosity, do you remember which trick you performed first? I don't remember which one I did, but I cringe to think how bad it must've looked!
Message: Posted by: jquackc (Sep 20, 2007 09:52PM)
I am not only a performer but a collecter of magic effects. I spend some of my time taking a break from practicing my working material just to search and practice other tricks, from difficult to "self-working". Scarne on Cards is as great book if your a collector of card tricks... there are some classics and even a card trick in there by Houdini. These "see through" tricks are great and fry laymen just as easily as ambitious card. If your a card trick collector than you should have this on your bookshelf (after reading through it of course).
Message: Posted by: Turk (Sep 24, 2007 09:50PM)
[quote]
On 2007-09-13 09:22, ScotDeerie wrote:
Hi everyone,
I'm new to the list and to magic. I'm trying to get together a library and some simple tricks together to teach my nephew (age 11). Would this be a good book for us to look at? We have the basic magic books on order and will start there, of course, but is this one I should bookmark for later? Can it be used fairly early on by a beginner or is it best left to experienced folks?

Thx,
ScotDeerie
[/quote]

First of all, Scot, welcome to the Magic Café. I hope that you enjoy your stay here.

BTW, it would be helpful to members if you enanbled the PM function in your profile. By doing so, you might find that members would be more willing to share more details with you that might not be appropriate on a public forum.

As for the Scarne book, I stumbled across a copy of it in a used book store and purchased it--particularly because Scarne mentioned that he had taken killer tricks from many experts and then reworked them to remove the sleights and to allow the performer to concentrate on presentaion.

I love this book so much that I buy 2nd and 3rd copies of it just to have it around so that I can give it out to friends of mine who are just starting out in magic. Just yesterday, I purchased yet another copy of the book here off of the Café.

What I especially love is being in the magic store (where the owner has/had 2-3 copies of the book that he had acquired from estate sales. Some of the finger-flingers might ask if the book is "any good" or they might have read the forward and seen that the book mentions that the sleights have been removed and then derisively "talk the book down" because it has no sleights in it. I then perform a few of the effects in the book without telling them where the effect(s) came from. When they ask where the effect came from and I point out the Scarne book, their jaws drop open in amazement. (I'm kind of like the Prego Spaghetti Sauce ad--"It in there".)

Now, its true that in order for the "tricks" in the book to garner any appreciable reaction, you should come up with your own entertaining presentations. The tricks will stand alone but, combined with an entertaining presentation, takes them to a new level and changes them from "tricks" into "effects" and/or "routines".

Picard is correct that the tricks as taught by Scarne are rather lean on presentation scripting but that is the beauty of it because this fact frees you up to come up with your own unique presentations. At the same time, it also lets beginners "immediately get into performing" (some interesting very credible magic tricks).

Just, IMHO. Hope this helps you in your evaluation of the book.

Mike
Message: Posted by: cristo (Sep 25, 2007 07:51AM)
[quote]
On 2007-09-24 22:50, Turk wrote:
I then perform a few of the effects in the book without telling them where the effect(s) came from. When they ask where the effect came from and I point out the Scarne book, their jaws drop open in amazement. (I'm kind of like the Prego Spaghetti Sauce ad--"It in there".)

[/quote]

Care to name any of those effects which you like from the book? They don't as a rule read very impressively, so I'm hoping to try out some that others have found to be good ones.
Message: Posted by: Steve Landavazo (Dec 6, 2007 02:19PM)
I have had Scarne's book for years and it is AWESOME! Years ago this was considered by many the definitive work on card magic! It should be in everyone's library. You will use and appreciate many of the great effects in this publication! My favorite is the, "Do As I Do" version with one deck. Get it!

Stever
Message: Posted by: Steve Landavazo (Dec 6, 2007 02:20PM)
Also Houdini's Affinity In Numbers is a classic...

Stever
Message: Posted by: Scott Cram (Dec 6, 2007 04:09PM)
Stewart James' "Miraskill" is in a class of its own. It's part of the basis of David Williamson's "Aunt Mary's Terrible Secret", and the Stewart James books have a great chapter called "Miraschool", in which the trick is taken to incredible new directions (including an ESP card, no-take-away version that's different each time you do it!).

Among my other favorite routines:
The Uninvited Joker
Future Deck
Einstein and the Magician
The Si Stebbins routines
Hands-Off Miracle
The Wizard
Scarne's Drunken Poker Deal
Piano Card Trick

BTW - I also have a least favorite. It's Egg A La Card, which is the close-up equivalent of the Hindu Rope Trick. Nobody has seen it themselves, but everybody seems to know someone who has seen it.
Message: Posted by: airship (Dec 9, 2007 09:56AM)
I have almost 50 bookmark tabs stuck in my copy of this book. :)
Message: Posted by: Steve Landavazo (Dec 9, 2007 08:05PM)
Did you know Scarne compiled his card book along with his magic tricks in one volume. Just some useless trivia for those that care...

Stever
Message: Posted by: Hansel (Apr 4, 2012 02:09PM)
Future Deck
Message: Posted by: galerius (Apr 9, 2012 01:33PM)
At the moment my favorite ones are "The upside down Deck" and "Traveling Aces", but I have to read it almost entirely...there are, I know, many many treasures to discover...!
Message: Posted by: the fritz (Apr 13, 2012 04:32PM)
Looking back at posts I made almost five years ago, I am still of the same opinion about the effects in this book. It is probably my favorite magic book and the only one in my library that I go through from cover to cover every year. I even have a gambling set I perform that is completely impromptu and the basic effects (with a few tweaks) come straight out of this book. I have yet to find an equal to this book (for self working effects anyway)!
Message: Posted by: james_thecanadian_magician (Apr 17, 2012 03:07PM)
Yes, I use "Up Side Down Deck" as my impromptu triumph style routine. The reason being because I think it's easy and strong . I did the triumph to a friend who likes to watch me like a hawk when I perform. It went over really well.

I plan to go back to this book soon.
Message: Posted by: Jon W. (May 6, 2012 04:56PM)
I just peeked inside the book on Amazon and decided to get it from looking at the table of contents and one or two tricks I was able to see in the preview. Based on some of the posts within this thread I am excited to dive into everything. Will be curious to read through and find my favorites to add to the list.
Message: Posted by: Ihop (May 17, 2012 03:32PM)
I bought mine when I was playing with magic when I was about 23 yrs. I was never really serious about magic. It was just a way to get attention & meet girls. I bought the book but never read it.
Now, that I am retired and hopefully a little wiser, I read most of it and even learned the value of "Practicing"

My copy was printed in 1973.

Ihor
Message: Posted by: RSchlutz (May 17, 2012 04:46PM)
Funny... I just started re-reading this book and this post starts up. It is cool to see the difference 10 years makes between reads. I actually made notes on each page of my opinions of the trick like... "awsome trick!", "great magician trick" and etc.

However what a difference time makes. I didn't appreciate the material at that that younger age. The last few days have been insightful. Like the books intro says, he eliminated sleights from each trick. If you put your thinking cap on you can turn a lot of the tricks into lethal weapons.

Ryan
Message: Posted by: Jon W. (Jun 26, 2012 09:56AM)
I am still not halfway through reading, but so far two of my favorites are Mind Control and The Magic Number Trick. I already have 11 tabs myself in which I want to go back to and reevaluate when I am done.
Message: Posted by: WalterPlinge (Jun 28, 2012 10:15PM)
I tried Mind Control. I think there is a mistake in the second to the last paragraph. Shouldn't "left" be replaced with the word "right"?
Message: Posted by: Billybonkers (Jul 9, 2012 08:02PM)
I've only recently managed to pick this up second hand, what a bargain this book is.

I'd say future deck has to be my favourite.....
Message: Posted by: Cipher (Jul 9, 2012 08:20PM)
Drunken Poker Deal and Future Deck stand out as some of the best. I also agree with those who have mentioned that because of the large "self working" nature of most of the tricks, some can feel a little flat and "meh". However, this book is still a classic, because of its cost and how much inspiration can be gleaned out of it.
Message: Posted by: Hideo Kato (Jul 11, 2012 05:27PM)
[quote]On 2012-06-28 23:15, WalterPlinge wrote:
I tried Mind Control. I think there is a mistake in the second to the last paragraph. Shouldn't "left" be replaced with the word "right"?[/quote]
Maybe Scarne ribbon spread cards from right to left.

'Mind Control' is one of very important tricks in the book, because the key card placement in the trick is very useful and the Distant Key concept can be used in many effective ways.

Hideo Kato
Message: Posted by: WalterPlinge (Jul 13, 2012 08:32AM)
[quote]
On 2012-07-11 18:27, Hideo Kato wrote:
[quote]On 2012-06-28 23:15, WalterPlinge wrote:
I tried Mind Control. I think there is a mistake in the second to the last paragraph. Shouldn't "left" be replaced with the word "right"?[/quote]
Maybe Scarne ribbon spread cards from right to left.

'Mind Control' is one of very important tricks in the book, because the key card placement in the trick is very useful and the Distant Key concept can be used in many effective ways.

Hideo Kato
[/quote]

Yes -- I had assumed that the spread was from left to right -- but the book doesn't specify.

thanks
Message: Posted by: lcwright1964 (Feb 22, 2014 02:25PM)
Just had to reanimate this thread after finding it.

This was the first magic book I owned as a child and I pored over it for hours. My well-worn Signet Paperback original is long gone, so I was delighted to find it reprinted by Dover in its extensive collection of magic works.

It doesn't seem to get a lot of mention around here, though it is crammed with some gems. Is this because it is from 1950, and today's aficionados of self-workers prefer more recent contributions by Fulves, Colombini, and others?

Les
Message: Posted by: JoeHohman (Mar 5, 2014 09:40PM)
Like The Fritz, I am partial to Upside Down Deck (not unlike a real easy Two card Triumph); I also use Travelling Aces a lot (which is like the very next trick in the book.
Message: Posted by: Cardflipper (Mar 7, 2014 09:39PM)
[quote]
On Sep 6, 2007, Andy the cardician wrote:
It is a great book. A lot sounds simple, but packs big
[/quote]

All the tricks in that book are terrific!
Message: Posted by: AnthonyJD (Mar 8, 2014 09:42AM)
How about "You do as I do".
Message: Posted by: lcwright1964 (Mar 8, 2014 11:34PM)
[quote]
On Mar 8, 2014, AnthonyJD wrote:
How about "You do as I do".
[/quote]

Indeed. It is a classic example of the magic truism that the impact of an effect is not necessarily related to the complexity or difficulty involved in achieving it. If I think like a magician, the straight-up Do As I Do seems so simple I am amazed that it gets past anyone. However, I have boggled people with this trick after they seemed underwhelmed by an effect with fancy finger flipping that SHOULD have impressed them more. In addition, the secret behind this trick shows up in jazzed up commercial effects which sell for a few bucks a piece just for a single trick--e.g., Paul Wilson's Con Cam Coincidencia is basically You Do As I Do in fancy modern dress.

It is all that that a great self-worker should be--simple and nearly fool proof, devoid of mathematical complexity, and baffling to the layman.
Message: Posted by: the fritz (Mar 13, 2014 10:39PM)
Still my favorite magic book (tied with Harry Lorayne's The Magic Book), still finding new ideas and effects, and still amazed! This is such a great book of card magic. In fact, I bought a second hardback copy to give to my son when he is old enough to receive and use magic books. I only have a few others set aside for that purpose.
Message: Posted by: Wilf Jonson (Mar 14, 2014 07:55AM)
[quote]Eric Fry wrote:
I thought I read once that Scarne didn't actually write the book. Anyone know anything about that?
[/quote]
[i]Scarne on Card Tricks[/i] is believed to be ghostwritten by Dr. Ben Braude, described in the book's dedication as "magic's most enthusiastic hobbyist."

Braude's Mental Card Trick, praised in this thread, is his trick.
Message: Posted by: Joey_Z (Mar 16, 2014 11:10PM)
Dang! I just passed this up at a used bookstore. Wasn't sure if it looked like a good purchase at the time (i know, I know... Don't judge a book...)
Message: Posted by: AKMan (Mar 26, 2014 10:38PM)
This is one of the best bargains in magic today. You can usually pick this up for less than five dollars. You will find something useful in this gook. As mentioned in other posts, embellish these effects with some sleight of hand or just play them straigt from the book. Either way you will find lots of things that will kill for laymen (and a few magicians). I have been doing variations on number 99, Cross Suits, for years. It always gets a nice response and is a nice filler in a broader routine.
Message: Posted by: LoveKey1988 (Apr 7, 2014 12:08PM)
For you guys that like Scarne on Card tricks I just posted my updated handling of the first trick in the book - Calling the cards - in Secret Sessions.

I hope you guys like it.

Regards, Marian
Message: Posted by: RogerTheShrubber (May 31, 2014 03:20AM)
Hands-Off Miracle is my favorite by a mile. I've done that one more often than all others in the book combined and have never had anyone catch on. However, you need to practice it over and over and over and over before even running it by a test audience. I've seen others try it and come across so poorly that they were busted on the spot. Once you've got the trick down and can do it well, you'll be baffling people forever.
Message: Posted by: LoveKey1988 (May 31, 2014 08:34AM)
Check out my handling of this trick in Secret Sessions


[quote]On May 31, 2014, RogerTheShrubber wrote:
Hands-Off Miracle is my favorite by a mile. I've done that one more often than all others in the book combined and have never had anyone catch on. However, you need to practice it over and over and over and over before even running it by a test audience. I've seen others try it and come across so poorly that they were busted on the spot. Once you've got the trick down and can do it well, you'll be baffling people forever. [/quote]
Message: Posted by: RogerTheShrubber (Jun 1, 2014 09:20PM)
[quote]On May 31, 2014, LoveKey1988 wrote:
Check out my handling of this trick in Secret Sessions

I look forward to doing so, but I have quite a few posts to go. When I can, I certainly will. Thanks.

BTW, one more word on the original question: I remember getting a killer reaction from Automatic Pencil Writing. Those who need a trick to amaze kids into silence should try it.
Message: Posted by: nattefrost (Jun 12, 2014 10:01AM)
Future Deck!
Message: Posted by: DelMagic (Jun 12, 2014 11:17PM)
Roger,

I love your Café name! Ni!

John
Message: Posted by: galerius (Jun 13, 2014 06:24AM)
[quote]On Jun 12, 2014, nattefrost wrote:
Future Deck! [/quote]
Very clever !
And when you make people believe that things went the opposite way they actually did gives you an additional intimate pleasure :)
Message: Posted by: David Martin (Jun 14, 2014 04:53PM)
A personal favortie of mine from Scarne on Card Tricks is trick #5 Dunninger's Mental Card Trick. If you take the time to find an appropriate size crystal ball and a mini card. The effect is not only very errie for everyone involved, but also incredibly visual in an otherworldly sense...

Other favorites include: #100 Card on the Wall, #97 Scarne's Tappit, and #94 Martin Gardner's Five Nine King.

David
Message: Posted by: nattefrost (Jun 21, 2014 05:51PM)
Galerius- That's what I love about this effect (the way things happen the opposite way )- it is super clever. Sure, the deck can be only used for one effect, but you can easily switch it in and out during a routine and really pull off a cool effect.
Message: Posted by: Jerskin (Jul 9, 2014 06:34PM)
One deck you do as I do. (page 25 in my edition)
Message: Posted by: Wabojeg (Jul 23, 2014 04:45PM)
[quote]On Aug 28, 2007, the fritz wrote:
Cristo,

I really love the Francis Carlyle effect where both spectator and magician select cards and replace their cards in each other's respective halves. The cards are them placed together face up packet between two face down packets. The deck is spread and everything proves to face the right way except the two selections. I don't remember the title! I think it may be "The Upside-Down Cards" or something of that nature.

I also loved "Cardini's Color Discernment" the second I read it.

There is a Dai Vernon effect that I love. The only way I can describe it is it resembles an Ambitious-Card-meets-Oil-and-Water-style routine in which three cards of the same value are interlaced between three indifferent cards with the entire six-card packet placed on top of the deck. When the cards are dealt face-up the three of the same value are seen to have "melted" back to the top. Again, I don't recall the name! [/quote]

I think the Carlyle effect was a Do As I Do plot. I got so much mileage out of that effect as a kid. My copy from when I was a kid is so worn out from reading that it barely holds together now, but I wouldn't part with it for the world.
Message: Posted by: RogerTheShrubber (Sep 17, 2014 01:16PM)
No, the Carlyle effect is the third trick in the book and is exactly as the fritz describes.

BTW, regarding Automatic Pencil Writing, I should point out that I use a much different technique to force the card than the one recommended by the book. I prefer to eliminate unnecessary dealing whenever possible.
Message: Posted by: gomerel (Sep 17, 2014 11:29PM)
A friend who knows I do magic just found that for me at a friends of the library book sale. This thread will be useful in reading it.
Message: Posted by: CraigMcK (Oct 8, 2014 06:36PM)
Kinda tempted to see if I can pick up a cheap copy from somewhere...
Message: Posted by: CraigMcK (Oct 8, 2014 06:41PM)
Just checked, can get it 2nd hand from an Amazon reseller for less than a fiver.
Message: Posted by: poolside (Oct 29, 2014 05:37PM)
Miraskill and Future Deck are beauties!
Message: Posted by: FatherWilliam57 (Nov 5, 2014 06:02PM)
There are several copies on Flea Bay for less than $5.00 at the moment. (One less than a few minutes ago 'cause I just bought it! Can't wait to dig in...)
Message: Posted by: Vlad_77 (Nov 8, 2014 07:15PM)
I absolutely love this book and I'm glad this thread was necro'd. I thought I'd toss out a favorite titled Carlyle's Migrating Decks. Two deck of cards transpose, that is, all except two selected cards. It's a very strong trick and I urge folks to learn this bad boy - it's REALLY strong.

Miraskill has been mentioned a few times. Stewart James was a master whose influence resonates to this very day. If you love Miraskill, all I can say is that is just the tip of the proverbial iceberg. Anyhow, I don't want to derail the conversation about Scarne's (Braude's?) book. I was looking through the contents and the names of the magicians whose effects are included is like a pantheon of magic up to the 1950s although the Milton Berle trick has been rumored to be something that Scarne taught Berle - not that the Berle trick is that good, but it was kind of weird seeing the name of this guy who I think looked like a human Bugs Bunny. ;)

My buddy Turk wrote back in 2007 that magicians would talk down this book until he fried them with a few tricks from it. Well, let people talk down all they want as it keeps this jewel out of the wrong hands. We know better! ;)
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (Nov 23, 2014 03:13AM)
Thanks to this thread I ordered this from Amazon tonight. I can't wait!

:hotcoffee:
Message: Posted by: FatherWilliam57 (Nov 24, 2014 01:03PM)
[quote]On Dec 9, 2007, Steve Landavazo wrote:
Did you know Scarne compiled his card book along with his magic tricks in one volume. Just some useless trivia for those that care...

Stever [/quote]

I realize this is an old post, but wondered if someone could clarify what is being said here: I am aware of "Scarne Card Tricks" and "Scarne Magic Tricks" as separate publications. Am I to assume from the above post that both these books can be found under one cover? If so, what is the specific name of this compilation or the ISBN number? Multiple searches on the internet have led to naught...
Message: Posted by: Kabbalah (Nov 24, 2014 02:09PM)
[quote]On Nov 24, 2014, FatherWilliam57 wrote:
[quote]On Dec 9, 2007, Steve Landavazo wrote:
Did you know Scarne compiled his card book along with his magic tricks in one volume. Just some useless trivia for those that care...

Stever [/quote]

I realize this is an old post, but wondered if someone could clarify what is being said here: I am aware of "Scarne Card Tricks" and "Scarne Magic Tricks" as separate publications. Am I to assume from the above post that both these books can be found under one cover? If so, what is the specific name of this compilation or the ISBN number? Multiple searches on the internet have led to naught... [/quote]

The name of the book is [i]Scarne's Tricks[/i].

My edition is published by Crown Publishers, Inc. - New York. Copyright 1950 by John Scarne. There is no ISBN listed since the ISBN wasn't created until 1965.
Message: Posted by: FatherWilliam57 (Nov 28, 2014 06:49PM)
Thanks, Kabbalah! Found one... :bigdance:
Message: Posted by: Kabbalah (Nov 28, 2014 10:15PM)
Happy to help!
Message: Posted by: Timtom (Apr 1, 2015 11:51AM)
After reading about this book here, I orded me a copy of it, so now I just sitt and wait for it :-)
Message: Posted by: the fritz (Apr 10, 2015 09:45PM)
So glad this book is getting the love it deserves. It is my favorite all time card book because there is so much variety. With the addition of a few easy false shuffles, forces, etc., many of the effects could easily find a place in any professional's repertoire. I go through this book at least once every year.
Message: Posted by: cafeinst (May 26, 2015 03:16PM)
The main problem with the book is that there are too many great tricks to choose from.
Message: Posted by: cafeinst (May 27, 2015 10:07AM)
I like Reverso the best. Easy to do and fools people.
Message: Posted by: cafeinst (May 29, 2015 01:13PM)
Reverso is worth the price of the whole book, in my opinion.
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (May 29, 2015 09:33PM)
Lorayne's Mind Reading Card Trick. It's also in CCV1. I scared my daughters with this one! :bg:
Message: Posted by: JoeHohman (Jun 4, 2015 12:38PM)
So, it's a year later, and I have another one that you should at least read: it is "It's a Natural" on page 23. It is a prediction effect using a deck of cards and a box or book of matches -- very appealing, particularly in the aspect that the spectator gets to select the cards used and the number of matches.
Message: Posted by: Juble (Jun 4, 2015 02:23PM)
Cheers Joe - will check that out. One I have used now and again is automatic pencil writing (trick 151). If you don't mind a bit of small prep it's brill!
Message: Posted by: Jaqk Clemente (Apr 13, 2017 06:48AM)
I do love this book! it was the first book I've read, along with Royal Road! I stumbled in this post as I'm doing a little research for my website, for a post about this book. Every now and then I open it and find little gems. I do agree that's a beginner book, but once you can put some more experience on the tricks, those are killers!

#1 Calling the Cards is HUGE if presented in the right way!
Message: Posted by: FilmMagician (Jul 7, 2017 09:03AM)
[quote]On Aug 30, 2007, Steve Haynes wrote:
Drunken poker deal is a hard hitting scam that is very nice and quite diferent than any other gambling routine out there.
If there was an award for sucker tricks, this would be in the running. [/quote]


Does he explain the !@#$* shuffle in how to do this trick?
Message: Posted by: FilmMagician (Jul 7, 2017 09:15AM)
[quote]On Sep 14, 2007, the fritz wrote:
Picard,

I respect your opinion, however I still believe the book is aimed at beginners.

One reason I believe this book is for beginner's comes from Scarne's introduction to the book. In my opinion, advice like "Never reveal how a trick is done" or "never repeat a trick for the same audience" is clearly directed toward someone new to performing card tricks. Scarne knew, as well as the rest of us who have performed before, that the temptation to reveal a secret or repeat a trick because people are dying to know how you did it can be overwhelming. Seasoned performers know why Scarne gives this advice.

Another reason I believe this book was originally intended for beginners is because Scarne mentions in his introduction, that he deliberately placed the simpler tricks at the beginning of the book and the more advanced ones near the end. Hugard and Braue also use this technique in their "Royal Road to Card Magic" because they know it is the most efficient way for a beginner to progress toward becoming an expert technician in card magic. This tells me Scarne had beginning card magicians or just someone interested in performing card tricks in mind when he wrote the book. He even quotes a statistic about people who've played card games before attempting a trick with cards.


Finally, as far as performing the tricks competently goes, Scarne talks about including "stories" to go along with the tricks, urging the performer to present the patter as written. In my mind, this book is definitely aimed at beginners. [/quote]

How could a magic book, that has no sleights in it, be a book for beginners? You'd need to know basic handling and card sleights before learning a lot of these tricks.
Message: Posted by: Dollarbill (Dec 25, 2017 09:04AM)
[quote]On Jul 7, 2017, FilmMagician wrote:
[quote]On Sep 14, 2007, the fritz wrote:
Picard,

I respect your opinion, however I still believe the book is aimed at beginners.

One reason I believe this book is for beginner's comes from Scarne's introduction to the book. In my opinion, advice like "Never reveal how a trick is done" or "never repeat a trick for the same audience" is clearly directed toward someone new to performing card tricks. Scarne knew, as well as the rest of us who have performed before, that the temptation to reveal a secret or repeat a trick because people are dying to know how you did it can be overwhelming. Seasoned performers know why Scarne gives this advice.

Another reason I believe this book was originally intended for beginners is because Scarne mentions in his introduction, that he deliberately placed the simpler tricks at the beginning of the book and the more advanced ones near the end. Hugard and Braue also use this technique in their "Royal Road to Card Magic" because they know it is the most efficient way for a beginner to progress toward becoming an expert technician in card magic. This tells me Scarne had beginning card magicians or just someone interested in performing card tricks in mind when he wrote the book. He even quotes a statistic about people who've played card games before attempting a trick with cards.


Finally, as far as performing the tricks competently goes, Scarne talks about including "stories" to go along with the tricks, urging the performer to present the patter as written. In my mind, this book is definitely aimed at beginners. [/quote]

How could a magic book, that has no sleights in it, be a book for beginners?

You'd need to know basic handling and card sleights before learning a lot of these tricks. [/quote]

"that he deliberately placed the simpler tricks at the beginning of the book and the more advanced ones near the end.". However I do not own the book. Just sayin'.
Message: Posted by: carlyle (Mar 4, 2018 02:22PM)
[quote]On Jul 7, 2017, FilmMagician wrote:
[quote]On Aug 30, 2007, Steve Haynes wrote:
Drunken poker deal is a hard hitting scam that is very nice and quite diferent than any other gambling routine out there.
If there was an award for sucker tricks, this would be in the running. [/quote]


Does he explain the !@#$* shuffle in how to do this trick? [/quote]

He does explain the shuffle, which is fairly simple but deceptive - it really does what it claims.

Going through the book again the past week or so, his "Drunken Poker Deal" did really stand out - one I have to keep in mind, very clever and funny. The set-up is pretty easy too - only certain cards have to be set as written, so it's easy to remember.

I'm wondering if the "drunk" were to get the two black jacks and a red jack face-up on the deal, if that would make the ending even more visually surprising.
Message: Posted by: nattefrost (Mar 18, 2018 03:01PM)
I know I probably said it already in this thread but I perform "Future Deck" a lot and it is just so clever, and without revealing the method, the spectator thinks they are doing one thing but actually doing the complete opposite, and they believe the magician is doing one thing but the magician is doing the complete opposite! I knew this was a great effect years ago when I performed it for my wife (who is not into magic at all but knows all the moves, gimmicks, methods, etc) and she gasped when both cards were turned over. It's just very clever. Yes- there is a one time set up that takes maybe 20 minutes tops, but believe me when I say it is well worth it! I've made up a few of these decks.
Message: Posted by: docguitarman (Apr 19, 2018 06:57AM)
[quote]On May 29, 2015, Theodore Lawton wrote:
Lorayne's Mind Reading Card Trick. It's also in CCV1. I scared my daughters with this one! :bg: [/quote]

I second this!

Since returning to magic in my retirement I've been recollecting magic literature, and a few months back got a copy of Scarne. Also I've been regularly showing the Mrs. a daily new card trick. Yesterday I picked up Scarne, dipped in it to Lorayne's Mind Reading Card Trick. After several private practice runs I approached the Mrs. and said "I have a new trick to show you!" I performed it three times. She was gobsmacked! She said it is the best trick I have ever done! I love it!

As a footnote, I have shown her a lot of tricks with sleights as I have learnt and re-learnt tricks. She always says "I think the cards are stuck together some how!" (Even when they aren't !) She thinks the tricks are visually cute but she is less impressed than she usually is with most of the self-working tricks.
Message: Posted by: federico luduena (Apr 19, 2018 10:02AM)
In Mathematics, Magic, and Mystery (p31), Martin Gardner lists his favorites. Haven't gone through all of them, but I recall having trouble with Stewart James' trick (No. 72).
Message: Posted by: docguitarman (Apr 19, 2018 02:05PM)
[quote]On Mar 18, 2018, nattefrost wrote:
I know I probably said it already in this thread but I perform "Future Deck" a lot and it is just so clever, and without revealing the method, the spectator thinks they are doing one thing but actually doing the complete opposite, and they believe the magician is doing one thing but the magician is doing the complete opposite! I knew this was a great effect years ago when I performed it for my wife (who is not into magic at all but knows all the moves, gimmicks, methods, etc) and she gasped when both cards were turned over. It's just very clever. Yes- there is a one time set up that takes maybe 20 minutes tops, but believe me when I say it is well worth it! I've made up a few of these decks. [/quote]

Thanks for the mention of "Future Deck"! I just looked this up in Scarne and I am going to make one! The book says use a pencil and erase the prediction at the end (I expect to reinforce the effect) but I think I am going to use a fine tip black sharpie to make the deck. If its marked with a sharpie I have an excuse to ditch the Future deck and bring out a clean deck to do other tricks! What did you use? Thanks!
Message: Posted by: docguitarman (Apr 19, 2018 02:08PM)
I just checked around and see that the Ultimate Self Working DVD says it used a sharpie to make the Future Deck. No brainer I guess, lol!
Message: Posted by: nattefrost (Apr 24, 2018 10:41PM)
Docguitarman- I used a normal sharpie to make up the deck, but not making it (the prediction) too large, so you can really give the face up deck a real nice wide spread across the table. I will have to find the book and take another look, because I don't remember reading about using a pencil in this effect. (I've got a terrible memory). I thought there was no need to use a pencil to erase the prediction at the end because I'm using a marker with a dried tip to "make the prediction" in the beginning. Without saying too much- how do you perform it?
Message: Posted by: docguitarman (Apr 25, 2018 09:49AM)
Nattefrost. I used a fine sharpie also and have the prediction small and along the margin area near the index. I can spread the deck wide also. I use a regular fine sharpie during the presentation and merely .... fill in the ellipses ...

First time I showed it, to the Mrs. (for the "Mrs. test" ) as I was about to write the prediction with the sharpie she said, "Oh no! don't ruin the deck !" I told her it was okay as it was just a dollar store Maverick deck, not a Bicycle deck, lol! And I can do the trick several times per deck by tossing out the "ruined" card.

When the trick was over she was gobsmacked.

I'm going to make a second deck with same back Mavericks for the occasional time when perhaps I decide its safe to do it one more time (maybe in a walk around situation were some spec nearby may see it twice and notice the card is different).
Message: Posted by: John Palazzo (Sep 20, 2018 12:55AM)
"Scarne on Card Tricks" is one of my all time favorite card magic books. So many wonderful gems in there. Just incredible. My Signet 1974 paperback copy is well worn with circled and marked routines and marked pages all over the place.

One of my favorites is Trick Number 3 The Upside Down Deck credited to Francis Carlyle, page 9 in my copy. Nice triumph like effect. I have a revised handling of the mixing sequence I posted in Secret Sessions titled Scarne on Card Tricks - Updside Down Deck Handling.

Best, John
Message: Posted by: sandromagic (Apr 30, 2019 07:55AM)
Time to reread this gem again.