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Topic: What do you do................
Message: Posted by: SoCalPro (Sep 26, 2007 07:55PM)
.......when someone calls you and inquires about your services? Do you just find out what they need, quote them a price and just move on?

OR

Do you take the time to write down all their contact info and detailed notes on the conversation?

I do the latter and it drives me nuts!!!!! The problem I have which adds to my everyday stress is that during each call, I take a ton of notes. After I am done pitching my services and quoting the client I politely say something like "Hey, would you do me a favor? I book on a first come first served basis and I'd REALLY appreciate it if you could call me back either way on this. This way I'll know if I should hold the date or book another show"( not word for word). They always agree to do this and then....guess what???? 9 times outta 10 they don't call me. This shouldn't, but this offends me a little. I really do TRY to call them back within a couple of days but because of conflicting schedules (I'm home doing business, their at work and can't be reached)I always end up with a big folder of possible clients that I never hear back from (most of the time). And when I do finally get a hold of them, a lot of the time they choose not to book me (I get a lot of shoppers like most do). I look at this big bad folder as a pile of $$ that I let go due to the fact that I didn't have time to call them, they didn't call me or we weren't able to communicate in some way shape and form.


Can any of you pros give me some advice on how NOT to let this get to me? More don't book me than not (yeah, I said it!!) and I am certain it's not my show. I think most that call me are just looking to book on price alone. I have a whole shpeal(?) about this that I say every time I get a call.


So, come on guys and gals. What do YOU do when you get a call for a show?

Any advice would be appreciated. :)

JIM
Message: Posted by: Donald Dunphy (Sep 26, 2007 08:13PM)
Hi Jim -

First question. Is this about birthday shows, in home private shows, corporate shows, etc? Which do you find this happens with the most?

That could help me, so I can give you some appropriate advice.

- Donald
Message: Posted by: rossmacrae (Sep 26, 2007 09:07PM)
How many "categories" you got, anyway?

What kind of show, age range, where, when, anything else that doesn't fit the preceding that I need to know?

Dress that up in a package including getting and using their name, gently guiding them to settle on my most suitable offering, letting them know how wonderful that offering will make their guests feel ... that's it.

They'll either call back or they won't. NEXT!
Message: Posted by: Donald Dunphy (Sep 26, 2007 09:51PM)
Hi Jim -

Second question. Are you always asking your prospects who's involved in the decision-making process, early in the sales conversation? Also, do you ask about their "buying criteria" (sometimes you have to use a different phrase so they understand what you mean)?

Third question. Do you ask right after giving the quote (and before asking for the sale), "Is that about what you expected it to be?"

- Donald
Message: Posted by: SoCalPro (Sep 26, 2007 09:55PM)
Donald,
It doesn't seem to matter whether it's a birthday or otherwise. I DO have a few that will just book me on the spot but most have to talk to "hubby" or bring it up at their next meeting and we leave it at that.

ROSS,
I always find out what they need and accommodate their needs. I offer everything from strolling to stage all the way to a 2 man 1 hour comedy magic show with lights, backdrop and sound.
I understand we all get "shoppers" but
do you guys take notes and contact them a few days later (follow up)? I was taught that this was the thing to do.
Message: Posted by: SoCalPro (Sep 26, 2007 09:57PM)
Donald,
Usually it's the mom calling to find out info for her kids party so her and her hubby would be the ones to talk to. I ALWAYS tell them all about my show before telling them the performance fee. I've never been one to say "I charge $XXX. PERIOD.
Message: Posted by: Donald Dunphy (Sep 27, 2007 12:38AM)
Hi Jim -

I sent you some ideas by PM.

- Donald
Message: Posted by: rossmacrae (Sep 27, 2007 02:34AM)
[quote]
I offer everything from strolling to stage all the way to a 2 man 1 hour comedy magic show with lights, backdrop and sound.
[/quote]
Many will disagree with me, but it looks like your "menu" of offerings is too confusing to throw at the stream of people coming in one "door of your shop." The phone rings, and you offer them everything from a McDonaldsburger to a $200-a-plate gourmet meal with two pages of "specials of the day."

It may be helpful to separate the stream of potential clients - more than one phone number, so you can "have your business suit on" when one phone rings and "wear your goofy party hat" when someone calls the other. More than one website. I've seen people advertise to different markets under different names: the same number reaches the same people at "Wizzo the Magic Clown" and "Elegant-o Magic Productions".
Message: Posted by: SoCalPro (Sep 27, 2007 12:19PM)
Hi Ross,
While is it true that I have a lot to offer my clients, I only offer them what will be beneficial for their event. Let's say if Timmy's mom calls and asks what I charge for his 8th birthday party, I'll just offer her my family show. If on the other hand I get a call from a corporation who is hosting an event with 400 people, I can offer them strolling magic, a stage show, a combination of both or our dynamic 2 man show. I NEVER pitch every service to every potential client that calls, that'd be silly.


So Ross... do YOU take notes and do follow ups?

JIM
Message: Posted by: nucinud (Sep 27, 2007 12:38PM)
When someone asks "How much?" I immediately
respond with, "I have several packages. Let's see which
might best suit your needs."

But before we get into my that, fortunately or unfortunately, I am very lucky to be one of the busiest magicians in the area.

What day and time are we looking at?

Where is the party?

What type of event is it? What is the age range?

By the way how did you hear about me?
Message: Posted by: magicofCurtis (Sep 27, 2007 01:03PM)
What has worked for me:

When an inquiry comes in... gather details and then quote a show and a price.... Ask if that is with-in their budget.... Sometimes they will say YES, or we were thinking little less, or Mr. magic down the road qouted xxxx.... Now if your qoute is unsuitable then sell them a lessor service... Or sometimes, they have even more to spend so you can offer additional services... :)

After speaking to the client mail them a flyer, a video, a postcard, etc.... Even email them inviting them to visit your website....
Couple days later send them postcard...
Then
Usually they will email you (since they have it handing from your last email) booking you or informing you no thanks...
Message: Posted by: Dannydoyle (Sep 27, 2007 01:04PM)
Here is the problem. You want to get as much as you possibly can from them, and they want to pay you as little as possible.

A classic epic battle of sales which has raged on since one person had something another person desired for whatever reason.

You are like me you hate sales. My advice, get someone who likes it and is good at it to do it for you. FAR less stress.
Message: Posted by: SoCalPro (Sep 27, 2007 03:25PM)
Soooooooooo..if you leave 1 message a day and they don't call back, is it safe to say they (those cowards) aren't interested??? :rotf:
Message: Posted by: magicofCurtis (Sep 27, 2007 04:49PM)
YEs or very busy.....

I had a lady who I followed up with and she was busy and said she was not going to use a magicain... BUT she phoned me a week later and booked after a second thought and viewing the postcard that was sent to her as a reminder.....
Message: Posted by: SoCalPro (Sep 27, 2007 04:51PM)
Curtis,
What if I faxed them a brief reminder of what was said on the phone and thanked them for their time. Do you think that might be just as effective?
Message: Posted by: TomBoleware (Sep 27, 2007 05:22PM)
I wouldnít let it get to me, hearing no, no, no, is common in sales. But depending on them to call you back may not be the best approach to take. Very few will return a call to tell you they donít want to buy something. Thatís just humans for you. Instead of asking them to call me, I would find out the best time for me to call them. Maybe get a couple of numbers so they can be reached. A follow up to a phone call is a must if you want to do well in sales. And sales is exactly what it is.

Tom
Message: Posted by: SoCalPro (Sep 27, 2007 05:27PM)
[quote]
On 2007-09-27 18:22, TomBoleware wrote:
I wouldnít let it get to me, hearing no, no, no, is common in sales. Depending on them to call you back may not be the best approach to take. Very few will return a call to tell you they donít want to buy something. Thatís just humans for you. Instead of asking them to call me, I would find out the best time for me to call them. Maybe get a couple of numbers so they can be reached. A follow up to a phone call is a must if you want to do well in sales. And sales is exactly what it is.

Tom
[/quote]

This is EXACTLY what I have been taught. You don't get anything without asking. Sometimes I'll ask when would be a good time to follow up but I feel that if I don't follow up at all, I may not have ANY change to book the gig.

Thanks Tom.
Message: Posted by: TomBoleware (Sep 27, 2007 05:31PM)
And donít forget, sometimes you have to keep asking. Nothing wrong with that because they did call you first. Hang in there until you plainly get an answer. Then accept the noís as being one step closer to a yes.

Tom
Message: Posted by: Donald Dunphy (Sep 27, 2007 06:12PM)
There's a good point. Follow-up is in your court. Instead of asking them to get back to you with an answer, find out when they will be making the decision, and at the same time, ask for their permission to call them back for an answer at that time.

- Donald
Message: Posted by: SoCalPro (Sep 27, 2007 06:23PM)
Bingo, problem solved. I have received some great advice via PM's. Thank you all. :)

Unless................anyone has anything else to add.
Message: Posted by: magicofCurtis (Sep 27, 2007 08:02PM)
Socalpro,

Faxing them is good too, anything to remind them of YOU!!!

I also kindly say... if we don't hear from you in a day or two I will check in.... Also, I say let me know one way or the other so I know how to work my schedule... I will hold this date for you.... (WINK)

This way they expect your call...
Message: Posted by: gardini (Sep 28, 2007 06:19AM)
What I do no matter what kind of sales I do, is I set up an appointment with them to call back after two to three days, I make a real big deal about setting up a time for them to be avaiolable to take my phone call, I found most of the time they will keep that appointment and I'll get my answer either way, If they call and do not book right away or won't book a call back appointment with me I forget about them and move on to the next one. Normally if they have insterst they will book a call back appointment about 80% of the time. How I get that appointment I just make a big deal how busy people get know a days, and I wouldn't want them to take achance of losing thier date because I was on the phone with another client when they finnally call back, and of course its shows people in the corperate world that you respect there time.

Scott