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Topic: Nervousness
Message: Posted by: DMG (Nov 11, 2007 01:07PM)
Well - a little over one month in and I am doing a couple of simple tricks for friends and family - all from Royal Road. I am doing Thought Stealer, Do As I Do and Poker Puzzle. The results have been good and a great amount of fun.

The issue I am having is nervousness. My hands shake like crazy when I am performing. Sure hope this goes away someday...
Message: Posted by: Jaz (Nov 11, 2007 01:31PM)
Here are some topics on this problem.
http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/search_results_posts.php?search_id=3518140
Message: Posted by: Father Photius (Nov 11, 2007 03:55PM)
Nervousness is something pretty common. More practice and more familiarity in giving performances will get you over that.
Message: Posted by: Andy the cardician (Nov 11, 2007 05:34PM)
Jaz is right, use the seach engine and you will find a lot of insights into this subject.

On another note, being nervous is normal - especially if you are new to it. It will go away.
Message: Posted by: DMG (Nov 11, 2007 07:00PM)
Thanks all.

:)
Message: Posted by: Tina I (Nov 12, 2007 12:47AM)
I found long ago that practice really helps on the nervousness. Practicing the entire performance again and again and again before you're actually performing before an audience. When you can do every little move with confidence, lots of the 'bad' nervousness goes away.
Message: Posted by: Philip Hilton (Nov 12, 2007 02:24AM)
There are two things to remember about this problem. One has been covered and its practice, unless you have all the moves perfect, you'll worry that it might not come off and that's when you can easily make mistakes. The other thing is setting too much importance on a trick, or an effect. I know it sounds foolish, but the best way I find is to practice very hard, to the point of knowing I have the thing, believing in the magic myself and then when presenting it relax.

You see if you're tense, the other person/people pick this up, its like when someone is scared of dogs, it becomes a two way street and the dogs sense this and become scared themselves. Believe in yourself and your magic and remember that even if anything did happen, its no big deal, nobody will get hurt and it won't hit the front pages. Don't worry. I used to be just the same, it was funny I could walk out on stage in a play in front of a large audience, but would be nervous as anything showing a friend a simple card effect. Then I heard the secret from Paul Daniels. He said that if you make a mistake, so what? The world won't come to an end. The next morning the same politicians will still be in power and nothing will have changed, so relax and don't worry. I applied this to my magic and bingo instead of tricks I was performing real magic, well almost :) Just enjoy what you do and relax.
Cheers Phil
Message: Posted by: Nedim (Nov 12, 2007 06:08AM)
Practise is not the only way you can loose nervousness. You can become nervous also. You must perform in everykind of sitưation to to become relax.

magicially yours,


Nedim Guzel
Message: Posted by: kosmoshiva (Nov 12, 2007 11:58AM)
Nervousness is a sign that you care.
Shaking hands are a sign of ungrounded energy and the mistaken belief that you need to stay still.
Knowing the route in your routine will help you keep it flowing to the end.
:)
Message: Posted by: R.S. (Nov 12, 2007 05:20PM)
Ease into your routine by starting with some very basic, sleightless tricks, or perhaps a gag trick to get people laughing and lighten the mood. The pressure of having to nail a sleight will thus be eliminated and you should feel more relaxed. Then, as you get good reactions and your confidence grows, you can attempt more challenging tricks. But everything mentioned so far is great advice. The main thing is to keep at it.

Ron
Message: Posted by: MagiClyde (Nov 12, 2007 08:08PM)
It might help you to realize that even the greatest among us flubs up from time to time. It's part of the human condition. Only practice and actual performance in front of others can help lessen the condition.

I have to admit to being nervous every time I perform Alien Autopsy for lay people, but once I start into the trick, my nervousness seems to vanish. It is one of the best and most fun tricks I do. Performing it for others gives me a great sense of satisfaction.
Message: Posted by: Larry Bean (Nov 12, 2007 08:20PM)
Nervousness is not overcome is a hurry - but you might be surprised how quickly you get over it. The solution: perform, perform, perform.
Message: Posted by: mrsmiles (Nov 13, 2007 05:08AM)
Getting over nervousness can be a long journey. Some of us will take a longer time to make that journey than others, but we can all eventually get there. We tend to rush into showing our tricks before we have really got them down - that's natural. But it will induce nerves! That in turn will reinforce to you that you are a nervous performer. Infact, there's a very confident and competent performer waiting to bust out, you know there is! Thus, starting with a self worker that you know inside out that you can do without thinking or do something that is virtually as simple with as few moves that you can also do without thinking is the way to go: As tipped by other wise counsells above, this is what I'd strongly advise. Do 2 or 3 effects like this and follow up with something a little more challenging. By then, you will have got into the groove, confidence raised, adreleline and nerves under control. The other great tip, undoubtedly, is to perform as much as possible. Try voluntary and charity work.

To this day, when I am working in a new effect into my repertoire I will never use it at my first few tables. I will be well into the gig & and the groove - before I attempt it. Even then I will not open with it, after all I am in front of a new set of people with a host of new dynamics to consider. Trying a brand new effect is not that great an idea to start off with. I hit them with a couple of my best that I know cannot go wrong (these days they are not self-workers!), and then I try out my new effect. So you see, even I, 20 years on, follow this tip to a modified degree.
Message: Posted by: Zeitgeist (Nov 13, 2007 08:11PM)
I have done magic for three years and I get nervous to the point at times where I will simply say "No not now, bad time" etc etc... while laughing of course. I never want to repeat a trick twice and often I feel like I gave the secret away. This is due to the lack of practice. I perform magic on and off and don't practice very much, so when it comes time for performing I get nervous and it shows.
Message: Posted by: Nedim (Nov 13, 2007 08:25PM)
Lets look from a different side. When we study a trick or routine we think that audiences can understand the secret or how we do it. It becomes easier whle our performances. But really they can't. that's because of we know the secret.:) When we think like that we want to do our best(of course) and we become nervous. But don't forget this sentence, "audiences never knows what we are going to do"...


magicially yours,


Nedim Guzel
Message: Posted by: Zeitgeist (Nov 13, 2007 08:32PM)
[quote]
On 2007-11-13 21:25, Nedim wrote:
Lets look from a different side. When we study a trick or routine we think that audiences can understand the secret or how we do it. It becomes easier whle our performances. But really they can't. that's because of we know the secret.:) When we think like that we want to do our best(of course) and we become nervous. But don't forget this sentence, "audiences never knows what we are going to do"...


magicially yours,


Nedim Guzel
[/quote]


I really like this piece of knowledge.
Thanks for sharing that. When you come to think about it you do relaize the audience never knows whats next and thefore you have nothing to hide. Good point.
Message: Posted by: Nedim (Nov 14, 2007 12:48AM)
Exactly. Also we just have to fun when we are performing.:)


magicially yours,


Nedim Guzel
Message: Posted by: DomKabala (Nov 14, 2007 05:34AM)
When you can perform your routine without much thought you will begin to loosen up. In most instances, a beginner will worry that he/she will fail and thus concentrate on flawless technique and stumble in presentation. A piece of wisdom from the past... "Never perform an effect in public that you cannot perform flawlessy in private". When you are satisfied with your technique, work on your presentation and keep this in thought..."I am the entertainer, you are my audience, get ready to be amazed". After all, you are in control.
Cardamagically,
Dom
:) :bwink:
Message: Posted by: DMG (Nov 14, 2007 07:09AM)
[quote]Thus, starting with a self worker that you know inside out that you can do without thinking or do something that is virtually as simple with as few moves that you can also do without thinking is the way to go: As tipped by other wise counsells above, this is what I'd strongly advise. Do 2 or 3 effects like this and follow up with something a little more challenging. By then, you will have got into the groove, confidence raised, adreleline and nerves under control. [/quote]
I like this advice - thanks. I always start with Do as I Do which is virtually a self worker (and popular-my wife still can't figure it out) and I can do it without shaking.
[quote]Try voluntary and charity work. [/quote]
What a great idea! I actually have never had any aspirations to actually perform for anyone but family and friends - but this is something I think I could endeavor to do (eventually). Thanks.
Message: Posted by: Jaz (Nov 14, 2007 07:48AM)
We're talking family and friends here, right?
Why do we get nervous?

While a lot of practice helps confidence, that confidence can get shook loose when in front of family and friends.

Is it fear of accidental exposure?
Fear of forgetting the moves and patter?
Fear of heckling?

I think so.

Relax.
Family and friends know you and that your doing 'tricks' and not real magic.

If you blow the trick then stop admit it or have an out.
If you forget the routine half way thru then admit that you forgot the rest.
If you get heckled then tell them to shut up. ;)
It's all a part of the learning process.
Keep the tricks simple and make it fun.

If it's a new routine involving several moves then practice until you fully understand it and it's second nature before showing it.

Good luck,
Message: Posted by: Nedim (Nov 14, 2007 04:39PM)
Having fun during your performance is very important.


magicially yours,


Nedim Guzel
Message: Posted by: MagicMan11 (Nov 14, 2007 08:30PM)
You need more confidence in your self. Maybe the reason why you are so nervous is because you are afraid that you might mess up or be caught. My advice to you would just be to practice and get each effect down very well. Just some of my thouhts.

Hope this helped
Message: Posted by: Nedim (Nov 15, 2007 03:35AM)
After several practices I mean whenyou start doing your act well, do it as much as you can. This makes you better on stage. This will help, believe me.:)


magicially yours,


Nedim Guzel
Message: Posted by: DMG (Nov 15, 2007 07:14AM)
[quote]
On 2007-11-14 21:30, MagicMan11 wrote:
You need more confidence in your self. Maybe the reason why you are so nervous is because you are afraid that you might mess up or be caught. My advice to you would just be to practice and get each effect down very well. Just some of my thouhts.

Hope this helped
[/quote]
Absolutely true. Part of the reason I am interested in doing magic is to boost my confidence. I am practicing and I hope to gain some personal instruction soon which will help I think improve my methods. Thank you.
Message: Posted by: MagicMan11 (Nov 15, 2007 05:25PM)
DMG, glad I could help. I know I use to be very nervous. Especilly when I was performing for people older than me and people I did not even know. I just practiced, practiced and practiced. Not only on the effects but your presentation as well. Once you know all your effects very well I am positive you will not be as nervous and you will be cnofident.
Message: Posted by: housermagic (Nov 16, 2007 07:20AM)
Self-confidence is very important to any performer. Maybe many of us get the "butterflies" when beginning to perform. As it has been said in the broadcasting industry (of which I was a part for 40+ years) "the mind performs perfectly, except when trying to say something intelligent". I have drawn a "blank" as to patter or the next step in a routine. You do overcome this with much practice.
Bill
Message: Posted by: Ray_Mago (Nov 17, 2007 02:31AM)
If you fear messing up, then you will get this feeling of nervousness.

But if you go all out, you will not have any nervousness. That's what I usually try to do.
Message: Posted by: donrodrigo (Jan 19, 2008 01:33AM)
No problem, DMG. The great Dante lets us know in his writings that he was always nervous before a show and conducted deep breathing exercises. Furthermore, it makes you more attentive. After more than 30yrs in this as a working professional, I too sometimes get the feeling. Break into a good conversation with your audience first to get to know them, especially in close up. Another hint I try is to rule them out; I mean as though you're doing a show for yourself. Practice with friends and family, they're you best audience 1st.
Message: Posted by: The Amazing Noobini (Jan 19, 2008 09:03AM)
I keep coming back to these nervousness-topics. I too have heard myself jokingly making excuses for not performing several times. When someone asks it is always a great surprise to me for some reason. A shock like hearing someone you know has died or getting punched in the stomach. I decline and afterwards I regret it since there may be months until I will have the chance again.

Because apart from these very few occasions when someone has asked to see a trick (maybe 4 times in all), I have no idea how people get to perform and perform and perform in order to gain experience. When I feel more secure I drop hints sometimes or say things like "just tell me whenever you should feel like seeing something". But nobody is interested.

It would have been easier had I started younger and had a school crowd around me or something. But when can an oldish person like me suddenly pull out a deck of cards? It feels very out of place. So not only does my hands shake violently with nerves. I feel really stupid and self conscious too.

The few times I have performed I have done so under the illusion that I am great. That happens sometimes after a few months in front of the mirror working on something. I think that I am great. Then I perform and screw up everything completely. And I am reminded of how badly I really suck.

Still won't give up tho. I guess I'm too stupid to realize how badly I'm wasting my time with this. :) After a performance failure it can take weeks before I understand why something didn't work. And it's always something I hadn't anticipated. But with so few performance opportunities it seems like it will take forever to get any of this up to a functioning level.
Message: Posted by: Bob Sanders (Jan 24, 2008 08:44AM)
DMG,

I tell people that I always shake while I'm being brave. (I'll soon be crossing my 50th year as a professional entertainer.)

We all have fear. It's a matter of what you do with it.

Good Luck!

Bob Sanders
Magic By Sander