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Topic: Heckled to the max
Message: Posted by: DonHarlan (Sep 19, 2008 02:21AM)
So tonight I was asked to perform some magic at a party, usually it goes over well for everyone and tonight most people enjoyed it. Except for one guy who had "friends" and you tube buddies. Anyway I was doing a routine with a flipper coin and wouldn't you know it he was calling the shots. As much as I tried to eliminate him from the equation he just kept going about how he has been shown all of this before in detail, going to the extent of taking a coin out of my hand and throwing it in the bushes. Needless to say I walked away head held high still knowing that some enjoyed what magic was done and left a flipper in the woods. As I got to the car I couldn't help but think was it worth it to have someone I knew what I did as a hobby or second job. When people ask to see something I have mixed feelings about it. Personally I'm not an animal who performs on command but letís face it sometimes some of our impromptu tricks are too good to let this chance unnoticed. Either way I feel somewhat defeated knowing that someone didnít enjoy it and made sure to point that out the entire night.
Message: Posted by: Connor Martin (Sep 19, 2008 03:25AM)
Did you get any compensation for your lost property? I would imagine that if the others were enjoying your magic and then some ****** threw your prop into a bush, never to be found again, that the others would turn against him pretty quick.
Message: Posted by: jmcgrath (Sep 19, 2008 06:36AM)
Jinx,

Most of us have been in a similar position at one time or another. One thing that I eventually worked out, and it took a while, was that I donít need to work with/for people like that.

If someone is being very obnoxious then I just thank everyone for their time and walk away, and this would generally happen long before it got to the point of him throwing away anything. If itís a paid gig Iíll tell my host about it when I get a chance so that they are not put on the spot later. Iíve never had it held against me, and it makes it clear to everyone in the food chain that they had better treat me with some respect.

Another important thing to understand is why he behaved like that. It was because he did not want you to be the centre of attention for the group Ė thatís the position that he likes to be in. Once you have someone like that there is nothing that you can do to stop them. If you try then the rest of the spectators will probably turn against you because you have turned on one of their own.

When I have walked away from a group often someone else in the group comes up and apologises for that member and asks if you'll come back as the rest of them want to be entertained. At that point the pain in the butt will generally shut up because of the peer pressure that his friends have excreted on him.

I hope this helps and is the end of the lost flipper situation.

Regards,

John
Message: Posted by: davidpaul$ (Sep 19, 2008 08:57AM)
Jinx,
You said at the end of your post that you "feel somewhat defeated". Well don't give the nitwit that kind of power over you. He obviously is a needy individual.
Trouble is these type of people can tell that they have power over certain people and will capitalize on it no matter how inappropriate. Learn all you can from that experience, think about what you could have done differently and certainly avail yourself to information on the subject. (Lee Asher is offering a book on the subject on his website.) http://www.leeasher.com/store/books/handle_hecklers.html

Anyway, I'm "not" sorry you went through that experience only because it will only make you a better performer provided you investigate and learn from it.
I am sorry that the "jerk" treated you with such disrespect and that you are out the coin. (I'd go back to try and find it) Confidence is the name of the game when you are performing. The right kind of confidence.

Thanks for sharing your experience. We've all gone through it. The worst thing you can do is "be defeated". It 's alright to feel that way but only for a little while.
David Paul
Message: Posted by: Eric Jones (Sep 19, 2008 10:03AM)
Now I try to be the consumate professional, but this guy REALLY deserved a swift punch in the throat!!!!!
Message: Posted by: DonHarlan (Sep 19, 2008 10:23AM)
Thanks for the input guys. jmcgrath I think you hit the nail on the head. This was the show boater of the group and even in side conversations had to be the loudest and have the "best" stories. I think the term "one up" guy fits accordingly. Eric I'm right there with you, but in the end I was able to keep my composure.
Message: Posted by: Justin Style (Sep 19, 2008 11:03AM)
Here's an idea. Next time you see him, give him a sucker punch to the head and when he falls to the ground kick him in the teeth. Than after that pee on him.

But don't say I told you to do this.


Good luck.


I have a motto: If you don't like the magic tricks I do, fine, call me all the names you want. However, don't touch my stuff or me. Once you do that be prepaired to die!

I take NO prisoners!

Treat me good, I'll treat you better. Treat me bad, I'll treat you worse!

Plain and simple.

I've performed all over the streets of NYC. And in all my years not ONE person ever f'ed with me. Now don't get me wrong, I'm not a bad-ash but I just give out a vibe that says let's play nice.

Good luck!
Message: Posted by: DonHarlan (Sep 19, 2008 11:16AM)
Justin believe me the thought of inserting a set of brass knuckles in my JSB sleeve pocket and waiting for the right moment IE coin flurry ending in the last coin production from under my shoe drawling his ever burning eyes and heckling face close to my knee and then pummeling the "you tube" video's out of him crossed my mind, but this was someone elseís house and as such I tried to respect it.

But thank you, this was a great piece of advice "Treat me good, I'll treat you better. Treat me bad, I'll treat you worse!"
Message: Posted by: doug brewer (Sep 19, 2008 12:25PM)
Jinx - unfortunately you are learning what a lot of people already have learned, and that is performing for "friends & family" is one of the most difficult venues to perform in. Since everyone knows you (or knows you through someone else), the first barrier of "courtesy to strangers" is broken down. Hence, the jackarse felt he could mess with you. If I approach a group of people, they normally are courteous (to a point). If I sense I may have interrupted something I can excuse myself. If someone starts to jack with me, I have the option of leaving the table. If they are really jackarses to everyone around them, we can have that person removed from the premises. Not so easy with friends and family - you usually have to endure or not do anything (I vote for "not do anything").

I'm sorry you had such a bad experience. Just know that the majority of people will enjoy what you show them. Don't let this a-hole ruin it for you.

Doug
Message: Posted by: MickeyPainless (Sep 19, 2008 12:28PM)
I'm with Eric and Justin on this one! Grabby people are hazards of the trade but someone throwing your prop in the bushes is grounds for a stomping!
I can certainly understand your feeling of defeat Jinx but whatever it takes my friend, don't let this scumbag win!

Mick
Message: Posted by: Tom G (Sep 19, 2008 12:46PM)
Taking someone's personal item and throwing it on them is way over any boundry line. Well past rude and thoughtless. Wonder how he'd like it if you threw his
car keys or wallet in the bushes. I'd ask my friends what his problem is...

Tom
Message: Posted by: pepka (Sep 19, 2008 12:46PM)
The one thing you may want to consider is learning multiple techniques. The second someone would have said flipper, it would have went away and I would have done something with regular coins. Also, if I have someone who is actually trying to ruin other's good time, I would have nailed him. It sounds like it's not a situation where you were caught, that's another thing. If someone busts you with a gaff or sleight, I really feel your only recourse is to practice more. But, if he was just revealing secrets for the sake of being a jerk, then I would have unloaded with a strain of insults and profanities that would make Andrew Dice Clay blush.

You're a far better Gentleman that I would have been Jinx. I have to totally agree with Justin on this. I have a very playful method of handling anyone who touches my props. If someone, I don't care who, a child, lady, or millionaire CEO reaches for something I don't want them to touch, I VERY lightly slap their hand. Like mom catching you with your hand in the cookie jar before dinner. This usually does the trick. However, it someone would grab something and throw it in the bushes it's different. If it were in a professional situation, I'd probably grab something of his, wallet, keys, glasses and do exactly the same. If it were a casual situation like you are saying, I'd do the same, after kicking him in his boys and kneeing him in the face.
Message: Posted by: Eric Jones (Sep 19, 2008 01:34PM)
If someone had thrown my coins during the middle of a performance, I would have looked at the guy who threw them in the eye and been like, " And for my next trick, the Bullet Catch....."
Message: Posted by: soccergod (Sep 19, 2008 01:40PM)
Ladies and Gentleman, for the first and only time, Eric Jones made me laugh.
Message: Posted by: Diavo (Sep 19, 2008 02:25PM)
[quote]
On 2008-09-19 14:34, Eric Jones wrote:
If someone had thrown my coins during the middle of a performance, I would have looked at the guy who threw them in the eye and been like, " And for my next trick, the Bullet Catch....."
[/quote]
I would've looked him in the eye until he broke down crying! Cause he would've been able to read MY mind from my stare, and know what I was thinking of doing to him in return. ;P

Anyway, I just happened to have read Jay Sankey's blog, and he had a post about a similar situation (with coins too):
http://blog.sankeymagic.com/default.asp?Display=14#Comments
The post it titled "Avoid Getting Dirty". Expertly handled.
Message: Posted by: DaveM (Sep 19, 2008 02:37PM)
The next effect would've been Coin thru Glass.....through his drivers side window.

....or a good throat punch as Eric suggested.
Message: Posted by: Justin Style (Sep 19, 2008 02:39PM)
Just for the record...I DON'T advocate violence.

I just like talking like a tough guy.


One time, a magician friend was giving me a hard time. I let it go. Then one day he had a wad of hundred dollar bills. I told him I just learned a NEW bill tear and to give me 5 of the hundreds.

I stacked them together and told him (and another guy who was there) to watch very closely. RIP, right down the center, his eyes almost bugged out of his head and he gave me a look like to say, "hey I hope this is a trick"? I now ripped the 10 pieces into 20. Then I threw them into the air and watched them float to the floor, then I said I was only kidding, I didn't learn a new bill tear. Tears came out of his eyes.

I left.

He thought once you rip money that it would not be any good. He wanted me to tape the bills back together; I told him that I didn't have any tape.

And this guy was a big time magician.
Message: Posted by: Eric Jones (Sep 19, 2008 02:52PM)
Justin, you're a meanie.......
Message: Posted by: TheAmbitiousCard (Sep 19, 2008 02:56PM)
If it's someone you know that did this, the keys in the bushes "gag" sounds like a great way to go. Of course it's not the best way to go or even the second best way to go but it would certainly send a clear message.
Message: Posted by: DaveM (Sep 19, 2008 04:09PM)
You could follow up with the "Vanishing Razor Blade" where it "reappears" superglued under the door handle of his car.

NOT that I would actually advocate this....:banana:
Message: Posted by: Tom G (Sep 19, 2008 05:41PM)
Yikes don't mess with DaveM.
Message: Posted by: sleightofhander (Sep 20, 2008 01:40AM)
[quote]
On 2008-09-19 11:03, Eric Jones wrote:
Now I try to be the consumate professional, but this guy REALLY deserved a swift punch in the throat!!!!!
[/quote] I agree with Eric! It's like spitting in your face.
Message: Posted by: sleightofhander (Sep 20, 2008 01:44AM)
[quote]
On 2008-09-19 15:39, Justin Style wrote:
Just for the record...I DON'T advocate violence.

I just like talking like a tough guy.


One time, a magician friend was giving me a hard time. I let it go. Then one day he had a wad of hundred dollar bills. I told him I just learned a NEW bill tear and to give me 5 of the hundreds.

I stacked them together and told him (and another guy who was there) to watch very closely. RIP, right down the center, his eyes almost bugged out of his head and he gave me a look like to say, "hey I hope this is a trick"? I now ripped the 10 pieces into 20. Then I threw them into the air and watched them float to the floor, then I said I was only kidding, I didn't learn a new bill tear. Tears came out of his eyes.

I left.

He thought once you rip money that it would not be any good. He wanted me to tape the bills back together; I told him that I didn't have any tape.

And this guy was a big time magician.
[/quote] He learned a lesson. Never hand someone 500 dollars.
Message: Posted by: DonHarlan (Sep 20, 2008 03:00AM)
I'm right there with you, it wasnít the easiest thing to swallow, but the long in the short of it is that I kept my composure and continued performing for the others who were enjoying it. This guy eventually singled himself out of the group. Even though it cost a flipper coin, I kept my cool and dignity and he still lost his. But being able to do a misers dream with his teeth afterwards would have been sweet, It wasnít the time or place.
[quote]
On 2008-09-20 02:40, sleightofhander wrote:
[quote]
On 2008-09-19 11:03, Eric Jones wrote:
Now I try to be the consumate professional, but this guy REALLY deserved a swift punch in the throat!!!!!
[/quote] I agree with Eric! It's like spitting in your face.
[/quote]
Message: Posted by: DonHarlan (Sep 20, 2008 03:03AM)
I appreciate the enthusiasm Justin, walking the walk and talking the talk are two totally different things. Obviously the guy with the hundreds had it coming or you were having a bad day. Iím going to have to quote you here but I would have peed on him too.

[quote]
On 2008-09-19 15:39, Justin Style wrote:
Just for the record...I DON'T advocate violence.

I just like talking like a tough guy.


One time, a magician friend was giving me a hard time. I let it go. Then one day he had a wad of hundred dollar bills. I told him I just learned a NEW bill tear and to give me 5 of the hundreds.

I stacked them together and told him (and another guy who was there) to watch very closely. RIP, right down the center, his eyes almost bugged out of his head and he gave me a look like to say, "hey I hope this is a trick"? I now ripped the 10 pieces into 20. Then I threw them into the air and watched them float to the floor, then I said I was only kidding, I didn't learn a new bill tear. Tears came out of his eyes.

I left.

He thought once you rip money that it would not be any good. He wanted me to tape the bills back together; I told him that I didn't have any tape.

And this guy was a big time magician.
[/quote]
Message: Posted by: Review King (Sep 20, 2008 09:59AM)
[quote]
On 2008-09-19 03:21, jinx8107 wrote:
So tonight I was asked to perform some magic at a party, usually it goes over well for everyone and tonight most people enjoyed it. Except for one guy who had "friends" and you tube buddies. Anyway I was doing a routine with a flipper coin and wouldn't you know it he was calling the shots. As much as I tried to eliminate him from the equation he just kept going about how he has been shown all of this before in detail, going to the extent of taking a coin out of my hand and throwing it in the bushes. Needless to say I walked away head held high still knowing that some enjoyed what magic was done and left a flipper in the woods. As I got to the car I couldn't help but think was it worth it to have someone I knew what I did as a hobby or second job. When people ask to see something I have mixed feelings about it. Personally I'm not an animal who performs on command but letís face it sometimes some of our impromptu tricks are too good to let this chance unnoticed. Either way I feel somewhat defeated knowing that someone didnít enjoy it and made sure to point that out the entire night.
[/quote]


IMMEDIATELY shut them up with a little shame. " That's not how this is done. There's allot of kids on Youtube exposing how they think these things are done. IF they were right, David Copperfield wouldn't be able to sell one ticket. So please, let others enjoy what I'm doing if it doesn't interest you".

That's warning #1.

If he continues, just stop and say "I'll show you all some Magic another time, when our friend isn't here trying to ruin it" and not matter what, don't continue unless she actually leaves.

That's for folks that can run into this.

As far as the coin being thrown in the bushes, that doesn't make sense. Why is your coin in the bushes and his teeth aren't?
Message: Posted by: Mr. Mystoffelees (Sep 20, 2008 06:18PM)
I'm with Chris- as Dirty Harry would have said, "now, punk, go get it"...
Message: Posted by: jmoran76 (Sep 20, 2008 09:57PM)
[quote]
On 2008-09-19 15:37, DaveM wrote:
The next effect would've been Coin thru Glass.....through his drivers side window.

....or a good throat punch as Eric suggested.
[/quote]

Coin thru Glass ..driver's side window......I'm absolutely cracking up over this post! What a great effect for an *ss**** like the one mentioned.
Message: Posted by: Joshua Barrett (Sep 22, 2008 11:08AM)
Heckling is one thing. taking your personal property and throwing it away is another. maybe its tasteless but I would have punch that SOB.
Message: Posted by: michaelmagicart (Sep 22, 2008 09:11PM)
Jinx8107


If you can still obtain the trick "Heat", then I would suggest you carry it with you. I did for many years and it would absolutely destroy a "Know it all Heckler".

Basically, you borrowed a pack of cigarettes, chewing gum, etc., and tore a strip of aluminum foil about i/2" x 2". Rolled it into a ball, and placed it in the jerk's hand,instructing him to close his fist over it and concentrate on the word "heat". The foil will get so hot it will blister his hand, unless he drops it. Believe me, it works and makes him look like a real jerk in front of his friends.

I used this on a "OutLaw" gang member years ago, in a bar full out his cronies, and I instantly became a hit, not only with his cronies, but him also.

I won't reveal the "secret here",and I would not advise anyone else to do so either, but if your are interested, PM me and I will tell you.
Message: Posted by: Lawrence O (Sep 23, 2008 06:24AM)
[quote]
On 2008-09-19 14:34, Eric Jones wrote:
If someone had thrown my coins during the middle of a performance, I would have looked at the guy who threw them in the eye and been like, " And for my next trick, the Bullet Catch....."
[/quote]

Look at the guy who threw them in the eye " And for my next trick, the Bullet Catch..... performed by this smart guy. I'll only do the shooting, he'll do the catch"

Seriously. I think we should reconsider ourselves. We know well that such people exist and that they feel agressed either for not being the centre of the group's attention or for being destabilized in their unstable knowledge.
When we get this sort of reaction, could it mean that our magic is presented too much as a challenge or as "I'm smarter than you all" type of presentation. When we SHARE a magical moment with a group, they don't throw our coins away (which admittedly they are not supposed to do under any circumstnce).
Approaching magic hidden behind the magic itself rather than boasting (vocally or just by behavior), when I meet this type of idiots, I use a self working trick which involves them and make them look really good as if they had made the magic happen. I then address to them saying "let me show my work on YOUR new variant for ....", just performing my own effect. Then the as&@#ole think that he is my friend and I wink at him from time to time (generally at the time of creating the magical moment that they unvolontarily help me to create) as if he was in the know (I want to believe that people really in the know would never have this type of attitude).

My point here is to suggest that we force ourselves to reconsider to what extent we are partly responsible when someone feels agressed by our tricks. Naturally the better the technique the more agressed people may feel up to doing unacceptble gesture of the kind mentioned. The same way we need outs for failure, we need pre-pared (think of the fencing ethymology of this word) enlightened handling for as&@#oles enabling us not to destroy our magic act.
Message: Posted by: DonHarlan (Sep 24, 2008 09:36AM)
I can see where you have a point Lawrence O.
Message: Posted by: The Wizards Machine (Sep 25, 2008 02:33PM)
Personally, I have found SOME folks to be much more sceptical of late. There are a few that absolutley refuse to let you have any credit for the illusion, or refuse to be fooled. They would rather offer an imediate obnoxious answer to the trick (an attempt at a reveal), than enjoy the illusion. Almost an 'inferiority complex' reaction.

Case in point: I did the "Factory Sealed" bottled water illusion last night for an aquaintance at a sporting event. She was miffed. Tisking and hurumphing whilst offering explanations on how I did it. Real 'chip on the shoulder' behavior.

I also did the "Here and There" card routine for another person. I'll call him 'Mr. Calculus Head". This guy, instead of even smiling when I perform the illusion, again gets miffed and starts totaling the odds of such an occurance and rattling off ways that I could have done it. Again; as if he was embarrased that I "duped' him.

I don't know. I think total stangers are a better crop of specs.
Message: Posted by: Joshua Barrett (Sep 25, 2008 03:05PM)
Oh very much so. friends and co-workers make the worst specs unless they are magicians
Message: Posted by: dilan_thomas (Sep 25, 2008 04:36PM)
Tips and Tricks for Friends and Family

1. If you know that person is a skeptic do something bullet proof. It may not be your best effect, but make sure it is bullet proof.

2. Always explain upfront that you spent months working on this, and you want to show it to an appreciative audience.

3. If there are people you haven't performed for before explain that magic uses peoples assumptions to create an unexplainable situation. The only reason it works is because people are intelligent and don't question the nature of simple things. In fact the more observant and sophisticated an audience the more fun it is to be entertained by things that you know can't really happen.

4. When all else fails:

If you aren't being paid to perform, but are being asked to perform by people you know then I consider all formal rules for treatment of audience members to be suspended. Furthermore, since you may be the only live magician your friend or family member (fofm) sees I consider it a moral obligation to teach them to behave properly. You do this not for self gratification. You do it to prevent them the embarassment and stigma that could be associated with them should they see another magician in a formal setting.

Therfore in order to help your fofm become a better person it is your duty to:

Tell them to shutup.

Toss them your props, and ask that such a knowledgeable person demonstrate something for the groups entertainment.

Comment upon any character trait which you know to exist, but would cause them to feel uncomfortable being expressed in public.

Any Sucker Trick.

Anything that the situation demands you do in the name of charity and goodwill towards your fellow man to make them look exactly like the idiot they are being. I know that this might be difficult, but remember it is your solemn duty. I and the rest of magic world are counting on you. If worse comes to worse line your change bag with plastic, pour in yellow paint, and then ask for someone to make certain the bag is empty.
Message: Posted by: Lawrence O (Sep 25, 2008 05:21PM)
Hi dilan_thomas

Speaking of hostile reactions they can take many forms.
I was doing card magic in Paris for friends gathered by the (then) Argentinian Ambassador to France at his home.
I did my (very structured) card act where the character is introduced as having met a business man who is using his knowledge of magic to understand what people inavowedly think and get bigger profits by satisfying these untold desires.
The last trick of the act is my version of Out Of This World where people briefly see the cards mixed face up (in fact in red, black, red, back... order) and then really riffle shuffle the deck themselves (which is not affecting my variant of the effect thanks to the Gilbreth principle)

A couple in their fifties, in this friendly group, even thoug they had been properly warned by the Ambassador that I would just do really astonishing sleight of hand, felt so agressed in their "need to believe" that they claimed that this could not be human and that there had to be something devilish about this. Despite our friendly reassurance that all of this was simply achieved by human means, they couldn't stay one minute more and physically felt the urge to leave the party.

I don't think that what I did that night was really extraordinary (in magicians' terms), I never make any ambiguous claim about any super power, and I tend to modestly hide behind the effects letting my character indirectly advertise for me.

So I agree with you. There are times when we simply cannot do anything about it. I would never however return hostility to an hostile spectator because even if the guy is a total a#&@ole, there is no way his violence (in any form) can bring me down to his level. One of the traits of civilisation is to recognize the supremacy of intelligence over brutal force: even though I'm toll and strong, my way of being proud and vain is to be dead set to remind humble but mentally (just mentally) superior to a#&@oles irrespective of what they do.
Message: Posted by: dilan_thomas (Sep 25, 2008 05:54PM)
Hello Lawrence,

I agree with what you did in the context of your situation. I think that returning a spectators hostility in kind is only appropiate when it is a friend or family member. What happened to jinx8107 goes far beyond the bounds of socially acceptable behavior. If this is a person that he knows then my recommendation stands. Begin by being as nice as pie. If that doesn't work declare war and become master of your domain.

jinx8107 knows that he can walk away, and choose not to perform if this person is present. This is valid advice and is usually the right choice. However, if jinx wants to perform, and is in fact requested to perform, why shouldn't he? If in order to perform he has to prove a point then so be it.

My post was intened to be of the tounge-in-cheek variety. My intention was to express that you do not always have to be supplicant in your behavior. Especially if you are performing in a informal situation for people you know.
Message: Posted by: The Wizards Machine (Sep 25, 2008 06:05PM)
Scarne's advise was:

1. Ignore at first.

2. If that doesn't work, then ask them to do some of THEIR tricks.

3. If that fails, kindly pack up and say," That's all the magic for tonight."
At that point anyone decent amongst the specs will be very mad at the moron.
Message: Posted by: Glen (Oct 6, 2008 12:53PM)
Recently I was in a coffee shop I frequent and performing a napkin rose levitaiton. of all people the owner comes over and with all her customers enjoying the show, she swats at the rose to knock it down. I did manage to grab it before her hand hit it. needless to say a few minutes later I had words with her about the stupid thing she just did . she later appologized, but I never got her to say just why in the heck she did such a stupid thing. geeze!!!!!!!!!!
Message: Posted by: Jimeh (Oct 6, 2008 01:33PM)
Yeah that was pretty stupid of her Glen! Just rude...
Message: Posted by: Mr. Mystoffelees (Oct 14, 2008 12:27PM)
Some good advice here. The only thing I want to add: due to the same sort of experiences, I have started to concentrate on magic that uses NO gaffs, stacks or mathmatical principles. It's not as limiting as you may think.

I find I enjoy working on the sleights, even have my Elmsley to the point where I now practice with Bee cards (3 blue, 1 red) and can fry a spec burning me. Have discovered RRTCM was correct- there is a truly great feeling doing a top change right under the spec's nose.

Give 'em the deck to look at, or the coin, or the rope, etc. etc. etc. 'cause there is nothing to see! The payoff? I find little appetite to heckle if they can't expose something "tricky".

I also think the more work something takes to perfect, the less likely it will be on youtube or masked malicious, etc.

Now, for the Asher Twist...

Jim
Message: Posted by: Airave (Oct 15, 2008 03:07PM)
Women are by far the worst.... grrrrrr....
They grab, feel and search your hands/body.

At a very small and private dinner party
I started moving siverware around the table
when MY OWN WIFE freaks and grabs my hands
(to no avail- I was ahead of her) w/o thinking
about or realizing the potential consequenses.

We had a serious discussion about that later.

Also at a very small friends/family party
my Lovely Assistant, who should know better,
also freaked and started desperately grabbing
for my pockets after I used her (1st time)
to demo "Memory Loss" (Sankey) in front of
my family.

You always have to be one step ahead of the Specs.
And trust no one. At least not imprompto.