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Topic: Have you seen any eye glasses that keeps the spectator from cutting the rope?
Message: Posted by: Dynamike (Sep 19, 2008 12:43PM)
I heard in the past a certain pair of gimmicked eye glasses were made. The glasses kept the spectator from seeing straight. When the spectator tried to cut the rope with sissors, he kept missing the rope. Have anyone heard of these?
Message: Posted by: Father Photius (Sep 19, 2008 12:55PM)
Most prismatic glasses would work, finding them is something else. Probably from some "scientific" place". They bend the light and make things look to be in another place.
Message: Posted by: Al Angello (Sep 19, 2008 01:41PM)
Mike
I have two pair of scisors one very sharp, and the other very dull. They serve the same purpose that you suggest.
Message: Posted by: Dynamike (Sep 19, 2008 03:25PM)
I was only asking about that for a Detroit Magician. He told me they are called "Devil Glasses." He told they are not manufactured anymore. He told me he remembered the glasses years ago, and wondering if I can help him find a pair.

Yes, I think those are the same type of scissors I have too Al. The spectator can not open or close them, only the magician. I got to sharpen mine up
Message: Posted by: Spellbinder (Sep 20, 2008 01:18PM)
http://scientificsonline.com/product.asp_Q_pn_E_3081934

Or make them yourself from prisms.
Message: Posted by: KOTAH (Sep 20, 2008 01:22PM)
Mention of eye glasses in rope magic; brings to mind an effect from the UK, called glass-sissors. a comedy prop in which the performers eyeglasses transformed into a scissors. It was used as a running gag. wHen it first came out it cost ten dollars. I used to know who invented it; but the name escapes me now. Perhaps one of you will remember.

Ron
Message: Posted by: Jef Eaton (Sep 22, 2008 04:43PM)
Hank Lee caried these years ago. They were inexpensive, and made very lightly of thin plastic.
Message: Posted by: Troels (Sep 23, 2008 10:12AM)
Dynamike, I think the glasses in the link from Spellbinder serves another purpose.
I understand you look for a pair of glasses which just shift the line of sight, so you think you cut the rope, but really miss it by some inches.
The glasses in the link look as if they bend the sight of line 90 degrees, so you can lay on you back and look in direction of your feet (at a television or a book).
Trolle
Message: Posted by: David Todd (Sep 23, 2008 10:23AM)
[quote]
On 2008-09-23 11:12, Trolle wrote:
I understand you look for a pair of glasses which just shift the line of sight, so you think you cut the rope, but really miss it by some inches.

[/quote]

So if these trick glasses shift the spectator's line of sight so that they miss the rope by inches when they try to cut it , does that mean they might accidently cut your fingers (or their own fingers) holding the rope instead? Ouch. I'd take care with that gag ...
Message: Posted by: Spellbinder (Sep 23, 2008 01:53PM)
[quote]
On 2008-09-23 11:12, Trolle wrote:
Dynamike, I think the glasses in the link from Spellbinder serves another purpose.
The glasses in the link look as if they bend the sight of line 90 degrees, so you can lay on you back and look in direction of your feet (at a television or a book).
[/quote]

It doesn't matter. The outcome is the comedy of the spectator trying to orient either himself, the scissors, or his eyes with the task at hand... which is to figure out where the rope is and try to cut it.

As far as danger to himself and others, this is a good time to hand him some kiddie safety scissors or the big plastic joke scissors. After milking all the humor from the situation, remove the glasses and hand him some better scissors that actually cut the rope... or do it yourself!