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Topic: Origin of the "Thin Model" Rising Cards
Message: Posted by: michaelmagicart (Nov 23, 2008 10:26PM)
After reviewing a number of threads on the thin model “Rising Cards”, and speaking to several members here on the Magic Café’, as well as other friends in magic, I believe it is time to set the record and rumors straight regarding the deck that revolutionized the manufacture of rising card decks and placed them in the hands of magicians all over the world.

My name is Barry Gibbs and I am the creator of the “thin model rising card deck”.
The original deck was the”A.M.Y. Rising Cards”, and was named after my oldest daughter “Amy”, who was 2 years old at the time. She is now 39 years old.

This can be verified by magicians such as Bev Bergeron, Paul Diamond, Arthur Emerson, Tim Quinlan (Inside Magic), Bruce Gold, Richard Adler, Jamie Porter, Whit Hayden, Neil Lester, Michael Ammar, Bill Wisch, Petrick and Mia, Herb Morrisey, Barry Taylor, Klingsor etc., just to name a few.

Full credit should be given to Harry Devano for the use of the weight principle, however the original Devano was bulky, not a self contained packet and could not be handled (shuffled, cut, convincingly fanned, etc.). In other words I wanted a deck that did not appear to be gimmicked in any way.

Another problem with the Devano was the original used a heavy cord which had a tendency to “hang up” during the rise and although you could adjust the tension on the cord, the problem still occurred where the cord had a tendency to “snag” at the most inopportune moments. The “gaff section of cards took up almost 1/2 of the deck. And was not “self contained, but a loose packet that could create a disaster if you slightly over fanned the deck.

Being a card man, I decided to make a rising card deck that you could riffle shuffle, hindu shuffle, overhand shuffle, faro shuffle,“one hand shuffle”, cut and fan, like a normal deck of cards. If you know how to handle cards, you can do all of this with an A.M.Y. Deck. If you don’t know these shuffles and handling then you should take the time to learn them as they will improve your card handling.

After much experimenting, I succeeded in reducing the size of the weight and the number of cards in the gimmick to less than 1/5th the size of a deck of cards. I further made this a self contained packet which was held together by the crystal thread I used to control the weight.

The face of the gimmick packet was always a face card, with a duplicate behind it. This helped to conceal the gimmick which if flashed was almost undetectable.

As for the lifting mechanism I elected not to use pins simply because it created another manufacturing step that would increase the cost factor, and further the pin mechanism was Harry Devano’s. I chose to use masking tape as a roll of tape would last many times the lifetime of the deck, was inexpensive and readily available to anyone who bought the deck. I was aware of wig tape, however, I felt this might not be available in all areas for someone to buy replacements, and I was not interested in creating a market for replacement tapes that had to be purchased from me. I personally felt this would be taking advantage of my customer by forcing them to buy replacements and further replacing the masking tape was a simple operation when the instructions were followed.

All decks A.M.Y. Rising cards were personally manufactured and tested by me before they were sold. They were not mass manufactured in an assembly line.

I shudder today when I see some of the copies that are on the market as they certainly would not stand up to the specifications that I used but are only made to mass market to make money for the manufacturers. Unfortunately, there is no way to legally protect a magic trick you create.

Check out this article on Inside Magic for the answer to protecting your invention:

http://www.insidemagic.com/magicnews/2008/11/12/magic-and-law-can-you-copyright-a-trick/

As I stated in the beginning, this deck was manufactured specifically with card magicians in mind.

Over the years I have had many a magician, both professional and amateur, approach me and say that the A.M.Y. Rising cards became a staple in their routines and this assured me that the deck I created was serving the purpose I created it for.

I recently spoke with my daughter, who still has all the manufacturing equipment for the A.M.Y. Rising Cards, and she wants to start manufacturing them again. Perhaps we may just do that in the future but more on that at a later date.

Now you know the story about the “thin model rising card deck” and where it had its beginnings. Hopefully this will update your Magic History lesson for today and serve to clear up all the disinformation that has been written.

I thank you for you patience.

Barry M. Gibbs /aka Michaelmagicart
November 23, 2008

I would like to thank those of your in the Magic Café' who encouraged me to clarify all the past misinformation written.
Message: Posted by: Robert M (Nov 24, 2008 10:58AM)
Thank you for clearing this up, Barry! It appears that only a handful of people knew the real story until now. Very interesting!

Robert
Message: Posted by: MueCard (Nov 24, 2008 11:29AM)
Thanks Mr. Barry M. Gibbs for the interesting information!
Please can you give us the date of your first model of the A.M.Y. Rising Card, was it about 1971?
Message: Posted by: Ray Tupper. (Nov 24, 2008 05:59PM)
[quote]
And was named after my oldest daughter “Amy”, who was 2 years old at the time. She is now 39 years old.
[/quote]
Judging from the 37 year time difference,I'd say 1971 was the correct year of the first run.
I have a model which was given to me quite a few years ago,whether or not it's an original I don't know but,it's had it's fair share of talcum powder sprinkled in it to keep it running over the years,it's probably the sweetest smelling gimmick in existance.
Ray.
Message: Posted by: michaelmagicart (Nov 24, 2008 07:14PM)
[quote]
On 2008-11-24 12:29, MueCard wrote:
Thanks Mr. Barry M. Gibbs for the interesting information!
Please can you give us the date of your first model of the A.M.Y. Rising Card, was it about 1971?
[/quote]
Yes, it was in early 1971 while working for Paul Diamond that the first model was completed and test marketed through the Magic Fun Wagon in the Palm Beach Mall. Later it was introduced at A Florida State Magicians Association Convention. The first real national exposure was at the Boston SAM Convention.

After I opened my own Magic Shop in West Palm, I devoted quite a bit of time to manufacturing and supplying other magic dealers with the A.M.Y. Rising Cards.

Now that Supreme Magic is a memory of the past I feel I can let the cat out the bag regarding Edwin Hooper secretly trading Supreme Magic for my rising cards on a regular basis. He did not sell them under the name AMY, because he did not want to offend Harry Devano. I remember a rising card routine by Ian Adair, written in an old Linking Ring Magazine, where he mentioned a deck he used that was manufactured in the U.S. because he felt it was the best rising card deck and that the gimmick was undetectable from only a few inches away. I will put my "tongue in cheek" on what deck he was referring to. What was so funny about the whole situation with Edwin was that other dealers at conventions I attended always wondered how I managed to have so much Supreme Magic for sale when they could not get it from Edwin.

I do not want to bore you with other tales from the past, but thank you for your interest
[quote]
On 2008-11-24 18:59, Ray Tupper. wrote:
And was named after my oldest daughter “Amy”, who was 2 years old at the time. She is now 39 years old.
[/quote]
Judging from the 37 year time difference,I'd say 1971 was the correct year of the first run.
I have a model which was given to me quite a few years ago,whether or not it's an original I don't know but,it's had it's fair share of talcum powder sprinkled in it to keep it running over the years,it's probably the sweetest smelling gimmick in existance.
Ray.
[/quote]
You must have some old talcum powder with zinc sterate in it. That is a collector item alone since the government outlawed zinc sterate in talc and baby powder a number of years ago. I always treated the gimmick with fanning powder during the manufacturing process, and recommended sprinkling a few drops on the gimmick from time to time in my instructions.

One thing may help to determine if you have an original A.M.Y. If the face card on the gimmick is a King Court card, chances are you have an original. The other thing would be P.M. me the actual cards in the gimmicked packet. All A.M.Y. Rising Cards were made with the same cards, in the same sequence. I doubt seriously, after seeing some of the rising cards on the market today, that anyone ever took to time to really do any research as to exactly how and why the gimmick was made with these cards.

Also, if you still have the wrapper it would be light blue.
Message: Posted by: Ray Tupper. (Nov 25, 2008 03:11AM)
Unfortunately it sounds like a copy.
It has an ace of clubs to the face,6 thru 9 of diamonds,then,2 thru 5 diamonds and finally a joker.They are on Bicycle stock.
That said,it still works a treat and always gets great reactions.
It's nice to hear a bit of history of a classic,thanks Michael!
Cheers,Ray.
Message: Posted by: MueCard (Nov 25, 2008 11:03AM)
Again thanks, Michael, for yourt "tales of the past", which I really admire!

I own a original A.M.Y. in a light blue wrapper.
Message: Posted by: Pete Biro (Nov 25, 2008 01:34PM)
I'll take one when you start selling again.
Message: Posted by: michaelmagicart (Nov 25, 2008 08:54PM)
Thanks Pete,

I will put your name at the top of the list and have Amy autograph the instructions for you. This is a love project that I am considering tackling in 2009, with updated instructions and handling. Actually, Amy is pushing me to do this, and you know how the ladies can be, especially daughters! She now has my Grandson pressing to start making them again.

Posted: Nov 25, 2008 10:16pm
MueCard,

You are welcome to all my tales of the past, and I am happy to hear your A.M.Y. Deck is an original. Light blue was Amy's favorite color and she picked the color for the wrapper.

If you really like tales from the past here are a couple additional tales I have written:

http://www.insidemagic.com/magicnews/index.php?s=Barry+Gibbs+in+the+beginning
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Nov 25, 2008 09:26PM)
I remember one of the knockoffs. It was the ARNE rising cards. Who made those?
Message: Posted by: michaelmagicart (Nov 25, 2008 09:38PM)
Ray Tupper.

Yes, unfortunately it is a copy, however, as long as it works for you that is all that is really important.

I would have never used an Ace of Clubs as a face card, as that would have defeated one of the features that is to me very strong. If you "flash" an A.M.Y. the chances are very slim that the gimmick would ever be detected.

Like I have said many times before when I see any effect copied, the copier does not understand the thought process that went into the creation and therefore the copy lacks the minute details that makes the original distinct from all the rest.
[quote]
On 2008-11-25 22:26, Bill Palmer wrote:
I remember one of the knockoffs. It was the ARNE rising cards. Who made those?
[/quote]
I will pm you that answer Bill.
Message: Posted by: Michael Baker (Nov 25, 2008 11:41PM)
I owned an A.M.Y. deck at one time, although I don't anymore. I often wished I did have one, because the copy versions didn't work as well. I hope to get another A.M.Y. deck once they become available again.

I was also intrigued to learn how the name came about. That was always a mystery to me.
Message: Posted by: MueCard (Nov 26, 2008 07:55AM)
[quote]
On 2008-11-25 22:16, Michaelmagicart wrote:
MueCard,

You are welcome to all my tales of the past, and I am happy to hear your A.M.Y. Deck is an original. Light blue was Amy's favorite color and she picked the color for the wrapper.

If you really like tales from the past here are a couple additional tales I have written:

http://www.insidemagic.com/magicnews/index.php?s=Barry+Gibbs+in+the+beginning
[/quote]

Barry, thanks for your additional tales! I do like them!
Message: Posted by: michaelmagicart (Nov 28, 2008 06:52PM)
[quote]
On 2008-11-26 00:41, Michael Baker wrote:
I owned an A.M.Y. deck at one time, although I don't anymore. I often wished I did have one, because the copy versions didn't work as well. I hope to get another A.M.Y. deck once they become available again.

I was also intrigued to learn how the name came about. That was always a mystery to me.
[/quote]

I will add you to the list Michael.

Incidentally, I visited your website and was impressed by your work. I see you take pride in what you do and that is rare today. Your attention to detail is very hard to find today.
Message: Posted by: Pete Biro (Nov 28, 2008 09:04PM)
ARNE... I thought, at the time, he was the originator. Seems to me they were available from Paul Diamond. I remember ARNE as one of the guys I used to run into on my trips East.
Message: Posted by: Michael Baker (Nov 29, 2008 12:14AM)
[quote]
On 2008-11-28 19:52, Michaelmagicart wrote:


I will add you to the list Michael.[/quote]
Thanks!

[quote]Incidentally, I visited your website and was impressed by your work. I see you take pride in what you do and that is rare today. Your attention to detail is very hard to find today.
[/quote]
Thanks again!
Message: Posted by: michaelmagicart (Nov 29, 2008 02:01PM)
[quote]
On 2008-11-28 22:04, Pete Biro wrote:
ARNE... I thought, at the time, he was the originator. Seems to me they were available from Paul Diamond. I remember ARNE as one of the guys I used to run into on my trips East.
[/quote]

I sent you a PM Pete.
Message: Posted by: FlashyMagic (Sep 24, 2009 10:51AM)
Hey Barry, don't forget the guy that sat beside you at the Wagon and made several suggestions on the Rising Cards design, including the one to use a silver dollar as a weight in the first ones built. I think I may still have some blisters on my fingers from cutting out cards by hand with a single edge razor.

>This can be verified by magicians such as Bev Bergeron, Paul Diamond, Arthur >Emerson, Tim Quinlan (Inside Magic), Bruce Gold, Richard Adler, Jamie Porter, Whit >Hayden, Neil Lester, Michael Ammar, Bill Wisch, Petrick and Mia, Herb Morrisey, >Barry Taylor, Klingsor etc., just to name a few.
Message: Posted by: Steve Brooks (Sep 24, 2009 12:59PM)
[b]michaelmagicart[/b], I assumed your name was Michael. That said Barry, might make things less confusing if your username reflected your real name of [b]Barry Gibbs[/b].

As for [b]FlashyMagic[/b], one would think that if crediting were an issue here you too would use your real name...just thinking out loud. :smoke:
Message: Posted by: ropeadope (Nov 18, 2009 11:11AM)
My deck was bought through Magic, Inc. many yers ago. When I ordered them the lady on the other end of phone said "You mean the Arne deck"? First time I had heard that name and still puzzles me as why they were calling them that. Happy at this time to find out the originator of the A.M.Y. deck. Thanks Barry for such a great deck!

John
Message: Posted by: Oli (Nov 28, 2009 12:57PM)
Fasinating story! I always find the history of a routine or effect adds so much more when using it!

Out of interest, does anyone know the best rising deck on the market? I've never used the effect but would be tempted if there was a similar model to what Mr Gibbs talks about!
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Nov 28, 2009 06:17PM)
"Best" is a subjective term. There are methods that are very clever and very expensive. There are methods that are very clever and very inexpensive. So much depends on your working conditions.

Some prefer the A.M.Y. deck, because of the thickness of the gimmick. Others prefer the Ted Biet system. Some like Kundalini Rising, which can be performed with any deck. Others prefer the Devano, because there is nothing that will stick to the cards.

There is a method in [i]Martin's Miracles[/i] that is great if you are seated, but it doesn't require a lot of thinking to figure out how to use it standing up.
Message: Posted by: Richard Kaufman (Mar 11, 2010 06:55PM)
I recently had the opportunity to examine and handle an original Devano Deck made by Devano himself.

It is completely untrue that the gimmick takes up nearly half the deck. It takes up only a small group of cards

The deck can indeed be fanned, shuffled, and handled freely.

The Devano mechanism does not hang up if properly manufactured, used, and maintained. The deck I examined belongs to David Berglas, who used the routine constantly in his professional work at one time. It had not been used for decades, yet worked perfectly, and repeatedly.

The use of tape rather than pins simply does not allow you to perform the effect as cleanly or effectively.
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Mar 11, 2010 07:11PM)
Ted Lesley gave me a Devano that was made up for one of his routines. It works very well. I remember the ones that Howard Bamman used to make. Those were very nice. Both of these use pins. Howard used surgical steel suture needles.

Posted: Mar 12, 2010 2:46pm
I think part of the confusion over the Devano decks was actually the result of something Tannen's made when Devano first started selling his decks. These were the "Devano" decks that had a brass weight. They were also sometimes called the "Vosburgh Lyons Decks." These had a rather thick gimmick section, mainly because brass isn't as dense as lead, and requires more metal to achieve the same kind of action. These also had a wig tape gimmick. I'm not sure when they were originally sold, but I believe there is a reference to the Devano vs. Lyons controversy in one of Annemann's editorial sections in an issue of Jinx.
Message: Posted by: Anatole (Apr 26, 2010 04:12PM)
The discussions of the rising card decks reminded me of the chapter "They Make the Magic" in Dexter's _Everybody's Book of Magic_. In addition to the Devano rising card deck, Dexter mentions an inventor named Martin who also made a rising card deck which is apparently rare and different in principle. Can anyone provide more information on Martin and his deck?

I also remember Del Ray's rising cards routine from his stage act. That incorporated a couple of highly visual "extras" including a moving pip card and a last minute revelation of a card when it seemed that Del had "forgotten" to reveal the last card selected. Then there's the "rising card case effect" when the card case that "accidentally" fell off his table and then jumped back onto the table when Del gave it a dirty look.

----- Amado "Sonny" Narvaez
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Apr 26, 2010 05:30PM)
Martin made clockwork rising cards. They are very hard to find. He was a mechanic-machinist who lived in London right about the time of WW II.
Message: Posted by: Pete Biro (May 1, 2010 11:06PM)
Kick me hard... I had and sold two jumbo Martin decks and one Poker size, as well as one German version of the clockwork system. I have a poker and jumbo Devano both made by Howard Bamman and they are fabulous.

At one time I made up a few jumbo electric-powered Devano's. One was used by Fred Kaps.

I have a Devano style jumbo that needs restoration and used, I think TANTALUM, a metal heavier than lead, but harder and thinner.

gotta go, Dodger game getting interesting.
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (May 3, 2010 01:20AM)
Tantalum would be heavier than lead. Tungsten would be heavier than tantalum. It is as dense as gold.
Message: Posted by: Pete Biro (May 4, 2010 02:49PM)
So a "gold" Devano could be worth a couple of thousand hides?
Message: Posted by: David Alexander (Jul 14, 2010 10:22PM)
Martin was "discovered" by Arnold DeBiere around 1926. DeBiere kept him a deep secret until he went to the big magic show in the sky around 1934. Martin was at the funeral. Cardini had him make things, then Davenport, then Frakson and others. He was considered the "Rolls Royce of Magic Mechanics."

I've owned several pieces of Martin apparatus, not as collectibles but as working props. They are absolutely reliable but that reliability does not come cheap. My first jumbo Rising Card deck was aquired in 1970, two years after Martin's death. It was $250. The second one came to hand just a few years ago and was $2500. The poker-sized clockwork decks are around $3,000 when available, which isn't very often.
Message: Posted by: Chris (Aug 12, 2010 07:50AM)
I am wondering if the new production run of AMY risers has ever taken place. Does anybody have any info?
Message: Posted by: Mowee (Oct 9, 2010 09:45AM)
Chris I was wondering the same thing. I have two originals in TallyHo and now am looking for bicycle versions.
Message: Posted by: Merc Man (Oct 23, 2010 06:21AM)
I've got an ARNE deck in Bikes that a friend bought for me in the USA during his holiday. It's quality/manufacture is pathetic if I'm honest, despite the $35 price tag! They are unreliable rubbish and I'd never dream of using them commercially. The instructions are also a complete and utter joke - such dealers should be banished from the fraternity as they are clearly focussed purely upon profit rather than advancing the art of magic.

By comparison, I have a Devano Deck made in Alf Cooke cards, manufactured by Mitch Devano in the early 1970's. It still works an absolute dream.

As for the 'slimmest' version of the Rising Cards - I think the slimmest version of rising cards I have is a gimmick by Gus Southall - and released by Ken Brooke in 1968. It's only 2 card thick and can be added to any deck - making it examinable.
Message: Posted by: Mowee (Oct 23, 2010 09:05AM)
I have found a guy who makes them today...he either makes the 8 card or a 5 card one. They are being shipped to me and will report on the quality.
Message: Posted by: Jim Mullen (Oct 31, 2010 12:48PM)
Mowee,

I would like to know who sells the A.M.Y. deck; please let me know by PM if you do not wish to post your findings.

I used the original Devano for many years--purchased from Magic, Inc.--and used it for the Don Alan routine. It is nice, and the use of the pin system is reliable and somewhat permanent in that there is no need to put on new tape.

Later, I purchased the thin model from Paul Diamond, and found it more practical than the original Devano, although it was not quite as robust.

Still, I think the thin model deck is preferable for several reasons. First, there is little likelihood of flashing the gaff. Second, the deck can be handled much more normally, e.g. you can do overhand and Hindu shuffles. Third, you can allow the rising to take place in the spectators' hands as is done in Whit Haydn's remarkable and powerful routine.

Incidentally, I agree with the argument that the face card of the gaff should be a court card--my Devano uses the King of Hearts. I do not recall what the Paul Diamond version had, but I think (from the above comments) it probably was the A.M.Y deck, which would have had the court card on the face of the gaff.

From a magic store, I purchased today's standard-issue, rising card deck and was disappointed. The gimmick is made up from twelve cards, which is good. The face card is the Ace of Clubs, which does not camouflage the gaff as well as a court card would. The tape is mounted on a small square cut from a playing card, and this became dislodged from the thread. Finally, there are no gromets as there are in the original Devano. I am not sure these are essential or even desirable, but he lack of them reduces the longevity of the deck. Finally, the mechanism is not nearly as smooth as with the Devano or with the first thin-gimmick model I purchased from Paul Diamond.

Incidentally, Mowee, it is pretty simple to convert a Tally Ho gimmick to work with a Bicycle deck: just replace the top card of the gimmick.

Jim
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Nov 2, 2010 06:58PM)
Why ask mowee, Jim? Ask Barry Gibbs. The AMY deck is his. You might be able to send him a private message if you check the first post in this thread.
Message: Posted by: Mowee (Nov 9, 2010 09:05PM)
Bill...I had posted hoping Barry would make it again. But not sure if he is still around of what happened. As I said I have two of his originals, but now needed them in Bikes since my Tally Ho's are getting rarer.
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Nov 10, 2010 12:17AM)
You may be able to track him down by clicking on the link in one of the posts he left. It won't take you directly to him, but the people where that post leads may be able to help you.

Regarding Tally-Ho's getting rare -- where have you looked? Kardwell has them. Murphy's doesn't have them at this time. I think some of the "street magic" sites that had them at one time have switched over to some of these trendy bike cards. But your gambling houses are probably going to be your best bet for these.
Message: Posted by: Mowee (Nov 10, 2010 03:18PM)
Yeah Bill...I am going to check out Gamblers Warehouse in Vegas this week when I am there. I love Tally Hos but since as of now USPC ain't making them....oh well gotta adapt.
Message: Posted by: Pop Haydn (Mar 20, 2017 03:31PM)
I have just published a downloadable video on the Thin-Model Rising Card Deck. It is thirty minutes long, teaching my routine and handling.

Available at http://www.popsmagic.com/store/p111/Pop_Haydn_on_the_Thin-Model_Rising_Card_Deck_~_Downloadable_Video.html

[youtube]OfgLXPpZSvM[/youtube]
Message: Posted by: Mowee (May 11, 2018 05:46PM)
Now if only someone would start making them again....
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (May 29, 2018 03:25PM)
[quote]On May 11, 2018, Mowee wrote:
Now if only someone would start making them again.... [/quote]

Whose item is this? It's up to them to delegate manufacturing permission/rights.
Message: Posted by: hugmagic (Jul 26, 2018 07:20PM)
I believe at one point Douglas Wayne made the Devano style deck.
Message: Posted by: Pop Haydn (Aug 26, 2018 06:24PM)
Marty Grams is selling a great deck here:

http://martinismagic.com/Products.html
Message: Posted by: Bill Thompson (Aug 27, 2018 08:05PM)
I'm surprised not to hear George Richbark's name mentioned...
Message: Posted by: Bill Thompson (Aug 28, 2018 11:22AM)
[quote]On Aug 26, 2018, Pop Haydn wrote:
Marty Grams is selling a great deck ...[/quote]

Is this the deck you use? If I recall correctly, he uses toupee tape on the gimmick and not the pins. Do you have a tip for removing the risen card from gimmick without it talking?
Message: Posted by: Pop Haydn (Aug 28, 2018 11:44AM)
I have a whole teaching video on it. I prefer to use masking tape. It is tamped until it is no longer sticky--just enough to pick up the card by friction. The spectator can take the risen card.

What is George Richbark's contribution? I am not aware of him.
Message: Posted by: Bill Thompson (Aug 28, 2018 11:57AM)
[quote]On Aug 28, 2018, Pop Haydn wrote:

What is George Richbark's contribution? I am not aware of him. [/quote]

http://www.richbark.com/m_closeup.html He makes and sells a devano type deck which uses the metal pins. He also has a court card on the face of the gimmick instead of an ace. He is recommended by Ron Bauer in the "Don Alan's Devano Card Rise" pamphlet.
Message: Posted by: Bill Thompson (Aug 28, 2018 02:05PM)
After watching Pop Haydn's video on the rising cards, I would say that Richbark is making a thin model A.M.Y./Arne type deck using the plate with the pins instead of something sticky, Not exactly a Devano deck.
Message: Posted by: Bill Hegbli (Nov 25, 2019 09:05AM)
I have a George Richbark's Rising Card deck, got it years ago through Stevens Magic. It is poker size deck. The line stretches a little and has to be adjusted. The pins are micro, and hardly can see them. How this guy got the pins pressed into a tiny circle of a playing card, is baffling. The deck is expensive, but I wanted to try the pins method.

I was on of the first to buy an A.M.Y. deck. They are great and work perfectly. The only thing they are out of fashion today. They were made in Bridge size cards, which was the card of choice for all magicians back then.

The A.M.Y. deck got to England very fast, as I remember Ken Brooke's Magic Place advertising them as well. A.M.Y. started the Rising Card craze to all in magic. The local magic shop sold them constantly. Every demo was a sale.

It was surprising how fast copies started springing up, seems like everyone was making and selling them to magic stores.

I really did not care for the Masking Tape idea, it dried out to quickly. Seems like I was replacing the tape every month or so. It was not a laborious task, but did get annoying when you just wanted to grab the deck and dash out.
Message: Posted by: hugmagic (May 18, 2020 08:04PM)
Del Ray's deck also tipped the card to the left or the right as directed by the spectator.

The original Devano was made with a brass weight and framework. As it was more commercially produced, it switched to lead weight. Al Goshman and Don Alan never used anything but a Devano deck . The pin lifting system would eventually wear the card but they could replaced.

I agree with Bill on the tape replacement problems.