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Topic: Best Manipulation Act you have ever Seen
Message: Posted by: mleskanic (Feb 20, 2009 02:17PM)
I know this is a very difficult question, but I was wondering what everyone thought the BEST manipulation act was. Not their favorite, but the best, most polished, and advanced routine.

I'll start

Card Manipulation I like Jeff McBride and Peter Marvey

Doves I like Lee Eun Gyeol and Channing Pollock

What do you guys think are the best routines?
Message: Posted by: MMAgicMan (Feb 20, 2009 02:35PM)
For most polished manipulation act I would vote for Cardini. As far as the most advanced card manipulation act I have seen, my vote goes to An Ha Lim. Hands Down. He won the stage competition at the IBM/SAM combined convention last year. His card manipulation is absolutely ridiculous.
Message: Posted by: Fred Johnson (Feb 20, 2009 02:49PM)
Most advanced manipulation act for his time: Geofry Buckingham
Message: Posted by: JamesTong (Feb 20, 2009 03:07PM)
[quote]
On 2009-02-20 15:35, MMAgicMan wrote:
For most polished manipulation act I would vote for Cardini. As far as the most advanced card manipulation act I have seen, my vote goes to An Ha Lim. Hands Down. He won the stage competition at the IBM/SAM combined convention last year. His card manipulation is absolutely ridiculous.
[/quote]

Is there a You Tube clip we can watch for An Ha Lim's act?
Message: Posted by: MMAgicMan (Feb 20, 2009 05:32PM)
[quote]
On 2009-02-20 16:07, JamesTong wrote:
[quote]
On 2009-02-20 15:35, MMAgicMan wrote:
For most polished manipulation act I would vote for Cardini. As far as the most advanced card manipulation act I have seen, my vote goes to An Ha Lim. Hands Down. He won the stage competition at the IBM/SAM combined convention last year. His card manipulation is absolutely ridiculous.
[/quote]

Is there a You Tube clip we can watch for An Ha Lim's act?
[/quote]

Unfortunately, no. If you search him on youtube there is some sort of clip about him that shows portions of his act though.
Message: Posted by: mleskanic (Feb 20, 2009 06:02PM)
I found a video of his act on youtube! It was on the Café and someone else had posted it and evidently I had favorited it on youtube.

It is pretty insane, Check it out!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W5qvj_uFaRk

Matt
Message: Posted by: Darkwing (Feb 20, 2009 06:47PM)
Ok, here goes;

Jeff McBride
Jeff Sheridan
Romaine
Shimada
Julieanna Chen
Geoffry Buckingham
Norm Nielson
Denny Haniney
Channing Pollock
Dale Salwak
Cardini
Peter Marvey
Neil Foster

Each stands on their on merit

I know I am leaving a few greats out.
Message: Posted by: Nachtzehrer (Feb 20, 2009 07:53PM)
David Sousa
Message: Posted by: WagsterMagic (Feb 21, 2009 09:39AM)
[quote]
On 2009-02-20 19:02, mleskanic wrote:
I found a video of his act on youtube! It was on the Café and someone else had posted it and evidently I had favorited it on youtube.

It is pretty insane, Check it out!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W5qvj_uFaRk

Matt
[/quote]

Wow!!! That was insane!!! Im just going to give up now! LOL
Message: Posted by: graywolf (Feb 21, 2009 10:23AM)
Downs, Lou Lancaster, Al Wheatley, Neil Foster, and Richard Pitchford.
Cordially, Howard
Message: Posted by: Roland Henning (Feb 21, 2009 12:03PM)
[quote]
On 2009-02-20 19:47, Darkwing wrote:
Ok, here goes;

Jeff McBride
Jeff Sheridan
Romaine
Shimada
Julieanna Chen
Geoffry Buckingham
Norm Nielson
Denny Haniney
Channing Pollock
Dale Salwak
Cardini
Peter Marvey
Neil Foster

Each stands on their on merit

I know I am leaving a few greats out.
[/quote]
Yeah like Fred Kaps.
Message: Posted by: Magnus Eisengrim (Feb 21, 2009 12:26PM)
Here's [url=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K7-jOfPNnEc]Geoffrey Buckingham[/url] with his 12 (!) ball routine.

John
Message: Posted by: JamesTong (Feb 21, 2009 01:44PM)
[quote]
On 2009-02-20 19:02, mleskanic wrote:
I found a video of his act on youtube! It was on the Café and someone else had posted it and evidently I had favored it on youtube.

It is pretty insane, Check it out!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W5qvj_uFaRk

Matt
[/quote]
The link doesn't work. I believe it has been taken down.

[quote]
On 2009-02-21 14:44, JamesTong wrote:
[quote]
On 2009-02-20 19:02, mleskanic wrote:
I found a video of his act on youtube! It was on the Café and someone else had posted it and evidently I had favored it on youtube.

It is pretty insane, Check it out!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W5qvj_uFaRk

Matt
[/quote]
The link doesn't work. I believe it has been taken down.
[/quote]
I found another link - [url]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N5Ke822_syY[/url]
Message: Posted by: Darkwing (Feb 21, 2009 02:18PM)
[quote]
On 2009-02-21 13:03, Roland Henning wrote:
[quote]
On 2009-02-20 19:47, Darkwing wrote:
Ok, here goes;

Jeff McBride
Jeff Sheridan
Romaine
Shimada
Julieanna Chen
Geoffry Buckingham
Norm Nielson
Denny Haniney
Channing Pollock
Dale Salwak
Cardini
Peter Marvey
Neil Foster

Each stands on their on merit

I know I am leaving a few greats out.
[/quote]
Yeah like Fred Kaps.
[/quote]
Roland,

You are correct. Fred Kaps is one of the greatest magicians who ever lived. He was simply brillant.

I knew I had left a few out.

David
Message: Posted by: JamesTong (Feb 21, 2009 02:22PM)
Yes, I agree with David ... Fred Kaps is also my favorite.
Message: Posted by: illusions & reality (Feb 21, 2009 02:52PM)
Jason Latimer is also pretty awesome.

Lou
Message: Posted by: mleskanic (Feb 21, 2009 05:04PM)
[quote]
On 2009-02-21 14:53, JamesTong wrote:
[quote]
On 2009-02-21 14:44, JamesTong wrote:
[quote]
On 2009-02-20 19:02, mleskanic wrote:
I found a video of his act on youtube! It was on the Café and someone else had posted it and evidently I had favored it on youtube.

It is pretty insane, Check it out!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W5qvj_uFaRk

Matt
[/quote]
The link doesn't work. I believe it has been taken down.
[/quote]
I found another link - [url]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N5Ke822_syY[/url]
[/quote]
James, my link seems to be working fine.

It is his whole routine as well.

Matt
Message: Posted by: cardone (Feb 21, 2009 05:42PM)
Cardini, Sheridan, McBride I like slower moving manipulation acts.
Message: Posted by: JamesTong (Feb 22, 2009 12:38PM)
[quote]
On 2009-02-21 18:04, mleskanic wrote:
[quote]
On 2009-02-21 14:53, JamesTong wrote:
[quote]
On 2009-02-21 14:44, JamesTong wrote:
[quote]
On 2009-02-20 19:02, mleskanic wrote:
I found a video of his act on youtube! It was on the Café and someone else had posted it and evidently I had favorited it on youtube.

It is pretty insane, Check it out!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W5qvj_uFaRk

Matt
[/quote]
The link doesn't work. I believe it has been taken down.
[/quote]
I found another link - [url]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N5Ke822_syY[/url]
[/quote]
James, my link seems to be working fine.

It is his whole routine as well.

Matt
[/quote]
My apology. I think it is my browser as I get a message that says that this video is not available in my country. Tried many times but keep getting the same message.

Any suggestions? Thanks!
Message: Posted by: mleskanic (Feb 22, 2009 01:38PM)
That's too bad. I don't know if there is a way to get around that. I doubt changing the languages would help.
Message: Posted by: eshdath (Feb 22, 2009 01:55PM)
Kaps and Cardini hands down. In present day Lance Burton, Arthur Trace. They, in my opinion, have/had a naturalness in movement and execution that is not seen as much as it should be in manipulation.
Message: Posted by: Matt101 (Feb 26, 2009 09:09AM)
Yes I got the same message: The video is unvailable in your country:-(
Message: Posted by: markis (Feb 26, 2009 11:27AM)
I second Arthur Trace
Message: Posted by: DanielCoyne (Feb 26, 2009 01:18PM)
Where can you get those brightly colored manipulation cards?
Message: Posted by: mleskanic (Feb 26, 2009 02:00PM)
SEO magic has some:

http://www.seomagic-usa.com/catalog/product_info.php/products_id/31


Matt
Message: Posted by: WagsterMagic (Feb 26, 2009 04:26PM)
I third arthur trace!!!!

And nestor Hato and Florian Zimmer both have excellent manip acts.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2FAuJbpL1uo -nestor hato
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6RKC_6PV_Zo&feature=related -florian zimmer

Best
Brandon
Message: Posted by: mleskanic (Feb 26, 2009 07:06PM)
Yeah Florian Zimmer is great!
Message: Posted by: Miraclemakers (Feb 27, 2009 01:19AM)
Absolutely Jeff McBride.
But I like Card manipulation video from Jeff Sheridan. (Genius at work!)
Message: Posted by: cardone (Feb 27, 2009 06:04AM)
I Have seen Sheridan do his magic Street style and then I saw it done in a theatre ...no music ...dead silent ...it worked in both venues but the theatre venue made it more surreal .... the best l!!
Message: Posted by: magicfish (Feb 27, 2009 10:49AM)
[quote]
On 2009-02-20 19:47, Darkwing wrote:
Ok, here goes;

Jeff McBride
Jeff Sheridan
Romaine
Shimada
Julieanna Chen
Geoffry Buckingham
Norm Nielson
Denny Haniney
Channing Pollock
Dale Salwak
Cardini
Peter Marvey
Neil Foster

Each stands on their on merit

I know I am leaving a few greats out.
[/quote]
You're mentioning Juliana Chen in the same breath as Cardini?
Message: Posted by: magicfish (Feb 27, 2009 10:56AM)
Anyway, the best manipulation act I have ever seen is Lance Burton's Gas Light routine which won him the Grand Prix at Fism. Next is the Cardini act. Everything else is..... everything else.
Message: Posted by: Targo (Feb 27, 2009 03:15PM)
Cardini and McBride are the best I have ever seen. I recently saw another called Ha Lim An in a magic convention here in Valencia and I was really amazed. He performs a card manipulation routine producing hundreds and hundreds of cards combining it with a nice music. The entire act is astonishing. Highly recommended!!!
Message: Posted by: lui (Feb 27, 2009 11:07PM)
One of the best acts I've ever seen live is performed by Ogus Engin. For me it's the best contemporary act.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1jKv9SCLjNg
Message: Posted by: Dynamike (Feb 28, 2009 04:05AM)
I've seen so many out there. But I will just make it short and mention Jeff McBride.
Message: Posted by: smagic (Mar 2, 2009 08:30AM)
An Ha Lim has the most most amazing card manipulation routine! He won the stage contest at the IBM/SAM this past summer. His act was incredible!
Message: Posted by: Anatole (Mar 2, 2009 10:14AM)
One performer I have seen only on video who does outstanding card manipulation is Haruhiko Nagisa from japan. I think I spelled the name correctly, He does an outstanding card production act including standard split fan productions in the right hand and and interesting split fan production (not from a BP) in the left hand with the back of the hand toward the audience. He had an instructional video out once on VHS but I don't know if it was ever available in the US. The video was introduced by Shigeo Takagi as I recall. Makes me wonder what other instructional video or books might be available in other countries. I can't remember how I found out about the Cirs and Nop book _Card Productions for the Stage_ published with text in four languages (English, French, German and I think Spanish). Does anyone know if Cirs and Nop ever produced a video? In addition to techniques for producing cards, I think there was some interesting stuff on other flourishes, including card spinning.
----- Amado "Sonny" Narvaez
Message: Posted by: bojanbarisic (Mar 4, 2009 04:23PM)
Anatole,
You are right about Nagisa, he must be one of the best card manipulators and after along search I finally found both of his instructional DVDs published by AIVIDEO. You can also get it thru Mahka Tendo`s web site.
I can`t believe that nobody mentioned Viggo Jahn, Richard Ross, Magic Christian, Ger Copper, Pierre Brahma, Tonny van Dommelen, Salvano, amazing manipulations done by Tommy Wonder and Alpha on FISM 1973, Silvan from Italy...... I can make this list quite long.
Message: Posted by: trashmanf (Mar 5, 2009 02:56PM)
I like many of those already mentioned but I also like Stephen Vanel's and Lance Burton's both of which I have seen a bit of when I was in Las Vegas. Burton's show opened with some manipulation and although I was in the 2nd row I could not detect his steals! truly a pro. And Vanel's rapid fire card work is an inspiration.

That An Ha Lim guy was impressive too (thanks for posting that youtube link) but it was a bit fast for me, many of the split fans didn't look very neat.
Message: Posted by: soleil (Mar 5, 2009 05:54PM)
Lance Burton's candles and cards routines are amongst the best art form expressions ever!!!
Message: Posted by: Peter Pitchford (Mar 5, 2009 06:17PM)
[quote]


That An Ha Lim guy was impressive too (thanks for posting that youtube link) but it was a bit fast for me, many of the split fans didn't look very neat.
[/quote]

I agree that on that video, he wasn't as tight as he was at IBM/SAM. But man is he tight now! He was flawless in both performances. The youtube video is only a taste of his act. You need to see the whole thing and see it live. It is indescribable.
Message: Posted by: magic4u02 (Mar 6, 2009 11:49AM)
I totally agree. Seeing him at the combined convention was just simply amazing. You honestly think he hits a certain level early in his act that he can not top, but yet he does. It builds so well and is just very dynamic and powerful.

Kyle
Message: Posted by: Alan Munro (Mar 6, 2009 03:52PM)
Lu Chen (Man, that was one tight act!)
Cardini (Of course. The magic simply happened.)
Romaine (He seems to have a philosophy similar to Cardini, in a number of ways. He has the moves down to the point where there appear to be no moves in the act - just like Cardini.)
Message: Posted by: Rainboguy (Mar 10, 2009 05:28PM)
Not necessarily in this order....but I have 6 magicians that immediately come to mind...3 of whom, many magicians may not normally associate with manipulation...but I do...in a different way..so here goes.....

1. Neil Foster: Seeing him when I was 8 years old at an SAM show in St. Louis made me decide right then and there that I was going to be a magician! What an artist! A master!

2. Norm Nielsen: Norm's stage persona and "style" is so polished, so beautiful, fluid, artistic and elegant that it is virtually perfect, in my opinion!

3. Lance Burton: Aside from being one of the genuinely nicest guys in the world, Lance's pure magic manipulative and entertainment presentation almost makes you want to cry, it's so beautiful.....seriously! And Lance, I'm sure would agree with me on Neil and Norm, too!

And, unlike magician's names that POP out and SHOUT OUT at you when you think of manipulation, here are 3 more I'd like to add:

4. Up close and in-your face manipulation:
Tom Mullica:
I've known Tom for years..........and his close up/standup/bar act shtick is one of the coolest things I've ever seen in magic. If you've never seen Tom eat lit cigarettes and play with pink chewing gum up close and personal for civilians, all I can say is...."Wow!" I had the priviledge of seeing Tom work his old Tom Foolery in Buckhead, near Atlanta, and boy was that experience special!(BTW....Tom's another HUGE Neil Foster devote and Tom now does a Red Skelton tribute show in Branson, Missouri)

5: Manipulating on-stage assistants from the audience minds: The Amazing Jonathon:
If you've ever seen him do a live performance in-person you might very well agree with me that just about no one today can manipulate the minds of his on-stage spectators and audiences like he can. The man's totally hilarious and controls and manipulates his assistants and audiences like no one you've ever seen...a trip!

6: Manipulating everyone everywhere on Television: Kris Angel! Isn't that his whole thing? Manipulating the TV Audience? Isn't this an ultimate form of magic manipulation....using the medium of Television's own unique properties to manipulate Television viewers?
Message: Posted by: deputata (Apr 1, 2009 01:00PM)
For me the best manipulation acts are:
Norm Nielsen
Cardini
Tom Mulicca
Jeff McBride-the masks routine
Message: Posted by: markmiller (Apr 1, 2009 01:51PM)
Cardini, Channing Pollock
Message: Posted by: DanielCoyne (Apr 1, 2009 02:11PM)
Here's a pretty routine that someone on the Café just posted about:

Zihao Liu's Flying Cards Magic Show
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5H0HJ_gWSWc
Message: Posted by: magictvlv1 (Apr 15, 2009 11:05AM)
Jeff Sheridan in Central Park... phenomenal...

Love Lance Burton as well... why doesn't he do it anymore?.. Put the ten minutes back into your dove routine.

I've seen some performers who although are great technically bore the tears out of me. Particularly, the Korean performer who was at the 2008 World Magic Seminar in Vegas..

However the Korean teen performer at the same show was great with a similar act.
Message: Posted by: nachotuoni (Apr 20, 2009 02:27AM)
I'll go for Fred Kaps, Cardini, Jeff McBride, Takamitsu Uchida and FISM 2006 winner Pilou.
Message: Posted by: BudTCB (Apr 20, 2009 11:18PM)
I'll also go for Fred Kaps too! Man that guy was simply amazing!! Smooth,... what an awesome magician/entertainer
Message: Posted by: Mr.P (Jun 6, 2009 12:56PM)
Salvano, geoff ray (technically brilliant), pierre brahma, norm nielsen, Ron Mcmillan, larry blake, brian sefton u.k, pat page is a pretty good manipulator also, so many old timers people have not seen or have forgoten about,
Message: Posted by: Vayron (Jun 9, 2009 12:50PM)
One of my favorite manipulation act is Norbert Ferre's one. Unfotunately there is no video of his entire act on the net. His has got at the same time a very funny and very serious characther.

Check his videos :

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9XTSosDjVa8

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2YycTcWP0tc&feature=related


He was fism word champion in 2003
Message: Posted by: Andrew Zuber (Jun 9, 2009 07:48PM)
[quote]
On 2009-04-01 15:11, DanielCoyne wrote:
Here's a pretty routine that someone on the Café just posted about:

Zihao Liu's Flying Cards Magic Show
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5H0HJ_gWSWc
[/quote]
While I certainly appreciate Zihao's routine and his technical skill, I felt that a routine in excess of seven minutes was a bit long for me. I started losing focus around 4:30...a little too much twirling of the cards. I know I'm one of those obnoxious people who doesn't have much of an attention span but maybe I'm just conditioned that way. I just felt the routine started to drag a little bit, even though he was doing a variety of different moves. I enjoy both Lance Burton's card routine which in one variety is only about 1:40 to Nestor Hato's which is a fast-paced 5:30 (it almost plays like a chase scene in a movie.) Any thoughts on a good length for a manipulation act?
Message: Posted by: kellebotond (Jun 10, 2009 12:56AM)
My favorite is:

SOMA - Phone Act
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jucxw56RDik

One of the best contemporary manipulation acts. The newspaper tear is the best ever.
Message: Posted by: Pete Biro (Jun 10, 2009 02:38PM)
Fred Kaps
Fred Kaps
Fred Kaps

All three of his acts were unparralled,unequalled.

BTW the guy originally mentioned, who's link wasn't working is too one dimentional.

Here is a link that should NOT been on youtube. I don't know who posted it, but there was not supposed to be any taping of that show.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xsSmIXY0Vf4&feature=related
Message: Posted by: cairo (Jun 10, 2009 02:58PM)
Some nice ideas.
Message: Posted by: Andrew Zuber (Jun 10, 2009 05:19PM)
[quote]
On 2009-06-10 01:56, kellebotond wrote:
My favorite is:

SOMA - Phone Act
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jucxw56RDik

One of the best contemporary manipulation acts. The newspaper tear is the best ever.
[/quote]
Does anyone know what he's using in this video to make the smoke come from his hands after the vanishes?
Message: Posted by: Vayron (Jun 10, 2009 05:32PM)
I suppose it's the ultra smoke 2000 or something like that.
Message: Posted by: Matt101 (Jun 11, 2009 01:06PM)
I really admire Jeff McBride and his work!
Message: Posted by: Magnus Eisengrim (Jun 12, 2009 10:18AM)
I'm curious to know what about these acts appeals to you all.

I've only seen most of the people listed on video if at all. Fred Kaps makes a huge impression. He is engaging and charming and his movements are absolutely beautiful. It's hard to imagine a more engaging performer in that style.

The one Cardini clip on youtube is truly wonderful as well. His characterization is superb and the magic is first-rate. It's so much fun watching the act there is no time to worry about "how did he do that?"

Many of the others listed are good, but none have the impact on me that Kaps and Cardidi do.

John
Message: Posted by: Andrew Zuber (Jun 12, 2009 12:49PM)
[quote]
On 2009-06-12 11:18, Magnus Eisengrim wrote:
I'm curious to know what about these acts appeals to you all.

I've only seen most of the people listed on video if at all. Fred Kaps makes a huge impression. He is engaging and charming and his movements are absolutely beautiful. It's hard to imagine a more engaging performer in that style.

The one Cardini clip on youtube is truly wonderful as well. His characterization is superb and the magic is first-rate. It's so much fun watching the act there is no time to worry about "how did he do that?"

Many of the others listed are good, but none have the impact on me that Kaps and Cardidi do.

John
[/quote]
I too love both Fred Kaps and Cardini. I appreciate Soma's phone act because it's something different; he's really thinking outside the box and using an everyday object to do something extraordinary. I love cards and billiard balls and such, but it's nice to see something unexpected sometimes.
Message: Posted by: markofmagic (Jun 13, 2009 06:03AM)
The best manipulation act I have ever seen is Terry Evanswood's card manipulation act. I have never seen any better the music, special lighting and nothing but pure skill in his manipulation.
Message: Posted by: magicelam (Jul 9, 2010 12:32PM)
I felt that way the first time I saw Terry's act... but then I saw it again later (at a Christmas show when he had his own theater, I believe) and it looked less polished - or maybe it was the fact I had sense learned how to perform the manipulation moves. No clue.
Message: Posted by: NathanManipulation (Aug 4, 2010 04:21PM)
And who could forget Yo Kato! A refreshing look at wand and thimble manipulation. :D

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yPbousz2T6o&feature=related
Message: Posted by: Oliver Ross (Aug 4, 2010 04:49PM)
As you've said already in your question it's very difficult to give a valuable answer. All depends what you're looking for.
You could "judge" the most advanced technical aspect of an act or the most entertaining act for you as an audience member. Since technically the manipulations are supposed to be simple and clean in the audience view I think that the audience don't really cares about how you do it (a card production stays a card production even though the technical achievement can be different) as long as it's technical perfectly done, but they DO care about the presentation (the story plot, the entertainment value...).

And this of course has been and still is and always will be a personal opion for each and everyone.

Oliver.
Message: Posted by: Anatole (Aug 4, 2010 06:47PM)
Four of my favorite performers (in no particular order) are Channing Pollock, Johnny Hart, Silvan and Levent. I've seen Levent and Johnny Hart perform a couple of times live at conventions, but Pollock and Silvan only on television. All of them--flawless manipulation.

Another great magician who specialized in card and billiard ball manipulation is Sweden's Carlo Tornedo. It was actually his performance on NBC's "International Showtime" that inspired me to learn manipulative magic.

I would have liked to have seen Ganson in his prime.

----- Amado "Sonny" Narvaez
Message: Posted by: joseph (Aug 6, 2010 06:30AM)
Cardini, McBride, Kapps..very nice...
Message: Posted by: Levent (Aug 6, 2010 07:17AM)
[quote]
On 2010-08-04 19:47, Anatole wrote:
Four of my favorite performers (in no particular order) are Channing Pollock, Johnny Hart, Silvan and Levent. I've seen Levent and Johnny Hart perform a couple of times live at conventions, but Pollock and Silvan only on television. All of them--flawless manipulation.

Another great magician who specialized in card and billiard ball manipulation is Sweden's Carlo Tornedo. It was actually his performance on NBC's "International Showtime" that inspired me to learn manipulative magic.

I would have liked to have seen Ganson in his prime.

----- Amado "Sonny" Narvaez
[/quote]


Hi Sonny:

I'm honored to be among those names, thanks.

I always considered Cardini to be head and shoulders above everyone else, with his perfect fusion of technique and acting.

I also loved Channing for his sense of style.

Kaps was great, because of his excellent acting. Kaps could take a trick that he did a thousand times and make it look (to the audience) as if he was experiencing it for the first time.

Sadly, I only saw those men on film.

Of the performers I saw live, I especially liked Richard Ross, because of his easygoing personality combined with excellent magic and methods.

Johnny Hart was great for his sense of fun on stage.

I've always been curious about Ganson, because I grew up studying his books. The two old timers in the UK with whom I discussed Ganson, told me that Ganson was a better writer than a performer, but perhaps others might feel differently.

I don't know the Tornedo that you speak of, but are you thinking of Toreno from Norway? Toreno was a very fine magician!!!

Best regards,
Levent
http://www.LeventMagic.com
http://www.MagicQandA.com
Message: Posted by: Bill Hegbli (Aug 6, 2010 07:42AM)
I believe Norm Neilsen is right up there with the best of the best. I have seen him twice live and I could not believe his perfection with card productions. Perfect fans every one and the quanity, I was per-plexed being he had a waist coat jacket tight at the waist, very much like the old "Ike" military jacket. True invention of original props.
Message: Posted by: mtpascoe (Aug 7, 2010 02:45AM)
[quote]
On 2010-08-06 08:17, Levent wrote:
[quote]
On 2010-08-04 19:47, Anatole wrote:
Four of my favorite performers (in no particular order) are Channing Pollock, Johnny Hart, Silvan and Levent. I've seen Levent and Johnny Hart perform a couple of times live at conventions, but Pollock and Silvan only on television. All of them--flawless manipulation.

Another great magician who specialized in card and billiard ball manipulation is Sweden's Carlo Tornedo. It was actually his performance on NBC's "International Showtime" that inspired me to learn manipulative magic.

I would have liked to have seen Ganson in his prime.

----- Amado "Sonny" Narvaez
[/quote]
Hi Sonny:

I'm honored to be among those names, thanks.

Best regards,
Levent
http://www.LeventMagic.com
http://www.MagicQandA.com
[/quote]
I agree with Sonny. I remember watching on Youtube a few years ago about Levent and was kind of puzzled because the person I remember watching at the Magic Castle in 80's did a slick manipulation act.

When I bought his book about Benson it was like a "duh" moment. The sudden change to the comedy act is what threw me.

I loved it when Levent did the jumbo Hummer card around his body. I wanted to do it ever since.
Message: Posted by: Levent (Aug 9, 2010 10:33AM)
Thanks Guys!!!

I actually did two different manipulation acts. All the videos of me that are out there show the first act. But after a year (1983-1984) in a Atlantic City casino, the shows producers, told me that if I were to create an entirely new act, I could stay in the new show for another year (1984-1985). So, I did what the client wanted and did a new act. It's not as good as the first act, but it did have a few cool things that were quite unusual. When I get back from the road, I'll see if I can find the video of the act and post it on youtube!

Best regards,
Levent
http://www.LeventMagic.com
http://www.MagicQandA.com
Message: Posted by: mtpascoe (Aug 9, 2010 11:01AM)
Thanks, that would be nice. Do you have any from the Magic Castle?
Message: Posted by: Levent (Aug 9, 2010 11:16AM)
I know I have videos of my comedy act at the Magic Castle, but I can't remember if I have video of the manipulation act at the Castle. At home I have a big box full of VHS tapes of my performances and I frankly have now idea what is exactly on them!

Best regards,
Levent
http://www.LeventMagic.com
http://www.MagicQandA.com
Message: Posted by: JamesinLA (Aug 9, 2010 07:54PM)
Levent,
I also carried around the same question in my mind about Ganson and for the same reason: because the routined manupulation books were my first magic books and had such an influence on me. My first ring routine was Ganson's from his book and my first torn and restored newspaper too. And when I was a kid I used to do his card production routine with 75 cards (which I can't do anymore)

I used to ask everyone I knew about how he was as a performer. I did find a youtube video of Ganson and I believe if you search youtube you can still find it posted. It looks like it's a video shot off of a tv screen.

Jim
Message: Posted by: Anatole (Aug 10, 2010 09:57AM)
Never having seen Lewis Ganson in his prime, I can't speak with any authority on his presentational skills. However, I trust Henry Hay's assessment in his Prefatory Note to _Routined Manipulations: Part II_: "I can just about count on the fingers of one hand the living magicians who are great performers, great teachers, and also willing to pass on their best material. Lewis Ganson gets counted on the forefinger of that hand." The first chapter in _Routined Manipulations: Part I" is devoted to the "Presentation of Manipulation."

I think in any art form--be it painting, sculpture, acting, writing or magic--to a certain extent the times dictate what a great artist is. Very few people in any of the arts--performing, visual, or musical--would transcend the preferences and values of their time. No one questions the greatness of Shakespeare or Tennyson, but to slavishly emulate their styles today would be ludicrous. Shakespeare himself acknowledged the need to keep pace with the times when he took the plot of Chaucer's _Troilus and Criseyde_ and gave the world _Romeo and Juliet_. And what was Marvel Comics editor Stan Lee's advice to aspiring comic book writers? "Read Shakespeare!"

Still, there is an eternal artistic truth in Tennyson's observation that:
The old order changeth, yielding place to new,
And God fulfills himself in many ways
Lest one good custom should corrupt the world.

I was always perplexed by the dichotomy of a custom that could be simultaneously "good" and yet able to "corrupt." Substitute the word "Art" where Tennyson used the word "God" and you come up with an insightful statement (with archaic verb use replaced by modern speech):
The old style changes, making way for the new,
And Art is viewed by us in other ways
To prevent one style from suffocating others.

I attended a lecture on the presentation of magic many years ago where the lecturer said that agents in Vegas were looking for fast-paced, flashy magic acts. I asked whether Channing Pollock's act would be booked by the Vegas agents of the 70's. He said "Probably not." But then some years later, Lance Burton arrives on the scene with a Pollock-like act and becomes a sensation. The music for his act is classical music from an even earlier time, but infused with a presentational touch that makes it fresh and reflects more modern preferences.

Similarly, on the (I think) fifth David Copperfield special, David presents a levitation that is light years beyond the Levitation of the Princess Karnac--but presented with a classy Gershwin musical composition.

There is a definite yin/yang aspect to all the arts, reflecting a balance of the best of the old and the best of the new.

----- Amado "Sonny" Narvaez
Message: Posted by: Levent (Aug 19, 2010 03:56PM)
[quote]
On 2010-08-09 20:54, JamesinLA wrote:
Levent,
I used to ask everyone I knew about how he was as a performer. I did find a youtube video of Ganson and I believe if you search youtube you can still find it posted. It looks like it's a video shot off of a tv screen.

Jim
[/quote]
Hi Jim
I just watched that video again on my iPhone and I'm not so sure that the man is Lewis Ganson. I have a feeling that the performer is Arthur Buckley. I have about 15 minutes of film of Mr. Buckley and that person has the same hair line and glasses as Buckley. Also he moves a lot like Buckley. Also, I don't think that Ganson performed with glasses, but Buckley definitely did. I can't say for sure but this video might be mislabeled?

Levent
http://www.LeventMagic.com
http://www.MagicQandA.com

Posted: Aug 19, 2010 6:13pm
Oh and one more thing about this YouTube video. I'm traveling internationally right now and I am away from my library, but I remember from Arthur Buckley's book "Principles and Deceptions", Mr. Buckley used a table that had a top that was round and painted black with a chrome trim around the edge (see his chapter on his Phantasy in Silver. That table in the book looks very much like the table on the YouTube video. Furthermore the close-up shot of the hands looks like a card production from the Buckley book.

IF this video IS Buckley, than it is a real treasure, because it is the only film I've seen of him doing billiard balls!

Levent
http://www.LeventMagic.com
http://www.MagicQandA.com
Message: Posted by: mtpascoe (Aug 19, 2010 05:52PM)
Interesting thing is that the comment from tinarocks88 says this is her grandfather.
Message: Posted by: Levent (Aug 19, 2010 06:21PM)
I noticed that as well. But please note, TinaRocks88 did not actually post this video. You can hear in the background, men talking in a foreign language (possibly in an Eastern European tongue?).

I think TinaRocks88 simply put her granddads name in the YouTube sear h and hit upon this video.

If TinaRocks88's parents claimed that the video was Lewis Ganson, then it would be far more believable.

Bottomline for me is that my memory of Ganson from the photos from his books, does not look like that performer. But if you look at the photos from the Arthur Buckley book you will see a real resemblance. I have two films of Buckley doing the misers dream. One film is Black and White and the other is in color and this guy moves and looks like Buckley.

I will know more when I have access to my library next week!

Levent
http://www.LeventMagic.com
http://www.MagicQandA.com
Message: Posted by: Jacques (Aug 19, 2010 10:35PM)
I'm looking at the "Lewis Ganson" video with Arthur Buckley's book "Principles and deceptions" in hand. Compared to the photos in the book, this video is definitely of Arthur Buckley. This book had a big influence on my manipulations. First time I see a Buckley performance.
Message: Posted by: Levent (Aug 20, 2010 08:12AM)
Thanks for checking Jacques!

A few more thoughts about this film.

I just did a check on the Magicpedia page and it seems that Lewis Ganson was born in 1913 and died in 1980.

Arthur Buckley on the other hand was born in 1890 and died in 1953.

If you look at that video, you can seen that it is an older man. Also when the guy bows his head down you can see that his hairline is receding pretty far back.

I would guess that the performer is about 60 years old.

When Arthur Buckley was 60 years old, it was the year 1950.

When Lewis Ganson was 60 years old, it was the year 1973.

I know that it is footage shot from a TV screen, but the way that film looks (sort of like the early Mystic Craig films, do you think that it was a film shot in the 1970s? Or do you agree with me that it is from an earlier time, such as the 1940s or 1950s?

For those of you who have the film of Buckley doing the Misers Dream from the TV show "You Asked For It" (see here: http://www.miraclefactory.net/youacts3.htm ), look at the YouTube video at counter number 3:08 and see how he address the audience and places the top hat on the table. The hand and body movements are identical to Arthur Buckley.

Best regards to all,
Levent
http://www.LeventMagic.com
http://www.MagicQandA.com
Message: Posted by: Levent (Aug 20, 2010 09:40AM)
Attached is a photo. The two shots on the left on Arthur Buckley, the man on the right is Lewis Ganson

Levent
http://www.LeventMagic.com
http://www.MagicQandA.com
Message: Posted by: Levent (Aug 20, 2010 12:07PM)
Hi Guys:

Just a little update. I was checking my computer files and it turns out that I happened to have the color film of Arthur Buckley doing his card and coin act, shot it the late 1940s. I looked at the card routine and it is move for move exactly the same routine as in the YouTube clip.

I am happy to say that there can be no doubt, I am 100 percent certain that the man on the video IS Arthur Buckley!

Levent
http://www.LeventMagic.com
http://www.MagicQandA.com
Message: Posted by: JamesinLA (Aug 20, 2010 04:08PM)
Levent!
Thanks for clearing that up. You have to be part detective as a magic historian and that is on display.
I read through Ganson's three billiard ball routines last night from routined manipulation and in it he devoits a full page to the famous Cardini monicle steal of one of his 8 balls.
I remembered that one page made an impression on me as a young boy. I didn't have any idea who Cardini was at the time, but it was clear from Ganson's writing that he was an important magician and that that famous steal was important as well. It made me appreciate all the more the wonderful gift you have given to us all in recreating the Cardini ball routine. Thank you.

Jim
Message: Posted by: Levent (Aug 20, 2010 04:57PM)
Hi Guys:

In case anyone still doubts that the man in the YouTube video that is labeled "Lewis Ganson" is in reality the fine Australian magician Arthur Buckley (1890-1953), I've uploaded some photographic proof. In the photos the left side of the image is from a film of Arthur Buckley recorded by the famous ventriloquist Edgar Bergen, the right side is from the aforementioned YouTube video clip.

Please note that the film in the YouTube clip has been accidentally flipped in the projector when it was TeleCine converted. In other words the film was put in the motion picture projector the wrong way, so that it is a mirror image of reality. I can tell that this happened because the jacket pocket that holds the handkerchief is in the right breast. Also the close up shots of the playing cards show that the pips are on the wrong side. I have downloaded the video and digitally corrected it so that the images are correct.

In the first photo you can see the face, eyeglasses and ears are the same.

In the second photo you can see that the balding pattern of his hair is the same.

In the third photo, Buckley is doing the same card routine with the same body language.

And finally if you look at the YouTube video there is something that is tough to see, but if you understand the techniques of Buckley, it is very telling. Look at the YouTube clip right after the ball routine at around the time counter number 3:12. After he places the top hat down on the table, he produces a coin from a back clip. This is the Buckley coin production number one, that I taught on the first disc of my "Ultimate Guide to The Miser's Dream" DVD set. If you don't have my DVDs, you can see me demonstrate this move on my website on the Misers Dream Video Trailer at the time counter number :51 This is an extremely difficult coin production move! And to the best of my knowledge, Arthur Buckley was the only manipulator to perform it. The flawless and beautiful way that he executes this coin production, brings tears to my eyes.

As an entertainer I am not crazy about the repetitive sequences with the balls at the beginning of the video. But we don't know the context it which this was filmed. Because he seems to be doing ball move after ball move, directly from his excellent book "Principles and Deceptions" (1948), I get the feeling that this was not a recording of his act per se, but actually a demonstration film somehow tied to his book.

Frankly I am astounded by his level of skill with wooden billiard balls. If I ever had the slightest doubt about his ability to do the stuff from his books. That doubt is gone. Thanks to this video and the other films I have with his coin and card work, I can say that Arthur Buckley was a sleight of hand master and this video is a treasure and a testament to his skills.

Best regards to all,
Levent
http://www.LeventMagic.com
http://www.MagicQandA.com

P.S. I want to thank JamesInLA for bringing this video to our attention and thanks for your comments about my Cardini recreation!!!

Photo Number 1
Message: Posted by: Levent (Aug 20, 2010 04:59PM)
Photo Number 2
Message: Posted by: Levent (Aug 20, 2010 04:59PM)
Photo Number 3
Message: Posted by: aiturran (Aug 20, 2010 05:10PM)
That is some amazing research.
I think we will now have to name you as Levent "Holmes" or something. :)

Great work, and I love everything related to magic history and classic magis, so I look forward seeing more of your work. If I have anything to collaborate, I'll surely let you know!

Antonio
Message: Posted by: Anatole (Aug 20, 2010 05:42PM)
Levent's detective work underscores once again the axiom that anything posted on the Internet should be corroborated from other sources.

Re Ganson--I keep hoping that the 8mm card manipulation films he made for Harry Stanley's Unique Studios will be released on DVD. I think I heard that it is not likely that they will be released because of the more recently released DVDs of routined manipulations (e.g. Jeff McBride's series) which are more detailed and up-to-date. Also the audio commentary that accompanies the recent DVDs would be missing from the Ganson films, which were silent. However, I feel that the historical value of those films justifies their archiving and dissemination to the magic community. Audio commentary from respected manipulators of today could be made an option on a second audio track, like the commentary options popular with full-length movie DVDs.

Related to Ganson... Can you think of any card manipulators of note who actually implemented the changes he suggested in the "Card Magic by Manipulation" sections of _Routined Manipulation Finale_, especially the idea of producing fans limited to eight cards rather than producing a fan of the complete stock? I liked Ganson's reasoning and practiced that technique assiduously, but in the end decided to go with the standard technique. The discrepancy that Ganson noted is valid, but it is something I think only an experienced card manipulator might notice. I doubt that true lay audiences would notice any discrepancy at all.

----- Amado "Sonny" Narvaez
Message: Posted by: Bill Hegbli (Aug 20, 2010 06:56PM)
That is truly wonderful, I purchased the Buckley books years ago and they are among my favorite material on manipulation magic.

I especially loved his transition move from Coins to Cards. It has solved a change in my coin and card work. We must really think the Gamblers Book Club for reprinting these book way back when.
Message: Posted by: JamesinLA (Aug 20, 2010 07:20PM)
And I was thinking that that video showed that Ganson had some real chops. I didn't know about the 8mm film that exsists of Ganson but certainly it should be preserved and diseminated.

Jim
Message: Posted by: Jacques (Aug 20, 2010 08:53PM)
I agree with Levent that this film look like a demonstration of sleights from Buckley's book "principles and deceptions", more than a standard act. I whish I had this film years ago when I started manipulating balls and coins. It would have help me with timing, synchronisation of movement, angles, etc.
This confusion between Ganson and buckley is strange. These two men don't look alike. And to add to this, I had these two books side by side in my bookshelf for years.
Message: Posted by: Levent (Aug 20, 2010 11:12PM)
Thanks Guys!

I'm glad you've all appreciated the research. This is exactly how I analyze all the magic from my instructional DVDs as well as my literary projects such as the Benson book. Except in this case, all I had to go on was the files on my laptop. I can do a much better job if I have access to my magic library at home.

Frankly, I wish I could find a cleaner copy of that Arthur Buckley footage so that I could examine the eight ball routine better. I know it from his book, but it was very cool watching him do it in tempo. Also his ball rolls, whilst secretly palming a ball are amazing! When I saw the two sound films of Buckley performing his entire Miser's Dream routine, I realized that he was a very good performer. Certainly by today's standards, his patter and style is very old-fashioned, but he performed with confidence and poise and I certainly have a lot of respect for the strength of his technique. What really blows my mind is that when these films were shot, Buckley had been retired from show business for about 15 years and had been making his living as an electrical engineer, yet he is doing amazingly difficult sleight of hand. The fact that so many of his sleights are executed while gazing out into the audience, shows how skillful he was. Also I must mention that by studying Arthur Buckley's mixing of patter with manipulation (in his Miser's Dream routine), I was able to gather a much better understanding of his idols: T. Nelson Downs and Allan Shaw.

Now I would like to say a few words in appreciation about Lewis Ganson. I have read all of his books and I have read every single issue of the magic magazine "The Gen" which Ganson had edited. And let's not forget that he was the person entrusted by Vernon and Slydini to write their most important books. When I was a child, his "Routined Manipulation" volumes and "Card Magic by Manipulation" were my constant companions. I believe that Lewis Ganson was no less than the "Professor Hoffman of Manipulative Magic". As a writer in this field, I cannot give a higher compliment.

As far as his technical skill was concerned, I have no doubt he could do all the sleights in his books. Many years ago, I DID see the 8mm films of Ganson that Harry Stanley produced and my memory of it was that they were perfectly OK. These films showed the sleights, but they really didn't reveal the performing ability. The real question I asked of Billy McComb (in 2005) and Patrick Page (in 2008) while I was working in England was "What kind of showman was Ganson?" By that, I was asking if her was a strong entertainer? They both gave me pretty much the same response. They felt Ganson's real magical gift was in writing and teaching our Art to his fellowman. Conversely, we have Cardini and Kaps who were titanic showmen, yet they left us with very little written insight into their craft. To me, in their own way, ALL of these men are my heroes.

Best regards to All,
Levent
http://www.LeventMagic.com
http://www.MagicQandA.com

Some personal responses below:

JamesInLA: I also first read about the Cardini monocle steal in Ganson's book. It was great fun putting it within the Cardini 8 ball routine in my Billiard DVD. Especially since it will give the young magicians a glimpse as to how clever Dick Cardini was. When I was at the SAM Convention in Atlanta this year, I showed my recreation of Cardini to a few old-timers that actually saw the Master work and I am pleased to say that they told me I got it right.

Antonio: Thanks, my friends tell me that I am a C.S.I. Detective for dead manipulators. :)
One of the things that I have learned over the years is that when it comes to technique, there is an infinite way of doing magic poorly, but when you do it correctly the technical choices are far more limited.

Sonny: I am very curious about where that YouTube video came from and who told the posters that it was Lewis Ganson? Very strange!
The cost of transferring the Ganson 8mm films to video is very cheap. If they keep the price of the DVD reasonable, I think a lot of people would buy it, even for historical reasons! Your idea of doing an audio commentary is terrific.
Regarding the production of a limited stock of cards as per "Card Magic by Manipulation" I agree with you that Ganson is trying to solve a purely academic problem. Personally, I'll stick with Charlie Miller's statement, "Don't run, when no one is chasing you" and therefore I always produce the full stock and only drop about 2 or 3 cards. That said, in the past I have seen the great Japanese magicians: Haruo Shimada and Masafumi Sakoh do the Ganson style split fan very effectively. Also, I have film of Buckley himself doing Ganson style split fans. So perhaps we should call them Buckley style split fans?

Wmhegbli: Yes, It was great that the Gamblers Book Club made the reprints of the so-called "Buckley Trilogy." I bought my one and only copy of "Principles and Deceptions" in paperback at a used book store in Brooklyn when I was about 12 years old. I paid $2.25 and it's safe to say that I got my money's worth! HA
Message: Posted by: Anatole (Aug 21, 2010 05:18PM)
While on the topic of Arthur Buckley, I thought I might bring up Geoffrey Buckingham. The two last names have the same first syllable, and _It's Easier Than You Think_ and _Principles and Deceptions_ are great books on manipulation. I've seen the Videonics lecture tape of Buckingham, as well as a clip from a FISM appearance.

One performer I wish I had seen is Ron McMillan, author of _Symphony of the Spheres_. In his act he used some traditional methods for secretly obtaining balls, but the method that intrigued me was his spring-loaded device. I think I saw a FISM videoclip of Petrick's billiard ball manipulation and he might have been using the McMillan holder.

----- Amado "Sonny" Narvaez
Message: Posted by: Bill Hegbli (Aug 21, 2010 06:50PM)
I got to see Ron McMillan at a magi convention one year. It was very good, but he only did his coin manipulations from his book he later published. Tannen once sold a spring loaded gimmick but never got around to purchasing them.
Message: Posted by: Jacques (Aug 21, 2010 08:12PM)
Anatole, you bring two books from which the billard balls routines made me suffer. I remember struggling to get at 12 balls as in Geoffrey Buckingham's routine. From his book, it look like serious buziness, but I was surprised to discover that he was presenting it in a comical manner, like in this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K7-jOfPNnEc
Ron McMillan "Symphony of the sphere is even more painful, he reach fourteen balls!
I never performed with as much balls as these. I stoped at five. Too scared.
Message: Posted by: Anatole (Aug 22, 2010 01:38PM)
Jacques,
I think the whole concept of trying to produce 12 balls and holding on to all of them without dropping any is a somewhat comical situation, as if the balls are multiplying out of Buckingham's control, a plot not unlike "The Sorceror's Apprentice" where the brooms are multiplying out of control. To me it's like Buckingham starts out confident that he has complete control over the balls that appear, but that as the number of balls increases, his confidence begins to fade until he just gives up. I think Buckingham is trying to express bewilderment rather than out-and-out comedy by his predicament.

When you think about the premise of productions in manipulative magic in general, the magician usually produces items and immediately discards them into a top hat or champagne bucket. Perhaps Buckingham is trying to assert his control of the situation by conscious determination not to let the annoying balls disturb his savoir faire. In the end, he just gives up.

To use an example from gimmicked/apparatus routines, the original passe passe bottle and glass effect evolved from a so-so routine with one bottle and one glass to a very comical effect of the bottles multiplying in a very annoying fashion. Annoyance is a subtheme in many magic presentations, as is the plot of "the magician in trouble." Sure, Buckingham could have produced balls one-at-a-time in a kind of "Miser's Dream with balls" fashion. But I think that would have gotten old after a while.

----- Amado "Sonny" Narvaez
Message: Posted by: Levent (Aug 22, 2010 03:00PM)
Sonny:

That's funny that you should mention that both men had the same first syllable in their names. Here's another coincidence, from what I understand both Buckley and Buckingham were electrical engineers! How weird?

By the way, I loved that lecture video of Buckingham, just terrific! I seem to have lost it, but years ago I had a video of Buckinghams entire act from the 1979 Brussels FISM and it was wonderful, seeing him do the full act!

I never saw Ron McMillan perform but I spent some time with him at the New York Magic Symposium in 1982 and he was a really, really, really nice guy and I was sorry to hear about his death. When I was at Blackpool, England this year I visited the dealers booth run by McMillan's family, I was told that they used to have a VHS video of McMillan in PAL System, but they were sold out and they were planning to re-release it in a region-free DVD in the future. I hope it works out as I will be the first person to order it! I used to have the spring-loaded ball holder when I was a kid and I did not have much luck with it. Also the spring was a little bit noisy when the ball shot out of your jacket, but I guess with music playing the audience wouldn't hear it. I would love to see Mr. McMillan use that gadget from his book as I am sure he could really make it work.

Levent
http://www.LeventMagic.com
http://www.MagicQandA.com
Message: Posted by: Anatole (Aug 22, 2010 08:18PM)
Levent,
I remember seeing a video of Petrick and Mia performing--might have been one of the FISMs--and in his billiard ball routine, I think Petrick may have been using the McMillan holder, because there was no normal "tell" to when the balls were stolen, and the position of Petrick's hands during the routine suggest that the McMillan holder (or something like it)might be what he used.

----- Sonny
Message: Posted by: ChristopherCool (Nov 26, 2010 10:42PM)
I would have to say one of my favorite manipulation acts of all time is James Cielen. He won the gold medal and peoples choice award at IBM a long time ago. One of the first guys to use the colored doves. I can't find is original competition piece, but here is a little bit of it. If anybody can find the video for the complete dove act, please share it.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=70dAQqVPUI4
Message: Posted by: Bill Hegbli (Nov 26, 2010 11:15PM)
[quote]
On 2010-11-26 23:42, ChristopherCool wrote:
I would have to say one of my favorite manipulation acts of all time is James Cielen. He won the gold medal and peoples choice award at IBM a long time ago. One of the first guys to use the colored doves. I can't find is original competition piece, but here is a little bit of it. If anybody can find the video for the complete dove act, please share it.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=70dAQqVPUI4
[/quote]
He sells a DVD of his act here: http://dovemagic.com/magicmore2.html scroll to bottom.

Here is his web site: http://www.dovemagic.com/index.htm
Message: Posted by: Anatole (Nov 28, 2010 08:45AM)
The use of colored doves in magic goes back five decades or more. There was some discussion in the magazines back in the 60's or 70's suggesting that the practice of coloring doves for magic be discontinued on the grounds that it was "unnatural." My personal feeling is that the silks used in a dove act provide all the color that is needed. In fact, the white of the dove's natural coloring is a pleasing contrast to the colors of the silks and makes the appearance that more startling.

This quote from the web documents the use of colored doves at least to 1957:
-----begin quote-----
[Ron Urban] did his first professional solo show in 1957 before a crowd of about 600 people at the Green's Crystal Terrace in Duluth, Minn. It was there that he unveiled a unique act that truly set him apart from other magicians.
Urban's "Pastels" employed 15 doves, each dyed a bright color. Highlights of the show included his producing a dove from inside a balloon and a continuous conjuring of colorful doves from his bare hands.
-----end quote-----
(retrieved 11/28/2010 from http://bryan-keith.angelfire.com/details/2719.html)

Interestingly, the URL cited above also shows Ron Urban presenting a tiger illusion, which also was fairly innovative at the time.

----- Amado "Sonny" Narvaez
Message: Posted by: ChrisPilsworth (Dec 14, 2010 09:13PM)
I know I've come to this discussion a bit late. I've got two performers that I've really enjoyed. Greg Frewin's award winning dove act was a real eye-opener when he won the IBM in Quebec City. Vito Lupo has great style and I've always enjoyed his work.

Cheers,
Chris
Message: Posted by: Conradi (Dec 26, 2010 07:18PM)
Lance Burton is the best
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Jan 2, 2011 09:26PM)
[quote]
On 2010-11-26 23:42, ChristopherCool wrote:
I would have to say one of my favorite manipulation acts of all time is James Cielen. He won the gold medal and peoples choice award at IBM a long time ago. One of the first guys to use the colored doves. I can't find is original competition piece, but here is a little bit of it. If anybody can find the video for the complete dove act, please share it.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=70dAQqVPUI4
[/quote]
Ramon Galindo was the first manipulator to use colored doves. This was back in the 1950's, before James Cielen was born.

No to detract from James' ability as a manipulator and an entertainer. He is top notch.

Posted: Jan 2, 2011 10:31pm
People generally don't think of this fellow as a manipulator, but he certainly is one of the best -- Johnny Thompson.
Message: Posted by: Rainboguy (Jan 6, 2011 08:58PM)
Overall, in my personal opinion, the best manipulator I have ever seen is Norm Nielsen; Norm is in a league of his own.
A VERY close tie would be Lance Burton and Neil Foster. Any one of these three gentlemen would certainly be considered to be at the top of the list of classic stage manipulators of all time.

As a side note, another less well-known and, I believe, very underestimated classic stage manipulator was Earl Ray Wilcox. Earl Ray's work with cards and billiard balls was outstanding.

Like most, if not every magician I have known in my life, Norm, Earl Ray, Lance, and Neil Foster have been salt-of-the-earth guys...great to know, down to earth, and friendly souls. I miss Earl Ray Wilcox and Neil Foster...may they rest in peace.
Message: Posted by: Anatole (Aug 29, 2011 12:12PM)
Here's a nice youtube clip of Earl Ray Wilcox's act:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZTLSAL26SOM

-----Amado "Sonny" Narvaez
Message: Posted by: LaurensMalter (Sep 3, 2011 11:36AM)
I'm not a big fan of very active Card Manipulation, but Jeff McBride sells it SOOO GOOD!

Dove Magic, I'd go with Lance Burton (huh, who would've guessed?).
The best bird act in Europe is definately Marko Karvo, seen him 3 times in August
and it's amazing! His birds are extremely well trained, the video doesn't really confirm that,
but then again, this was a 1 time gig, so he had no time to have the birds get used to the area:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oezdfqlup4E

Not seen in this video: he has a tiny little bird, don't know exactly wich kind, he makes it appear from an egg, then produces a small cage and the bird walks from one hand, past his neck, to the other hand into the cage. BEAUTHIFUL!
The cockatoo and macaw finale is the best I've ever seen in a bird routine, very impressive!
After his performance here in Belgium I've had a beer with him afterwords and he's a really nice guy, very calm and relaxed.

Another good manipulation act is the Parasol routine by Ernesto Planas, very entertaining and he brings it VERY WELL:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dzPbwUf_KPU
Message: Posted by: Rainboguy (Sep 7, 2011 10:14AM)
Anatole:

Thank you for posting the YouTube link above to Earl Ray Wilcox's act as seen in Colon at Abbott's Get-Together many years ago. I would encourage those magicians who have never had the pleasure of seeing the late great Earl Ray Wilcox perform his classic stage manipulations to click the link above and watch the YouTube Video.
Message: Posted by: Nick W (Sep 7, 2011 06:46PM)
I find it entertaining that the people who made the movie The Prestige wanted to hire a magician for the lead role....but did not because they couldn't find a magician who is a good actor.....so they hired a good actor and taught him a french drop!
Message: Posted by: Anatole (Sep 7, 2011 09:34PM)
Nick W. wrote: "I find it entertaining that the people who made the movie The Prestige wanted to hire a magician for the lead role....but did not because they couldn't find a magician who is a good actor.....so they hired a good actor and taught him a french drop!"

Did the producers really think first of hiring a magician... or is that conjecture? Robert-Houdin's famous quote to the contrary, magicians are by and large not very good actors. There are some exceptions to the rule, but I qualified my statement with the phrase "by and large" to suggest that there may be a few (very few) magicians who are competent actors. Channing Pollock in his prime would have been good in "The Prestige." His film "Judex" in 1963 was included in the select group of _Fifty Classic French Films, 1912-1982 : A Pictorial Record_ by Anthony Slide. Out of all the films made in France in that 70 year period, "Judex" made the cut as one of the top 50. I'd say that's quite an accolade. "Judex" was actually Channing's fourth European film, the previous three being "The Sea Musketeers" (in 1962), "The Red Sheik" (1963), and "Rocambole" (also 1963).

However, there aren't many magicians alive today who have cinematic acting skills comparable to Channing Pollock. I did think David Copperfield did a good acting job in "Terror Train," but I think he realized that his destiny lay in elevating magic as an art form. Otherwise his acting career might have progressed similarly to that of his co-star in "Terror Train"--Jamie Lee Curtis.

The magician from whom I took my Magic Café name--Anatole--is the main character in a 1962 episode of "The Dick Powell Theater." Curt Jurgens played the title role in "The Great Anatole" and did an outstanding job executing a few magic tricks including a most impressive film-to-life illusion. Dana Wynter was also the quintessential magician's assistant in that teleplay, classily dressed in an evening gown rather than the ubiquitous tights.

There are probably magicians performing today who would have done a good job in "The Prestige" or "The Illusionist." But being unknown to the public-at-large, casting them in a high-profile movie role would have been a risk the producers might not have been willing to make.

----- Amado "Sonny" Narvaez
Message: Posted by: TheAmbitiousCard (Sep 7, 2011 09:40PM)
[quote]
On 2009-02-21 15:52, illusions & reality wrote:
Jason Latimer is also pretty awesome.

Lou
[/quote]
Not when I saw him. His color changing tie dropped on the floor.
He dropped billiard balls.
His "appearance" onto a bed revealed either him or his assistant crawling out from under the bed. Can't remember which.
I'm sure there was more.

During the act, people's cell phones were lighting up in the audience.. texting their pals about how awful the act was.

Ask Michael Close. He was there.
Message: Posted by: Stucky (Sep 9, 2011 12:12AM)
Many may not have seen him do it, but Kozak does some killer manip in his show. I learned a lot from just watching him perform.
Message: Posted by: Pete Biro (Sep 9, 2011 11:19AM)
I don't know what the MacMillen gimmick is... but perhaps a comment my father made will add a historic note. My dad worked on a show with Arnold DeBiere, and he told me that he had some kind of spring device that shot a billiard ball out from his jacket, secretly, into his hand.
Message: Posted by: bojanbarisic (Sep 9, 2011 12:05PM)
Arnold De Biere`s Billiard Ball production fake was described by Will Goldston in Tricks of the Masters. Fake was used to produce 5-6 balls. Ron McMillan`s ball holder (holdout) is used to produce one ball. Ron described it in his book Symphony of the Spheres. I watched Ron`s act many times and I don`t remember he ever used that holder. He explained his manipulation act on a video tape recorded in Portugal and that is the video that Levent mentioned in an earlier post.

regards,
Bojan
Message: Posted by: dahih beik (Sep 9, 2011 12:24PM)
I have the video its cool, this man has the devils hands.

Posted: Sep 9, 2011 1:25pm
There is no such gimmick discribed in the video nither in the book.
Message: Posted by: bojanbarisic (Sep 9, 2011 12:57PM)
[quote]
On 2011-09-09 13:24, dahih beik wrote:
I have the video its cool, this man has the devils hands.

Posted: Sep 9, 2011 1:25pm
There is no such gimmick discribed in the video nither in the book.
[/quote]

What book did you check out ? It is not in his Modern Art of Coin Magic. You can buy his Billiard ball book for 9$ at Library.com
Message: Posted by: Anatole (Sep 10, 2011 08:11AM)
Bojan,
You wrote: "You can buy his Billiard ball book for 9$ at Library.com" Can you provide the author and title of the book you're referencing as well as the link at the lybrary.com site for the billiard ball book? Thanks!

----- Amado "Sonny" Narvaez
Message: Posted by: dahih beik (Sep 10, 2011 08:16AM)
You are right bojan
Message: Posted by: bojanbarisic (Sep 10, 2011 09:09AM)
Here it is Amado,
http://www.lybrary.com/macmillans-symphony-spheres-p-27690.html
Message: Posted by: Bill Hegbli (Sep 10, 2011 12:01PM)
I have that book in front of me. It is a knuckle buster! Tannen use to sell the gimmicks for the routine, way back when. After one of their famous fires, they no longer offered them for sale. They had at least 3 fires, several items I purchased still had smoke damage on them. Wish I would have purchased at least 1 set of 3 of the gimmicks, so I know how they operated and looked.
Message: Posted by: sickmagic (Sep 11, 2011 10:04PM)
I am shocked and in a way sad that not one peraon mentioned the o ly two tine lions head winner james dimmare. His dove act ia the best I've ever seen period. The work and creativity in it is unmatched. Also which not many oeople have aeen is his salt pour and new manip act. His alt pour is amazing and as cloae to real magic with salt that I have seen. The dove act as made him many awards over the years and on top of that he was close friends with channing.
Message: Posted by: sickmagic (Sep 11, 2011 10:05PM)
I am shocked and in a way sad that not one peraon mentioned the o ly two tine lions head winner james dimmare. His dove act ia the best I've ever seen period. The work and creativity in it is unmatched. Also which not many oeople have aeen is his salt pour and new manip act. His alt pour is amazing and as cloae to real magic with salt that I have seen. The dove act as made him many awards over the years and on top of that he was close friends with channing.
Message: Posted by: Nak (Sep 11, 2011 11:52PM)
I'm curious if the responses would be changed at all had the post been titled "most entertaining manipulation act"? While we all ogle at intense manipulators, I often wonder what a layperson's reaction would be to a number of the acts named. No disrespect to the performers of course...as in any art, the lay people don't often appreciate the "greats" within the community because of a lack of understanding (not everybody would shell out the cash for a Picasso!) Any thoughts on most entertaining manip acts for the general public?
Message: Posted by: sickmagic (Sep 12, 2011 01:15AM)
Dimmare is for sure one of them...also lance and johnny and pam....layman love all 3 of these acts. I can say moat layman don't get a lot of the people mentioned in thia thread as I've seen some of them for lay audiences.

I think magicians like to put acts in high regards for the wrong reasons. Most don't look at theater and entertainment. In a lot of cases they focus on the magic and any pro will tell you that is a very small part of being a magician.
Message: Posted by: Bill Hegbli (Sep 12, 2011 01:23AM)
Well, James Dimmare would have to win as the most entertaining manipulation act. He moves on stage like a Fred Astire, performs like Channing Pollack and entertains his audiences with unique surprising and creative magic effects. He is hard to beat by any standard.

Second would be Joseph Gabriel, he is very different then Dimmare, but just as entertaining. Dimmare has created a number of different acts touching on many different fields of manipulation magic and illusions.

Retired Lance Buton would be included, but he did not change his act much over the years to my knowledge.
Message: Posted by: dahih beik (Sep 12, 2011 02:29AM)
He didn t hasve to , his act is over the top .
Message: Posted by: sickmagic (Sep 12, 2011 02:39AM)
[quote]
On 2011-09-12 03:29, dahih beik wrote:
He didn t hasve to , his act is over the top .
[/quote]
Who's act is over the top? Didn't have to.what? I'm confused by your post. Lol
Message: Posted by: Nak (Sep 12, 2011 10:40AM)
All great acts, I'd have to put Dan Sperry's name in the hat now as well. I'm quite impressed by the range of audience members he reaches with his persona...he always has great approaches to whatever he does.
Message: Posted by: Devious (Sep 12, 2011 10:51AM)
[quote]
On 2011-09-12 03:39, sickmagic wrote:
[quote]
On 2011-09-12 03:29, dahih beik wrote:
He didn t hasve to , his act is over the top .
[/quote]
Who's act is over the top? Didn't have to.what? I'm confused by your post. Lol
[/quote]

I'm certain that his post is in reference to Lance Burton's act not having changed much. I would agree, why change a good thing. Kind of like the Volkswagon Beetles and the Jeep Wranglers eh?
Message: Posted by: Anatole (Sep 12, 2011 08:57PM)
I agree with Israel that Lance Burton's act is a classic that doesn't really need changing... But Lance himself has directed the evolution of his act beyond what it was when it started. His IBM Gold Medal-winning act with the Zombie finale was classic. When he decided to go for the gold at FISM, though, he made some changes. The traditional zombie was replaced by the bird-cage zombie, for instance. Eventually the zombie birdcage version was replaced by a classic Thurston-like floating bird-cage. Then he added the Duel with Mr. Death and the levitation. Channing Pollock had a classic dove/card act, but also explored illusions like the double twin-sawing.

In the days before television, magicians could get by with one basic act or show because by the time they went from the East Coast to the West Coast with their show, the folks on the East Coast were ready to see the classic show that they remembered fondly. But the advent of television meant that the audiences that used to take months to cover are now covered in a single evening.

I think, though, that audiences also enjoy "golden oldies" in magic the way they do "golden oldies" in music. I think sometimes, though, the performers get tired of the same old/same old--as in the classic story of Ricky Nelson that became the song "Garden Party" that ends with the line: "You can't please everyone, so you've got to please yourself."

Keep in mind, too, that Thurston started out doing a card manipulation act with some classics like the Rising Cards... and when he became an illusionist, still kept a "cameo" spot for the card manipulations.

----- Amado "Sonny" Narvaez
Message: Posted by: Bill Hegbli (Sep 12, 2011 09:39PM)
It seems people chose to read what they want in a posting. I never said Lance Burton should change his original act. I said he never changed his much over the years. Meaning create additional acts to his one version.

James Dimmare has a Dove act, a cane act, and other acts stretching his material and offerings much farther then any other performer in magic. He does all this to perfection.

So as the most inventive and creative magician with very unique acts, I vote for James Dimmare. His Huge Shrinking and Vanishing Bird Cage is the most wonderful piece of magic in the world. It is better then a floating bird cage IMHO. A huge cage at least 2' by 18" (sorry I don't know the exact measurments) is shrunk in his hands under a cloth to 3"x3" and then visually vanished. And I love the feature that the huge cage is actuall lifted up off the cart for all to see it is separate. What a wonderful illusion.

Here enjoy!!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6G4Qbwj9vFc
Message: Posted by: billappleton (Sep 13, 2011 09:30AM)
Oh man I wanna be that guy.
Message: Posted by: mtpascoe (Oct 13, 2011 03:04AM)
Not the best I've seen of all time, but the best I have seen in a while http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SaOX-GMwhqs&feature=related Charlie Frye show's you how to do manipulation to music properly. Master mime, juggler, and comedian, this guy knows how to entertain.