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Topic: Who said this first?
Message: Posted by: electric.ceu (Apr 15, 2009 10:17PM)
I just watched an old (1982) Videonics video of Michael Ammar called 'World Class Closeup,' and he said, "I don't want to run when I'm not being chased." By the way, he actually had hair in the video. I've heard many other people say this. I'm just wondering if anybody knows who first coined the phrase?

Tim
Message: Posted by: Uli Weigel (Apr 16, 2009 08:05AM)
Al Baker coined that phrase. He's also known for this one: "Many a good trick has been ruined by improvement."
Message: Posted by: electric.ceu (Apr 16, 2009 06:13PM)
Thanks! That's another great saying!
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Apr 29, 2009 05:00PM)
I thought Mae West said it first.

Or maybe it was, "Don't run when you aren't being chaste."
Message: Posted by: Gerald (May 1, 2009 09:04AM)
That is one of your best replies, Bill. :)
Message: Posted by: Donal Chayce (May 1, 2009 02:18PM)
[quote]
On 2009-04-29 18:00, Bill Palmer wrote:
I thought Mae West said it first.

Or maybe it was, "Don't run when you aren't being chaste."
[/quote]

If politicos were to follow Miss West's advice, the halls of Congress would be all but empty.
Message: Posted by: DStachowiak (May 6, 2009 07:03AM)
[quote]
On 2009-05-01 15:18, Donal Chayce wrote:
[quote]
On 2009-04-29 18:00, Bill Palmer wrote:
I thought Mae West said it first.

Or maybe it was, "Don't run when you aren't being chaste."
[/quote]

If politicos were to follow Miss West's advice, the halls of Congress would be all but empty.
[/quote]
At least, it would be a start.
Message: Posted by: andre combrinck (Apr 28, 2010 02:08PM)
In fact, that was Solomon of the Bible. But said: "Only a fool runs when not being chased!"
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Apr 28, 2010 06:02PM)
What's the book, chapter and verse?
Message: Posted by: mindguru (May 29, 2010 01:38AM)
You guys make me laugh.
Message: Posted by: jtb (May 29, 2010 04:06PM)
Here is a quote from Al Baker's 'Magical Ways and Means':

[i]Another thing: some magicians always want to prove something that the audience doesn’t question. They tell the story about the little repertory company with a special between acts, a magician with no appeal, not much experience. They tell him he has to play a bit in the show, put this cloak on, this hat on and use this rubber dagger. He comes out at the proper cue and stabs the villain. The poor villain comes back at him, “Gad, what the hell did you use?” “I used my own dagger.” “Why didn’t you use the rubber dagger that I gave you?” “You cant pass that out for examination,” the magician replied.[/i]
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Jun 2, 2010 02:53AM)
There are so many noobs who ruin magic tricks by wasting countless minutes allowing people to examine props, that I really wonder why they do it. There are exceptions, of course. For example, when Richard Hatch does the cups and balls, he hands out the cups so that a couple of people can examine them. HOWEVER -- he has entertaining material that goes on while the prop examination is taking place. You can't just sit there like a bump on a log waiting for people to give you your props back.

There is a principle I call "examination by implication." It occurs like this. You hand a deck of cards to a spectator to hold while you reach into your pocket for a Sharpie marker. Or, you have a spectator hold a coin while you reach for a glass tumbler. You don't say, "Examine this, please." Just let them hold the prop. BUT you watch them out of the corner of your eye, so you don't let them do risky things with the items.

Or, you can just place something on the table and (apparently) pay no attention to it.