(Close Window)
Topic: Your Postcard?
Message: Posted by: simchamagic (May 10, 2009 04:22AM)
Hi!

I'm about to go tomorrow to a printing house to design and print 5000 postcards. Their goal - to be given out (together with a B. card) after preschool shows and birthday party shows, and to be sent in the mail from time to time to prospects or past clients.

Just before I go and print this amount, do any of you have a postcard for these age groups and mentioned purposes who could share it's design here, just to get ideas and "to fill the well" (<= a term taken from the excellent book "The Artists Way" - meaning in short - to get new ideas and inspiration).

Thanks!

Simcha
Message: Posted by: Spellbinder (May 10, 2009 09:32AM)
The biggest advantage of a postcard for advertising purposes is that we have all been trained to turn them over and look at both sides before tossing them away. That gives you TWO chances to give your message and make that sale. If the pictures are interesting enough to examine rather than merely glance at, that gives you a bit more time with the prospective customer on the way to the trash. The "holy grail" of postcards is the "keeper and the sharer." That's one that's so interesting that the prospective customer will want to keep it and share it with others. A puzzle, a coupon, a winning scratch off number can all potentially do that.

Type font should be immediately legible (don't get fancy here!) and the message given in short, easily read words. Always include mailing address, phone number and Web site (plus e-mail address), that is, if you aren't hiding out from the cops and want to be found. Make it easy for the customer to contact you and make it worthwhile to do so.

Since you are having so many postcards printed at one time, leave a space to attach a sticker where you can write in new information... such as an expiration date for coupon offers, a change of contact information, etc. It may take you a long time to go through a printing of 5,000, unless you shower them down on the population by crop duster.
Message: Posted by: stempleton (May 10, 2009 10:17AM)
[quote]
On 2009-05-10 10:32, Spellbinder wrote:
The "holy grail" of postcards is the "keeper and the sharer." That's one that's so interesting that the prospective customer will want to keep it and share it with others. A puzzle, a coupon, a winning scratch off number can all potentially do that.

Since you are having so many postcards printed at one time, leave a space to attach a sticker where you can write in new information... such as an expiration date for coupon offers, a change of contact information, etc. It may take you a long time to go through a printing of 5,000, unless you shower them down on the population by crop duster.
[/quote]

Wow... these tips are worth my entire annual membership, Spellbinder :)
Seriously, I rely heavily on postcards, usually printing 300 at a time for a single mailing. Recently, I have considered a 5000 run but have been delaying due to concerns you just addressed.

Also, I know a fellow performer who no longer uses business cards, and simply gives out his postcard after events, with his "autograph" on the back if requested. I think it is a bit redundant to give a postcard AND a business card, but that's just me.

As for taking the project to a "designer," I do that myself with an online service (currently printsmadeeasy.com, but I may change) because I like the creativity involved...uh, and I'm cheap!
Message: Posted by: todd75 (May 10, 2009 10:36AM)
I'll be doing a lecture at this years Kidabra conference in Pigeon Forge, Tenneessee which will include some of the unique things I do with postcards.
Message: Posted by: Donald Dunphy (May 10, 2009 10:38AM)
Here's another idea.

Put your photo on one side. Optional idea - a speech bubble which you can autograph or write a note. Variation - buy a huge posterboard with a fancy border from a store like Staples -- pose for your promotional photo holding the posterboard in front of you or to the side of you. On the final postcard that's printed, you write your notes / comments on the blank white posterboard area.

Print part of the batch as a regular postcard back, which you can use for mailings.

Use the rest of the batch as giveaways at shows, by printing illustrations of teach-a-trick magic tricks (Ed Harris type artwork) on the back. That way, your giveaway has both your photo and also beginner magic tricks to learn.

If you want to get fancy, you can create a series of cards with different fronts (photos) and backs (tricks), which you can number and the kids can collect. Like trading cards.

With both styles of back, you put your contact info on the back.

Some people put their contact info on the back, or the front, or on both sides.

- Donald
Message: Posted by: todd75 (May 10, 2009 01:25PM)
I'll be revealing my secret for what I do with postcards AFTER I autograph them. Kidabra is only 3 months away so make plans to be there!
Message: Posted by: Futureal (May 11, 2009 02:31AM)
... and you are?
Message: Posted by: John C (May 11, 2009 08:58AM)
[quote]
On 2009-05-10 05:22, simchamagic wrote:
Hi!

I'm about to go tomorrow to a printing house to design and print 5000 postcards. Their goal - to be given out (together with a B. card) after preschool shows and birthday party shows, and to be sent in the mail from time to time to prospects or past clients.

Just before I go and print this amount, do any of you have a postcard for these age groups and mentioned purposes who could share it's design here, just to get ideas and "to fill the well" (<= a term taken from the excellent book "The Artists Way" - meaning in short - to get new ideas and inspiration).

Thanks!

Simcha
[/quote]

Try vistaprints.com if you can stomach their upsell attempts you can get 100 for 9.99 just to test around.

John
Message: Posted by: magic4u02 (May 11, 2009 09:07AM)
Also, overnightprints.com is also very good. I have used them for all my designer projects and stuff I have done for others over the years. Great quality, great color and good stock and customer service. They may not be the cheapest, but cheap does not always mean better. =)

Kyle
Message: Posted by: John C (May 11, 2009 09:59AM)
Yes, I also use overnight. Probalby had over 10,000 or more postcards printed by them.

I use vista for test runs if I don't need more than a few.

J
Message: Posted by: derrick (May 11, 2009 11:12AM)
Use an alternate/throw away e-mail address if you use Vista Print. They will junk mail you death.
Message: Posted by: Matthew W (May 11, 2009 11:23AM)
[quote]
On 2009-05-11 12:12, derrick wrote:
Use an alternate/throw away e-mail address if you use Vista Print. They will junk mail you death.
[/quote]

It is not junk mail, they always send great offers. I just got an email for a free 3 x 1.6 foot full color vinyl banner. I have never paid for business cards from them.
Message: Posted by: Potty the Pirate (May 11, 2009 11:49AM)
I give away about 10,000 postcards a year. Every child receives one. They've been designed for kids to personalise and keep - and I know a large number of them end up in kids' bedrooms, on the wall or noticeboard.
The front of my card has my web address (which is also my performing name, so no need for a separate bit of text), and a studio photo. the other side has a smaller picture of me and my parrot, as well as a bit of blurb confirming tha the owner of the card is a "Crew Member". My signature is printed onto the cards, and there is a space for the kid's name and the date. All my contact info is on the back, email, phone, etc.
They cost about 3p (5c) each, and are the cheapest and most effective form of advertising I use.
I agree that changing the pictures every year is a good idea, as then kids will start to collect the "series".
Potty
Message: Posted by: The Great Smartini (May 11, 2009 11:52AM)
I really like Donald's suggestion of "teach a trick"...thanks for sharing that.

I've used print shops but I've also recently purchased a colour laser printer for doing small/personalized cards. You can also purchase an Avery poster set which gives you the templates for designing large size pictures that you can print. It breaks it down into pieces which you connect and add to a large poster. Cost me like $15 for this.

jeff
Message: Posted by: Neale Bacon (May 11, 2009 12:00PM)
I am also a fan of Vista Print. I have had them do postcards and brochures all at no cost except shipping. They have done other stuff for me to like business cards etc.

As to using the postcards - they make good thank you mailers, good give aways, or just a little "hello reminder" to clients.

I have sent them to certain clients telling them when I am performing or to certain prospective clients who have asked me to let them know when I am performing so they can come see me.
Message: Posted by: Neale Bacon (May 11, 2009 12:00PM)
Forgot to mention, I like Donald's idea of the speech bubble or holding the posterboard. Good idea for sending special announcements.
Message: Posted by: simchamagic (May 11, 2009 02:57PM)
Hi!!

OK, I went to the printing house, and they gave me this example:
http://www.mediafire.com/?sharekey=8143f4a3296bf5df6b21be4093fab7ac8e3b713b968ec749c95965eaa7bc68bc
*Please* tell me what you think.
The first file is side #2 and the second file is side #1. I'm sorry about the language. At the first one it gives a few testimonials and at the second side it reads: "Bring joy, fun and lots of happiness to your next event..."

Thanks,

Simcha
Message: Posted by: Neale Bacon (May 11, 2009 04:21PM)
I like it. Nice layout and shows children having fun.
Message: Posted by: todd75 (May 11, 2009 04:23PM)
Looks good!
Message: Posted by: Spellbinder (May 11, 2009 07:57PM)
On side 2, the photo on the lower left clips some of your head off. See if the photo can be lowered without messing up anything else.
Message: Posted by: Rock_Slatestone (May 12, 2009 11:22AM)
Vertical Response (www.verticalresponse.com) is really good and the high gloss postcards look fantastic. The also incorporate snail mail and email so you can keep everything(addresses and names) all in one system for all your projects.

Steven
Message: Posted by: Cesar Munoz (May 13, 2009 10:19PM)
Spellbinder,

Postcard looks pretty good. I like the fact that you have printing in the areas where you may occasionally place a postage stamp or mailing label, this works great when you hand them out and when you mail them.

One idea that I'm toying with is to have 4 postcards printed on an 8.5" x 11" sheet. This way I can do an export from by database and a mail merge in MicroSoft Word. The end result is that the front of the post cards are customized with the child's name (e.g. Happy Birthday Chris!) and the back of the post card has the mailing address and stamp. I currently just use plain card stock and create my own graphics.

With this system I send out a customized "Happy Birthday Child's Name" card to all of my clients a couple of months before their birthday.

Cheers,

Cesar