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Topic: Clip boards & such
Message: Posted by: Michael Peterson (Oct 5, 2001 10:03PM)
What kind of stuff do you all use for your dirty work? Clip boards, pads, centers, etc.



I use a handy dandy thought transmitter, but I would like something bigger such as a clip board for larger audiences.



Any recommendations are appreciated. :banana:



_________________

Thanx,

Ichazod



All the worlds a stage,

And the men & women merely players;

They have their exits

and their entrances,

And one man in his time

plays many parts.
Message: Posted by: tctahoe (Oct 8, 2001 03:19AM)
Are you wanting something for pre-show work?
Message: Posted by: Michael Peterson (Oct 8, 2001 11:48AM)
Pre-show or during the show, Iím curious as to how others do it & what they use.



Ichazod :banana:
Message: Posted by: Scott F. Guinn (Oct 9, 2001 10:48AM)
The Lee Earle Millenium Board is nice, but I like the old Nelson pads, too. I use lots of other stuff as well, which can be found in the basic texts of mentalism.
Message: Posted by: Ian Rowland (Oct 18, 2001 03:07PM)
I second the Nelson clip boards - absolutely basic but still, in my view, all you could want. The ultra-thin type, such as the original Lee Earle, micro-thin, are good and may be considered more deceptive, but it depends how much time and privacy you have for obtaining the info. With the humble, simple Nelson board you can 'whip it out' (if you'll pardon the expression!) in a second or two - say, just under cover of putting something away in a case.



A word about the transparent type, as invented by Roni Shachnay but marketed by Guy Bavli. Roni's original was clear plastic, which worked very well. The Bavli version is sometimes tinted plastic, such as a light brown or coffee colour. This is a design flaw, in my opinion, and the impression can be seen against the plastic even by the spectator. So, if you want the see-thru plastic type, which IS very deceptive, make sure you get it with the totally clear plastic (like clear glass).
Message: Posted by: Tom Cutts (Oct 19, 2001 12:35AM)
To heck with all that. I wish I could do cold reading. Now I wonder where I could learn the complete facts about cold reading :idea:



:lol: :rotf: :lol: :goof: :lol: :rotf: :lol:



Makes watching J. Edward like watching a cooking show...and I'm only about half way through. Thanks Ian!



Tom Cutts
Message: Posted by: JaquaiGul (Oct 19, 2001 08:33AM)
Where can the Nelson boards be found today? Are they available through dealers?

:babyface:
Message: Posted by: Ian Rowland (Oct 22, 2001 04:26PM)
I don't have the definitive word on the availability of the Nelson-style boards, but I'm pretty sure you CAN still get them. Many years ago I thought Magic Inc. in Chicago used to carry them, and John Cornelius marketed a set of them (two boards) a while back. But this is all probably out of date. All you can do is trawl around the dealer sites until you find a winner.



That is, until someone better informed than I (i.e. most people) comes along to this here forum.
Message: Posted by: Lee Marelli (Nov 14, 2001 08:30PM)
If you are looking for a great pad, you cannot go wrong with Kerry Summers NOTE BOOK, Golden West Productions.
This is a fairly new item. The spiral notebook uses a principle I have not previously seen in the literature, although Max Maven or Ian may have.
You literally get the information right in front of your audience assistant. It can be used for pre-show or during your show. Also it is something you can carry with you all the time for those "impromptu" moments.
Message: Posted by: Jonathan (Nov 14, 2001 09:11PM)
Iím interested in this pad. What kind of stuff can you do with it? Iíve always been a close-up kind of guy who didnít have much training. I just saw people do things and wanted to be able to do better then they did. So I came up with the effects I wanted to achieve and just thought and played around with stuff until I found a way. This has itís advantages and disadvantages obviously. Iím wanting to try performing professionally starting this summer. I have just received the "how to be a millionaire performing magic or entertaining" book (not exact title), but I need to adapt an act to stage. Please excuse my ignorance, but Iím trying to learn a whole new area.


Jonathan
Message: Posted by: magiker (Jan 30, 2002 07:50PM)
Ted Lesley has a good pad in his book Paramiracles called: The working pros switch pad
Message: Posted by: Michael Peterson (Jan 30, 2002 10:17PM)
I too am interested in the Summers notepad, I have heard good things about it.

I also wish to thank Drew McAdam for giving me some advice on this subject.


:devilish:
Message: Posted by: Andy Leviss (Jan 30, 2002 11:25PM)
I've seen the pad, and frankly while it's a good principle, two things turned me off. First, when I saw it demoed, it didn't work smoothly. This may have been because it wasn't properly prepped, but regardless, it wasn't a good first impression.

Second, the pad looks like a pad from the stationery section of Toys R' Us, with a cartoony drawing on the front cover (I can't remember exactly what it was offhand). It didn't look like a pad any self-respecting entertainer working for adults (especially in a business environment) would ever use. To be usable for me, it would have to have at worst a low key pattern, at best a solid cover (or a few solid colored sections, as necessary to hide the gaff).

My recommendation is to find a shop that stocks it and see it before you buy it, so you can decide for yourself.
Message: Posted by: Scott F. Guinn (Jan 31, 2002 01:44AM)
You could always cover the cover (?) with a wood grain or other type of contact paper.
Message: Posted by: Mark Strivings (Jan 31, 2002 02:02AM)
Sorry, you can't cover the cover of the Notebook. It won't work.

Too bad you saw a bad demo, Andy. I think it's a killer. Granted, the thing does look like it came from a low end stationary store, but for many venues it's fine. If you're working extreme upscale (or if your own performing persona doesn't mix with it), I would use something else. For the vast majority of us, I think it's great. Certainly the most immediate impression available and the easiest to reset on the fly. Very practical.

Just my opinion,

Mark Strivings
Message: Posted by: Scott F. Guinn (Jan 31, 2002 02:09AM)
Sorry. I don't have it, and was offering this as a suggestion. Clearly, I should have kept my keyboard shut!
Message: Posted by: Drewmcadam (Jan 31, 2002 04:44AM)
Just to make one thing clear about my comments on the KS notebook - it's the PRINCIPLE that's clever and can be used in a variety of ways in other situations. Granted it looks kinda' tacky, but take the idea and make it work elsewhere - there are DOZENS of applications!
Message: Posted by: Mr Amazing (Jan 31, 2002 05:11AM)
...however you could [i]exchange[/i] the toyish cover for something else along the lines suggested by Andy, but it would take some work.

I'm a little surprised to why this isn't done by Mr, Summers actually. It wouldn't be any problem.

Matias
Message: Posted by: Andy Leviss (Jan 31, 2002 10:17AM)
What Drew, Matias, and Mark say is quite true about the pad in question.

Another great immediate impression is Allen Zingg's "Son of Mindscan". That's always been a favorite of mine (which reminds me, I need to order a few :)
Message: Posted by: fordkross (Feb 5, 2002 03:35PM)
There are various good impression devices. Nelson's UP clip board probably the best. But looking at original material is preferale e.g. billet switch, Jacks Wallet, center tear. It's often adventageous to mix up your methods so no no one has a chance to see it over and over
from
Ford
Message: Posted by: Gianni (Feb 5, 2002 04:45PM)
[quote]

Another great immediate impression is Allen Zingg's "Son of Mindscan". That's always been a favorite of mine (which reminds me, I need to order a few :)
[/quote]

I have Mindscanner. Is this your reference? I have never seen anything described as "Son of Mindscan." Is there a dealer description of this?

Also, I have the Notepad. When I first got it I thought the principle and design were terrific. I still do. Problem is, it is a scary thing to rely on in performance. Spectator has a lot to do with your ability to make the peek if they write lightly. And you only get a second to do the dirty stuff so if the words aren't there, you have to plan for a good out.

Gianni

Gianni
Message: Posted by: Andy Leviss (Feb 6, 2002 04:50PM)
IIRC, Hank Lee's carries Allen's pad: http://www.hanklee.net and search for "mindscan".

And nope, it has no relation to the Tenyo "Mindscanner" (which is the same in basic method, inferior to, and predates the Cornelius's "Thought Transmitter"). I believe the original "Mindscan", on which it was based, was by Kenton Knepper, but I'm not 100% sure on that.

It's a small paper scratchpad. Somebody writes or draws anything on it, and tears the sheet off. You take the pad, tear a sheet off for yourself, and you've got the glimpse. It's pretty devious, and nothing to break or really go wrong.

E-mail me privately if you'd like, and I'll get you in touch with Allen directly.
Message: Posted by: Michael Peterson (Feb 7, 2002 12:39PM)
Son of mindscan can be purchased through L&L publishing.


:devilish:
Message: Posted by: Ian Rowland (Feb 7, 2002 02:20PM)
I'd like to offer another vote for the Kerry Summers pad. Buy it from Mark Strivings. Learn the principle. Then, if you want, make up your own version of the prop. Stuff like white board, clear plastic, laminating film etc. is widely available and it's not hard, even for a DIY klutz, to create your own variation on the Kerry Summers theme.

Get your own version to look however you want it. Make a small version for close-up out-of-the-pocket work. Make a larger version for platform or stage, and you'll have the best instant, real-time, no-pre-show drawing dupe effect in the world. The PRINCIPLE is superb, and worth twice what Mark charges for it. (At least)
Message: Posted by: bitterman (Feb 13, 2005 10:38AM)
The Summer's cover is fine. Just say you borrowed the notebook from your kid.
Message: Posted by: Reuben Dunn (Feb 15, 2005 12:47PM)
[quote]
On 2001-10-18 16:07, Ian Rowland wrote:
A word about the transparent type, as invented by Roni Shachnay but marketed by Guy Bavli. Roniís original was clear plastic, which worked very well. The Bavli version is sometimes tinted plastic, such as a light brown or coffee colour. This is a design flaw, in my opinion, and the impression can be seen against the plastic even by the spectator. So, if you want the see-thru plastic type, which IS very deceptive, make sure you get it with the totally clear plastic (like clear glass).

[/quote]

You might want to consider Earles' "Millennium Clipboard". It's a smokey plastic clipboard that hides the gimmick rather well. Better still is that replacing the gimmick is rather easily done and is not costly.

I put together 6 A5 size clipboards (They are half the size of an American 8X10 paper size clipboard.) that took me all of three minutes to gimmick up.

I know that this is a public board, but if anyone wants help in putting one together for less than £2.00 each, contact me via my web page. The URL for the page is listed under my signature.
Message: Posted by: gothxman (Feb 22, 2005 11:02PM)
Where can I get a Roni Shachnay tranparent type clipboard?

BTW, thank you Ian, for tipping us the fact that the spectator might be able to see the impression on the tinted plastic board. I was wondering this myself.