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Topic: Osterlind's CT pads
Message: Posted by: Kit (Nov 18, 2009 09:48AM)
I want to order some CT pads from Richard Osterlind, but the postage to the UK is about $30! I would like to order directly from Richard, but I just can't justify the postage for only 4 pads. Obviously this isn't Richard's fault, as posting to the UK is always extortionate.

I know it's a long shot but is there anywhere else I can get hold of them? Maybe in the UK?

If not I may have to just save up and buy something else to accompany the pads to level out the cost of postage.

Cheers.
Message: Posted by: matthu (Nov 18, 2009 10:10AM)
Maybe if there are enough UK users interested we can do a bulk order ... maybe Richard would do us a special deal?!
Message: Posted by: Stuart Cumberland (Nov 18, 2009 02:25PM)
Step 1: Calculate your own "perfect" billet. Play with paper until you come up with a size that perfectly suits your needs.

Step 2: Go to a printer with the exact measurements.

Step 3: Tell printer to cut up 500 sheets of 60lb cover stock to those exact dimensions.

Step 4: Tell printer to bind them into pads for you.

Step 5: Go home. Wait for printer to call you. When you get call, go to step 6.

Step 6: Pick up box of pads. You'll have enough to last you a long, long, LONG time.

Carry them with you. Use them in your daily life. Make them part of you. I use mine for shopping lists, taking down phone numbers, quick notes to self, etc.

It's not hard to do, and it's certainly NOT hard for the printer to do for you. In fact, friends of mine own a print shop and it's just about the simplest job they can do.

S.C.
Message: Posted by: robwar0100 (Nov 18, 2009 03:11PM)
Stuart,

Your advice is good. I would only add if someone does not want to do that, go to a store specializing in paper (or an office supply store) pick out a nice paper like you suggested, and cut them with a paper cutter to 2.5 inches x 3.5 inches. Gather some of these billets/slips of paper and hold them together with a small bulldog clip.

Or, if you want to make your own designer notepads, check out this link: http://www.magician.org/portal/en/node/902

Bobby
Message: Posted by: Kit (Nov 18, 2009 03:23PM)
Thanks for the responce, but I need Richard's so I can perform Great Mind's Think Alike from 13 steps. The paper needed is hard to find here, and Osterlind's pads are built with this routine in mind. Any old paper stock won't do as it needs the special surface.
Message: Posted by: robwar0100 (Nov 18, 2009 04:13PM)
Kit,

Check out this thread: http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewtopic.php?topic=337725&forum=82&12

Bobby
Message: Posted by: Stuart Cumberland (Nov 18, 2009 05:33PM)
"Your advice is good. I would only add if someone does not want to do that, go to a store specializing in paper (or an office supply store) pick out a nice paper like you suggested, and cut them with a paper cutter to 2.5 inches x 3.5 inches. Gather some of these billets/slips of paper and hold them together with a small bulldog clip. "

Bobby. Respectfully, 2.5 inches x 3.5 inches is not the perfect size. Every hand is different, and the perfect palm is certainly different from hand to hand. My billets are very unlikely to be perfect for you, and I can assure you that size you mention is far from perfect for me.

The SINGLE biggest mistake that I see billet workers make is using what Annemann suggested. It worked for him. The perfect size is the size that is perfectly hidden in your finger palm. Period.

I used a guitar analogy before, so let me use it again. Stevie Ray Vaughan used a neck on his guitar that was like a baseball bat. It was super, super thick. Eric Clapton uses a thin version... but he prefers the "V" neck.

The point? Unlike a guitar--which can easily cost you between $1000.00 to $2000.00, you can get CUSTOM MADE billets that will last you a lifetime.

Seriously. I'm almost out of mine. In fact, I'll be re-ordering this week. The last batch lasted me nearly TWO years.

Now, if you need a SPECIAL type, then you should know you can ALSO get them from your local print shop.

OR... simply suck it up and order from Osterlindmysteries.com . They have great service and the postage has nothing to do with them. It is what it is. But you'll be happy if you order from them.

SC
Message: Posted by: robwar0100 (Nov 18, 2009 05:58PM)
Stuart,

Thanks for the clarification. The size I suggested works for me. I don't fold the billets like Annemann, either. I use quarter folds.

Bobby
Message: Posted by: Brane (Nov 18, 2009 08:18PM)
Everyone seems to have their own 'best,' other than Richard's own pads. I cut 32 pound 100% white cotton paper, (the 'good' stuff!), onto 3" x 3" squares and use Richards CT. Have no problems tearing. Small stack of these stuck in my business card holder . . 'for notes.' The one on top actually HAS a phone number and name on it . . .
Have, in the past, had some cut and padded at the printers, but it doesn't seem necessary, really.
brane
Message: Posted by: Reuben Dunn (Nov 20, 2009 11:16PM)
When I lived in the UK I would go to Office World or to the Staple store in coventry and buy 100 count white unlined index cards.

They're the perfect thickness for me. I would then slice them in half, and then trim a little bit off the length side as well, I seem to prefer the smaller size paper.

I got some copydex, which is the UK version of rubber cement, I cut a square shape from the card board backing of a note pad, and used a bulldog paper clip. I then glue the width of the cards together. Presto, an hour later or so, I have a rather nicely made pad of paper stock to use for whatever CT effect is needed.

Today at work I was asked if I could "do something". I got a manilla folder cut it into the right size sqares and had some fun. In fact, I think I prefer the stock and the thickness to that of the other pads, either bought commercially, or those cards that I make.

As far as the cost to mail to the UK is concerned, well when thePound is stronger than the Dollar it doesn't hurt that much.

What I liked about ordering from Richard was the propmtness of the order, the communication if there was going to be a delay, and the explaination that he would not lie and declare on a customs form that the gear was a "present". I may have had to pay Customs and Excise, but it wasn't too bad.