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Topic: I passed on this. What would you do?
Message: Posted by: Neale Bacon (Nov 25, 2009 08:30PM)
I got an enquiry via an agent that said someone was looking for entertainment for a 4 year olds birthday. A direct quote from the client was "I don't really care what kind of entertainer. Just want someone who can keep the kids busy for an hour."

That sounded like babysitting to me.
Message: Posted by: akolodner (Nov 25, 2009 08:37PM)
But when you show up and wow them you'd have gotten paid and opportunities for more work. Remember we're the professionals. Most people don't know what they really want. You could have kept the kids attention for an hour and then surpassed their expectations with a great show. Never turn down work. If they really wanted a babysitter they wouldn't have called an entertainment agent.
Message: Posted by: seadog93 (Nov 25, 2009 08:45PM)
I disagree, a lot of people are looking for childcare. That's not a problem if that's what you want to do, and a lot of people do, but I would certainly turned it down myself.
Message: Posted by: Dynamike (Nov 25, 2009 08:49PM)
I would take it. Bottom line.
Message: Posted by: Skip Way (Nov 25, 2009 09:12PM)
I would have asked for more specific details on exactly what they were looking for, as I'm sure Neale did. I, like Neale, am very selective when I hear requests like this.
Message: Posted by: Neale Bacon (Nov 25, 2009 09:45PM)
Skip,

This was a group of 4-6 year olds. No particular cultural significance.

I think the most telling is when she said just wanted someone to keep the kids busy for an hour. This tells me the adults will be elsewhere, and that they don't care much about who is with their kids.

I have worked too hard to get where I am to be a babysitter for an hour.
Message: Posted by: Donald Dunphy (Nov 25, 2009 10:25PM)
If they didn't care about which entertainer they got, wouldn't they just look for the lowest priced option? Surely that can't be you, Neale?

- Donald
Message: Posted by: scaevola (Nov 26, 2009 12:15AM)
I would need more information myself, ie how many kids. If a client doesn't seem right to you, my advice is don't take the show. I could see someone saying that they didn't care in such a way that I would react like you did. I could also see them saying it in such a way that I would be like "great! now I try out a whole mess of new stuff, because she doesn't care." But yeah, if a client rubs you the wrong way and you aren't starving, I would advise leaving the show for someone else to pick up.
Message: Posted by: Jeff Haas (Nov 26, 2009 12:19AM)
They probably would have taken anyone who would have agreed to do the show as long as it fit into their budget. Also, I doubt that any more work would have come out of it...the adults wouldn't be in the room to see how well you did, they only wanted to drink with their friends.

Or, from their point of view, "How much is it going to cost me to keep the brats tied up for an hour?"
Message: Posted by: seadog93 (Nov 26, 2009 01:12AM)
"Also, I doubt that any more work would have come out of it...the adults wouldn't be in the room to see how well you did, they only wanted to drink with their friends."

Good point. My favorite birthday shows (not that I'm an expert, just my favorites) are basically family shows, with the adults watching, wither from the back of the room or mixed in with the kids. I think this is especially fun because the adults let there guard down and have at least as much fun as the kids.
Also, I just don't feel comfortable babysitting.
Message: Posted by: kimmo (Nov 26, 2009 03:11AM)
I tend to trust my instincts. Neale obviously does the same.
Message: Posted by: Potty the Pirate (Nov 26, 2009 03:23AM)
A good sales pitch would have secured the booking, then you could go and knock their socks off. Just insist that at least two adults are in attendance during the show.
Clients like this are ready to be shown what it means to hire a quality entertainer. In my opinion you judged this client without even speaking to them. Why do you think they called an agent? Their enquiry seems pretty genuine to me, they're looking for someone who will engage the kids.
In cases like this, you should take the lead, and make it clear to the client what their options are.
On the other hand, if you don't need the work, you can afford to pick and choose.
Potty :)
Message: Posted by: ColinDymond (Nov 26, 2009 04:14AM)
I'm with Kimmo. Sometime it just feels wrong. Yes you could do a great show and it might be fine or you could just take the money and run but sometime you have to say no!
Message: Posted by: stijnhommes (Nov 26, 2009 04:28AM)
Different culture or not. When someone says they don't care what type of entertainment they get as long as it keeps the kids busy for an hour, they obviously don't care if the kids will be truly entertained.

I'd have taken the show, just to make sure the kids would have a great time, but I understand it when people want a couple of adults to be present.
Message: Posted by: rossmacrae (Nov 26, 2009 04:29AM)
Why are you asking? Are you that hungry, that you're having second thoughts about declining a show you weren't comfortable with?

I would have been conflicted, too, but the show had as many potential negatives as positives. My big deciding factor: it sounded like "we won't respect you, and if you don't corral 100% of the kids in rapt unmoving attention for a full hour we won't be happy with you."
Message: Posted by: Gerry Walkowski (Nov 26, 2009 06:43AM)
Colin hit on something that is so true. Sometimes you just have this GUT feeling that something isn't right and you need to stick to your instincts.

Let me give you an example of something that had happened to me. I should have never let this happen to me, but it did.

This past Halloween I had a call from a very posh Country Club. The person called me and I called the person back. No matter what time of day I called, I could never reach the person. (I've always flagged that as a warning sign.) Finally, I just gave up on this person.

Two weeks later I had another call and the lady said, "I hope we're still on for that date." I called her and could never reach her. Finally, I went to their website, found her name there and sent her and e-mail. We o.k.'d everything and she did return my contract. Although I didn't ask for a deposit, my contract reads, "Payment is due immediately following the performance."

I presented the show which went over exceptionally well. When it came time to be paid the lady said, "I'm so sorry. I've been so busy I didn't have a chance to have our accounting office get your check."

Well, it took me about 3 weeks to finally get it. However, I sent her several e-mails and she never responded to any of them. Finally I contacted their finance manager and he sent the check.

Bottom line (and I have to beat this into my own head, as my example clearly proves) LISTEN TO YOUR INNER INSTINCTS.

Enjoy,

Gerry
Message: Posted by: Red Shadow (Nov 26, 2009 10:22AM)
Sorry, but I'm in the category of take the money and run. Maybe its because I have bills to pay, maybe its because were in the middle of a credit crunch, or maybe because I just don't turn work down. But even if they wanted a babysitter - its getting paid!

Look at it this way, instead of turning the work down because you thought it was a babysitting job, why not charge the client double. If they book you, and you end up babysitting - at least your getting paid handsomely for it. They might be looking for the cheapest, but you've left the option for them, and not just turn them down outright.

You also have to remember that just because you (or I) know were good compare to our nearest competitor, the client does not know this. They have no idea who you are and a web-search is probably the first time they have even heard of you. You can sell yourself, but especially in regards to price, your just as good as the next person in the phone book until they see you and someone else live and know how to compare you. Most clients have no idea what a 'good' children's entertainer consists off. They just want someone to give their children a good time or keep them occupied for a while.

But at the end of the day, I entered this business for the children. To give them memories of a great show they will have for life. It doesn't matter what the clients reason was for booking me, my job is to amaze the children and make them remember magic as something cool and funny. I can only do that by getting the booking and performing my show, regardless of what role (babysitting / entertainer) I am in - I'm still going to give those children a show they will remember for life.

Steve

P.s: Your right that repeat bookings for an event like this are rare.
Message: Posted by: Neale Bacon (Nov 26, 2009 11:26AM)
[quote]
On 2009-11-26 05:29, rossmacrae wrote:
Why are you asking? Are you that hungry, that you're having second thoughts about declining a show you weren't comfortable with?
[/quote]

I was comfortable saying no. I was just seeing what others thought. It's called making conversation.
Message: Posted by: jiayi (Nov 26, 2009 11:32AM)
I will have to say no. I think it is important to have self-respect for you and your show. If a client talks to me like that, it is very clear that they don't have respect for your service, you will most likely be treated poorly when you show up for the show. Plus I will feel cheap taking a gig like this therefore I will suggest them to find someone else for the job. If you are doing it for money then you might as well find a part-time job on the side. After all, you need to respect yourself before someone else respects you. What would the agent think of you if you end up taking the show?
Message: Posted by: keeblem (Nov 26, 2009 12:15PM)
[quote]
On 2009-11-26 11:22, ku7uk3 wrote:
Sorry, but I'm in the category of take the money and run. Maybe its because I have bills to pay, maybe its because were in the middle of a credit crunch, or maybe because I just don't turn work down.
[/quote]

I agree. I have a mortgage to pay and family to feed. I often find November is a quite month. I envy anyone who is in the position to turn paid work down - unfortunately I'm not.

Mark
Message: Posted by: RJE (Nov 26, 2009 12:19PM)
Just to give a reference to my point of view, Pat and I do not do children's birthday party shows. That being said, I would have suggested Neale did the show and here's why.

When many potential clients approach an agent, they haven't a clue what they are looking for or what they are going to get. True, some call the agent with a specific request for a certain act or performer or genre, but many do not. They have a function, special event, party, etc.... and they are looking for some entertainment and the agent's expert advice on what is available.

Typically, the client's primary concerns are the cost to them for the entertainment, whether or not the entertainment can fill a specific time requirement and are they any good. Given this type of inquiry, the agent is then left to offer the client options of what they can provide; magician, juggler, face painter, vent, etc.... The client then asks questions that may or may not show any knowledge of the industry and makes their decision.

Often, at this point, the client has no idea who is going to show up at their door because the agent still has to check on the availability of the act(s) they suggested that might be suitable for the client.

At this time too, the client may ask what the performer does, but just as often they do not understand the answer unless it is generic; they do lots of jokes, they get the kids up and do magic with them, they have a live rabbit, they sing songs etc....

What it comes down to, more often than not, is that the client is really asking, "Do you have someone that you can send to my kid's party for 60 minutes that is an entertainer?"

So the request Neale got is typical or to be expected. In fact, I don't even see it as an insult to Neale or performers. The only difference I see is in its blunt truthfulness.
Message: Posted by: Cesar Munoz (Nov 26, 2009 12:57PM)
I turn down shows all the time--when the FIT is wrong. My "ideal customer profile" is an audience comprised primarily of 4-9 year olds. That's it. If they are within my driving range and willing to pay my fee, THEY QUALIFY. Buyers will often disguise what they REALLY want, in order to put downward pressure on a fee. Agents are masters at this, as they get to keep the difference between your fee and what the customer pays. If your "instinct" sent you a danger signal, then you should be mindful of that. But, EVERY person who hires a children's entertainer has the secondary (or primary) goal of getting the children sitting down in a controlled environment for an hour, so that in itself shouldn't prevent you from taking a show. If you’re not the right performer for them, they will disqualify themselves by not hiring you.
Message: Posted by: Red Shadow (Nov 26, 2009 03:44PM)
We should also not forget that this enquiry came through an agent. You should never turn down agent work because they often get your more work in the future. But if turn them down for one show, that's the last you will most likely hear from that agent. They'll just continue through their books, find someone who will do the job and just call that entertainer in the future.

You should always stay on good terms with agents if you want to continue working with them, even if it means doing the occasional babysitting job. It will pay for itself in the long-run.
Message: Posted by: Gordyboy (Nov 26, 2009 04:38PM)
Neale, I would have referred it to me ;-)

Sorry, for the right price, I'll babysit, and probably have a blast doing it.
Message: Posted by: Neale Bacon (Nov 26, 2009 05:34PM)
This same customer also emailed me directly, trying for a better price, so my agent was not unhappy with me but with this customer. (I told the agent about them contacting me)

Ultimately it comes down to fit or comfort. Yes, I could have just sucked it up and done the show just for the money, but that's not what I am about.

I have bills to pay too, but I also have to look at myself in the mirror. If I feel people are being disrespectful to me or my art, I will pass.

If you guys want to be a babysitter, knock yourselves out.

I guess what I have really learned here is to keep my questions to myself.
Message: Posted by: Donald Dunphy (Nov 26, 2009 06:51PM)
[quote]
On 2009-11-26 01:19, Jeff Haas wrote:

They probably would have taken anyone who would have agreed to do the show as long as it fit into their budget. [/quote]

Right. Good point.

- Donald
Message: Posted by: TonyB2009 (Nov 26, 2009 09:20PM)
I will take any gig. Just because the booker is not specific about what they want doesn't show disrespect for what you do. Also, I am not worried about whether an adult is in the room or not (aside from the obvious safety of the kids aspect). I am quite happy to work in a room close to where the adults are, so that they know they can look in on my at any time and check that nothing is going on that should not be going on.

The only time I will turn down work is when someone tries to go behind the bookers back and book me direct for cheaper. That is a disloyalty to the agent, and I always say no - through the agent you contacted orginally, or you don't get me. Apart from that, I say yes to everything - and I mean everything.
Message: Posted by: ERIC (Nov 26, 2009 11:03PM)
[quote]
On 2009-11-26 11:22, ku7uk3 wrote:

Look at it this way, instead of turning the work down because you thought it was a babysitting job, why not charge the client double. If they book you, and you end up babysitting - at least your getting paid handsomely for it. They might be looking for the cheapest, but you've left the option for them, and not just turn them down outright.

[quote]

That is exactly what I would have done and advised. If they still booked, your making out, If not, Oh well.
Message: Posted by: keeblem (Nov 27, 2009 12:53AM)
[quote]
On 2009-11-26 22:20, TonyB2009 wrote:
Just because the booker is not specific about what they want doesn't show disrespect for what you do.[/quote]

Spot on. I think some perfomers take themselves way too seriously.

Mark

[quote]
On 2009-11-26 18:34, Neale Bacon wrote:
but I also have to look at myself in the mirror.
[/quote]

I would have looked at myself in the mirror and said to myself, "Hey Mark, you did a great job!" And felt very proud! :)

[quote]
On 2009-11-26 18:34, Neale Bacon wrote:
I guess what I have really learned here is to keep my questions to myself.
[/quote]

Not at all! It's created a very interesting debate. Everyone has their own ideas and opinions. It's what this forum is for.

Mark
Message: Posted by: Potty the Pirate (Nov 27, 2009 03:24AM)
I think the message is to be a little less sensitive. In my opinion, the client was showing some initiative going through an agent, though of course, he then contacted you directly. Well, that is likely to be a coincidence, as you turned down the gig - so the agent wouldn't likely have mentioned your name. this client was calling around - perhaps someone explained what to expect from a good entertainer, and secured the booking.
I regularly have clients who have no experience with kids' parties. I take the lead in describing what COULD happen. Once a picture of a fab party is planted in their mind, they will then have much higher expectations.
Potty ;)
Message: Posted by: sleight king (Nov 27, 2009 04:21AM)
This is easy, If they meet the fee and you get paid before in cash, take the job.
There is NO room for sentiments as a childrens entertainer, you are there usually just to fill a GAP.
Also a most importantly there are innocent children there who may have that one truly amazing magical moment in their lives. Why not let that be you!

Also, the talk about FIT being wrong. This is crazyness. Things are never that straightforward and if there is the odd 10 year olf in with the 5 year olds it is VERY bad not to do your best to make sure he/she has a great time also.
Message: Posted by: Neale Bacon (Nov 27, 2009 06:15PM)
OK.. let me try to clarify again
1. She called my agent and said she didn't care who she got as long as they worked for her budget
2. She then emailed performers directly trying to undercut the agent
3. I didn't feel it was right.

Sleight King - I am NOT there just to fill a gap. I am a professional entertainer there to do a professional show. I don't want to set the reputation as a performer who will do anything for money.

Potty - yes maybe I am a bit sensetive. When others say "I would have taken it" that's fine. When I get comments about performers taking themselves too seriously or I was stupid to turn it down, I get sensative.

Maybe more children's performers should take themselves and their art seriously.
Message: Posted by: LVMagicAL (Nov 27, 2009 06:31PM)
I most likely would have taken it (through the agent). You never know who you might meet at the event that might be a good connection and/or referral source. Maybe...maybe not. You never know what kind of shows might follow as a result. Perhaps you'd get some additional shows, perhaps not. I've met some great people and some great referral sources at the most unlikely events. I agree with the previous post about not wanting to let the agent down. That'll be a stumbling block down the road (most likely).

I do have the "2 adults must be present during the performance" clause in my performance agreement...for a variety of reasons, and I would have insisted on it at this event too. That might have been a deal killer...but I've seen too many stories/posts where Magi have been accused of inappropriate behavior at shows....I don't want to be one of them. In fact, I now video tape ALL of my performances for personal evaluation purposes as well as for my protection against allegations of inappropriate behavior.

Just my 2 cents worth...
Message: Posted by: Donald Dunphy (Nov 27, 2009 07:07PM)
An old thread:

[url=http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewtopic.php?topic=74050&forum=17]--> Magic Café thread titled... The babysitters club?[/url]

- Donald
Message: Posted by: Neale Bacon (Nov 27, 2009 08:13PM)
For those who worried that I let my agent down - when she found out the client was contacting all the performers directly to undercut the agent she really didn't care.

She told me she was having nothing to do with this woman.
Message: Posted by: seadog93 (Nov 28, 2009 12:12AM)
[quote]
On 2009-11-27 05:21, sleight king wrote:
This is easy, If they meet the fee and you get paid before in cash, take the job.
There is NO room for sentiments as a childrens entertainer, you are there usually just to fill a GAP.
Also a most importantly there are innocent children there who may have that one truly amazing magical moment in their lives. Why not let that be you!

Also, the talk about FIT being wrong. This is crazyness. Things are never that straightforward and if there is the odd 10 year olf in with the 5 year olds it is VERY bad not to do your best to make sure he/she has a great time also.

[/quote]

So your saying that if someone offers you cash you should do what ever they want, because we're ...entertainers? I can think of plenty of other jobs where I can have people tell me what to do and not give myself the option of considering what I want to do.
If you would take the job, right on. If you can't understand not taking the job, I respect that. However, to say that there is only one right answer, and that it comes down to doing anything that the person with money asks you to do, is just sad.

[quote]
Sleight King - I am NOT there just to fill a gap. I am a professional entertainer there to do a professional show. I don't want to set the reputation as a performer who will do anything for money.

[/quote]
Seconded.
I am willing to "fill a gap," in the right circumstances and to give children a wonderful show. I also reserve the right to decline a show.
Message: Posted by: keeblem (Nov 28, 2009 02:34AM)
[quote]
On 2009-11-27 19:15, Neale Bacon wrote:
When I get comments about performers taking themselves too seriously or I was stupid to turn it down, I get sensative.

Maybe more children's performers should take themselves and their art seriously.
[/quote]

I've looked over this entire thread and I can't find anyone calling you stupid. Someone did say "some performers take themselves too seriously".

Oh wait - that was me!

Hey, I didn't mean any offence. I admire anyone who stands by their principles. However my principles would have allowed me to take the money and not worried about being disrespectful to my art. As far as I'm concerned, I wasn't.

Mark

P.S. I take what I do very seriously. But let's not forget what is really important...
Message: Posted by: Potty the Pirate (Nov 28, 2009 12:49PM)
I do feel that this client has only done what one would expect. From the posts I've read of Neal's, I don't believe the client had high expectations. That doesn't make her someone to be avoided - my opinion is that she's just the kind of client you should welcome with open arms!
There's no reason why someone shouldn't contact an agent as well as several performers directly. She's keeping her options open, and you can be sure, will learn a lot about hiring kids entertainers after her experience. My hope is that she did eventually find someone who can go along and knock the kids' socks off.
That said, there's no doubt that there ARE clients who should be avoided. I find that almost every time I have a client who looks for a deal, for a cheaper or shorter show, or who asks me to provide things that I don't normally offer, the event turns out to be difficult.
So there is much merit in the discussion, and my position is that in this case I would most likely have been happy to accept the gig. But I would have asked a lot of questions, and also filled out my booking form, which leads me through all the stuff the client needs to know.
Potty :)
Message: Posted by: seadog93 (Nov 28, 2009 02:06PM)
Potty,
that's a really interesting idea. Could you say something more about your booking form? I've never heard of one, is it standard?
Message: Posted by: Potty the Pirate (Nov 29, 2009 03:10AM)
[quote]
On 2009-11-28 15:06, seadog93 wrote:
Potty,
that's a really interesting idea. Could you say something more about your booking form? I've never heard of one, is it standard?
[/quote]
Well, we must all have some kind of booking form. After my sales pitch (largely a description of the show/party I'm offering), I ask the client if they'd like to go ahead and book the date. If the answer is yes, I take various details, such as contact address/phone no, type of event, number of kids attending, venue, etc. The form I complete includes everything I need to know about the event. As we go through, important matters like the numbers of kids, and adults being present, etc, are covered.
My aim is that after talking to me and booking a show, my clients:
...feel reassured
...understand what to expect and what not to expect for their event
...have a clear idea of the show they will be getting
...understand what is expected of them during the event
...are excited to be having a pirate show - hopefully the kids will watch my internet video clips!
Potty :)
Message: Posted by: chris mcbrien (Nov 29, 2009 09:25AM)
[quote]
On 2009-11-26 19:51, Donald Dunphy wrote:
[quote]
On 2009-11-26 01:19, Jeff Haas wrote:

They probably would have taken anyone who would have agreed to do the show as long as it fit into their budget. [/quote]

Right. Good point.

- Donald
[/quote]

Neale
Be the guy that opens their eyes and blows them away...that's on the "artsy fartsy" side. On the business side, everyone's money is good, go and get it!
Just because they dented your artistic ego, does not mean your business sense should shut down.
Best Regards,
Chris
Message: Posted by: Leland (Nov 30, 2009 07:18AM)
To answer your questions, I would have taken the job just to be sure to give the kids a great show.
In my years of doing this, I have always contacted the parents and explain what I expected of them, have an adult in the same room to keep the kids in line, and it never fails that I will be left alone with the kids.
Same parents just don't get it!
Message: Posted by: Ed_Millis (Nov 30, 2009 09:23AM)
The last time I was in this position, I was booked for a "children's birthday party". The company I worked for went through the standard qualifying format, including "this much space in the home, this much time for set-up", etc.

When I got there, the birthday child was asleep - being only 1 year old!! I was shown to a small corner in the side yard and given five or six kids ages 4-12! While the rest of the party was going on, they were supposed to give me their attention for my full show.

I hated that gig!! Yes, I got paid. No, it wasn't worth it. I know (or learning) how I work best, and if I can't work that way, I won't do it. Not just for the ego sake, but I resent being backed into a corner where I can't give the customer what they wanted. They're not happy with what they've paid for, and I'm not happy until I'm at least six blocks away from them!!

There's a reason to ask qualifying questions - "Do you fit me?" is just as important as "Do I fit you?" My personal opinion - I hope I never get to the place where I will take *anything* just to get the money. May as well be a Wal Mart greeter or grocery bagger, rather than a magician.

Ed
Message: Posted by: seadog93 (Nov 30, 2009 05:20PM)
ED Millis

Great post and great point.
Message: Posted by: mr shiney (Nov 30, 2009 07:12PM)
I guess for me it would depend if I needed the work
because theres no pride for me if the bills are not getting paid!!
my bookings went down so I started 8 year olds parties (normally 4 to 7)
now I can turn them down again.
so if you had no work coming in and had to feed your family Im sure you would be doing the booking
but you are lucky you can pick and choose.
one day I will only done parties for 5 year old girls and calm boys and only 20 guests and no stairs in the venue :sun:
Message: Posted by: keeblem (Dec 1, 2009 12:56AM)
[quote]
On 2009-11-30 10:23, Ed_Millis wrote:

There's a reason to ask qualifying questions - "Do you fit me?" is just as important as "Do I fit you?" My personal opinion - I hope I never get to the place where I will take *anything* just to get the money. May as well be a Wal Mart greeter or grocery bagger, rather than a magician.

[/quote]

I find it fun and challenging to fit in with unusual requirements/set-ups/gigs. (and I've had plenty!) I don't consider it as "doing anything to get the money", more the mark of a professional who has the ability to adapt to any situation.

Mark
Message: Posted by: Neale Bacon (Dec 1, 2009 03:50PM)
[quote]
On 2009-11-30 10:23, Ed_Millis wrote:

There's a reason to ask qualifying questions - "Do you fit me?" is just as important as "Do I fit you?" My personal opinion - I hope I never get to the place where I will take *anything* just to get the money. May as well be a Wal Mart greeter or grocery bagger, rather than a magician.

Ed
[/quote]

Ed,

Thank you! Someone gets what I was saying! I love your post.
Message: Posted by: Ed_Millis (Dec 1, 2009 05:49PM)
Some people thrive on challenge - I need a more predictable structure. If a calm and predictable show isn't your cup o' tea, send it to me or Neale!

Ed
Message: Posted by: bsears (Dec 2, 2009 12:45PM)
Maybe the reason they didn't want you specifically is because they've never seen you work! I would have taken this gig and impressed them to the point that next time they needed an entertainer, it was me they asked for.
Message: Posted by: TheAmbitiousCard (Dec 2, 2009 01:16PM)
Anytime I don't really want the gig I just bid high. If they take it, we're all happy.


p.s. MagicSanta gave me a line I use all the time when there are little kids around with no parental supervision that is quite pointed but also hilarious.
Message: Posted by: scaevola (Dec 2, 2009 05:15PM)
Yeah I agree with Frank. Once I got a request to do a show WAY out of town. I bid very high and told her that the price included my travelling fee. She was like "Great!" Hey, money for me.
Message: Posted by: magicone (Dec 2, 2009 05:28PM)
I had a boss once that said "WWFM" and when I questioned what that was he said... "We Work For Money"

I believe it's personal perspective - I have only 6 gigs this December (so far)... I guess it depends on how hungry (or needy) you are - I find I'm a very high priced baby sitter in some cases but hey....WWFM!

Happy Holidays and may we all get what we need this year.