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Topic: Failed first time out T_T
Message: Posted by: okamis (Jun 25, 2010 05:43AM)
Hi!
My first time out hit giant ego hard, the bigger it they are the harder they fall I guess. So let me start from the beginning

It was at a market I woke up early and got to the market, set up my table, I had a great spot I think, it was not next to all the stalls but inside the market where are the people were, close to all the Café and everything, I had nothing no wall against my back which I heard is a bad thing but I don't think will affect alot. I put up my table and wrote on a paper "Magic show". I wrote "When: A little sooner" as a joke but It got a bad effect as they really thought sooner so I marked it over.

So after sitting a while and catching some courage I went to my table and started shouting magic show, please come here, watch this magic show etc etc. Weird thing was that people got surprise by my shouting and said "wow" took a step back when they went past me, I even tried talking to specific persons, "Come and see this magic show" they chuckled looked down the floor as they shaked their heads finding it a bit hilarious. Swedish people are very shy, that I know but come on. Should I have done a Jimmy thing and put something on the floor and spending 5 minutes talking about it instead? I managed to gather no one and when I watched out it felt quite empty of people, like they had disappeared. After that short shout I didn't dare to do it again, what happened was that some kids got interested and I did some improvised card magic, catching the attention of children I felt like a babysitter. Than a band started playing and from that point I didn't do anything for 6 hours just waiting. In the end I bought a blow whistle which I never got the opportunity to use or more accurate never seized the opportunity.

What I had planned to do was a card show and a generell show which I would switch back and forth but I never managed to get an audience bigger than 5-7 children and they it wasn't exactly fun to show them some effects. With just 5 children should I have started my real show for just them?
If anybode asks, no I never did use any hatlines, not like I didn't dare but more that I didn't get a chance, kids don't pay right?
If you ask me how much I earned it was about 2.5 dollars which a friend gave me


My only question is
Where did I go wrong with the gathering/crowd pulling?!

Ill get my next big chance in the late August, want to be able to have tried it once and know how it feels to decide my future fate in entertaining the streets.
Message: Posted by: Mario Morris (Jun 25, 2010 08:04AM)
Hi There
I would suggest an indoor market might seem to be a safe bet but there are going to be a lot of distractions in any ones mind. They are normally there for a reason i.e. shop.

Find a good pitch in a place without established busking history is an art in its self.
I disagree I don't think you need your back to a wall for a start off, you may have to because a pitch dictates that but it does not have to be so.

A busy place is not nessarly the best place.
If you have not already, I suggest you develop a joy to people watch it is my favorite pass time I can spend hours just watching.
If I am thinking of working an unworked pitch then I will ask.
What are most doing?
Shopping, Lunch breaks, how many shopping bags are folk carrying in every ten folk. Often the best places are the qwiter parts of town, places where people slow down. You will see it in their pace. You will slow down just being there. Now ask what are they doing?
Window shopping, eating ice cream, chilling, people watching, are there less shopping bags than around the corner.

Look out for qwalerty traffic not busy traffic, if you're a street trader you want busy as a street performer that is not neccely the case. Qwalerty is better than qwanterty.

The build will be slower hear, the audience perhaps smaller but your hats will be bigger because the energy will be better.

To develop this you have to go out and slog it as often as you can. You have to develop a thick skin. Shaking heads is all part of it. The most confusing part of a street show can be the crowd build. Folk don't understand what you are trying to do even if you spell it out. Push through and keep on keeping on as often as possible it's the only way.
Mario
Message: Posted by: TheAmbitiousCard (Jun 25, 2010 09:39PM)
A couple things you probably laerned:

Gathering kids to start is a double-edged sword; it's easy do draw kids but once you do.... your show is a kid's show. Not good if you want money or respect from adults.

A lot of people (myself included) hate shouting.
Message: Posted by: gaddy (Jun 26, 2010 12:48AM)
You'll do better next time, for sure. Chalk it up to experience.
Message: Posted by: augiemagic (Jun 26, 2010 01:19AM)
Hey Gaddy, good to see you here!

I was actually going to post a topic similar to this. I went out today (second time out) and... We'll call it a "learning experience" (I've got a lot of those to come, I tell ya).

Over the course of two hours I stopped exactly two people, in a busy area. I think the traffic was mostly commuter traffic, with people in a hurry to get somewhere. Oh well, I got two hours to practice! I might have set a record for number of silk vanishes in a two-hour period...

But then, just getting out there and doing something is helping me get over my "Crowd Shyness" so it's all good.

Frank- you don't like shouting, and you don't seem to like stopping kids. What else would you recommend for stopping people?

So far my biggest success has been rolling a linking ring towards someone, and when they bring it over, trade them for a rope (almost before they know what's happening), ask them to check it out, and jump into Ring on Rope/ Professors Nightmare/ Assorted rope goodness.

I'm trying to work in a Multiple Selection routine to bring the crowd in closer, but as of yet, I haven't had enough of a crowd to try it out.

-Butts McCracken
Message: Posted by: Ojasa (Jun 26, 2010 01:25AM)
Don't be discouraged, building your crowd (i.e. getting the first group stopped)can be the hardest part. I have found that if you approach it a lot like restaurant workers do, and not necessarily ask them if they want to see a magic show, it works very well for me. The classic example is the color changing knife... Hey Sir did you lose a pen knife?? And before they know it they are watching and laughing and your crowd is building.

To be clear I don't ever actually do the Color Changing knives, but I do use the idea.... See what you can come up with on the same lines and we'll compare notes.

Youv'e already done the hardest part. You put yourself out there, and now your trying to learn from the experience. That is invaluable!
Message: Posted by: Michael Baker (Jun 26, 2010 02:39AM)
[quote]
On 2010-06-25 09:04, Mario Morris wrote:
Hi There
I would suggest an indoor market might seem to be a safe bet but there are going to be a lot of distractions in any ones mind. They are normally there for a reason i.e. shop.

Find a good pitch in a place without established busking history is an art in its self.
I disagree I don't think you need your back to a wall for a start off, you may have to because a pitch dictates that but it does not have to be so.

A busy place is not nessarly the best place.
If you have not already, I suggest you develop a joy to people watch it is my favorite pass time I can spend hours just watching.
If I am thinking of working an unworked pitch then I will ask.
What are most doing?
Shopping, Lunch breaks, how many shopping bags are folk carrying in every ten folk. Often the best places are the qwiter parts of town, places where people slow down. You will see it in their pace. You will slow down just being there. Now ask what are they doing?
Window shopping, eating ice cream, chilling, people watching, are there less shopping bags than around the corner.

Look out for qwalerty traffic not busy traffic, if you're a street trader you want busy as a street performer that is not neccely the case. Qwalerty is better than qwanterty.

The build will be slower hear, the audience perhaps smaller but your hats will be bigger because the energy will be better.

To develop this you have to go out and slog it as often as you can. You have to develop a thick skin. Shaking heads is all part of it. The most confusing part of a street show can be the crowd build. Folk don't understand what you are trying to do even if you spell it out. Push through and keep on keeping on as often as possible it's the only way.
Mario
[/quote]

"Qwalerty" advice and I think one of the major keys to unlock the treasure chest. Many will miss it.
Message: Posted by: MagiCol (Jun 26, 2010 05:03AM)
Hi, Okamis and Butts. In New Zealand, we say "Good on you for trying." Fact is, both of you have taken action and got out to perform. Mario's advice about studying what's happening with the people is sound. I do magic and balloons, and for the balloons aspect my major indicator of how well I expect to do for income for a session is to watch the people to notice how many children [they love balloons, want them, and bring the parents over with the money] are around.
Jimmy reckons that when you start out doing Street Magic you're going to suck. Some folk reckon it takes a year or so on the street to really get things right. There's a whole lot of things to find out about and apply. Do we ever stop working and improving getting people to stop, watch, and pay at our Magic Shows?
Bit by bit you'll add to your street skills, so keep on going out and learning.
Message: Posted by: DaiJou (Jun 26, 2010 02:31PM)
I can't brag with my experience, but I stopped people by choosing one or two person from group of people and (depending of his/her age) I either:
a)Challenge him/her, works for teens and young adults
or
b)Ask for "young couple" to come forward, when I point at older people

One or two times these won't work but 8 out of 10 stopped and stayed for the rest of the show.

And don't worry, next time you will get them! Hardest part is already behind :)
Message: Posted by: teachersears (Jun 26, 2010 06:16PM)
I'm a rookie myself. Only out 2 times. Both were to Saturday morning markets. Busy places, but it seemed to me that most there were on a mission and generally couldn't be bothered to stop and watch a show. I'd go back for the practice, but would like to try other places too. Appreciate Mario's advice on looking for the right kind of traffic.
Message: Posted by: augiemagic (Jun 26, 2010 06:31PM)
Just got back from day number 3. Definitely a better experience. Out four hours, made enough money for transportation and a night out, so not too shabby. My best shows were definitely when I worked with/played to the kids, and I was able to keep the adults watching too. I guess I don't look like the type they want to leave their kids alone with...

My biggest problem today was keeping a crowd once I built it a bit. My transitions were pretty bad, and my show structure wasn't the greatest. The Flight of the paper balls, which I was closing with, seemed to be the biggest crowd drawing tool. When I hatted the groups after I did that, most just left, as it was the only trick they had seen, and probably didn't feel they got their money worth. So now, the paper balls will be near the beginning of the show, right after the TT silk and sponges, or possibly after some ropes (which did a decent job of pulling people once I already had a group).

I am removing my card stuff for the time being, as I'm just not ready to play it up big. This was probably where I lost most of my crowds.

Now I just need to find a new closer. Currently, the "Artistic Limitation" I set on myself, is "No cups and balls."

Anyway, I learned a lot today, and heading back out tomorrow for another go at the gauntlet!

-Butts McCracken
Message: Posted by: Bobert (Jun 26, 2010 10:17PM)
Hey Man,
It's good that you got out there and tried. I've been busking in Korea the past few months and it's hard to get decent crowds over here. (It probaby doesn't help that I speak very little korean.) I've had some really hot nights and I've had some pretty bad ones too. Just get back out there and try again. And I agree with Mario people watching is a great hobby to have when your out busking.

Keep on trying man!

-Rob
aka Bobert
Message: Posted by: okamis (Jun 27, 2010 12:30PM)
Know that I think back, I was In an area where people really slowed down, The stalls are next to the place I was, but I was in an open space with benches and an icecream shope and last but not least a Café as mentioned before, many people, mostly elderly, were sitting there and doing nothing. Also a band played there later and they sure did get a great crowd.

Btw Frank, if you are against shouting, how do you gather a crowd, I bought a whistle after the market or the word maybe is fair?

Anyway can I get more concrete exemples how to gather a crowd like Daijou, I did your option B, asked a small group if they wanted to see a show, they laughed, shoke their heads and even looked down the ground while passing by.
Message: Posted by: Arkadia (Jun 27, 2010 03:02PM)
Okamis: What you did was the hardes. Going out again. Good!

Listen to Yoda from Star Wars. He knows what he's talking about. "Do or do not, there is no try"

So, don't ask them if they wanna se a magic show. They don't. Why should they? Do!

Hope to see bump into you on the streets some day!
Message: Posted by: Hawkan (Jun 27, 2010 03:03PM)
Okamis, there are lots of threads about this. And some great books (Jimmy Talksalot, Cellini, Gazzo, Eric Evans) and DVDs (Cellini, Kozmo, Mario Morris) on the subject. If you donīt have the money, look into Jimmy Talksalotīs blog, itīs a goldmine of information.

Do not ask anyone if they want to see something. Do something that is interesting enough to make people stop and watch. It doesnīt have to be magic. You donīt have to shout. You donīt have to say anything.
Keep everything simple.

Good luck!

Håkan

:wavey:
Message: Posted by: Hawkan (Jun 27, 2010 03:17PM)
Okamis, there are lots of threads about this. And some great books (Jimmy Talksalot, Cellini, Gazzo, Eric Evans) and DVDs (Cellini, Kozmo, Mario Morris) on the subject. If you donīt have the money, look into Jimmy Talksalotīs blog, itīs a goldmine of information.

Do not ask anyone if they want to see something. Do something that is interesting enough to make people stop and watch. It doesnīt have to be magic. You donīt have to shout. You donīt have to say anything.
Keep everything simple.

Good luck!

Hawkan

:wavey:
Message: Posted by: TheAmbitiousCard (Jun 28, 2010 01:30AM)
[quote]
Frank- you don't like shouting, and you don't seem to like stopping kids. What else would you recommend for stopping people?

-Butts McCracken
[/quote]

I find it easier to stop a small group of people. 2 or 3 works fine.

If you have the recent magic menu, I have an article in there that describes a technique I use.

I also might do some hat juggling , linking rings moves or whatever. If I do that, sometimes people just come up and sak what I'm doing.
Message: Posted by: okamis (Jun 28, 2010 03:51AM)
[quote]
On 2010-06-27 16:03, Hawkan wrote:
Okamis, there are lots of threads about this. And some great books (Jimmy Talksalot, Cellini, Gazzo, Eric Evans) and DVDs (Cellini, Kozmo, Mario Morris) on the subject. If you donīt have the money, look into Jimmy Talksalotīs blog, itīs a goldmine of information.

Do not ask anyone if they want to see something. Do something that is interesting enough to make people stop and watch. It doesnīt have to be magic. You donīt have to shout. You donīt have to say anything.
Keep everything simple.

Good luck!

Håkan

:wavey:
[/quote]

I appreciate that some are giving their double effort to post here ^^

Anyway My aim here is to succesfully be able to gather a crowd and entertain them and they tipping me, my goal are quite small this summer so I don't feel like putting out money, If I would learn a lot this summer and actually be succesful than maybe next summer I would consider buying those books and dvds to improve myself
Message: Posted by: ray raymond (Jun 28, 2010 09:14AM)
Within any field. people pay for there education whether it be textbooks, tuition, paying a tutor, paying for lessons. If you are not willing to sacrifice something. (time, money, etc.) I wonder how much you really want to learn. People find a way when they have a real desire for what they want.
Message: Posted by: Skip Way (Jun 28, 2010 10:00AM)
Humans are private, yet curious by nature. As noted above, hit them head on and they'll shy away from you nearly every time. But, do something that draws their curiosity and they're far more likely to stop, watch and join in.

I always start with a set that catches the curiosity of one or two...something as simple as the Miser's Dream with my own special touch and draw. For example: I find countless coins that clang away loudly in a stainless steel pot; but, I also find the occasional egg, orange, feather, pickle, banana and so on behind ears, elbows and ankles. People hear the laughter and move in to see what else I'll find. Once you've planted and properly nurtured the seeds, the crowd will begin to grow.

But, as Ray stated, there is a price that we all paid to learn our craft from the masters. It isn't as much to mimic their successes as it is to learn from their mistakes. Why waste time reinventing the wheel?
Message: Posted by: TheAmbitiousCard (Jun 28, 2010 12:23PM)
Until you feel comfortable in your own skin out there it's much harder to gather a crowd. People can see that you're a rookie by just looking at you.

A way to solve this is to just get out there and do what you can. Endure until you're not a rookie anymore.

Find what works for you. Take some chances. Fail and suck until you don't fail and suck anymore.

As long as you've got a good repertoire of tricks at your disposal (or anywhere in your kitchen, for that matter) bring them and use them. They will help see you thru.
Message: Posted by: augiemagic (Jun 28, 2010 12:57PM)
Well crud, Frank. I was hoping for an easy way out... You mean I'll actually have to pay some dues?! ;)

I've been going out and doing a lot of the "Fail and suck" lately, and definitely getting used to it. Gaddy actually gave me some good advice the other day: "You have to, HAVE TO take your ego out of it." Submitting to the fact that I'm gonna look massively bad/uncool for a bit really helped.

Also, I think getting rid of my expectations has helped.

On a side note, I think I've caved on my "No table, No cups" rule. At least until I find something else to close with.

Thanks all!
-Butts
Message: Posted by: Arkadia (Jun 28, 2010 01:20PM)
[quote]
On 2010-06-28 10:14, ray raymond wrote:
Within any field. people pay for there education whether it be textbooks, tuition, paying a tutor, paying for lessons. If you are not willing to sacrifice something. (time, money, etc.) I wonder how much you really want to learn. People find a way when they have a real desire for what they want.
[/quote]

This was a really funny post! Have you read anything on this thread?

Here we have a guy who wants to make it. He goes out there, without a table, not doing cups and wants to learn. He fails, he gets up and tries again. What is that if not sacrifice? You've got to be kidding us!

All he did was using this forum to ask for some advice. I think it is about time that we start to treat people on this forum in a kinder way. People have been saying things like: "Read Kozmo, Gazzo, Moris, Cellini, Talksalot" as if that was some sort of holy bible. It is not! Sometimes it is great to say "read this" sometimes it is just plain stupid. I'm not saying that these books and DVD:s are no good - I like theses sources just like the other guy. What I am saying is that just because someone asks a questions doesn't make him a cheapscate. We should start to treat people with real world experience with some respect. If someone is out there workin', give him some cred!
Message: Posted by: ray raymond (Jun 28, 2010 01:40PM)
I did not intend any thing bad by that. I just simply meant the more you put into something the more you get out of something. A few years ago I was in his shoes doing the same thing. I am still a newbie to this compared with a lot of people. I understand what he is saying. If you want to laugh at me go ahead. However the experiences I have had can not be argued with. I also never called him a cheapskate. I have been poor before and will probably go through some tough times in my life to come. we have all been there.

Why do so many people on here automatically assume the worst of others?
Message: Posted by: Arkadia (Jun 28, 2010 02:07PM)
[quote]
On 2010-06-28 10:14, ray raymond wrote:
I wonder how much you really want to learn. People find a way when they have a real desire for what they want.
[/quote]

This was the reason for my reaction. Perhaps I read more into it than you ment.
Message: Posted by: Hawkan (Jun 28, 2010 02:51PM)
No, the DVDīs and books arenīt the Bible. But they contain knowledge, many years of of hard-earned knowledge. From some top magician buskers. Of course Okamis could get the information in other ways: from talking to you or coming to the street festival in Stockholm in July - watching other buskers and speaking to them. And he knows that.

He could also learn by doing, which is fine. But I am sure he would be a better busker in a shorter time if he also learned from other peoples experiences - be it from a book, dvd or a person. Just like in any school or education. Thatīs what schools and teachers are for, arenīt they?

I can not see how pointing him to the sources I did could be plain stupid. And I have no idea how you made the connection from my advice to say heīs a cheapskate.

Håkan

:wavey:
Message: Posted by: Arkadia (Jun 28, 2010 03:01PM)
Hawkan: You are right. You did not say that, and as far as I can see you didn't mean that either. The above was not directed towards you, but I can see that it is a way to read my post. Sorry about that.

I am sure that you can become succesfull faster by reading. Hey, I am reading everything I can get my hands on. But I know that learning by doing it THE way to do it if you want to find your own way. I was thinking more about the on going discussion about clones.
Message: Posted by: Hawkan (Jun 28, 2010 03:30PM)
Itīs O.K. Arkadia. Maybe we should start writing in Swedish instead...;) There is always the risk of becoming a clone, but he has to learn from somewhere. Itīs almost impossible not to be a clone at some degree, in the beginning. Hopefully itīs just a phase we all go (and must?) through. Every advice you take makes you in some small part a clone. Or? I donīt know anymore, gotta sleep..

Håkan
:wavey:
Message: Posted by: aitchy (Jun 28, 2010 03:50PM)
My grandmother would say

"fail again but fail better"
Message: Posted by: Skip Way (Jun 28, 2010 03:55PM)
[quote]
On 2010-06-28 14:20, Arkadia wrote:
What I am saying is that just because someone asks a questions doesn't make him a cheapscate. We should start to treat people with real world experience with some respect. If someone is out there workin', give him some cred!
[/quote]

It's also true, Arkadia (and this is not directed at you, Okamis), that there are those who come onto the Café and want to be spoon-fed ideas, routines and scripts without any personal effort. We all know them - "I've decided to hit the streets tomorrow...any suggestions on what I should do?" Again - this is not Okamis' situation.

I enjoy sharing and mentoring, but if we all give too freely we're undercutting those who wrote the books we learned from. I don't think Ray was being disrespectful. Fair questions deserve fair, respectful answers. As Hawkan pointed out, one of those answers is where to find the most useful resources.
Message: Posted by: okamis (Jun 28, 2010 05:06PM)
I will tell you guys my reasons again and than put in some arguments about sharing experience. This is only my opinion so don't take it to personally.

Im here to learn how to do a "side walk show", Im not asking you guys to give me a free worthless to pro lessons but something to bite on so I know I can go out there and perform a little at a beginner level. Im just asking for some advice on how to gather a crowd and I got many good tips and I thank you all for that.

Anyway why I don't want to buy a book is because Im a novice, I just want to try out to do a few shows, and if I enjoy it a lot I will BUY a book so I can evolve.

my opinion, a simile:
If I want to try to drive I car I wouldnt BUY a car to try it out and I believe no one else would. But I would on the other hand maybe borrow a car. Hope this make sense.

Also, this is a forum, a place where people discuss and share ideas and experience, I don't think we should hold back our knowledge if they are sincere

Last but not least I want to thank those people here posting those encouraging posts, it really gets my spirit back to where it should be and not on the floor.

So lets steer this topic back.
Message: Posted by: Dave V (Jun 28, 2010 05:19PM)
I think the main point being made is that education costs. Something... It may not be money, it could be time or effort. Spending time on the streets is just as good, or even better, than spending money on books talking about the streets.

Don't quit now just because some feel you should buy this book or that DVD. You've already paid something toward your education by going out there and learning what doesn't work.
Message: Posted by: Pizpor (Jun 28, 2010 05:32PM)
I'd offer this formula; think of your show as a beginning, middle, and an end. In the beginning phase you're trying to get peoples attention. Pick something that is easy to see and maybe a bit odd. It should be 'big' in a manner of speaking - and I mean that in terms of visibilty and your manner. Let them know something amazing is about to happen. The beginning can be a stunt, a gag, or a trick, but whatever it is, you have to engage the audience and make them curious.

The middle is just about anything. Once you've engaged them, interact with them. Play. Let them have fun. Pick things that people will be amused as well as amazed. During the middle is the time that you want to promise them that if they stick around, they will witness something truly amazing. The show should always lead to the ending, and part of your job is to remind that the good stuff is right around the corner.

The ending is the payoff. This is the trick you want to be selling the whole show. So you HAVE to pick a closer. Most people pick cups and balls. I do too for most most of my shows, but if I've got an especially playful audience, I'll do what I call the 'box of doom.' it just depends. But you have to close strong and interactive.

Keep the shows tight. Transitions should flow seemlessly. Learn how to read the energy in the crowd. Engage people without being threatening - most just want to watch and not participate. Respect that.

Most important - learn from every show. The crowd will teach you. Listen to them.

Just keep trying. It will happen.

Just my opinion
Message: Posted by: okamis (Jun 28, 2010 05:57PM)
[quote]
On 2010-06-28 18:19, Dave V wrote:
I think the main point being made is that education costs. Something... It may not be money, it could be time or effort. Spending time on the streets is just as good, or even better, than spending money on books talking about the streets.

Don't quit now just because some feel you should buy this book or that DVD. You've already paid something toward your education by going out there and learning what doesn't work.
[/quote]

OMFG, where did I write quit? you think Im a "*@!'?!$. You really think someone as cool as me will quit ^^. Nah sorry man, magic already flows in my veins.

Also to Pizpor, It reminds me a bit of what Hawkan pm:ed me. Im so going to try it out, but as beginning, should I do something that can be repeated like vanishing a silk and reproduce it multiplied with 10 times or something big like a torn and restored newspaper or rope magic?
Message: Posted by: Pizpor (Jun 28, 2010 07:16PM)
I'd say - Keep it simple.

One of the thing I'll do is this weird levitating apple thing that only lasts about 5 seconds. But that's after about 5 or so minutes of build up. It gets a hugh laugh, creates focus, and helps establish the nature of the show.

If you think T&R will work, just try it. Experiment with stuff (I think it's probably going to prove to be more stuff than you want to haul around).

Vanishing silk is easy, and if done well, a true mystery. But sadly, I think it's done poorly more often than not. You should be able to do it in such a way that people may make comments such as, they've seen it done with a fake thumb, but they have no idea how you just did it.

Again, just me opinion.
Message: Posted by: Kozmo (Jun 28, 2010 07:28PM)
Who ever said this was going to be easy.....get as much info as you can to speed up your curve and go to work.....the hardest thing to do after you fail is to go out and do it again the next day.....PERIOD....go to work....theres no silver bullet

GO TO WORK!
Message: Posted by: ray raymond (Jun 28, 2010 10:53PM)
Resources re important, I also believe experience is one of the best teachers. So good for Okamis for going out and getting some.
Message: Posted by: augiemagic (Jun 29, 2010 01:23AM)
Hey, props to you, Okamis, for going out WITHOUT having read the books. In my mind, that probably leads to a much more organic learning process, and a deeper appreciation for your knowledge.

I, on the other hand, would not have the guts to do it without having read at least a few books on it. I've been "Preparing" for about three months (Buying another book is always an excuse to put off going out and actually DOING SOMETHING for me). I can't honestly say it went much better because of the preparation. Reading can impart knowledge, but it does seem to take getting out there and doing it to actually make sense of said knowledge. Also, actually going out has lit up a fire to be better: my practice sessions and study time are much more productive because of it.

-Butts
Message: Posted by: okamis (Jun 29, 2010 03:07AM)
Who said I have not read anything? I have spent my time reading this forum which is really full of information ^^ :) But even though I read and thought I was prepared, it was quite weird, every bit of knowledge you helps to build this mental wall inside your head that will fool you to believe your show will be succesful. But than you go out and you know its important to "Gather, Keep and get paid" and you are thinking like, its maybe a litttle intimidating to do some hatlines and get paid but you actually fail to Gather a crowd, you didn't even get to second or third base.

Congratulations for you for going out I must say.
Message: Posted by: SilvaAce (Jun 29, 2010 08:25AM)
I think Pizpor's formula is great advice!


Here's mine:
Okamis, maybe you know your stuff and maybe you are prepared, but for some reason people just didn't give a sh*t about watching something cool that day. Maybe none of that had anything to do with you. The world was just rotating a little off that day. Don't let it mess with your mind!
Message: Posted by: Mr. Pitts (Jun 29, 2010 10:30AM)
I work a lot different from most here because my street show has no magic tricks at all, but I will offer this. I don't ask people if they want to see something cool, or anything like that. I start in one of three ways, depending on the circumstances.

Typically, I will get out my concertina and play a little tune, not really trying to engage anyone directly. When someone seems to notice, I catch their eye and ask them if they've ever seen one of these (the concertina) before. Then I start a little conversation (well rehearsed on my end, lots of jokes etc.. get 'em laughing and comfortable). I have some comedy I do with the concertina and it starts to build a little, growing from a conversation to a routine. Then, after the crowd has grown a bit, I ask them if they'd like to see my little show. I tell them it's real short, only a few minutes, but very funny. Generally I get a few nods and I start. If they shake their heads and walk I say thanks, I introduce myself with a handshake to the first person I stopped, say it was nice meeting you have a nice day.

The second method is to directly engage a kid WHO IS WITH A PARENT. I say "don't tell me, let me guess"... and I guess their name or age. I guess funny names, this gets 'em laughing and comfortable, then I ask them and their parents if they'd like to meet one of my puppets. I get one out and we start. This usually works ok too.

The third method is my fall-back, nothing else is working to stop them method. I get out Henry, my vent figure, and have him start asking questions of people walking by. He flirts, he picks on people, he attracts attention, he gets them laughing. Then, once he has them engaged, I ask them if they want to see a short show and we start. The reason I don't do it this way every time is that Henry is my closer, so I actually have to put him up to start the show and get him out later. It's awkward, but it works ok. I could just keep him out and do a trickle show, which is what works sometimes, but a show with three parts and a strong closer gets more applause and $.

All three methods depend on engaging one passerby (although they may be with a small group, I focus on one), not getting ANY kind of commitment until I am already entertaining them, and making them comfortable enough to stick around a few minutes. I always let them make these 'choices' but if I do it right, it's like forcing a card. They make the choice to stay and watch.
Message: Posted by: augiemagic (Jun 30, 2010 12:40AM)
Okamis, thanks you for the congratulations, and I return them to you! Also, I didn't mean to be insulting and say that you haven't read anything. I think that maybe came out wrong. My apologies.

SilvaAce- Yeah, I found that out last Friday. My Saturday was much better.

Mr. Pitts- Thanks for the info! I'm sure everyone who will be able to use and adapt that information.

-Butts
Message: Posted by: augiemagic (Jun 30, 2010 12:47AM)
Okamis, thanks you for the congratulations, and I return them to you! Also, I didn't mean to be insulting and say that you haven't read anything. I think that maybe came out wrong. My apologies.

SilvaAce- Yeah, I found that out last Friday. My Saturday was much better.

Mr. Pitts- Thanks for the info! I'm sure everyone who needs to will be able to use and adapt that information.

-Butts
Message: Posted by: okamis (Jun 30, 2010 03:36AM)
No, it was a joke that I got a little mad ^^
Why is everyone so stiff apologizing right to left?

Thx Mr Pitts, I definitely think I can use some of your tips to engage people
Message: Posted by: augiemagic (Jun 30, 2010 09:35AM)
Eh, probably because there are quite a few on the Café who are easily offended, and you never know who it might be.

Sorry I said sorry. ;)

-Butts