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Topic: Where could I find one of these?
Message: Posted by: Samuel Catoe (Jul 9, 2003 02:54PM)
I would like to find a silk that says "Gone Fishing". Any idea where I could find one? I have had no luck.

Samuel
Message: Posted by: Magicrma (Jul 9, 2003 05:23PM)
Check the "special printed silks" posting by Jay.
There is a lot of that info there.

MagicRMA
:fyi:
Message: Posted by: Bob Sanders (Jul 22, 2004 06:00PM)
Thanks to the trusty Sharpie pens, text is not difficult to put onto a solid color silk.

I never could find one that simply said "Congratulations!" or "Done!"

Bob Sanders
Magic By Sander
Message: Posted by: Regan (Jul 22, 2004 06:24PM)
I don't know where to find a "Gone Fishing" silk, but Bob is correct. Sharpies work great. I have used black and red Sharpies to mark on silks. They come in a large assortment of colors now. I have even "touched up" some of my printed silks with the black color to perfect the outlines or details, and it blends in so well with the original prints it is virtually indistinguishable.

Good luck,

Regan
Message: Posted by: hugmagic (Jul 22, 2004 10:29PM)
The Sharpie idea is good. If that doesn't work give me a shout and I'll quote you a price based on the size silk you want. Look at my website for other silks I have painted.
Message: Posted by: Bob Sanders (Jul 23, 2004 02:13PM)
I surely am glad Richard hasn't seen my artwork. He would still be laughing. That's why I limit myself to TEXT.

He would really like my "Phuled Ewe Awl" and the "Phuled Ewe Awl Agenn!" silks! It works fine in Alabama because I have to read it to them anyway. (It's not even embarrassing when it's upside down.)

Bob
Bubba Whodini
Support Mules for Magic!


Bob Sanders
Magic By Sander
Message: Posted by: Alym Amlani (Jul 23, 2004 07:42PM)
ROFL!!! Bob you crack me up.
Message: Posted by: MrMagic1 (Dec 18, 2004 08:33PM)
If I need writing on a silk,
I'll just use a Sharpie. :firedevil:
Message: Posted by: eb02 (Dec 21, 2004 08:47AM)
Use your computer and prepare the words you need, cut them and use the shape, put it on a silk (any color) and spray with any sprayer.
On the other hand you can go to a store that print on T-shirts and ask them to print you on a silk.
Message: Posted by: ChrisG (Dec 21, 2004 07:06PM)
If you use butcher paper with the wax finish you can iron your silk to the paper cut to 8.5" x 11" and run it through your printer.
That's what my wifes sewing group does.
ChrisG
Message: Posted by: Bob Sanders (Dec 21, 2004 10:33PM)
[quote]
On 2004-12-21 09:47, eb02 wrote:
Use your computer and prepare the words you need, cut them and use the shape, put it on a silk (any color) and spray with any sprayer.
On the other hand you can go to a store that print on T-shirts and ask them to print you on a silk.
[/quote]

Regular silk screening processing, paints, and iron-on text leave silks feeling more like rubber floor mats than magicians' silks. Many ink type paints and stains "run" and "bleed" on real silk. Some simply don't stick or dry evenly.

Test! Test! Test!

Even try using an airbrush with stencil.

For a single silk, Sharpie pens are still hard to beat. But even Sharpie Pens make a good silk stiff. In the 70s I used a staining wax crayon method. I wish I could say it is the solution. Wrong! But it does work well for greens and yellows. I used it for years but I still don't recommend it. It actually worked better on Rayon than silk. (That means Robbins blends.) The crayon method was not as bad as most sprays on silk in terms of "texture" problems. They no longer move like silks.

There is a good reason why quality work costs money. Long runs must be justified to spread the setup costs. Frankly, the market is usually just not there.

Bob Sanders
Magic By Sander
Message: Posted by: Rice (Dec 22, 2004 09:19AM)
Bob is right as usual! TEST! TEST! TEST! I have had many customers ask about designing their own patterns/messages on silks. I am happy to send an irregular solid silk to those interested in testing their idea for a nominal fee. PM me re: colors/sizes of interest. Of course, you have to keep in mind that you are "testing" on a high quality silk that may not (probably won't) produce the same results on a lower quality silk. However, it is often useful to do some practicing before trying on the final product.

Ruth
Silk King Studios
info@silkkingmagic.com
Message: Posted by: hugmagic (Dec 22, 2004 08:36PM)
Even testing does always give consitent results. I have been handpainting and stencils silks for several years and now I have had a few problems that I have had to redo the processes.

I just did a job for a guy for a custom 4 color 36" silk. I only charged him $125. After ruining 4 silks, I got one that I felt was suitable. He did not so I am stuck with a silk. The minor imperfections in handpainting are acceptable on stage as no one looks that closely. Rice's silks are exquisite but the detail is often lost on the general public.

I figure if this fellow wanted spend over $1000 to set up the screen and another $1000 or so to make the silk, it would be perfect.

Back to testing, silk dyes are the only way to go for painting silk. They leave the silk feeling like silk not an iron on tranfer. Another problem with silk is that the normal colors used for dyeing do not dye the same shades or colors on silk. Black is one of the hardest colors to do.