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Topic: Name two books you want to read but haven't gotten to or finished yet.
Message: Posted by: panlives (Mar 10, 2011 07:43AM)
Here is Cliff Pickover’ s reply:

“I first began reading the works of Marcel Proust for background material for my book Sex, Drugs, Einstein, and Elves (Smart Publications, 2005). Proust asserted that great works of art, and significant books, have little to do with their subject matter but more to do with the treatment of that matter. He thought everything was a fertile subject for books. He peered into all aspects of mind, the fringes of reality, the beauty of nature, and the quirks of pop culture of his time.

I would also like to read more of German Jewish philosopher Walter Benjamin (1892-1940), who was similar to Proust in some ways. His mind seems as if it were about to explode as he pondered all aspects of life simultaneously: urban exploration, street signs, prostitution, apartment interiors, psychoanalysis, catacombs, boredom, shopping malls, Walt Disney, railway stations, Baudelaire's poetry, strange realities and language. Benjamin assisted in the translation of Proust's In Search of Lost Time so that it could reach a broader audience and then spent 13 years taking notes for the "Arcades Project," 1,200 pages of insight that he called "an experiment in the technique of awakening."

Sometimes I imagine myself stuck in a room with Proust's volumes at one end and the Arcades Project at the other. Perhaps I could be happy for the rest of my life in this self-imposed exile. For Benjamin, the enclosed shopping malls of the 19th century were a material replica of a human collective unconscious. Contemplated along with Proust's novels of involuntary memory, we'd enter wonderful realms of thought and imagination.”

Yours?
Message: Posted by: landmark (Mar 10, 2011 08:11AM)
War and Peace. Started many times, never got very far. Maybe someone can recommend a good translation?
My son is reading Chronicle of a Death Foretold in Spanish so I'm jealous. My Spanish is nowhere near good as his.

I'm in the middle of reading a bunch of books now, but I'm not sure that's what you were looking for.
Message: Posted by: muse (Mar 10, 2011 08:37AM)
'The Spy Who Came In from the Cold' John le Carre
'Flaubert's Parrot' Julian Barnes
Message: Posted by: MickeyPainless (Mar 10, 2011 09:28AM)
Erdnase and anything by Marlo!
Message: Posted by: critter (Mar 10, 2011 10:05AM)
I'd like to read some of Ragnar's stuff:
http://www.paladin-press.com/category/s?keyword=ragnar+benson
I think the first one I'd like to read is "Eating Cheap."

Eventually I'd like to finish "Abe Lincoln, Vampire Hunter." I got halfway through over summer break but never had time to finish it.

There are tons more. How can it be limited to just two?
Message: Posted by: George Ledo (Mar 10, 2011 12:01PM)
Nothing so heavy. :)

Churchill's biography and FDR's biography. Just one of each would do it for me.
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Mar 10, 2011 12:10PM)
I bought Ullyses last summer, but I just can't seem to get started.

I also just kind of lost my way through Little Dorrit and have never gone back. But I feel guilty about not going back.
Message: Posted by: seadog93 (Mar 10, 2011 12:10PM)
Korzybski's "Science and Sanity: An Introduction to Non-Aristotelian Systems and General Semantics"

Rosenberg's "Nonviolent communication"

There are SO MANY books that I would love to have read, but I either don't want to actually read them, or I do but there are too many books on higher priority.
Message: Posted by: Magnus Eisengrim (Mar 10, 2011 12:12PM)
[quote]
On 2011-03-10 13:10, stoneunhinged wrote:
I bought Ullyses last summer, but I just can't seem to get started.

I also just kind of lost my way through Little Dorrit and have never gone back. But I feel guilty about not going back.
[/quote]

I've read Ulysses a couple of times and very much enjoyed it. Finnegan's Wake completely defeated me. Don't know if I'll try again.

John
Message: Posted by: HerbLarry (Mar 10, 2011 12:19PM)
Hobbit
Greater Magic
Message: Posted by: gaddy (Mar 10, 2011 12:47PM)
"Poker Without Cards" by Ben Mack. I got about 3/4 through this and lost the book...

"The Voynich Manuscript" but only in a really nice edition that does justice to the original document...
Message: Posted by: panlives (Mar 10, 2011 01:14PM)
[quote]
On 2011-03-10 11:05, critter wrote:
I'd like to read some of Ragnar's stuff:
http://www.paladin-press.com/category/s?keyword=ragnar+benson
I think the first one I'd like to read is "Eating Cheap."

Eventually I'd like to finish "Abe Lincoln, Vampire Hunter." I got halfway through over summer break but never had time to finish it.

There are tons more. How can it be limited to just two?
[/quote]

I posed the question asking for two titles because originally, I was going to ask which book do you want to read but haven't yet; and which book do you want to read but suspect you will never actually read or finish...
Message: Posted by: critter (Mar 10, 2011 01:25PM)
No, it's cool. I understand. Just hard to pick two out of my huge list of books I wanna' read.
Message: Posted by: Magnus Eisengrim (Mar 10, 2011 01:52PM)
I read a lot, and I know I will not live long enough to finish all the books I want to read.

John
Message: Posted by: landmark (Mar 10, 2011 02:28PM)
[quote]
On 2011-03-10 13:10, seadog93 wrote:
Korzybski's "Science and Sanity: An Introduction to Non-Aristotelian Systems and General Semantics"

Rosenberg's "Nonviolent communication"

There are SO MANY books that I would love to have read, but I either don't want to actually read them, or I do but there are too many books on higher priority.
[/quote]
Can you tell me more about the Rosenberg book? It sound interesting.
Thanks
Message: Posted by: panlives (Mar 11, 2011 09:09AM)
From amazon:

"Product Description
Do you hunger for skills to improve the quality of your relationships, to deepen your sense of personal empowerment or to simply communicate more effectively? Unfortunately, for centuries our culture has taught us to think and speak in ways that can actually perpetuate conflict, internal pain and even violence. Nonviolent Communication partners practical skills with a powerful consciousness and vocabulary to help you get what you want peacefully.
In this internationally acclaimed text, Marshall Rosenberg offers insightful stories, anecdotes, practical exercises and role-plays that will dramatically change your approach to communication for the better. Discover how the language you use can strengthen your relationships, build trust, prevent conflicts and heal pain. Revolutionary, yet simple, NVC offers you the most effective tools to reduce violence and create peace in your life – one interaction at a time.

Over 150,000 copies sold and now available in 20 languages around the world. More than 250,000 people each year from all walks of life are learning these life-changing skills."
Message: Posted by: seadog93 (Mar 11, 2011 10:01AM)
Well, that pretty much sums it up. I believe that it's influenced quite a bit by Carl Rogers work, such as unconditional positive regard, and even by Korzybski's work, such as avoiding the "is of identity."