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Topic: Mom sends autistic boy's advanced theories to physicists and gets the shock of her life
Message: Posted by: panlives (Mar 29, 2011 12:19PM)
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1369595/Jacob-Barnett-12-higher-IQ-Einstein-develops-theory-relativity.html
Message: Posted by: R.S. (Mar 29, 2011 05:13PM)
Yeah? Well, I can drive a car and buy liquor. Let's see boy wonder try that - ha!

Ron
:)
Message: Posted by: The Burnaby Kid (Mar 29, 2011 05:22PM)
I was told there wasn't going to be any math.
Message: Posted by: randirain (Mar 29, 2011 05:27PM)
I wish I was autistic.
:loss:

Randi
Message: Posted by: critter (Mar 29, 2011 05:40PM)
He isn't autistic, per se. He has Asperger's syndrome, which may be [i]related to[/i] autism. The link was inconclusive last I checked.
"Sufferers from the syndrome are like autistic individuals in that they show the same kind of impairments from early childhood; yet they are unlike them in being far more verbally articulate and socially adapt. They can be highly intelligent and reminiscent of eccentrics with their unusual interests, special skills, and unworldliness." (Uta Frith, et al, 1991)
That paper came the year before this book:
http://www.amazon.com/Autism-Asperger-Syndrome-Uta-Frith/dp/052138608X
Which is dry and hard to read if you like that sort of thing :)

Pay attention to the "can be" in the above quote. They aren't always more intelligent. It is even possible to have both Asperger's (or autism)and mental retardation comorbidly.
Message: Posted by: Chessmann (Mar 29, 2011 06:30PM)
WOW! That's pretty heady stuff for a 12 year old!

I hope he is able to balance all this with the other aspects of growing up and live a well-balanced life.
Message: Posted by: balducci (Mar 29, 2011 06:51PM)
Two more detailed articles:

http://yourlife.usatoday.com/health/medical/conditions/story/2011/03/12-year-old-whiz-has-sights-set-on-stars/45083348/1

http://www.indystar.com/article/20110320/LOCAL01/103200369/Genius-work-12-year-old-studying-IUPUI
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Mar 29, 2011 07:36PM)
Asperger is not classic autism, but it is an Autism Spectrum Disorder.
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Mar 29, 2011 07:44PM)
I didn't realize Einstein's IQ was so low.
Message: Posted by: critter (Mar 29, 2011 07:52PM)
[quote]
On 2011-03-29 20:36, LobowolfXXX wrote:
Asperger is not classic autism, but it is an Autism Spectrum Disorder.
[/quote]

That classification is based solely on similarities in symptoms though, not necessarily a common cause. Though they could have a common cause. We don't know. That's why I say it's not autism "per se."
The "per se" means that it is, but it isn't. So, it's classified the same, but it's not the exact same disease. It is kind of a version of autism, but it isn't autism. Not exactly. More or less. And so forth.
I think it could be related in terms of causation, but we have no idea. I just want that to be clear.
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Mar 29, 2011 08:04PM)
Most laypeople don't know that "autism" is ambiguous; it refers to both a specific disorder ("classical" autism), and a spectrum encompassing a range of disorders. Asperger Syndrome is embraced by one of the definitions of autism, but not the other.
Message: Posted by: critter (Mar 29, 2011 08:13PM)
Yeah, I was trying to clarify the difference but I guess I didn't do too good a job.
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Mar 29, 2011 08:22PM)
You got the important thing...there's not a lot we know about it. Which really sucks, given how common it is.
Message: Posted by: critter (Mar 29, 2011 08:28PM)
I think my daughter might have Asperger's. Then again, she might just be two. The symptoms are similar.
Message: Posted by: tommy (Mar 29, 2011 08:30PM)
Wonderful not that understand the theory.

Some one in the comments asked an interesting question:

“Why is it, like John Nash of Princeton University who in 1994 won the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics, and portrayed in the Hollywood movie, A Beautiful Mind, feel compelled to scribble mathmatical calculations on windows. In the article of which I took note it shows Jake doing the same as John Nash supposedly had done while a professor at Princeton. I find this attribute curious, is there any explanation?”

I wonder if it would help us be more creative writing on widows or glass because one see the world through it.
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (Mar 29, 2011 08:32PM)
It pretty much comes down to whether he can express his insight in the formal language of mathematics or using the current model in physics to make novel predictions or offer a more elegant model. Time will tell on that.
Message: Posted by: magicfish (Mar 29, 2011 10:07PM)
I tried to read your post but it was just some yellow lettering with many slashes and dots. What is the topic?
Message: Posted by: abc (Mar 29, 2011 10:37PM)
Tommy,
The main reason is that it is easy to erase.
I also do it and I am no genius. Heck, I hang out at the magic Café.
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Mar 29, 2011 11:06PM)
Well, yeah...you ain't no laypeople.
Message: Posted by: balducci (Mar 29, 2011 11:15PM)
[quote]
On 2011-03-29 21:30, tommy wrote:
Wonderful not that understand the theory.

Some one in the comments asked an interesting question:

“Why is it, like John Nash of Princeton University who in 1994 won the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics, and portrayed in the Hollywood movie, A Beautiful Mind, feel compelled to scribble mathmatical calculations on windows. In the article of which I took note it shows Jake doing the same as John Nash supposedly had done while a professor at Princeton. I find this attribute curious, is there any explanation?”
[/quote]
Maybe the kid watched the movie?
Message: Posted by: ed rhodes (Mar 30, 2011 05:33AM)
[quote]
On 2011-03-29 18:27, randirain wrote:
I wish I was autistic.
:loss:

Randi
[/quote]

My son is autistic, my daughter has Asperger's (sp?) My other daughter MAY have Asperger's, but it wasn't readily understood when she was going to school, she had to deal with it herself. My last son has ADHD and Terrett's Syndrome.

Sometimes I don't think I should have bred.
Message: Posted by: critter (Mar 30, 2011 10:15AM)
Yeah you spelled it right.
Didn't facebook guy write his formula on a window too?
Beautiful Mind was not a very accurate representation of schizophrenia. They had to Hollywood it up quite a bit.
Message: Posted by: ed rhodes (Mar 30, 2011 01:51PM)
I knew nothing about the character or the story when I first saw the trailer. I thought it was actually about a scientist who got involved with spies!
Message: Posted by: Pakar Ilusi (Mar 31, 2011 12:29AM)
[quote]
On 2011-03-29 18:13, R.S. wrote:
Yeah? Well, I can drive a car and buy liquor. Let's see boy wonder try that - ha!

Ron
:)
[/quote]

Drive a car and buy liquor? At the same time? ;)
Message: Posted by: Carrie Sue (Mar 31, 2011 08:52AM)
Jacob was on Glenn Beck's show last night. A fascinating and wonderful young man!

Carrie
Message: Posted by: critter (Mar 31, 2011 10:05AM)
[quote]
On 2011-03-31 01:29, Pakar Ilusi wrote:
[quote]
On 2011-03-29 18:13, R.S. wrote:
Yeah? Well, I can drive a car and buy liquor. Let's see boy wonder try that - ha!

Ron
:)
[/quote]

Drive a car and buy liquor? At the same time? ;)
[/quote]

You have to in Texas. It's state law. Better be shooting a gun at the same time or I'm turning him in for the reward.
Message: Posted by: ed rhodes (Mar 31, 2011 09:42PM)
[quote]
On 2011-03-31 01:29, Pakar Ilusi wrote:
[quote]
On 2011-03-29 18:13, R.S. wrote:
Yeah? Well, I can drive a car and buy liquor. Let's see boy wonder try that - ha!

Ron
:)


Drive a car and buy liquor? At the same time? ;)


[/quote]

We used to have a liquor store in Middletown where you could drive through, buy a six pack (or a pint) and then drive home. So, yeah.
Message: Posted by: gdw (Apr 1, 2011 07:45AM)
I am very curious to see what comes from his attempt to disprove big bang theory. Should be very interesting and fascinating. If he comes up with a new model as well, I am quite excited.
Message: Posted by: panlives (Apr 1, 2011 08:02AM)
All of this in a 12 year old brain…does it ever feel as if the Universe is using hominid wetware as an operating system to figure itself out?
Message: Posted by: critter (Apr 1, 2011 10:44AM)
[quote]
On 2011-04-01 09:02, panlives wrote:
All of this in a 12 year old brain…does it ever feel as if the Universe is using hominid wetware as an operating system to figure itself out?
[/quote]

The best laid plans of mice.
Message: Posted by: ed rhodes (Apr 2, 2011 04:31AM)
ARTHUR: "...and men."

MICE: "What?"

ARTHUR: "The best laid plans of mice and men."

MICE: "What have 'men' got to do with it?"

It's very weird in my head sometimes.
Message: Posted by: irossall (Apr 2, 2011 11:59AM)
[quote]
On 2011-03-31 22:42, ed rhodes wrote:
[quote]
On 2011-03-31 01:29, Pakar Ilusi wrote:
[quote]
On 2011-03-29 18:13, R.S. wrote:
Yeah? Well, I can drive a car and buy liquor. Let's see boy wonder try that - ha!

Ron
:)


Drive a car and buy liquor? At the same time? ;)


[/quote]

We used to have a liquor store in Middletown where you could drive through, buy a six pack (or a pint) and then drive home. So, yeah.
[/quote]

In the 70,s you could buy a very large beer on tap to take back to your car at the La Mirada Drive-In Movie Theatre in southern California.

Back on topic.
Watching this video made me feel very stuuuuupid. Forget the Formula's or Math, I would just like to know what this is saying and how it relates to the real physical World.

I think they should introduce this kid to Steven Hawking and leave them alone for awhile and see what develops.
Iven :patty:
Message: Posted by: critter (Apr 2, 2011 12:03PM)
[quote]
On 2011-04-02 05:31, ed rhodes wrote:
ARTHUR: "...and men."

MICE: "What?"

ARTHUR: "The best laid plans of mice and men."

MICE: "What have 'men' got to do with it?"

It's very weird in my head sometimes.
[/quote]

I sympathize :)
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (Apr 2, 2011 04:50PM)
Let him be a kid - physics will be there whenever he feels like exploring it - and hopefully with enough life and academic experience to communicate insights in ways that he can use rather than being used as a "stupid pet trick" by family and media.
Message: Posted by: gdw (Apr 2, 2011 10:24PM)
[quote]
On 2011-04-02 17:50, Jonathan Townsend wrote:
[quote]
On 2011-04-02 16:59, kcg5 wrote:
I think they should let him BE A KID.
[/quote]

Agreed- physics will be there whenever he feels like exploring it - and hopefully with enough life and academic experience to communicate insights in ways that he can use rather than being used as a "stupid pet trick" by family and media.
[/quote]

Excuse me? Physics IS what the kid wants to do. He's not been pushed into it by anyone. He stays up at night working on formulas when he can't sleep. For him, this IS being a kid.
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (Apr 2, 2011 10:31PM)
[quote]
On 2011-04-02 23:24, gdw wrote:
Excuse me? Physics IS what the kid wants to do....
[/quote]

Let's see if he gets through Sears Zemansky and Young before worrying about it.
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Apr 4, 2011 01:24PM)
[quote]
On 2011-04-02 23:24, gdw wrote:
Physics IS what the kid wants to do. For him, this IS being a kid.
[/quote]

:applause:
Message: Posted by: landmark (Apr 4, 2011 01:35PM)
[quote]
On 2011-04-02 23:31, Jonathan Townsend wrote:
[quote]
On 2011-04-02 23:24, gdw wrote:
Excuse me? Physics IS what the kid wants to do....
[/quote]

Let's see if he gets through Sears Zemansky and Young before worrying about it.
[/quote]
Whoa, nostalgia whiplash!
Though I don't remember the Young. But then I still think it's Crosby, Stills, and Nash. :)
Message: Posted by: balducci (May 24, 2015 09:38AM)
[quote]On Mar 29, 2011, panlives wrote:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1369595/Jacob-Barnett-12-higher-IQ-Einstein-develops-theory-relativity.html [/quote]
An update:

http://www.jacobbarnett.com/jacob-barnett.html

http://www.ctvnews.ca/sci-tech/15-year-old-jacob-barnett-one-of-the-world-s-most-promising-physicists-1.1479602
Message: Posted by: TonyB2009 (May 24, 2015 11:41AM)
My brother had similar abilities at a similar age; massive mathematical ability years beyond his years, and an eidetic memory. In high school his teacher organised for him to tutor college students (including myself) to keep his mind engaged. IQ in the high 160s, best result in the country in the final state exams.

He is now a professor of maths in Notre Dame.

I know everyone is different, but my brother had great difficulty dealing with normal people, and was moody and odd. He matured into a wonderful, rounded and generous person with a huge circle of genuine friends, one of the nicest guys I know. And he is still super bright, though the eidetic memory is no more.

As for the comments that he should be allowed grow up, and the physics can wait - completely wrong. Mathematicians and physicists, like sprinters, peak in their early twenties. My brother lost two years through stupidity (he joined a religious commune) and to this day regrets it. He didn't begin undergraduate work until he was 19, and he should have had his degree finished by that stage. People with extraordinary abilities are generally best going with those abilities.
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (May 24, 2015 09:54PM)
[quote]On May 24, 2015, TonyB2009 wrote:" comments that he should be allowed..." ... [/quote]

... to follow his interests - without outside expectations or the strange interference of media celebrity - and see if he does do things which elicit the cooperation of the big name folks in physics who do fret over those problems - like Hawking, Wheeler, Kaku...
Message: Posted by: Magnus Eisengrim (May 24, 2015 10:17PM)
[quote]On May 24, 2015, Jonathan Townsend wrote:
[quote]On May 24, 2015, TonyB2009 wrote:" comments that he should be allowed..." ... [/quote]

... to follow his interests - without outside expectations or the strange interference of media celebrity - and see if he does do things which elicit the cooperation of the big name folks in physics who do fret over those problems - like Hawking, Wheeler, Kaku... [/quote]


How do children get interests without the influence of others? I spent my childhood fishing.

In the end, prodigies often do not end up being giants in their fields.
Message: Posted by: ed rhodes (Jun 1, 2015 08:09AM)
Sorry, I already posted this, so I'm erasing it. :mad: