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Topic: Chasing lights
Message: Posted by: hocuspocusjay23 (Apr 11, 2011 05:32PM)
Hello, I have a portal that was built by Chalet magic, it has lightbulbs all around it that chase. Does anyone know a source to buy the wiring for this type of light effect.

Thanks so much
Message: Posted by: makeupguy (Apr 11, 2011 06:43PM)
The answer to that question has changed recently.

I would probably go to a store that sells xmas gear.. and just buy the new LED lights... many of them have a tiny little box with SEVERAL patterns... one of them is Chase... sometimes you can even adjust the rate!!

It would surprise me if you couldn't cut the box out and use it for any light that operated on 110 V, though you'd have to be willing to burn one out first to find out.
Message: Posted by: hocuspocusjay23 (Apr 11, 2011 07:06PM)
Would the LED lights be bright enought to do on a stage outside? There is a roof over the stage that blocks off the sun.
Message: Posted by: hugmagic (Apr 12, 2011 07:07AM)
A guy I used to work with had one similar. We found them in the Home Depot. They were an appliance type bulb. I assume that this has a separate controller for the flashing.

Makeupguy is right on the money with rewiring this. In a couple of years, there will be no replacement bulbs available. There are plenty of the rope chase lights available. As for brightness, you could add extra rows of bulbs and put silver reflective material behind them.

Richard
Message: Posted by: hocuspocusjay23 (Apr 12, 2011 09:49AM)
I will look, thanks for the information. We have a Home Depot not too far from here.
Message: Posted by: Mike Maturen (May 7, 2011 08:28AM)
I am doing a modified version of Andrew Mayne's "Specter Cabinet", which is--in essence--an upright shadow box. I am modifying it to resemble an electrical/nuclear device (yellow/black stripes, etc). I had planned to use strobes to simulate an electrical short (along with a "bzzzt" sound effect)...but I couldn't figure out the best way to wire and control them.

After reading this thread, I am now wondering if this might be my answer.

Thoughts?
Message: Posted by: Ray Pierce (May 7, 2011 11:07AM)
[quote]
On 2011-05-07 09:28, Mike Maturen wrote:
I am doing a modified version of Andrew Mayne's "Specter Cabinet", which is--in essence--an upright shadow box. I am modifying it to resemble an electrical/nuclear device (yellow/black stripes, etc). I had planned to use strobes to simulate an electrical short (along with a "bzzzt" sound effect)...but I couldn't figure out the best way to wire and control them.

After reading this thread, I am now wondering if this might be my answer.

Thoughts?
[/quote]

It is certainly the most efficient way to do it! You can use traditional 6S6 lamps and Leviton sockets with a back that screws on seting the 18ga. zip cord lines in place and wire any chaser to it yourself but there are so many great pre-wired options as suggested above. The ultimate question is... How much light output do you need to stop down the viewer's eye for the BA to be effective? That depends on the surrounding and ambient light levels. In a dark room (if the prop is far enough away) you can use small Christmas lights and be fine. If the prop is closer with higher ambient light levels, you would need a higher output (larger lamps or more smaller lamps). I wanted a maximum of about 600 watts of output to cover any situation so I used 100 6S6 lamps with an inline dimmer so I could set it as bright as I needed for the effect to work. Keep in mind if they are chasing you will lose between 33% and 75% of the full output depending on the number of circuits and chase pattern.
Message: Posted by: Mike Maturen (May 7, 2011 12:30PM)
[quote]
On 2011-05-07 12:07, Ray Pierce wrote:
[quote]
On 2011-05-07 09:28, Mike Maturen wrote:
I am doing a modified version of Andrew Mayne's "Specter Cabinet", which is--in essence--an upright shadow box. I am modifying it to resemble an electrical/nuclear device (yellow/black stripes, etc). I had planned to use strobes to simulate an electrical short (along with a "bzzzt" sound effect)...but I couldn't figure out the best way to wire and control them.

After reading this thread, I am now wondering if this might be my answer.

Thoughts?
[/quote]

It is certainly the most efficient way to do it! You can use traditional 6S6 lamps and Leviton sockets with a back that screws on seting the 18ga. zip cord lines in place and wire any chaser to it yourself but there are so many great pre-wired options as suggested above. The ultimate question is... How much light output do you need to stop down the viewer's eye for the BA to be effective? That depends on the surrounding and ambient light levels. In a dark room (if the prop is far enough away) you can use small Christmas lights and be fine. If the prop is closer with higher ambient light levels, you would need a higher output (larger lamps or more smaller lamps). I wanted a maximum of about 600 watts of output to cover any situation so I used 100 6S6 lamps with an inline dimmer so I could set it as bright as I needed for the effect to work. Keep in mind if they are chasing you will lose between 33% and 75% of the full output depending on the number of circuits and chase pattern.
[/quote]

I am also going to use the traditional light hanging down to help with the dirty work. I just wanted to add the flashes to simulate an electrical short, or lightning...
Message: Posted by: idomagic (May 8, 2011 11:59PM)
http://www.christmaslightsetc.com/p/70-LED-Green-Wide-Angle-Flicker-Free-Style-Light-Set-Green-Wire-Wide-Angle-5MM-LED-Lights--20356--864.htm

This type of light is REALLY bright when it's pointed directly at you, plus it doesn't look like an LED x-max light. They also sell chaser styles like this, it's just what I found on short notice.

For the Mayne illusion, use some good diffraction material for the bright lights, I love the inserts for fluorescent lighting, gels are great and metal screens (window, etc.) work well. There is also an aluminum vent type thing (about 4"x8') that's used for the eves under the gutters, and it's really cool back-lit. There are also clear hollow tubes used to cover fluorescent lights that make nice "light sticks."
Message: Posted by: sleightly (May 9, 2011 12:21AM)
http://www.actionlighting.com/

I've used this supplier for a number of projects. They have the mechanical chase systems as well as rope and LED lighting for special needs...

ajp
Message: Posted by: idomagic (May 9, 2011 11:14AM)
[quote]
On 2011-05-09 01:21, sleightly wrote:
http://www.actionlighting.com/
ajp
[/quote]
Great resource sleightly. Thanks!
Message: Posted by: Mike Maturen (May 9, 2011 12:29PM)
Thanks to everyone for the links and info!