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Topic: Name a children effect that fools adults
Message: Posted by: Jonace (Sep 16, 2011 05:17PM)
I have many effects that gets the adults laughe. But I would like to build a show with only children effects that fools adults.

Name some tricks. :)

The umbrella mystery
Splash bottle gimmick and coke
thumb tip

:)
Message: Posted by: philblackmore (Sep 16, 2011 06:37PM)
I think your question could be "what general or adult magic effects can be performed for children"?

Sponge balls, misers dream, cut and restored rope, chair suspension and handkerchief vanishes are some of the ones I do, but the list is endless.
Message: Posted by: SpellbinderEntertainment (Sep 16, 2011 06:54PM)
I've learned that almost any children's piece can be adapted to adults with success with enough imagination. Not always the other way around. It's a matter of thinking way out of the box, and I actually speak quite a lot about in my book. Thanks, Walt
Message: Posted by: Al Angello (Sep 16, 2011 07:18PM)
My whole show.
Message: Posted by: TonyB2009 (Sep 16, 2011 08:02PM)
I was wondering how to respond, but then Al answered for me.
Message: Posted by: mrpiper (Sep 16, 2011 08:02PM)
Aren't most adults just kids with arthritis and less hair?
Message: Posted by: BIGmagiclV (Sep 16, 2011 08:18PM)
Ketchup bottle and dice box are my 2 biggest adult foolers. Sponge balls, too. ABC stung fools them but they won't admit it.
and my bill at the end of the party really fools them!
Message: Posted by: stevezany (Sep 16, 2011 08:23PM)
I love Daryl's Amazing Acrobatic Knot. Leaves kids and adults stunned.

Video: http://goo.gl/bjFXs
Message: Posted by: Ken Northridge (Sep 16, 2011 10:10PM)
In many ways I think its more difficult to fool children than adults. So, I would ask, ‘what children’s effects fool children?’
Message: Posted by: tgs (Sep 16, 2011 10:31PM)
The only stuff in my show that wouldn't translate pretty much directly to an adult audience is the stuff that requires total audience participation. For example, sucker effects that rely on the audience shouting out the false method, or any routine that's magical or funny because the entire group is getting involved (Capehart's miser's dream is one).
Message: Posted by: Daniel Ulzen (Sep 17, 2011 01:05AM)
Snake Can from David Ginn - even magicians are suprised when the snake jumps out of the can!
Message: Posted by: MichaelCGM (Sep 17, 2011 01:24AM)
Linking Ropes and Comedy Glass in Paper Cone.
Message: Posted by: Potty the Pirate (Sep 17, 2011 01:47AM)
There are so many to choose from - I like to include a few adult-foolers even in my youngest kids shows. My dove pan routine always gets the adults (not the final production, I hasten to add, though it's a good comedy moment). Of course, some adults are smarter than others. I've fooled many adults with the Silver Sceptre, Smokey Mountain Pizza Box, and even Passing Water. I have a large selection of comedy card tricks, most of them for older kids, which always fool the adults (my favourites are Barry Mitchell's Super Sleuth, Wolf's The Flea, and 5 Card Opener. King's Crossing is also very strong.)
The Cellulator (Wolf's Magic) is a real fooler, although I've adapted my prop to facilitate this.
I don't agree that the question "what adult tricks can be performed for children", is the same, as that really is another question entirely.
Frankly, even a change bag handled expertly, will fool almost everyone. I think so much is often in the handling and presentation of effects.
Potty
Message: Posted by: philblackmore (Sep 17, 2011 06:15AM)
Ok, I'm slightly confused. Are we talking about doing children's tricks for adults, doing a show for kids that will also fool the adults there, or what?
Message: Posted by: TedLashley (Sep 17, 2011 04:30PM)
Over my 40-odd years performing shows for both kids-only and family-type audiences, two tricks that I do mostly for kids that ALWAYS get a great reaction from the adults are the Mutilated Parasol (or umbrella trick) and Hippity-Hop Rabbits. Sometimes weeks or months following a show, an adult will come up to me and inquire about the umbrella... and I've also had adults come up after a show and look closely at the two Hippity-Hop Rabbits (I leave them out on my table for anyone who wants to examine them) and rub their fingers over the front and back surfaces, trying to discover some hidden way of changing the colors. Hilarious!

TED
Message: Posted by: mrpiper (Sep 18, 2011 12:08PM)
[quote]
On 2011-09-17 02:05, Daniel Ulzen wrote:
Snake Can from David Ginn - even magicians are suprised when the snake jumps out of the can!
[/quote]

Isn't David Ginn the most creative children's entertainer? I LOVE the teachings of the "snake can" routine. I have also adapted that move to use the snake can in a longer running skit. I own every book he has written and most of his dvd's. When ever I get stuck for an idea, it's "to the library" and David Ginn ususally helps me through it.

I find that every trick that I do, whether it fools anyone or not, is ENTERTAINING for everyone because I make it fun.
Message: Posted by: danfreed (Sep 18, 2011 08:59PM)
Woody Pittman's act is like that, he sort of acts like a kid, and does tricks that are common for kids acts, but he's really clever and funny from what I've see - I've only seen him on Youtube. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JdglWKFVVyA
Message: Posted by: TheAmbitiousCard (Sep 18, 2011 10:43PM)
[quote]
On 2011-09-16 20:18, Al Angello wrote:
My whole show.
[/quote]

I would be embarrassed if my entire show didn't fool adults. I mean really....
Magicians on the magic Café can't fool adults with their kid's act?

If so, have some self-respect and re-think your act.

No excuses. No debate. Just do it.
Message: Posted by: Jonace (Sep 19, 2011 12:55AM)
Frank Starsini: I see what you say, but then again I am not sure if my style is the same as yours :). I use the giant climb in balloon, but I don't do it to fool anyone. Just to make anyone enjoy the show. I still to the coloring book. I love it, but I would never do it in my adult show (actually yes, but that's another story).

Al Angello: thanks for posting, but I did not help :)
philblackmore: The point is to name
Ken Northridge: This is actually a good point.



I use Losanders f loathing table in my children act, not my adult act. Because it will not fit my theme. My point for posting this post is actually to hear what kind of tricks that get an reaction from the adults. So maby I should be more specific.

I do not agree that all children show should fool adult, nor the kids as long as the show are entertaining.

So any thinking of this topic helps :)
Message: Posted by: Potty the Pirate (Sep 19, 2011 02:10AM)
I think it's more important that your kids' show entertains kids, rather than fools adults. It's very difficult to come up with a lot of real adult foolers, for instance, when creating a nursery show for 2 1/2- 4 year-olds. Or for a 3-year old Birthday Party. Sure, some of the show can include amazing jaw-dropping magic - but younger kids also enjoy all the silliness and by-play.
Most of my shows have a relatively small number of "magic moments", compared to heaps and heaps of gags and comedy, songs, and puppets.
I firmly believe that a show for kids should be aimed at the kids, and whilst it's great to include a little something for the adults too, it's quite wrong, I believe, to have too much that goes over the kids' heads. I learnt this many years ago as a pantomime actor. Most big pantos in the UK include masses of double-entendres, and gags that only the adults will "get". But, a panto which is aimed squarely at the kids, where they are able to understand absolutely everything that occurs, is way, way more entertaining for the little ones, and the adults still enjoy all the silliness.
It's for my family shows and parties for older kids that I concentrate on clever magic. Up to the age of about 7, kids are more entertained by comedy than magic.
My opinion.
Message: Posted by: Ken Northridge (Sep 19, 2011 07:03AM)
If you call yourself a magician you [b]must[/b] have [b]some[/b] jaw dropping moments that fool both children [b]and[/b] adults. Having said that, I agree, not all routines have to fool. The entertaining moments, bits of business, etc. set up the dramatic magical moments.

[quote]
On 2011-09-19 01:55, Jonace wrote:
I use Losanders f loathing table in my children act, not my adult act. Because it will not fit my theme.
[/quote]

Could you expand on that? I have not found a way to perform the floating table for children without provoking a ‘let go’ chant from the children. Its like doing the invisible deck for children, they simply don’t appreciate the incredible magic that is happening. Would you share you philosophy on this?
Message: Posted by: Leland (Sep 19, 2011 07:09AM)
I once had a parent approach me after the show and ask me how I did that coloring magic book. I just looked at her and didn’t know what to say.

I guess if you’ve never seen it before, it is magical.
Message: Posted by: Potty the Pirate (Sep 19, 2011 07:43AM)
[quote]
On 2011-09-19 08:03, Ken Northridge wrote:
If you call yourself a magician you [b]must[/b] have [b]some[/b] jaw dropping moments that fool both children [b]and[/b] adults. Having said that, I agree, not all routines have to fool. The entertaining moments, bits of business, etc. set up the dramatic magical moments.
[quote]
On 2011-09-19 01:55, Jonace wrote:
I use Losanders f loathing table in my children act, not my adult act. Because it will not fit my theme.
[/quote]
Could you expand on that? I have not found a way to perform the floating table for children without provoking a ‘let go’ chant from the children. Its like doing the invisible deck for children, they simply don’t appreciate the incredible magic that is happening. Would you share you philosophy on this?
[/quote]
Jolly Roger has a nice bit with the Losander Table, where he does actually let go. I think his presentation is the strongest I've seen.
Message: Posted by: Al Angello (Sep 19, 2011 10:02AM)
Jonace
If my simple answer did not help you then how about:
cut and restore
ultimater card rise
Will Rogers snap knot
laso rope trick
Pizza box
Chicken sword
pull my finger
String theory
Panama rope trick
Ring and rope trick (mine)
Invisible deck (my version)
Acrobatic rope
PN (my version)
I also do four juggling routines
I have others that I mix, and match depending on the size, and age of the audience
Message: Posted by: rsylvester (Sep 19, 2011 10:10AM)
For years, I took the Coloring Book for granted. I finally broke down and bought one. Now, I get as much reaction from the adults as I do from the kids. I have adults say it was among their favorites. We're talking really big reactions. And I do a routine built around the suggestions of my 12yo daughter, who said, "Daddy, I think you ought to do it this way." That said, I think it's the way I use the kids on stage (again my 12yo's idea) that makes it even more fun for the adults, so maybe that's because it's a mixed audience thing. But I've found it works for all ages, and I just can't question it any longer.
Message: Posted by: MoonRazor (Sep 19, 2011 10:28AM)
Coloring book
Message: Posted by: Potty the Pirate (Sep 19, 2011 12:55PM)
[quote]
On 2011-09-19 11:28, MoonRazor wrote:
Coloring book
[/quote]
???
Message: Posted by: mrpiper (Sep 19, 2011 06:48PM)
[quote]
On 2011-09-19 13:55, Potty the Pirate wrote:
[quote]
On 2011-09-19 11:28, MoonRazor wrote:
Coloring book
[/quote]
???
[/quote]
Yep, isn't it amazing after all these years how much fun you can still have, and how many creative routines you can come up with using a simple "Magic Coloring Book!"
Message: Posted by: Leland (Sep 20, 2011 06:30AM)
Yea I know, it's hard to believe but I do get reactions from parents with the coloring book.
Message: Posted by: Potty the Pirate (Sep 20, 2011 10:44AM)
Aaag! Not for me, Ye Olde Coloringe Booke is consigned to the bottom of my magic drawer.
;)
Message: Posted by: TheAmbitiousCard (Sep 20, 2011 05:09PM)
I do a change bag routine. I don't think it fools adults
........ until the very last moment.

Read between the lines for insight on why all your magic should fool everyone.
And if yours doesn't, you have every opportunity, even with the coloring book, to fool not only kids and adults, but other magicians watching the show.

Reading thru the works of Jerry Andrus and Gary Kurtz might give you just the idea with the coloring book needed to pull that off. Not that I think they've published anything on the coloring book, but read enough and it will come to you.
Message: Posted by: knick23 (Sep 21, 2011 04:14PM)
Ahh, crumbs from the masters table. Great stuff.
Message: Posted by: echomagic (Sep 21, 2011 04:50PM)
I have found that most magic geared for age groups old enough to appreciate seeing the impossible will almost always fool adults too. Two typical examples would be: color changing hankerchiefs and the yellow bandana.
Message: Posted by: tboehnlein (Sep 21, 2011 04:55PM)
I was sitting here trying to think if I do anything in my kids show that does not fool an adult audience and honestly I can not think of anything, I may be wrong but I have had adults ask how all my effects are done one time or the other. Not saying they all fool everyone all the time.
Message: Posted by: MoonRazor (Sep 22, 2011 11:11AM)
[quote]
On 2011-09-19 13:55, Potty the Pirate wrote:
[quote]
On 2011-09-19 11:28, MoonRazor wrote:
Coloring book
[/quote]
???
[/quote]
I was answering the original question, "name some kid tricks that fool adults".
Message: Posted by: MoonRazor (Sep 22, 2011 11:13AM)
[quote]
On 2011-09-20 11:44, Potty the Pirate wrote:
Aaag! Not for me, Ye Olde Coloringe Booke is consigned to the bottom of my magic drawer.
;)
[/quote]
Yet I still get adults snapping their heads back when the change occurs.
Message: Posted by: Potty the Pirate (Sep 22, 2011 01:00PM)
[quote]
On 2011-09-22 12:13, MoonRazor wrote:
[quote]
On 2011-09-20 11:44, Potty the Pirate wrote:
Aaag! Not for me, Ye Olde Coloringe Booke is consigned to the bottom of my magic drawer.
;)
[/quote]
Yet I still get adults snapping their heads back when the change occurs.
[/quote]
I think to be fair, it's very different here in the UK. The Coloring Book is seen all the time, most kids (and their parents) probably see it every weekend for several years...and again, at family events, and just about every time they see a run-of-the-mill kids' entertainer. Not only do all the magicians use it, but so do the activity party people, DJs, and every entertainer that wants to give a nod towards keeping the kids amused. I understand that in the US, kids don't see anywhere near the same number of entertainers, so perhaps it still flies over there.
In my area, you just keep away from the CB, as it's so hackneyed.
Message: Posted by: TheAmbitiousCard (Sep 23, 2011 01:13AM)
[quote]
On 2011-09-22 14:00, Potty the Pirate wrote:
I think to be fair, it's very different here in the UK. The Coloring Book is seen all the time, most kids (and their parents) probably see it every weekend for several years...[/quote]

Sounds like just the thing to change up a bit so the end is an utter surprise to those "in the know".

I'm not sure I could resist.
Message: Posted by: Potty the Pirate (Sep 23, 2011 03:46AM)
I have a couple of "altertnative" takes on it, but to be honest, apart from very young kids who maybe have never seen it before, it's a tough call to use this effectively. For me, at least. I have seen many performers use it, and they "get away" with it most often. But you can see the kids' eyes start to wander the moment they set eyes on this prop. Older kids frequently just get up and walk off as soon as they see the CB.
Have to admit, it's not just the CB, but this is becoming the attitude towards kids' entertainers in general! We have several hundred "entertainers" in our area now, and the majority have really only just started out, or are youngsters working for kid's party organisers for pocket money. More and more, at family events (not Birthday parties) I notice that older kids (7+) appear to hav eno interest whatsoever in watching a magic show....until they realise that the show might actually be entertaining, and not the same ol' same ol'.
It's a pity, but so many folks have decided that entertaining kids is money for old rope (well, perhaps that is literally true...) At least it means that I'm kept really busy, but I hear more and more tales of woe. The poor entertainers do disappear off the scene fairly fast...but it seems there is an endless number of newbies who put themselves out there (usually at full professional rates), as fast as the others go.
Message: Posted by: Mike Brezler (Sep 23, 2011 06:33AM)
Dan Harlin's half gallon milk jug.
Message: Posted by: trickychaz (Oct 2, 2011 04:30PM)
Just a thought...maybe the problem isn' how to fool the adults. Maybe we should (myself included) think about how we can create the unexpected. I find every time I pull out a change bag and place a scarf into it, I hear a kid or two say "he is going to pull something out of it or change it into something else" Turn the tables on the audience and give them something they didn't expect and they will be floored...what do you think? What insight do you guys have to offer?
Message: Posted by: pradell (Oct 3, 2011 01:47PM)
What's Next is a trick that can get a great reaction in a family audience and the "wow" moment from adults in the back row of a children's birthday party show.

But really, it is the question that needs to be reviewed. Is our purpose to "fool" everyone?

A good entertainer can have everyone in the audience mystified by a great theatrical performance, with or without magic props.

So, is your purpose to "fool" anyone, make the children (and/or the adults) feel like "fools" because they failed to figure it out, or have a great time, create a sense of wonder, and entertain everyone in the room and leave them with a sense that there really is "magic" in the world?

You decide.

:magicrabbit:
Message: Posted by: Anatole (Oct 10, 2011 10:20PM)
Re: the coloring book routine: I think the entertainment value of the coloring book is minimal if it is used all by itself. My routine (written up in I think the March 1984 Linking Ring Parade) incorporates the use of the Bongo hat and an eggbeater (a Clayton Rawson prop in his mind-reading routine) or alternatively the nested wands in addition to the coloring book. The child volunteer and the audience are having so much fun laughing at the sight of the props on the volunteers head and in his hands that they don't have time to yell "I've seen this before!" I did my coloring book routine with the Bongo hat at the Congressional Country Club and it got a great reaction from the crowd.

Working for several years in magic shops in Virginia and Maryland helped me develop novel presentations with standard over the counter props that turned otherwise hackneyed effects into crowd pleasers. The Chinese Sticks is another example. I sold many a set of sticks with a routine that included a couple of novel presentation ideas.

----- Amado "Sonny" Narvaez
Message: Posted by: Higgenbottom (Oct 11, 2011 08:12PM)
One reason I've kept the coloring book in my kids' shows is that it fools the adults.
Message: Posted by: magicgeorge (Oct 12, 2011 05:27AM)
You could also approach it from the other side; what adult effects can be used to entertain children?
Message: Posted by: Paul Rathbun (Oct 12, 2011 07:14AM)
Sketch-o-magic by Samuel Patrick Smith definitely fools adults.
Message: Posted by: Joseph_Then (Oct 16, 2011 08:30AM)
[quote]
On 2011-10-12 08:14, Paul Rathbun wrote:
Sketch-o-magic by Samuel Patrick Smith definitely fools adults.
[/quote]
It gets my thumbs up too. But I usually use this for olders kids in parties. Younger kids may not understand the mentalism portion.

Another trick that will fool the adults: Dream bag.