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Topic: Have you ever gone really hungry because you had no money to buy food?
Message: Posted by: Pakar Ilusi (Dec 15, 2011 10:15AM)
To be honest, I have not.

The only times I've been hungry is because I was dieting.

I cannot imagine not eating because you cannot afford food. I am blessed coming from a middle class family in a moderately abundant country where starvation is almost unheard of(not always the case in this part of the world)...

I can only imagine what the kids (even toddlers and babies) starving in some parts of the world are feeling... :(

So, have you ever gone really hungry because you had no money to buy food?
Message: Posted by: Kevin Connolly (Dec 15, 2011 11:37AM)
What country are you in. I'm in the USA.
Message: Posted by: randirain (Dec 15, 2011 12:00PM)
I have come close.

Once, while living in LA, I had no money. It wasn't that I didn't have any money coming in, I just didn't have any money until I got paid.
Which was like days away.

So I had to eat what I had in the refrigerator, which wasn't much.

One night I had to force myself to eat freezer burned frozen spinach. It was the most disgusting thing I ever HAD to eat.
Nothing else, just a plate of green mush. It was either that, or be hungry.

They say character is created by adversity, they just don't tell you what character.

Randi
Message: Posted by: Devious (Dec 15, 2011 12:21PM)
No worries, [url=http://www.elpasotimes.com/newupdated/ci_19553317]Burger King to the Rescue[/url] :hamburger:
Message: Posted by: giobbi1 (Dec 15, 2011 12:45PM)
Yea. Grew up in a single parent household. On public assistance before they had food stamps where you could get what you wanted. 1st of every month, you gathered up a couple empty boxes and went to a warehouse where they loaded you up with powdered milk, peanut butter, cheese, lard, butter and a generic version of spam. That had to last you the whole month. Many times my Mom and I would break bread up in a glass and fill it with milk and eat it with a spoon that was our suppers until we could go get our supplies again. To this day I am greatful for every meal I eat. That thsnkfully I can afford to eat well and much too amply. Happy holiday everyone.
Message: Posted by: Dennis Michael (Dec 15, 2011 01:36PM)
A couple times but only for a day or two. Once in my youth when I wanted to stay in Wildwood, NJ for a week without money. I finally got a job but had to wait for that first measly pay check.

Another time when I got divorced, and lets leave it that.

Dennis
Message: Posted by: Michael Baker (Dec 15, 2011 02:29PM)
I have often joked with people who have asked me what it is like to be a professional magician. I say, "I know at least 47 different ways to cook potatoes."

This is based in truth, however. While I have never been hungry to the point of pain, I have been scared as to where my next meal may come from. At this point, I am content to live a simple life, because I know it can always be worse.

With that, I will leave you with the punch line of a comic strip I once read: "Ice cube sandwiches are not bad, if you put enough ketchup on them."
Message: Posted by: Payne (Dec 15, 2011 02:46PM)
I used to have to subsist on Popcorn or Ramen a few days before Pay Day. But that was years and years ago when I first moved out of my parents home.
Message: Posted by: Tom Jorgenson (Dec 15, 2011 03:26PM)
Yup...Payne knows my pain...popcorn, then the gas was shut off...I'd go to a neighborhood restaurant, posterboard and markers in hand..would draw the daily specials signs in trade for a hamburger. God bless that generous and insightful family 50 years ago.

Today I know the meaning of my old Norwegian Pastor's favorite prayer-clause: "Grant us sufficient unto our needs."

I think it taught me how to cook cheap and healthy. I have been dead broke many times in my life, including once living out of my car until my first new-job paycheck came in. Going hungry gives you both Resiliency and gratitude. Or, at least, it certainly should.
Message: Posted by: critter (Dec 15, 2011 03:38PM)
Yes I have.
Message: Posted by: Pakar Ilusi (Dec 15, 2011 11:14PM)
[quote]
On 2011-12-15 12:37, Kevin Connolly wrote:
What country are you in. I'm in the USA.
[/quote]

I'm in Malaysia, Kevin. ;)

Wow, very very insightful... Thanks for sharing everyone. :applause:

I have come close but only with instant noodles or plain rice.

(I learnt a great recipe though, cooked rice and fresh milk with sugar. Taught to me by an African friend while studying in Australia... Yummy...)

Anyone else care to share?
Message: Posted by: foolsnobody (Dec 15, 2011 11:30PM)
When I was a street freak in the SF Bay area "back in the day" I used to eat food that people left on their plates at Robbie's (Chinese food and Roast beef sandwiches)(no longer there), and Café Mediterraneum (still there I believe), both on Telegraph Avenue in Berkeley. I did that in Ann Arbor also.

Across the Bay Bridge (this was before BART), in SF at the communal crash pads where I mostly lived, we would dumpster dive behind Safeway for bruised fruit and vegetables and dented canned goods, all of which they threw out every night. So all we had to panhandle the money for was cigarettes, a gallon of Gallo Burgundy ($1.50!), and sometimes smoking dope, though often that was free. Oh yeah, and brown rice!
Message: Posted by: Pakar Ilusi (Dec 15, 2011 11:37PM)
[quote]
On 2011-12-16 00:30, foolsnobody wrote:
When I was a street freak in the SF Bay area "back in the day" I used to eat food that people left on their plates at Robbie's (Chinese food and Roast beef sandwiches)(no longer there), and Café Mediterraneum (still there I believe), both on Telegraph Avenue in Berkeley. I did that in Ann Arbor also.

Across the Bay Bridge (this was before BART), in SF at the communal crash pads where I mostly lived, we would dumpster dive behind Safeway for bruised fruit and vegetables and dented canned goods, all of which they threw out every night. So all we had to panhandle the money for was cigarettes, a gallon of Gallo Burgundy ($1.50!), and sometimes smoking dope, though often that was free. Oh yeah, and brown rice!
[/quote]

:wow:

I hope you're doing better now... I really do.
Message: Posted by: Dennis Michael (Dec 16, 2011 04:59AM)
French Fires and brown gravy. I guess when your hungry, anything tastes good. including C-rations.

In Vietnam, I really saw what is was like to be starving and saw lots of people and children fighting for scraps left by the GIs, very heart-sicking, to see people live that way.

Our "slop-cans" was their meals! They were willing to die for that garbage.
Message: Posted by: Pakar Ilusi (Dec 17, 2011 06:04AM)
[quote]
On 2011-12-16 05:59, Dennis Michael wrote:

French Fires and brown gravy. I guess when your hungry, anything tastes good. including C-rations.

[/quote]

Nothing like French Fires when you're famished... :goof:
Message: Posted by: Steve_Mollett (Dec 18, 2011 05:48PM)
I came close for a few months.
Message: Posted by: michaelmystic2003 (Dec 18, 2011 07:43PM)
I'm still young and live with my family, and we've fortunately never been hungry. In fact, the worst it's been for me was a 2 day period of eating nothing but rice while my mom was away on a business trip and left me with no money for food.

However, in about a year or so I'll be off to university. Then, I'll surely know what it's like to starve!
Message: Posted by: Father Photius (Dec 18, 2011 08:01PM)
Yup, more than a few times in my younger years. Fortunately it has been a very long time since then.
Message: Posted by: Salguod Nairb (Dec 18, 2011 08:30PM)
I lived off of instant potatos and Jiffy Mix Corn Bread for a couple of weeks. I gave it up when it came out yellow.
Message: Posted by: Devious (Dec 18, 2011 08:42PM)
That was way too much information Mr. Douglas!
:banned: :fruity:
Message: Posted by: Salguod Nairb (Dec 18, 2011 08:57PM)
Hey I was a poor college student in Gainesville. Winn Dixie sold Jiffy Mix for 5 - 10 cents a box so I could eat for a week on $5.

I will never look at a Corndog the same way again....