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Topic: Public Speaking Mentalists
Message: Posted by: Decomposed (Dec 19, 2011 11:12AM)
Does anyone know anyone who performs keynote speaking with mentalism? I know long ago I chatted with someone here who was a professional speaker using mentalism but it was long ago when I first visited the topic. I have been fervantly working on my first speech and need more information. Not public speaking information but more of what mix/blend of mentalism to inject.

Do not want names necessarily just curious about how many out there combine the two. The only resource I know is regarding magic and speaking btw.

Thanks in advance.

G-ani
Message: Posted by: Garrette (Dec 19, 2011 11:22AM)
Ken Weber?
Message: Posted by: Scott Burton (Dec 19, 2011 11:31AM)
Hmmmm.....how about me :)

I combine my personal experiences with health issues and ultra-marathon racing and mentalism effects to talk about long-lasting motivation and the potential of people. Also present some business topics.

Check out:
http://www.amazingcompanyevents.com/keynote/ and http://www.athletemotivationalspeaker.com

If you are interested....we can talk and discuss.
Message: Posted by: dmoses (Dec 19, 2011 11:57AM)
Contact Eric Samuels on this board.
Message: Posted by: DrRob (Dec 19, 2011 12:01PM)
Kennedy does keynote speaking and mentalism.

Dr Rob.
Message: Posted by: sgrossberg (Dec 19, 2011 12:06PM)
http://thinkingmagically.com

Just a thought!
Message: Posted by: Decomposed (Dec 19, 2011 12:41PM)
Wow, thanks to all. Good selection here. I really had no idea. Be in touch. :)
Message: Posted by: Alan M (Dec 19, 2011 02:22PM)
I think Chuck Hicock fits in here.

http://www.chuckhickok.com/
Message: Posted by: Mindpro (Dec 19, 2011 03:03PM)
Yes, I do the same as well.
Message: Posted by: kinesis (Dec 19, 2011 03:35PM)
I do corporate keynote.
Message: Posted by: Mauricio Jaramillo (Dec 19, 2011 03:56PM)
Same here.
Message: Posted by: tiriri (Dec 19, 2011 04:01PM)
I use mentalism sometimes when I lecture at the University and also when Iím hired to do motivational talks and corporate capacitating,

I have also done corporate training in sales with a hypnosis show and it worked pretty well ;)

Giovanni.
Message: Posted by: Christopher Taylor (Dec 19, 2011 04:23PM)
Barrie Richardson!
Message: Posted by: robwar0100 (Dec 19, 2011 06:37PM)
Richard Osterlind's business card states he is a motivational speaker. He performs his mentalism show and shares a motivational message at the end.

Bobby
Message: Posted by: bobser (Dec 19, 2011 07:07PM)
Feel free to PM me and I'll help where I can.
Message: Posted by: Waters (Dec 19, 2011 07:57PM)
Aren't we all?
Message: Posted by: Mindpro (Dec 19, 2011 10:00PM)
In my opinion mentalism is perfect as the foundation or format to present a motivational program or key note, far more than magic. Magic has little real affiliation or connection with motivation as it pertains to each of our personal and/or professional lives, whereas mentalism is an open gate of direct afiliations.

Why do you ask?
Message: Posted by: DrTodd (Dec 20, 2011 01:49AM)
Yes. I think maybe he means a public speech on a particular subject or theme that uses mentalism.

Like this:

http://www.thersa.org/events/audio-and-past-events/2011/rational-intuition-strategic-thinking-and-gut-instinct-for-successful-leadership

Cheers

Dr Todd
Message: Posted by: barneyfife (Dec 20, 2011 11:23AM)
Of those of you who are motivational speakers using mentalism to emphasis points what do yhou suggest as effects, dvds and books to acquire to help further someone who is interested in this type of mentalism? the bookms may be in or out of mentalism

Barney
Message: Posted by: Decomposed (Dec 20, 2011 02:12PM)
Thanks to all. Sorry, with the holidays and all I am pretty tasked out. The reason I asked is I am moving more into the keynote speaking market. Visited this topic a few years ago and worked here and there on it but now been putting as much time into as possible.

Thanks to all and Dr Todd for that audio. That was excellent! I only have a Masters but never really have used it, hopefully it will help with my marketing.:)

And yes, I agree mentalism is better suited then magic because I think most mentalist are already use to longer drawn out presentational platforms.

Great stuff. I was asking also to see how much mentalism mix ya'll inject into your speeches. Anyway, the market is very ripe as we move into 2012. Subject matter seems to be one of the toughest decisions for me at least. There are a ton of motivational speakers already on the market so I skipped over that one. I am leaning more towards the mind in business right now. Rewrote many outlines.

BTW: I have not contacted her yet but does anyone know how to get the Tripp Model alone without buying an entire package?

Thanks

G-ani
Message: Posted by: Decomposed (Dec 20, 2011 02:32PM)
Todd, I noticed your speech was 30 minutes, is this the norm for you?
Message: Posted by: Decomposed (Dec 20, 2011 05:59PM)
Scott my longest run is 50K, better leave your topic alone lol!
Message: Posted by: Mindpro (Dec 20, 2011 08:26PM)
[quote]
On 2011-12-20 12:23, barneyfife wrote:
Of those of you who are motivational speakers using mentalism to emphasis points what do yhou suggest as effects, dvds and books to acquire to help further someone who is interested in this type of mentalism? the bookms may be in or out of mentalism

Barney
[/quote]

This is only one approach of incorporating mentalism into speaking, albeit one of the most popular, which is why I stay away from this. Dig deeper and mentalism offers so much moree. Quit thinking effects, but rather messages.

By the way, mine tend to be 45, 60 or 75 minutes in length.
Message: Posted by: Scott Burton (Dec 20, 2011 09:05PM)
In my opinion, the mentalism should not be more than a "visual aid" in the context of the presentation. Just like with a photograph in a slide-show presentation while you speak, the visual aid does only that - aid the presentation. If you strip out all of the effects in your presentation, do you still have something that you can sell and will be valuable?

Establish the messaging elements and flow of the presentation first and, only then, add something in an effect or two.
Message: Posted by: Decomposed (Dec 20, 2011 10:17PM)
Well said Scott.

Mindpro,

DO you obtain more speaking bookings then entertainment gigs?
Message: Posted by: Mindpro (Dec 20, 2011 10:33PM)
I made a conscious effort about three years ago to start being very selective about the entertainment bookings I accept, while looking for speaking engagements to fill my weekdays. It varies depending on the time of the year - summer is nearly all entertainment, fall and winter is about 65% speaking/35% entertainment, Spring is about 80% entertainment shows and 20% speaking. My speaking has been carefully designed to feature, highlight and co-promote my books (nine) and series of programs.

Last year I was on the road just over 40 weeks per year, so the speaking has allowed me to fill in the space between the prime entertainment shows, allowing me to maximize my time and expense on the road, rather than just go out for 2-3 days a week, come home for a few days then go back out again. Since I route (or at least try to) my speaking gigs around my performance destinations, they are mostly all profit, plus they are more BOR-prone.
Message: Posted by: DrTodd (Dec 21, 2011 02:18AM)
[quote]
On 2011-12-20 15:32, Decomposed wrote:
Todd, I noticed your speech was 30 minutes, is this the norm for you?
[/quote]

This is a modular package that can be 30 minutes, 60 minutes or a workshop package that mixes formal lecture with group work. The longer lecture includes a prisoner's dilemma where ... errr... I always win :)

I am delivering this in the new year to a client for an hour...The RSA lecture format was 30 minutes plus time for Q n A

Cheers

Dr Todd
Message: Posted by: Decomposed (Dec 21, 2011 03:20AM)
Excellent informatin Dr Todd and Mindpro....I noticed so many speakers are authors.

Thank U
Message: Posted by: Mindpro (Dec 21, 2011 06:24AM)
There is a reason for that. Serveral actually.
Message: Posted by: DrTodd (Dec 21, 2011 10:49AM)
[quote]
On 2011-12-21 04:20, Decomposed wrote:
Excellent informatin Dr Todd and Mindpro....I noticed so many speakers are authors.

Thank U
[/quote]

You are welcome. Yes, I have written a few books :)

New one from Cambridge arrrived today for proofing!

I think Mindpro has a point...writing books helps scripting and presentation. So does lecturing/teaching/professing ;-)

Cheers

Dr Todd
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Dec 21, 2011 11:15AM)
Being an author is also a strong selling point for booking speaking engagements.

Good thoughts,

Bob
Message: Posted by: ELima (Dec 21, 2011 04:34PM)
Interesting post.
My world has been corporate speaking for 20 years. I started adding mentalism as "spice" only 6 years ago. It then became more of a "theme". Now I frequently do mentalism as the main theme, but with the speaking as a "spice".
The most funny moments now are when companies hire me as mentalist, but sort of want to know if I can tailor slightly to their corporate agenda! Easy ;-)
It is demanding though to get the balance right, as the booking agent and the audience are not necessarily on the same frequency. It takes quite a lot of questioning and preparation.

Endre
Message: Posted by: Decomposed (Dec 22, 2011 12:20AM)
[quote]
On 2011-12-21 17:34, ELima wrote:
Interesting post.
My world has been corporate speaking for 20 years. I started adding mentalism as "spice" only 6 years ago. It then became more of a "theme". Now I frequently do mentalism as the main theme, but with the speaking as a "spice".
The most funny moments now are when companies hire me as mentalist, but sort of want to know if I can tailor slightly to their corporate agenda! Easy ;-)
It is demanding though to get the balance right, as the booking agent and the audience are not necessarily on the same frequency. It takes quite a lot of questioning and preparation.

Endre
[/quote]

That is excellent Endre, appears much easier breaking into the market adding the spice rather then the other way around. I had no idea there was so much to public speaking until I jumped in head first. I do know my shows have defintely improved though so its a win win situation.

G-ani
Message: Posted by: vinh.giang (Dec 2, 2012 05:37AM)
This was a great discussion! I am actually a speaker from Australia and at this point most of my gigs are keynotes with a hint of magic, it used to be the other way around. How was 2012 for everyone? I got quite a lot of work at this point as most speakers don't have a point of difference, where as us as magicians we have that extra spice and I feel that we are naturally better speakers as we have been trained as showmen? Would you guys agree?
Message: Posted by: jamiesalinas (Dec 2, 2012 11:41PM)
Although my public speaking presentation is called the magic of customer service, I open with my background and credentials including my magic background and then immediately perform my routine Loto Fever which is a lotto prediction of six randomly selected numbers. I include techniques that allowed me to take an organization from the worst customer service rating ever to the best ever within one year. In the second year, I beat my previous record!

Even though it is called the magic of customer service, I am performing Mentalism.

Jamie
Message: Posted by: Scott Burton (Dec 3, 2012 07:00AM)
The role of my mentalism in my presentations becomes less and less over time. I come to understand that powerful content and engaging delivery can be far more powerful and appreciated than mentalism which can be seen as distractions to the value of the presentation. Of course, we all have our strengths and our own types of clients who value different things. Capturing people with your value & delivery is a rewarding experience. I do see this as a natural progression for myself who always had the ultimate goal of being a speaker. But, yes, the skills I have gained over 25+ years of working the stage is extremely valuable in delivering powerful presentations.
Message: Posted by: Mindpro (Dec 3, 2012 07:13AM)
Great to see how well you've progressed Scott. I agree that the mentalism or magic should on;y be an enhancement to your content. Many beginning speakers try to base a speaking presentation around the effects. It is truly all about content. I too rarely find myself using little or no effects in my speaking presentations as it is truly more about content, interaction and impact. Unless an effect can add to any of these three it isn't worth the time to try to make it fit in and work.

Speaking is about much more than performing as an entertainer. I see many entertainer turned speakers that think they're doing well, when in reality the audience feedback and the hiring client end up saying this like what was that? What was his point? Was that a magic show or was there a point to all of that? Sometimes it can cloudy the water. Great hearing from you Scott, I had been thinking about you and your success.
Message: Posted by: Scott Burton (Dec 3, 2012 07:51AM)
Thanks Mindpro! Your constant support is wonderful and valued.

For you or others (I believe you asked once), I posted several recent videos of my presentations on my web site. These are longer excerpts which total about 40 minutes of presentation footage. They can be found on these pages:

http://www.amazingcompanyevents.com/motivational-speaker/

http://www.amazingcompanyevents.com/sales-training/

http://www.amazingcompanyevents.com/leadership-training/

Warning: there is no mentalism (or magic) in these videos because, as mentioned above, this is not the reason why my clients buy (perhaps a bonus but that's it). I'm also not putting myself forward to you all as a perfect speaker - just me plain and simple (but getting better every day).
Message: Posted by: Ken Dyne (Dec 3, 2012 09:39AM)
Personal view is that motivational speaking is pretty pointless. For the most part anyway. People tend to leave with a feeling of 'so what' or at best understanding something that's just re-hashed obvious drivel.

Tools and skills based talks however are different. If you want to do keynotes on a skill that people can then go away and use to positively impact their business, life or relationships then this is pretty good. As someone already pointed out, I used to do a lot of training on persuasion, influence, selling and presentation skills. I realised that I'm not particularly passionate about this, not compared to performing my mentalism show anyway, so am really focused on that.

Good luck.
Message: Posted by: Scott Burton (Dec 3, 2012 12:20PM)
Hey Kennedy,
Long time my friend. It is interesting to hear that you are changing direction back to your mentalism roots. It is important (for us all) to understand and connect with our passions. I continue on my quest to become a speaker as that is where my true/core passion lies. It's not chasing the money but really a bringing together of my various passions, interests, and personality traits. I agree that "motivation" on its own is pretty empty so I do try to transfer skills as much as possible. As with anything, progression and refinement is a continuous and rewarding activity.
Message: Posted by: MagicofDesperado (Dec 3, 2012 02:23PM)
Would people who do this recommend joing their local toastmasters group as starting down this road?

Dave
Message: Posted by: Scott Burton (Dec 3, 2012 02:55PM)
I recommend Toastmasters to anyone - even if you stick to entertainment. Communication is a skill that can help in all areas of life.

Just like joining a magic club won't make you a pro magician, toastmasters won't make you a pro speaker. However, you will improve your skills and that is one hell of a good start!
Message: Posted by: vinh.giang (Dec 3, 2012 03:19PM)
There's also a group called National Speakers Association, I am apart of the Australian one and it's fantastic :) You get to meet professional speakers and learn from them direct. I agree that the content and delivery is probably the key value that people take away in a talk but the magic is a great engagement vehicle as well, I usually do 45 - 60 minute business keynotes. From my experience when I can tie in a little magic that is relevant, the engagement factor jumps up a few notches.

As Scott said training your communication skills is probably the most important thing you'll do! It has changed my life :)
Message: Posted by: MagicofDesperado (Dec 3, 2012 09:08PM)
Thanks for the advice:)

Dave
Message: Posted by: Ken Dyne (Dec 4, 2012 05:17AM)
Toastmasters is great. NSA and in the Uk PSA is more about the business of speaking. One frustration with TM is that they want you to do it their way, and there is much less room for character development. Although at my local club they really wanted me to be a member so I negotiated that I'd go along and be me ;)

Great to hear from you Scott. My concern with many Motivational speakers (and you are not in this category at all) is the speaking is part of their therapy. Which is think is wrong. E.g. there is a speaker here who had a tough time with the care system and being abused and such as a child. Terrible things happened to him. And now he speaks about it and shocks people. But what do they do when they leave? They think 'wow he had it rough...back to work'.
Message: Posted by: Scott Burton (Dec 4, 2012 10:13AM)
Can't disagree at all! Mind you, I think about all the magicians and mentalists who are in the art to overcome personality and confidence issues (likely just as - or more - common as with motivational speakers). Even my own career came from a childhood of overcoming shyness, awkwardness, and self esteem issues to start into magic so I must include myself in this group. Regardless, just like there is an audience for magicians, mentalists, and side show acts, there is an audience for story tellers (speakers) for provide not much more than shock and awe. Sometimes a speaker's role is to be just a compelling story teller and the client is happy to pay for that. Other times it is to train on specific skills. The question is: what is the client and/or audience looking for and what can you do to meet those needs?

You have to watch with Toastmasters not to have your confidence inflated too much without a basis in reality. The group exists to encourage but I find the strong and exact criticism (which I would want) to be lacking. I see a lot of inflated self-esteem in long-time members and a lot of dreams of becoming "professional" that continue for years without much progress. I join up now and again but other times try to focus only on "real" audiences to get accurate feedback.
Message: Posted by: Ken Dyne (Dec 4, 2012 01:08PM)
Scott, you're dead on with your views on TM - went to get better and after each speech my feedback was 'you're amazing you can tell you perform as your job' and I was frustrated too as I was there seeking strong, critical, precise feedback to become better - not to have my ego stroked.

You are without a doubt spot-on about their being a market or audience for motivational speakers, the market place is HUGE and some of my closest friends are well paid motivational speakers too. Just because I don't personally see any value in it, I know I'm in the minority because conferences everywhere are hosting events with such speakers closing and opening them.
Message: Posted by: Scott Burton (Jan 11, 2013 08:07AM)
I had the opportunity recently to speak at the conference of a local skeptical organization. Here is the video of the entire talk and Q&A that followed (from their youtube account): http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=gxDXRUHzbr0

I talked about the power of the mind and being critical of self directed beliefs but used storytelling to bring my point across.
Message: Posted by: TonyBrand (Jan 11, 2013 09:41AM)
Scott,

I had a chance to view your presentation and thought it was excellent. My significant other and I have recently become interested in long-distance running, so the presentation actually hit close to home. I don't have much to add as I am not a professional speaker by any stretch of the imagination, but I thought you engaged your audience very well and got your message across nicely.

Bravo,

Tony
Message: Posted by: Scott Burton (Jan 11, 2013 09:44AM)
Thanks Tony. I'm glad you enjoyed it and good luck with your adventures!
Message: Posted by: jamiesalinas (Jan 11, 2013 10:19AM)
When I received my feedback from my last public speaking job, I was the second highest rated speaker of the entire conference (36 presenters) including the key note speakers. I did two effects, one at the very beginning and one at the very end after the Q and A session. I agree that most speakers are re-hashing what is already been published or what has already been in print. What makes a great speaker to me is one that is passionate about what they are talking about, are great communicators, and they provide me with useful tools and or information that I can use. I attended many of the presentations and the ones that stood out for me met my criteria. A few were entertaining but they did not have any "meat" in their presentations while others seemed to just re-hash typical information.

I think a great speaker should have real world experience in what they are talking about. I provided examples of what I did to take an organization from the worst customer service rating ever to the best ever. Many of the techniques I used are not new but I gave a fresh approach to how and why I did what I did in real world situations. I also provided a framework for providing excellent customer service from a sales point of view. I would suggest that you speak about what you are an expert in. I do believe there is a place to add magic and or mentalism to enhance your presentation and make it stand out from the crowd but do remember, public speaking is NOT a magic or mentalism show with some re-hashed material added. Please provide SUBSTANCE!

My 3 cents...

Jamie
Message: Posted by: Waters (Jan 11, 2013 10:41AM)
When I worked for a large(r) corporation, all of the speakers at the annual national meeting had written books, so as Bob said it obviously helps. Also, some performers often equate energy with inspiration. They are not the same thing. It is a boon if the entertainers/speakers/educators also have accomplished these sorts of things in their own rights. Nothing inspires like a person whom the audience can relate to, who has done it. In other words, sincerity and authenticity. Information or entertainment doesn't typically inspire on it's own, people who have a compelling story do. Most companies hiring for this type of event (as opposed to entertainment) are looking for a return on their investment in the hearts and minds of their employees. Tell your story and find areas that co-relate with your performing material. All of these should be relevant, interesting and appropriate or they will be off-putting, as Kennedy mentioned.

Scott's example of shyness is a great example and Jamies' story of change is another. The more personal is it, I think the more persuasive and compelling. I love hearing stories like these and listen to them quite often. I can listen for hours (while traveling) and not get tired. You can tell the difference between those who are engaged and those who are not.
Message: Posted by: Scott Burton (Jan 11, 2013 11:10AM)
Agreed that speaking is a different ball game. Honestly, it's taken me years to market myself, understand the business side, and inch my way into this market. I'm still no expert - in fact far from it!
Message: Posted by: Decomposed (Mar 5, 2019 11:09PM)
I am revisiting this topic since I have a speaking gig coming up and wanted to see if their are any more thoughts on this.
Message: Posted by: Mindpro (Mar 6, 2019 12:28AM)
Be prepared (don't wing it as many performers tend to do when trying to speak), work on connection and rapport, hooks, and know the exact points and takeaways you are leaving the audience with before you go in. Remember it is not about your effects. Remember to the audience, it is not about you, it's about your content or message. If you have a solid and clear message, coupled with your personality and connection, you will be in a good position. Operate strongly from your audiences position and perception. Smile. Best of luck!
Message: Posted by: Senor Fabuloso (Mar 6, 2019 12:28PM)
[quote]On Dec 20, 2011, DrTodd wrote:
Yes. I think maybe he means a public speech on a particular subject or theme that uses mentalism.

Like this:

http://www.thersa.org/events/audio-and-past-events/2011/rational-intuition-strategic-thinking-and-gut-instinct-for-successful-leadership

Cheers

Dr Todd [/quote]

The link is broken.
Message: Posted by: DrTodd (Mar 19, 2019 08:47AM)
Yes it looks as though the RSA has updated its website.

I have recently done two of these for NBC Universal in London and Amsterdam, as well as leadership and alumni events.

Best wishes

Todd
Message: Posted by: ringmaster (Mar 23, 2019 06:15PM)
Dr Bob Cassidy Talks about this in Vol II of "The Artful Mentalism of Bob Cassidy".
Message: Posted by: funsway (Mar 24, 2019 05:55AM)
I would point to the Scott Burton line above: "The question is: what is the client and/or audience looking for and what can you do to meet those needs?"

In the 7 years since that statement a lot has changed as to the ability of any performer to "know the audience."

Many of the "audience"may not be able to relate to "real life experience" with manly only having vicarious ones.

also, the trend for a a modern audience to project their own bias onto a speaker is greater today,
and if they are into false persona and posting embellished junk on social media they may not believe a word you say.

A third problem is "the terrorism of the single right answer." With modern eduction focusing on true/false and multiple choice tests,
there is less openness to ideas that require idea integration or complex decisions. Most people today operate from convictions based on "believed things"
rather than discernment based on knowledge.

Using magic effects as allegory can be great but is "fraught with peril"if the audience only has experience with YouTube or TV magic.
The result could be diminished trust and you viewed as an clown entertainer rather than a professional with a message.

My views come from multiple advanced degrees in Organizational Communication and Educational Technology,
plus decades or work as a sales trainer and business consultant with a small group dynamic speaking focus (and classroom teaching at all grade levels)

What worked before 2010 cannot be assumed to be effective today. Not sure where to direct a person today to "be in touch" - just a thought of caution.
Message: Posted by: eSamuels (Mar 25, 2019 08:59PM)
3 words for the successful speaker to live by:
Relevant, compelling, storyteller.

Same was true 100 years ago. Same will be true 100 years from now.
What makes the presentation relevant might change, but the other two factors remain a constant.
Have been since the dawn of human communication.

e
Message: Posted by: Decomposed (Aug 10, 2019 02:20AM)
Words of Wisdom Eric.

One thing about TM. I have visited several clubs and I am a member. I see older established clubs members as having inflating egos as Scott has noticed. I see the exact opposite in feedback though and how they perceive regular established members. TM has a speaker of the night at the end of each meeting. This is where members vote. I see some of the worse presentations get voted best speaker of the night over and over. I know this is not the norm for all clubs but I even brought a guest with me one time to see if it was just me. The same response. Established members have to complete assignments and must present speeches regularly to move up the ranks to DTM. The voting must be a way of boosting confidence. Checking one's ego at the door is advised if you ever come across one of these. There are so many clubs all over though, so its easy to join another every six months if the travel time is not too far. For me, its about 3 hours out of my schedule each week and it gets very tough after a while to make it. Some never miss and I think it is more of a social issue with those types.

I still recommend TM overall but I think if one can afford it, personal coaching is the best route. TM can help just about any performer but after a while, I think of them as a magic club. I am sure there are some excellent TM clubs around and I have heard from others about professional type business presenter type members at those clubs. Personally, I still prefer real audiences and their reviews. I know my weaknesses and work on them. The only way anyone can get better is to practice speaking. My mentalism shows are not just a hodge podge of effects and demonstrations. I try to create more and more of a story and take away from my entertainment, even strolling.