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Topic: Frank Gorshin on how James Cagney became . . . well . . . James Cagney
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Apr 22, 2013 05:43PM)
[url=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NVFRI0h5NFw]Enjoy![/url]
Message: Posted by: Daryl -the other brother (Apr 22, 2013 06:47PM)
Good One! Public Enemy is one of my favorite movies. Cagney is a classic.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Apr 22, 2013 08:22PM)
Sometimes people forget that Cagney was also a fine song and dance man. Watch his portrayal of George M. Cohan in "Yankee Doodle Dandy. Simply fantastic.
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (Apr 22, 2013 08:27PM)
[quote]
On 2013-04-22 21:22, mastermindreader wrote:
Sometimes people forget that Cagney was also a fine song and dance man. Watch his portrayal of George M. Cohan in "Yankee Doodle Dandy. Simply fantastic.
[/quote]

One of his best performances, in my opinion.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Apr 22, 2013 08:40PM)
He received the Academy Award for Best Actor for his role:

[quote]In 1942, a musical biopic of Cohan, Yankee Doodle Dandy, was released, and James Cagney's performance in the title role earned the Best Actor Academy Award. The film was privately screened for Cohan as he battled the last stages of abdominal cancer; Cohan’s comment on Cagney’s performance was, "My God, what an act to follow!"[/quote]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_M_Cohan
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (Apr 22, 2013 09:29PM)
Great stuff there mastermindreader. The first time I saw Yankee Doodle Dandy was on a July 4th weekend when I was about fourteen, circa 1961. I was born and raised in Queens, NY; a street kid, and had no interest in musicals in cinema, and had never been to a Broadway play despite easy access. Yankee Doodle Dandy was the first musical in my life that I was completely taken with and it probably birthed the interest from which later evolved in my delight for theatrical musicals.

Cagney was superb in Yankee Doodle Dandy.
Message: Posted by: landmark (Apr 22, 2013 09:44PM)
Bobs (1Dog and Cassidy), I don't know if you remember, but at that time, 1961 in the NYC area, channel 9 used to run what they called Million Dollar Movie, where they played the same movie over and over in the same day, like four times in a row. And on July 4th it was always "Yankee Doodle Dandy," and I never got tired of it either, even the fourth time around.

Harrigan, Mary, You're a Grand Old Flag, Over There... I don't remember who the female lead was. I think Cagney just blotted everybody else out of my memory.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Apr 22, 2013 09:51PM)
I LOVED Million Dollar Movie. Remember that they used the theme from Gone With the Wind for their intro music? As I recall, though, they repeated the movies every night for a week.

I remember loving to repeatedly watch Mighty Joe Young and King Kong. By the third night my mother would make me change the channel.

Channel 9 was WOR, right?
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (Apr 22, 2013 09:55PM)
You got it Landmark! Bob, Million Dollar Movie and the theme song WAS from GWTW and I never realized it till I saw the movie years later! Wow! And Bob, I remember Mighty Joe Young multiple times too! WOR was the home station of my beloved NY Mets from day one, till SNY came along.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Apr 22, 2013 10:07PM)
Haha. When I first saw Gone With the Wind, I wondered why they were using the theme from Million Dollar Movie. :eek:

I was about twelve years old, I think.
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (Apr 22, 2013 10:09PM)
[quote]
On 2013-04-22 23:07, mastermindreader wrote:
Haha. When I first saw Gone With the Wind, I wondered why they were using the theme from Million Dollar Movie. :eek:

I was about twelve years old, I think.
[/quote]
Tha-a-a-at's funny!
Message: Posted by: Chessmann (Apr 22, 2013 11:51PM)
Here's (to me) the best moment from the AFI Lifetime Achievement gala Frank Gorshin worked. Go to the 4:12 mark and start - he references Frank's imitation of him, and then drops the BOMBSHELL of the evening! :)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&v=XXxZCrM04uI&feature=fvwp
Message: Posted by: Daryl -the other brother (Apr 22, 2013 11:51PM)
[quote]
On 2013-04-22 21:22, mastermindreader wrote:
Watch his portrayal of George M. Cohan in "Yankee Doodle Dandy. Simply fantastic.
[/quote]

Bob this is one of those rare occasions where I completely agree with you! :)
Message: Posted by: Woland (Apr 23, 2013 03:49AM)
The two best weeks each year on Million Dollar Movie were "Mighty Joe Young" and "The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms." I also liked "A Walk in the Sun," but I think that was shown on Saturday mornings, along with the classic films of Leo Gorcey and Huntz Hall.
Message: Posted by: ed rhodes (Apr 23, 2013 03:54AM)
[quote]
On 2013-04-22 21:22, mastermindreader wrote:
Sometimes people forget that Cagney was also a fine song and dance man. Watch his portrayal of George M. Cohan in "Yankee Doodle Dandy. Simply fantastic.
[/quote]

He also re-did it in "The Seven Little Foys" with Bob Hope.
Message: Posted by: landmark (Apr 23, 2013 07:07AM)
[quote]
On 2013-04-23 04:49, Woland wrote:
The two best weeks each year on Million Dollar Movie were "Mighty Joe Young" and "The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms." I also liked "A Walk in the Sun," but I think that was shown on Saturday mornings, along with the classic films of Leo Gorcey and Huntz Hall.
[/quote]
I also looked forward to "Rodan!" My mother would not let us watch it because she thought it was too scary, so we had to sneak it.
Message: Posted by: Woland (Apr 23, 2013 11:53AM)
For some reason, it was difficult to see "Rodan," but I don't remember why. Ray Harryhausen also had a follow-on to "The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms," about a giant pleiosaur, as I recall. It wasn't "It Came From Beneath the Sea," which was about a giant squid or octopus, though - and which I also liked.
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (Apr 23, 2013 08:23PM)
If my memory serves me correctly the monster in [i]It Came from Beneath the Sea[/i] was a two legged thing with webbed arms and feet in a cheap rubber costume bearing an ugly face.

Then there was the Attack of the Crab Monsters, though I'm not sure it made it to the Million Dollar Movie.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Apr 23, 2013 08:56PM)
[quote]
On 2013-04-23 04:54, ed rhodes wrote:
[quote]
On 2013-04-22 21:22, mastermindreader wrote:
Sometimes people forget that Cagney was also a fine song and dance man. Watch his portrayal of George M. Cohan in "Yankee Doodle Dandy. Simply fantastic.
[/quote]

He also re-did it in "The Seven Little Foys" with Bob Hope.
[/quote]

Another excellent, but mostly forgotten film. A shame because Eddie Foy was a top vaudevillian who deserves to be remembered. His son, Eddie Foy Jr. (who started as one of the "Seven Little Foys") became a famous character actor.

And, particularly interesting since you mentioned that Cagney reprised his role in "The Seven Little Foys," Eddie Foy Jr. portrayed his father, Eddie Foy, in "Yankee Doodle Dandy."
Message: Posted by: Woland (Apr 24, 2013 04:30AM)
Hi Bob1Dog, I think you're thinking of "The Creature from the Black Lagoon," one of the best Revell models that I built (I had Frankenstein's monster, Dracula, the Creature, and the Mummy, I think.)
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Apr 24, 2013 05:24AM)
Yes. The big hump and fin on the creature's back was covering a scuba tank.
Message: Posted by: ed rhodes (Apr 24, 2013 09:21PM)
[quote]
On 2013-04-23 21:56, mastermindreader wrote:
[quote]
On 2013-04-23 04:54, ed rhodes wrote:
[quote]
On 2013-04-22 21:22, mastermindreader wrote:
Sometimes people forget that Cagney was also a fine song and dance man. Watch his portrayal of George M. Cohan in "Yankee Doodle Dandy. Simply fantastic.
[/quote]

He also re-did it in "The Seven Little Foys" with Bob Hope.
[/quote]

Another excellent, but mostly forgotten film. A shame because Eddie Foy was a top vaudevillian who deserves to be remembered. His son, Eddie Foy Jr. (who started as one of the "Seven Little Foys") became a famous character actor.

And, particularly interesting since you mentioned that Cagney reprised his role in "The Seven Little Foys," Eddie Foy Jr. portrayed his father, Eddie Foy, in "Yankee Doodle Dandy."
[/quote]

There was a series of Peanut specials that dealt with various historical elements. Most of them, frankly, bored me. But one had Linus giving a speech about popular music in America. When he got to George M. Cohen, Snoopy came out and danced to "I'm A Yankee Doodle Dandy." I swear they used Cagney's choreography to trace over for the animation! It was actually impressive.
Message: Posted by: Chessmann (Apr 25, 2013 09:03AM)
[quote]
On 2013-04-24 05:30, Woland wrote:
Hi Bob1Dog, I think you're thinking of "The Creature from the Black Lagoon," one of the best Revell models that I built (I had Frankenstein's monster, Dracula, the Creature, and the Mummy, I think.)
[/quote]

I bought all the re-releases a few years ago. You can still get them all - even glo-in-the-dark versions, and they are coming out with new ones! I recently got an all-glo "Forgotten Prisoner..." model.
Message: Posted by: Woland (Apr 25, 2013 09:57AM)
Thanks, Chessmann, they look great!
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (Apr 25, 2013 11:31AM)
[quote]
On 2013-04-24 05:30, Woland wrote:
Hi Bob1Dog, I think you're thinking of "The Creature from the Black Lagoon," one of the best Revell models that I built (I had Frankenstein's monster, Dracula, the Creature, and the Mummy, I think.)
[/quote]
Yup, Woland, I sure am.... thanks for the memory! :)
Message: Posted by: Woland (Apr 25, 2013 06:46PM)
[quote]One of his best performances, in my opinion.[/quote]

Returning to our moutons, as it were, unless I am mistaken, Mr. Cagney was always very proud of his terpsichorean abilities and his talent as a singer.
Message: Posted by: Pop Haydn (Apr 25, 2013 09:39PM)
[quote]
On 2013-04-23 21:56, mastermindreader wrote:
[quote]
On 2013-04-23 04:54, ed rhodes wrote:
[quote]
On 2013-04-22 21:22, mastermindreader wrote:
Sometimes people forget that Cagney was also a fine song and dance man. Watch his portrayal of George M. Cohan in "Yankee Doodle Dandy. Simply fantastic.
[/quote]

He also re-did it in "The Seven Little Foys" with Bob Hope.
[/quote]

Another excellent, but mostly forgotten film. A shame because Eddie Foy was a top vaudevillian who deserves to be remembered. His son, Eddie Foy Jr. (who started as one of the "Seven Little Foys") became a famous character actor.

And, particularly interesting since you mentioned that Cagney reprised his role in "The Seven Little Foys," Eddie Foy Jr. portrayed his father, Eddie Foy, in "Yankee Doodle Dandy."
[/quote]

Eddie Foy told a story about sitting in a Café in Tombstone, Arizona with Wyatt Earp and Bat Masterson. He said a shot rang out in the street, and he turned toward the window; when he turned back, the other two men had vanished. He looked down and they were both flat on their backs on the floor under the table, with their guns drawn and held up in front of their faces. When the shot was heard, they kicked their chairs out and hit the floor. They were going to do their looking from there...

He said, "I learned something about gunmen today."
Message: Posted by: ed rhodes (Apr 25, 2013 11:04PM)
[quote]
On 2013-04-25 10:03, Chessmann wrote:
[quote]
On 2013-04-24 05:30, Woland wrote:
Hi Bob1Dog, I think you're thinking of "The Creature from the Black Lagoon," one of the best Revell models that I built (I had Frankenstein's monster, Dracula, the Creature, and the Mummy, I think.)
[/quote]

I bought all the re-releases a few years ago. You can still get them all - even glo-in-the-dark versions, and they are coming out with new ones! I recently got an all-glo "Forgotten Prisoner..." model.
[/quote]

A link, please. Many years ago, I appeared in a play entitled; "An Evening of Terror." The play was four one act productions based on; Dracula, Frankenstein, The Phantom of the Opera and The Hunchback of Notre Dame. While preparing for this play, I found glow in the dark versions of each of these characters at Woolworths. I bought them, assembled them at home, put them in a box and took them to the theater. A bizarre thing that happened was that I was sitting on the subway train with this open box with four glow in the dark figures inside of it, out of sight. If you've been on the NYC Subway, you'll remember that from time to time, they hit spots where the lights go out. This happened and when the lights came back on, EVERYONE in the train was staring at me. It hadn't dawned on my that when the lights went out, I was sitting there with a box that was glowing!

Anyway, we put the models up in the dressing room and everyone oooed and ahhed and we went on to do the production that night. Between scenes in Frankenstein, there was a black out. The director later said; "Thanks for warning me about the models glowing. I almost had a heart attack!"

When the production shut down, each of the "monsters" got their model.
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (Apr 25, 2013 11:07PM)
Ed, nice story. I rode the NYC subway trains to Bed Stuy for two years, 1965-67 while attending a NYC community college annex in an old coffin factory on Flushing Avenue. 179th St in Jamaica, Queens, E or F to Queens Plaza then the GG to Brooklyn. I remember those blackouts quite well.
Message: Posted by: Woland (Apr 26, 2013 09:13AM)
[quote]When the shot was heard, they kicked their chairs out and hit the floor. They were going to do their looking from there...

He said, "I learned something about gunmen today."[/quote]

What do you think he learned?
Message: Posted by: ed rhodes (Apr 27, 2013 11:20AM)
They don't aim as well as they think they do?
Message: Posted by: Woland (Apr 27, 2013 04:07PM)
Hi Ed,

I would guess that professional gunmen know exactly how well they aim, although they might not want others to know it. At least, [i]living[/i] professional gunmen.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Apr 28, 2013 07:21PM)
Wyatt Earp certainly did something right. When he died of old age, he had never suffered as much as a bullet scratch to his body. The Clantons, and innumerable others, weren't so lucky.
Message: Posted by: Woland (Apr 28, 2013 08:58PM)
What amazes me about Wyatt Earp, Bob, is that although he lived in Los Angeles and survived into the era of the great silent films, and in fact I think he worked as an adviser for several films, he was never filmed himself. Of course he was probably too old by then. He spent more of his years as a gold miner, I think, than as a lawman or "gunfighter," and as some of our members here are aficionados of the "sweet science," they may know that he refereed the Fitzsimmons-Sharkey fight, too. He also had a faro concession in Tombstone, but I do not know if he actually played, or if he could do a faro shuffle.