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Topic: Breaking In Osaka Bills
Message: Posted by: Peter McMillan (Nov 9, 2013 01:54PM)
Picked up ten brand new $1 bills and started working on Osaka Bills. The new bills stick together like roughing fluid was applied. Kept working with them until one set of five started sliding a bit easier. Needed to keep fingers moist also, or they would slide on the bill, and the bill would not pop into place, and nothing would happen.

Has anyone found a better method of conditioning new bills to get them to pop and slide better, or is it just a matter of working with them over and over to break them in.

Would the paper stage money/training money be better to work with in the long run, or does it rally matter.

Pete
Message: Posted by: Wizzard (Nov 9, 2013 02:46PM)
Peter,
I started using Gallos' method back in 2005. I used it for a six bill repeat routine, audiences really liked the effect. I used both real currency and made my own 'advertising' stage bills. Whatever type of note you are using it requires a "touch". I found if you do not try to force the production, but get a rhythm to your production. It is that pull down with the first finger that keeps the bills coming out as one, not more. If you use stage bills they will not last very long, they will split at the seams. Real currency, the rag bond it is made with is much stronger and last much longer. Real bills do have a tendency to stick but practice will reduce that tendency.
JMN
Message: Posted by: ljsviol (Nov 9, 2013 02:52PM)
Peter,
In putting together an Easy Money/Hundy 500 type effect, I found the bills I had were too new and didn't separate well (as though they'd been roughed). I used fanning powder on them, lightly, and it helped a great deal for me. I don't know what goes into an Osaka bill, so I don't know if this would help or hinder, but it's an idea for you. I hope it helps.

Larry S.
Message: Posted by: Peter McMillan (Nov 9, 2013 04:58PM)
Both posts are helpful. In the 24 hours I've been practicing I have already worn a couple of holes in the center crease and knew I must be doing something wrong. I'll give the fanning powder a try as well as working on my technique on the pop. Thank you JMN and Larry. Pete
Message: Posted by: Bill Hegbli (Nov 9, 2013 08:02PM)
Yes, the Fanning Powder is a good solution, it works. Another idea that has been tried is those Instant Shine sponge applicators sold in the shoe polish section of Walmart and many stores with a shoe polish display.

If you are putting holes in your bills you are pushing in the wrong direction. Try pushing more to the left if held in the right hand. Another thing you can do is fold the bills, then push on the center with the bill partly open. This will soften the point a little and will help gliding past the stack. Also don't bare down so hard as you push. They are only paper and don't need to be handled roughly, use a softer touch.
Message: Posted by: Peter McMillan (Nov 12, 2013 01:52PM)
Right Bill. I will work on this. Thank you.
Message: Posted by: JNeal (Nov 20, 2013 01:36PM)
I always put a piece of 1"wide scotch clear tape on one side of the bill...it keeps the center where the two creases meet...from wearing out (so quickly).

Instead of using fanning powder, you can rub the bills vigorously with a clean cotton cloth...it smoothes the surface and makes them slide better.

Regards-
J.Neal
Message: Posted by: DrVG (Feb 3, 2019 12:44AM)
HAs anyone experienced Osaka bill production in close up ?
Message: Posted by: Bill Hegbli (Feb 12, 2019 06:44AM)
DrVG,

Osaka Bills is not what you would consider a Close-up effect. It was created for stand-up performances in front of an audience. The angles are not good for close-up.
Message: Posted by: Bill Hegbli (Feb 12, 2019 06:51AM)
[quote]On Nov 20, 2013, JNeal wrote:
I always put a piece of 1"wide scotch clear tape on one side of the bill...it keeps the center where the two creases meet...from wearing out (so quickly).

Instead of using fanning powder, you can rub the bills vigorously with a clean cotton cloth...it smoothes the surface and makes them slide better.

Regards-
J.Neal [/quote]

JNeal,

I have found that your Scotch Tape idea, thickens the stack and makes the folds more difficult, with new bills, anyway.

The late creative mind of Roy Johnson published "instant shine" method, and I believe the also the Fanning Powder method, but not certain. I know I read it for some dollar bill counting routine.

I have used it, and both methods work very well.
Message: Posted by: Zauberman (Feb 26, 2019 08:08PM)
I've often wondered. Could you do the Osaka Bills with the new polymer plastic notes?????

I'm considering purchasing, but it must work with Polymer notes that we have here in Australia & UK.
Message: Posted by: Bill Hegbli (Feb 28, 2019 12:24PM)
Zauberman,

Having never seen or handled polymer plastic note, I have not idea. If it cannot be folded in half length and width wise, without breaking of tearing, then I would say, no it will not work. As this this is a stage effect, why not use the older notes. It is the effect that counts, not the note's make-up. I don't know about your country, but when new bills are issued here in the use, it takes years for them to remove the older bills from circulation. I don't believe any country these days, has a replacement bills / notes day any longer like they did in the times of the great wars. Everyone in the country had to exchange their notes and bill on a certain day, or all the old bills were worthless.
Message: Posted by: Zauberman (Mar 1, 2019 07:28AM)
Thanx for the reply bill. The new Polymer bills are quite hardy but don't hold a fold that well.
I have decided to go ahead and buy it, so I'll keep my fingers crossed.
As for replacement bills by a certain date....we had that in E. Germany early 90's. You had a certain date by which you had to exchange your money....after that the old bills were worthless.