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Topic: Mentalism burn out in the 21st century
Message: Posted by: Rolyan (Jul 19, 2014 03:30AM)
Has anyone else noticed the near hysteria that greets the release of the latest effect, book, DVD from our favourite mentalists (you decide who yours is). It sometimes appears that there is an almost uncontrolled outpouring of excessive glee when something is released, followed quickly by breast beating depression if we fail to get it.

To me, there's sometimes a child like enthusiasm that is not altogether encouraging, and I'm trying to understand where it comes from. In my experience excessive zeal is often followed by burnout, which is not what we want obviously.

This is purely 'magical' philosophy and I appreciate that most will not even ponder it. But I'm genuinely interested to know why we appear to be creating zealots who appear to have uncontrollable desires for the next best thing.
Message: Posted by: MatCult (Jul 19, 2014 04:41AM)
[quote]On Jul 19, 2014, Rolyan wrote:
I'm genuinely interested to know why we appear to be creating zealots who appear to have uncontrollable desires for the next best thing. [/quote]
Because it's good for business.

It's not just in magic.

Most of the western world finds meaning in life through buying things now.

Hobbies are a parade of "must haves" - the hot new amp for your guitar, the latest sable brushes, the revolutionary Shimano gears.

The system trains us to desire the "next big thing". If enough people stopped upgrading their cars, phones, kitchens and wardrobes the whole thing could unravel - magic is just a microcosm of the bigger picture.

So join me, give away your belongings and free yourself.

Posted on my Samsung Galaxy S5.
Message: Posted by: seamagu (Jul 19, 2014 05:03AM)
Man you got the s5, I so want one
Message: Posted by: innermind (Jul 19, 2014 05:36AM)
[img]http://s2.quickmeme.com/img/13/13751ac4f65de157d56cfb35abf12b6bd01eb0ca77fc7e409af59535a0f49183.jpg[/img]
Message: Posted by: IAIN (Jul 19, 2014 06:37AM)
Its probably that we can just express it with more people these days, via digital means...

i would imagine waiting two weeks for your order to be sent via mail, received, cheque cashed and then packaged up and sent to you would be intense... its just that apart from your real non-digital friends no one else would know about it...
Message: Posted by: Godzilla (Jul 19, 2014 07:25AM)
It's a "Monkey See, Monkey Do" mentality !
Message: Posted by: gypsyfish (Jul 19, 2014 09:43AM)
One hundred monkeys see, one hundred monkeys do.
Message: Posted by: kasper (Jul 19, 2014 09:44AM)
That's because were all involved in a cult. :sun:
Message: Posted by: sandsjr (Jul 19, 2014 10:32AM)
[quote]On Jul 19, 2014, Rolyan wrote:
To me, there's sometimes a child like enthusiasm that is not altogether encouraging, and I'm trying to understand where it comes from.

...zealots who appear to have uncontrollable desires for the next best thing.
[/quote]

If you truly want to understand where the enthusiasm and uncontrollable desires come from you'll find the answer here...

http://www.amazon.com/Practicing-Power-Now-Essential-Meditations/dp/1577311957/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1405783706&sr=8-1&keywords=practicing+the+power+of+now
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Jul 19, 2014 10:45AM)
I used to have that feeling on Christmas morning- rushing downstairs as early as possible to discover what Santa brought me.

Nowadays I just use the time to sleep late.
Message: Posted by: harris (Jul 19, 2014 12:30PM)
My regular gig has been working either with addict or in prevention work.
I have worked in prisons, with street people and folks who have their family name on streets.

Years ago Shel Silverstein(writer for Dr. Hook , Playboy, and children books. )
Wrote a piece called
In search of the perfect high.

Magicians and Mentalist perhaps are also looking.

The piece like the mentalist / magician journey ends the same.
The peace and answers are within.

Harris
Still too old to know it all
Message: Posted by: RedDevil (Jul 19, 2014 01:26PM)
This is the last morning
That I wake up in this dirty city
Lookin' for the sunshine
as the buildings block the sky.
--Shel via Dr. Hook

Love this song and this album (Sloppy Seconds). Forgive the digression.
Message: Posted by: Rolyan (Jul 19, 2014 05:30PM)
[quote]On Jul 19, 2014, IAIN wrote:
Its probably that we can just express it with more people these days, via digital means...

i would imagine waiting two weeks for your order to be sent via mail, received, cheque cashed and then packaged up and sent to you would be intense... its just that apart from your real non-digital friends no one else would know about it... [/quote]
Hmmm, not sure about that. Over the years I've purchased, owned, read and used almost every major work released. So have my peers. We started off with the send a cheque and wait 2 (or more) weeks. Some of these items were 'huge' (in the sense of impact, although with Stewart James, in a physical sense as well). But I don't remember the intensity that comes across nowadays. Perhaps it is indeed a modern thing that affects all walks of life. But I still find it faintly disturbing.
Message: Posted by: GaMind (Jul 19, 2014 08:40PM)
There's nothing new about people wanting the latest and greatest. As for the Café reaction to new routines, when you add human nature to the strong emotional connection most of us have to magic and mentalism, you're going to have enthusiastic -- perhaps even "childlike enthusiasm" -- responses. Which, IMO, is not a bad thing.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Jul 19, 2014 08:49PM)
Most who have been in this business for a long time have learned that, as in magic, things are rarely what they seem to be (nor as they are touted). So we usually don't get all that excited about the "Latest and Greatest." Personally, I rarely buy anything other than books and utility items.
Message: Posted by: MentalistCreationLab (Jul 20, 2014 12:35AM)
Mentalism has not burn out in the 21st century! In fact, I busier now than I was at the end of the 20th Century. Which is exactly what I thouht and knew would happen. How did I know that? That is a good question and you will find that answer below.

Back in the beginning of the 20th century mentalism then under a different name but still mentalism was all the rage. It would not be till about the 1930 that mentalism would start to fade slightly and by the late 1940s and 1950s mentalism would be a bit more underground. However during this time period new foundations would arise that would later become modern mentalism and a new form of this thing would begin to emerge. See the works of Robert Allen Nelson and what UF Grant was doing in Columbus Ohio during this weaning period of mentalsim. Which was still around but not at popular as magic was during this period of the 1940 and 1950 although during this time it did have its stars but even they did a bit more general magic than those in different time periods. Mentalism would pick up again strong during the 1960s and 1970. Or what some refer to as a golden age of modern mentalism.

The same pattern can be seen in the 17th century and 18th century as well.

Mentalism is just doing what it has in one of its many forms for hundreds of years. Its just staying true to its historic cycle.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Jul 20, 2014 05:17AM)
???

Mentalism hardly began to "fade" in the 30's.

With the advent of the Jinx in the 1930's, the period actually marked the beginning a a new age in mentalism, coincident with the interest in ESP popularized by the experiments of JB Rhine at Duke. And by the 1940's, Joseph Dunninger, billed as The Master Mentalist, became one of the most popular personalities on radio.

Mentalism was hardly a "bit more underground."
Message: Posted by: Rolyan (Jul 20, 2014 05:01PM)
[quote]On Jul 19, 2014, GaMind wrote:
There's nothing new about people wanting the latest and greatest. As for the Café reaction to new routines, when you add human nature to the strong emotional connection most of us have to magic and mentalism, you're going to have enthusiastic -- perhaps even "childlike enthusiasm" -- responses. Which, IMO, is not a bad thing. [/quote]
Correct, there is nothing new about people wanting the latest and greatest. My point is that I don't recall seeing the apparent hysteria that greets some releases, when things were released in the past. I was in a group that were extremely serious about performing, and we were around when major releases were put out (equal if not greater than all the material released today and yes, I do mean by Pete, and Atlas, Colin, Luke et al). But we didn't react the way that is seen nowadays.

It was only ever meant to be a philosophical look at modern day purchasing, but trust me, it is massively different to that witnessed a few decades ago. I have my own beliefs as to why, I just wondered what others thought.
Message: Posted by: sandsjr (Jul 20, 2014 07:07PM)
Welcome to the era of the Internet & credit card

I want it ALL and I want it NOW!

However, people buy things for different reasons. Not all are looking for the answers to their prayers.

I think there's nothing wrong with buying new things. (of course the more knowledgeable you are the more selective you become) With regards to immersing yourself in what you love, look at Jimmy Page's record collection for example. It's big. He loves music. If you love mentalism it's ok to get excited about new things. You don't owe anyone any explanations. New angles/ideas can be stimulating and inspiring. Some people just love to eat, sleep and drink mentalism... (can you do that?) On the other hand, if you're looking for your next purchase to make you great, you're going to be disappointed.
Message: Posted by: GaMind (Jul 20, 2014 08:02PM)
[quote]On Jul 20, 2014, Rolyan wrote:
My point is that I don't recall seeing the apparent hysteria that greets some releases, when things were released in the past. I was in a group that were extremely serious about performing, and we were around when major releases were put out (equal if not greater than all the material released today and yes, I do mean by Pete, and Atlas, Colin, Luke et al). But we didn't react the way that is seen nowadays.

Great point, and to this I would point back to Iain's comment early on, the internet plays a huge role. It makes all of this accessible -- to pros and hobbyists alike. It also provides a voice for every thought and opinion. Some of the hyperbole is likely driven by the belief that the next great trick will make us successful. But I suspect that in this environment, it is driven more by professional courtesy on the part of pros (at least most pros) and a desire to belong, to be "one of the guys" by the hobbyists (a category I have to put myself in).
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Jul 20, 2014 08:26PM)
Not sure what you mean by "professional courtesy." Are you referring to professionals hyping each others products maybe?

Personally, I don't endorse anything if I don't really like it. And it doesn't matter who the creator is. The only professional courtesy I extend is not saying anything at all if I think something stinks.
Message: Posted by: rjbullock (Jul 21, 2014 09:22AM)
I personally buy very little new material these days... I think we all probably have enough material to study for the rest of our lives. Perhaps the problem is a resistance to put in the work to make the art truly engaging and meaningful? Being a bit lazy, maybe we want the latest and greatest product to do the work for us perhaps?

I went from looking for new methods to looking for novel plot ideas to just looking for inspiring performances... I find so little these days that truly adds anything to "the classics" (including the modern classics), I will only purchase something if 2-3 people I respect say it is a "must have"... And that doesn't happen to often.
Message: Posted by: geraldbelton (Jul 21, 2014 09:55AM)
[quote]On Jul 19, 2014, MatCult wrote:

Posted on my Samsung Galaxy S5. [/quote]

I see what you did there!
Message: Posted by: GaMind (Jul 21, 2014 07:34PM)
By professional courtesy, I didn't mean to imply hyping. I meant pretty much what you said, Bob, to avoid saying anything overly negative about a product. Which I feel is a sign of professional courtesy. In fact, most of the posts from the more recognized, respected names seem to provide the most level-headed comments. Guess that's one of the reasons why they're respected in the first place.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Jul 21, 2014 07:36PM)
We're on the same page, then.
Message: Posted by: Mind Guerrilla (Jul 21, 2014 09:09PM)
In his book, "Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion," Robert Cialdini cites "Authority" and "Scarcity" as two major factors.

Authority: A prominent mentalist starts hyping his buddy's upcoming product as the best thing since sliced bread. Others join in.

Scarcity: "Limited edition! Become part of an exclusive club! Don't let your friends see it! Pre-order now before people find out how over-rated it is! Buy an extra copy which you can re-sell to some other schnook for big bucks!" ;)

And then there's the [b]lack of critical feedback[/b] once a product is released, which encourages recidivism on the part of both sellers and buyers, allowing the cycle to begin again. Let's face it, whether motivated by professional courtesy or by purchasers' reluctance to admit they've been taken, the reviews sections on the Café tend to contain little more than thinly veiled advertisements. In the rare instance where someone posts a negative comment, the usual suspects rush to the seller's defense, even if all they can come up with is, "I've found that So-And-So is always very responsive to my emails! Great customer service!" I've posted some critical reviews and have received less-than-professional responses from effects' creators, including one from a guy who decided he would "punish" a dissenter like me by refusing to sell me any more of his overpriced products. Oh, no. Not that. :goof:

Ultimately, we're each responsible for what we choose to spend our money on but when the product turns out to be far less than what it was touted to be, I don't believe the hype machine can be held blameless. I recall a Café member who bought into the hype of a pair of limited edition book tests costing $185 and who used [i]his disability check[/i] to pay for them. But how could he go wrong? His pals on the Café were gushing over them before they were even released! "Magicians Helping Magicians," right? Well, it turns out the book tests were utter rubbish. I did post a review to that effect, motivated in no small part by this guy's story. If my review helped convince one other person not to throw their money away, then I feel I helped. How much courtesy (professional or otherwise) do con men deserve?
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Jul 21, 2014 09:43PM)
MindGuerilla-

I've never hyped ANYTHING that I didn't personally like out of "professional courtesy." Some pros undoubtedly do, but it's pretty easy to spot that kind of thing after a while.

Like I said, the only professional courtesy I've ever extended was not commenting at all about something I thought was sub par.

Bob
Message: Posted by: Mind Guerrilla (Jul 21, 2014 09:49PM)
[quote]On Jul 21, 2014, mastermindreader wrote:
MindGuerilla-

I've never hyped ANYTHING that I didn't personally like out of "professional courtesy." [/quote]
I never said you did! Your integrity here is beyond reproach. Sorry if you thought I implied otherwise. I can also understand why someone of your prominence would avoid posting negative remarks. To the recipient, it would be like getting a "thumbs down" from God. ;) People have defenestrated themselves over less. My stature here is much less God-like and, so far, reactions to my comments haven't risen above nasty PMs.

[quote]Some pros undoubtedly do, but it's pretty easy to spot that kind of thing after a while.[/quote]
One can only hope! :)
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Jul 21, 2014 10:04PM)
I know you never said I did that. I just wanted it to be clear that it's not something that all pros do for one another.

But, in addition to what you said about the effect of a thumbs down on a creator, a lot of us are hesitant to criticize because it could often invite unwarranted retaliation on our own works. And sometimes not saying anything is just the pragmatic thing to do.

And besides, I wouldn't want to create the impression that I was hyping my own works by denigrating the work of others.

(But in private, of course, we aren't so circumspect with our opinions.)
Message: Posted by: Mind Guerrilla (Jul 21, 2014 10:39PM)
But most of you people here do [i]not[/i] have the prominence of Bob Cassidy. Most of you are just poor schlubs like me.

So why do [i]you[/i] remain silent when your purchases turns out to be...(struggling to be polite)...disappointing?
Message: Posted by: Martin Pulman (Jul 22, 2014 01:29AM)
[quote]On Jul 21, 2014, Mind Guerrilla wrote:
But most of you people here do [i]not[/i] have the prominence of Bob Cassidy. Most of you are just poor schlubs like me.

So why do [i]you[/i] remain silent when your purchases turns out to be...(struggling to be polite)...disappointing? [/quote]

Because people are wary of the wrath of the mob. I once posted a negative review of Peter Turner's "Dare to Be Bold" and was bombarded with vitriol, including the usual accusations of not being smart or skilled enough to understand it. I was even told by PM that I was going to be banned if I continued to voice my opinions in so negative a manner.

A lot of younger people are going to be intimidated by that sort of behaviour. Luckily, I have more important things to worry about.

( I should add, though, that while I continue to remain unconvinced by much of Peter's early works his later releases have contained some of the most exciting, original thinking of the last decade. But if someone hates the later stuff, or any release, they should be free to say so without fear of the fan-boy army.)
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Jul 22, 2014 07:59PM)
But here's the real problem I have with some alleged "endorsements." Very often, they are taken out of context. I am very careful nowadays when someone I don't know approaches me at a convention and shows me something he invented. I used to be very polite and just say something like, "That's great." when he was finished.

Until I starting seeing ads with me quoted as saying, "That's great."

I now call those "ambush endorsements" and am very careful about what I say.

So if you you show me something like that one day, don't be too puzzled if I just smile and say "Yeah." :eek:
Message: Posted by: Mind Guerrilla (Jul 22, 2014 11:25PM)
[quote]On Jul 22, 2014, Martin Pulman wrote:
Because people are wary of the wrath of the mob. I once posted a negative review of Peter Turner's "Dare to Be Bold" and was bombarded with vitriol, including the usual accusations of not being smart or skilled enough to understand it. I was even told by PM that I was going to be banned if I continued to voice my opinions in so negative a manner. [/quote]
Scary. Were you told this by a moderator? Were you using inflammatory language?
Message: Posted by: Martin Pulman (Jul 23, 2014 12:41AM)
[quote]On Jul 23, 2014, Mind Guerrilla wrote:
[quote]On Jul 22, 2014, Martin Pulman wrote:
Because people are wary of the wrath of the mob. I once posted a negative review of Peter Turner's "Dare to Be Bold" and was bombarded with vitriol, including the usual accusations of not being smart or skilled enough to understand it. I was even told by PM that I was going to be banned if I continued to voice my opinions in so negative a manner. [/quote]
Scary. Were you told this by a moderator? Were you using inflammatory language? [/quote]

No to both. But as you can see, I'm still here, so no harm done.
:)
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Jul 23, 2014 12:58AM)
Giving a negative review is hardly a reason for getting banned. Whoever told you otherwise is an.... well, let's just say he's wrong.
Message: Posted by: Rolyan (Jul 23, 2014 06:48AM)
[quote]On Jul 23, 2014, mastermindreader wrote:
Giving a negative review is hardly a reason for getting banned. Whoever told you otherwise is an.... well, let's just say he's wrong. [/quote]
I agree in principle, but I've seen posts deleted at the whim of Mr Brooks/the moderators (who knows who) for no apparent reason, and certainly none given. The posts just vanish. The last one I saw it happen to was a mild disagreement, but a well known poster was critical of certain well known published material. Deleted. I even posted my concern about lack of freedom of speech. That was deleted too (which is both funny and really really sad at the same time).

Power corrupts and all that.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Jul 23, 2014 09:57AM)
Freedom of speech is a wildly misunderstood concept. All it says is that the GOVERNMENT may not regulate speech. It has nothing whatsoever to do with privately owned entities, such as Internet forums.
Message: Posted by: David Thiel (Jul 23, 2014 12:18PM)
Do I like every product I've purchased? Nope.

Do the ones I don't like all get bad reviews? Nope.

Am I afraid of the "wrath of the mob?" Nope.

Here's the thing: I think the person writing the review needs to realize that whether a prop/method/idea works in any given performance really is, most of the time, a highly subjective matter. In other words...just because it doesn't work for me doesn't mean it won't work for you. I'm not thrilled to death with the recent pile of "propless/doing it for real" releases. for example -- but others seem to really benefit from them. Who is going to point a finger at them and call them nasty names? We are all different performers with different perspectives.

You need to balance your reviews so that you deal with the product and not the person releasing it -- and that whatever you say is clear, clean and reasoned.

To be honest, there IS an aspect of backlash as well. I've given lots of less than enthusiastic reviews. I wrote that PERSONALLY I didn't like "Ghost" by Alakazam...and one of Docc's recent releases. Again...both were reviews done from a personal viewpoint...and in both cases there were PMs and discussions and sometimes vitriolic responses on both sides. How come? It's just one guy's opinion...but some people seem to have a hard time separating the product from the person. I get that.

It's much easier to say something nice about a product than it is to say something negative. But there is still a place for honest responses and I think differing opinions make for a better forum, especially when they don't turn into schoolyard brawls.

David
Message: Posted by: Martin Pulman (Jul 23, 2014 12:27PM)
There will be no point to the Café if it just becomes a place for "creators" to praise and hype each other's "creations".

We need more honest responses and I don't think they necessarily need to be tempered by consideration of whether others may find the product useful. Unless that is we make exactly the same demand of those posting positive reviews.

Say what you really think. As long as one is not rude, the Café should be home to a plurality of views.
Message: Posted by: Martin Pulman (Jul 23, 2014 12:28PM)
[quote]On Jul 23, 2014, Martin Pulman wrote:
There will be no point to the Café if it just becomes a place for "creators" to praise and hype each other's "creations".

We need more honest responses and I don't think they necessarily need to be tempered by consideration of whether others may find the product useful or not. Unless that is we make exactly the same demand of those posting positive reviews.

Say what you really think. As long as one is not rude, the Café should be home to a plurality of views. [/quote]
Message: Posted by: Rolyan (Jul 24, 2014 12:40AM)
[quote]On Jul 23, 2014, mastermindreader wrote:
Freedom of speech is a wildly misunderstood concept. All it says is that the GOVERNMENT may not regulate speech. It has nothing whatsoever to do with privately owned entities, such as Internet forums. [/quote]
Yes, that's definitely the legal position as applied in some countries. But there is a much wider moral position.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Jul 24, 2014 10:30AM)
I'm speaking of the United States where that is the case.

The moral position is somewhat murky, since allowing absolute freedom of speech would necessarily include hate speech, threatening speech, yelling "fire" in a crowded theater, etc.
Message: Posted by: Rolyan (Jul 24, 2014 05:40PM)
Yes indeedy, the moral position is not an easy one. As the moderators appear to have discovered.

Anyway, I don't want to derail my own thread, which was more concerned with the hysteria and over exuberation that greets new releases. It can't all be put down to lack of knowledge and experience, although some clearly is.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Jul 24, 2014 05:42PM)
Based on what I see here at the Café, I'd say that MOST of it clearly is.
Message: Posted by: Mind Guerrilla (Jul 24, 2014 08:27PM)
[quote]On Jul 23, 2014, David Thiel wrote:
Here's the thing: I think the person writing the review needs to realize that whether a prop/method/idea works in any given performance really is, most of the time, a highly subjective matter.
[/quote]

Of course, any review is subjective on some level, but how does this make a positive review worth posting and a negative review not worth posting? If subjectivity is the problem, shouldn't the usefulness of both positive and negative reviews be called into question?

And reviews aren't always totally subjective. For example, whether or not an item performs as described is an objective fact.

If I see that a Café member has never posted anything critical, I subsequently tend to take anything they say with a mountain of salt. And I'm sure I'm not the only one who does this.
Message: Posted by: Rolyan (Jul 29, 2014 05:05PM)
[quote]On Jul 24, 2014, mastermindreader wrote:
Based on what I see here at the Café, I'd say that MOST of it clearly is. [/quote]
You cab get away with saying that, because you are Bob Freakin Cassidy. I just thought it!
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Jul 29, 2014 05:08PM)
Yes, it's good to be me. (with apologies to Mel Brooks in The History of the World, Part 1)
Message: Posted by: Stephen Young (Jul 30, 2014 12:52AM)
With regard to negative reviews (or lack thereof) purely from a personal point of view.

I have had enough experiences of finding something to be of little use to me, or impractical or transparent, and put it aside.
Only to later come back to it with a different viewpoint/frame of mind whatever and realise the nugget of gold that I previously overlooked.

Or found great value in things that others have rubbished.

For this reason I feel that any negative feelings I have for something may be quite likely to be my fault rather than the product.
For that reason I feel it not necessarily appropriate to post any misgivings I may have about some new release.

I know there are those who think this approach is unbalanced, but this is my policy. Just thought I'd share that.

Steve
Message: Posted by: Syndrome (Aug 19, 2014 12:19AM)
[quote]On Jul 19, 2014, Rolyan wrote:
Has anyone else noticed the near hysteria that greets the release of the latest effect, book, DVD from our favourite mentalists (you decide who yours is). It sometimes appears that there is an almost uncontrolled outpouring of excessive glee when something is released, followed quickly by breast beating depression if we fail to get it.

To me, there's sometimes a child like enthusiasm that is not altogether encouraging, and I'm trying to understand where it comes from. In my experience excessive zeal is often followed by burnout, which is not what we want obviously.

This is purely 'magical' philosophy and I appreciate that most will not even ponder it. But I'm genuinely interested to know why we appear to be creating zealots who appear to have uncontrollable desires for the next best thing. [/quote]


What a great topic! In my opinion, a sugar crash is always inevitable for a zealot. Some regain balance after equilibrium returns, yet I agree, for others there appears to be an almost comical need for more, more, more (zombies anyone?). "I bought it, now you must buy it. I KNOW what I'm talking about." Consumerism is the new altruism. We're just people helping other people, right? I believe we can give thanks to the likes of AmAz0n, FA[E-B00K and U-T00B along with the entire new "own superstar" culture. Hyping a product on a forum gives some a great sense of importance regardless of what or how good the merchandise is. The importance lies in 'WHO's selling it, and the WHO's importance' in the zealot's mind (echoed by other parrots?).

That said...I don't think it's an issue of "we appear to be creating zealots" - but a techno-illogical society issue in general. As for a "mentalism burnout" this century, I highly doubt it. Those who are meant to stay, will stay. How many people have come and gone since you first started in magic or mentalism? I'm sure you've seen many. Fads change but people generally don't. I think we are only exposed to this "zealousness" more today than ever before because we spend too much time in front of a screen...almost as if our lives depended on it.

I usually find it quite entertaining to see how some express their ravenous nature over the latest release. At times, the ensuing orgy of opinion and occassional (albeit unfortunate) exposure has indeed helped me make a decision as to whether the latest release might be appropriate for me or not.

Whew! I gotta go now and upload a video to FB and update my profile...important stuff you understand.
Message: Posted by: Galileo (Aug 19, 2014 02:02AM)
[quote]On Jul 19, 2014, innermind wrote:
[img]http://s2.quickmeme.com/img/13/13751ac4f65de157d56cfb35abf12b6bd01eb0ca77fc7e409af59535a0f49183.jpg[/img] [/quote]

Gunna have to go with him on that one pretty much sums up all my feelings leading up to a new release in one meme