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Topic: Craig's CM is featured in a TED Talk
Message: Posted by: bond19 (Aug 11, 2014 03:19AM)
C****r M***h is featured in a Ted Talk

http://www.ted.com/talks/david_kwong_two_nerdy_obsessions_meet_and_it_s_magic
Message: Posted by: Funnybaldbloke (Aug 11, 2014 03:46AM)
Fantastic.

Red Donkey is genius!!!
Message: Posted by: Richtofen (Aug 11, 2014 03:58AM)
Do I'm the only one to find his performance too much?
Anyway as he says himself, he is a magician.
About MD, everybody does basically the same things, creativity at is best:-)
Message: Posted by: saysold1 (Aug 11, 2014 10:28AM)
Yikes!!!

Wow that was the weakest public performance of CM I've ever watched. Shame.

It proves to me that even though the genius of PMs products make the effect easy to perform, it still requires practice and thought and preparation to be effective. This lackluster performance felt like he had few test drives with it and figured he would just perform a quickee out of the box. Yuck.

For a TED talk you would think that Kwong would have at least prepped better. One of the pens was dried out (happens but you would know if you tested it a few hours prior to show time), one color purple was forgotten, and the presentation had nothing to do with puzzles at all which is this guys specialty. Argh!

If this guy Kwong likes magic I wish he would have approached anyone here at the Café or elsewhere to brainstorm his ideas before presenting to that big an audience.

Sorry he may make amazing puzzles but the performance was a total dud IMO.
Message: Posted by: saysold1 (Aug 11, 2014 10:29AM)
[quote]On Aug 11, 2014, Richtofen wrote:
Do I'm the only one to find his performance too much?
Anyway as he says himself, he is a magician.
About MD, everybody does basically the same things, creativity at is best:-) [/quote]

It's not MD.
Message: Posted by: saysold1 (Aug 11, 2014 10:45AM)
Using the printed days NY Times crossword with all the hints made no sense as the spectator was never exposed to the paper as far as we know. How would she have been subliminally influenced by the paper?

Also the spectator looked and was treated like a prop.

Sorry that's what I feel. Disappointing.

I still love Justin's presentation best.
Message: Posted by: Adam Hince (Aug 11, 2014 11:24AM)
I thought using the NYT crossword made sense. If you watch again, he didn't say it was an influencer. It was a prediction that was even more indelible, meaning he couldn't have tampered with it.

The influencing section was constrained to the presentation portions.

I was quite impressed with the presentation as a whole.

Regards,
AH

[quote]On Aug 11, 2014, saysold1 wrote:
Using the printed days NY Times crossword with all the hints made no sense as the spectator was never exposed to the paper as far as we know. How would she have been subliminally influenced by the paper?

Also the spectator looked and was treated like a prop.

Sorry that's what I feel. Disappointing.

I still love Justin's presentation best. [/quote]
Message: Posted by: saysold1 (Aug 11, 2014 01:09PM)
Really?
Message: Posted by: voh002 (Aug 11, 2014 02:12PM)
[quote]On Aug 11, 2014, saysold1 wrote:

For a TED talk you would think that Kwong would have at least prepped better. One of the pens was dried out (happens but you would know if you tested it a few hours prior to show time), one color purple was forgotten, and the presentation had nothing to do with puzzles at all which is this guys specialty. Argh!

[/quote]

The purple was left out intentionally, and he did not forget it. That was his last prediction: "Oh, by the way, the sheep can be left .... (blank)". Look at 10:42.
Message: Posted by: Rudy Sanchez (Aug 11, 2014 02:29PM)
And the silver color didn't dry out.... that's what the silver color looks like.
Message: Posted by: saysold1 (Aug 11, 2014 03:20PM)
OK and how about the spectator being treated as a cardboard cutout? Very little interaction.

Look - the audience seemed cold to the performance too through the majority of it.

To me this felt like the performer was trying to use CM just for the sake of using it

I use CM all the time and I have seen many perform it - my feeing is that this was not one of the better performances.

Justin, Federico Soldati and others have creatively brought something new to CM. At yhis TED talk, the performer taught the audience nothing, and CM seems like it was shoehorned in without enough thought...as an excuse to show off a puzzle revelation.

The beauty of CM is it's visual simplicity, which is it's strength.

Alright I've ranted enough on this one.
Message: Posted by: jamiesalinas (Aug 11, 2014 03:34PM)
My 2 Cents:

First of all, I love that he stepped outside the box and made it his own! The basic effect is startling and strong but Mr. Kwong took it further for his presentation. I applaud him for making it his own.

This does not mean that I loved it. I think there was toooooooo much going on! The effect was watered down as often times less is more. Not a bad performance, but for me, it went to far.

Jamie
Message: Posted by: Mindpro (Aug 11, 2014 10:49PM)
Maybe it was just me but the setup was too long and boring, he insulted the majority of the audience with his surveying, terrible treatment of an audience volunteer and after all of this he deems it just "coincidence"?

I think it was interesting and maybe entertaining to him and few else.
Message: Posted by: Magical Dimensions (Aug 11, 2014 11:09PM)
ZZZZZZZZ.....ZZZZZZZ....ZZZZZ
Message: Posted by: Bill Hallahan (Aug 11, 2014 11:11PM)
This was great. Some in the audience even gave him a standing ovation. It was engaging.

saysold1 wrote (in a longer post):
[quote]
... one color purple was forgotten ...
[/quote]
He did not really forget the color purple. He said that it was forgotten, but if you watch the video all the way to the end, the final newspaper prediction makes it very clear he intentionally did not include the purple marker.

Just to show this is not just my opinion, the TED editors liked that video so much, they featured it on their home page!
Message: Posted by: robwar0100 (Aug 11, 2014 11:12PM)
I thought the thing was forced and was not a TED Talk. I didn't learn anything, a first for a TED Talk.

It was clever, but forced.

Bobby
Message: Posted by: saysold1 (Aug 11, 2014 11:19PM)
Here is a link to Kwong's magic website - who knew?

http://davidkwongmagic.com/
Message: Posted by: C.J. (Aug 12, 2014 12:12AM)
After a minute and a half, I already disagree with his premise. I don't like the reduction of magic to the level of puzzles. But nonetheless, I've started so I'll finish...

... and the rest of the talk, I didn't mind too much. Sure, there was a dryness to his interaction with Gwen, and she was left standing too long, but the actual effect and multiple reveals demonstrated better scripting than his entire introductory speech. I didn't mind this performance nearly as much as some that I have seen.
Message: Posted by: WilburrUK (Aug 12, 2014 10:05AM)
He also drew attention to what, in my humble opinion is the weakest aspect of the free selections, in his explanation.

Also, "Prestidigitation" isn't worth 20 points in scrabble, because the board's not big enough to play it.
Message: Posted by: saysold1 (Aug 12, 2014 10:21AM)
Kwong threw the reveal of the envelope contents on the floor like trash. The reveal itself was made such that it killed the amazement. That's apparent by the audience's non reaction.

His strength is puzzles without a doubt - and this was a dreadfully weak TED talk that supposedly meshed with magic. By focusing too much on the puzzle aspect he failed to take into consideration the theatricality and process to make the reveals amazing.

The odd pen color names also added to the mess.
Message: Posted by: Matt Pulsar (Aug 13, 2014 12:55AM)
I have had many normal folk tell me about this ted talk and how much they liked it. Usually academic types. So it's an effective bit of entertainment. I feel like this display makes it easy to "solve" unless you buy into the idea that she was just picking up on subliminal clues. The problem is that you can watch a video more than once. I think this would go over better lie than taped. But heres what works for him. He has a way of making himself stand out. He is the puzzle magic guy.
Message: Posted by: NeilMcCauley (Aug 14, 2014 09:58PM)
As with all mentalism effects, it's vitally important to have (apparently) sound logic behind how the goal is achieved. I don't think the performance in this TED talk fully succeeded in that goal. If he is able to put anything he wants into a NYT crossword puzzle, I think he should have focused on that as the main point of influence on the audience or participant. All it did in his chosen performance was act as secondary (and therefore redundant) prediction. After all, predicting the same outcome twice is no more impressive than doing it once. In fact, it could almost be seen as rubbing it in.

I also don't think he did enough to shroud the actual 'dirty work'. There's much to be said for 'straight line' methodology, as Max Maven puts it, but simply...well, I won't say what he did in case I give away the secret, but having her participate in the way he did wasn't a smart choice. He essentially did a very weak version of what Derren Brown did in a couple of his earlier stage shows: claim that unconscious exposure to earlier stimuli led to the audience/participant following a predetermined and unavoidable path. But it wasn't convincing enough for my taste. It was, in my opinion, an overly glorified pseudo-method for a trick that should have better sold the idea of what it was purporting to do: influence and bring order from chaos.
Message: Posted by: Syndrome (Aug 18, 2014 10:25PM)
It was a TED talk. They loved it. He looks like he accomplished what he set out to do. AIDA. I liked it.
Message: Posted by: Slim King (Aug 19, 2014 02:07AM)
He lied to the audience and it doesn't take much lying to see that there might be a lot of lying. He told them he forgot the pen yet in the paper he said it's OK to leave it blank ...meaning he DIDN"T forget the pen ... which now places ANYTHING he says in doubt.
Message: Posted by: C.J. (Aug 19, 2014 02:35AM)
[quote]On Aug 19, 2014, Slim King wrote:
He lied to the audience and it doesn't take much lying to see that there might be a lot of lying. He told them he forgot the pen yet in the paper he said it's OK to leave it blank ...meaning he DIDN"T forget the pen ... which now places ANYTHING he says in doubt. [/quote]

But to be fair, he also presented it as a puzzle, so I don't think audience doubt is something he is at all concerned about. As I said, the premise irked me, but the presentation wasn't bad, and was consistent with his premise. Sure, it can be reverse-engineered, but that seems to be his point in this talk. And to be fair, the *actual* workings still can't be easily guessed. It's just sad that the audience seemed so disconnected until the last couple of minutes.
Message: Posted by: saysold1 (Aug 19, 2014 07:57AM)
Purely as a piece of entertainment I thought that this was the weakest use of CM that I've yet seen.

Yes it was a TED talk - lots of sophisticated and brainy people who are drinking the collective Kool Aid of tech and a well done PowerPoint. I've seen many of them and some are fantastic and others call flat. This one taught the audience nothing IMO - it was a poor piece of mentalism, a weak demonstration of magic, and a cute but utterly forgettable "puzzle" at best.

Now granted many of us feign teaching concepts of influence, body language etc in our own work. But the routine needs to be good and this one was not.