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Topic: Books that have shaped me
Message: Posted by: landmark (Sep 29, 2014 07:40PM)
Not necessarily the best, or even my favorites. But something about each of these books has affected who I am. Had I not read any one book on the list, I would have been a different person. In no particular order:

1. The Shock Doctrine--Naomi Klein
2. The Catcher in the Rye--J.D. Salinger
3. Debt--David Graeber
4. Chemical and Biological Warfare--Seymour Hersh
5. Letting Go--Philip Roth
6. The Autobiography of Malcolm X
7. Crime and Punishment--Fyodor Dostoyevsky
8. Endless Night--Agatha Christie
9. Othello--Shakespeare
10. Hamlet--Shakespeare
11. The Mound Builders--Lanford Wilson
12. An Actor Prepares--Stanislavsky
13. Mind and Nature--Gregory Bateson
14. Summerhill--A.S. Neill
15. The Structure of Scientific Revolutions--Thomas Kuhn
16. Flatland--Abbott
17. Theater of the Mind--Barrie Richardson
18. The Alexandria Quartet--Lawrence Durrell
19. Howl--Allan Ginsberg
20. The Ginger Man--J.P. Donleavy

And you?
Message: Posted by: General_Magician (Sep 29, 2014 07:59PM)
Here is a few of mine:

1. Art of War by Sun Tzu
2. The Intelligent Investor by Benjamin Graham
3. Tarbell Course in Magic Volume 1
4. Card College Volume 1
5. Art of Happiness by the Dalia Lama
6. Zen and the Art of Happiness
7. King James Holy Bible
8. Paul Harris Art of Astonishment Volume 1
9. Sun Tzu and The Art of Business by Mark R. McNeilly (probably also falls under the Art of War)
10. Books written by Vietnam Veteran John H. Poole and former Army General David Petraus (hope I spelled his name correctly; both of these authors also reference Art of War extensively in their own books)
11. It Doesn't Take A Hero by Former Army General Norman Schwartzkopf (another former Army General who put to use Sun Tzu's teachings from the Art of War during Desert Storm)
12. The Secret Art of Magic by Evans and Carver
Message: Posted by: tommy (Sep 29, 2014 08:19PM)
Nature - By God
Message: Posted by: General_Magician (Sep 29, 2014 08:20PM)
Three more books I forgot to add:

13. The Trick Brain by Dariel Fitzkee (really a book on the mechanics of the art of magic)
14. Showmanship For Magicians by Dariel Fitzkee
15. Sleights of Mind by Stephen L. Macknik and Susana Martinez-Conde (book on the neruoscience of magic)

Another book I finished reading earlier this year and has helped to shape me and my business:

16. Growing Your Business, What You Need To Know, What You Need To Do by Mark LeBlanc (it's a small, simple booklet, yet has helped me grow my business)

I am going to re-read number 16 again just to refresh myself on what he teaches in his book. Make sure I have absorbed all the lessons taught.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Sep 29, 2014 08:30PM)
To Kill a Mocking Bird - Harper Lee
The Illuminatus Trilogy- Robert Anton Wilson and Robert Shea
Nightmare Alley- William Lindsey Gresham
The Amateur Magicians Handbook - Henry Hay
David Copperfield- Charles Dickens
Great Expectations- Charles Dickens
The Complete Works of Edgar Allen Poe
Macbeth- Shakespeare
The Crying of Lot 49- Thomas Pynchon
Foucault's Pendulum- Umberto Eco
A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court- Mark Twain
The Aleph- Jorge Luis Borges
Coincidance- Robert Anton Wilson
Message: Posted by: General_Magician (Sep 29, 2014 08:37PM)
I'll check out "The Amateur Magicians Handbook" by Henry Hay that you have listed there Bob. I read some of the reviews on it on Amazon and it has a lot of great reviews. Must be something good about the book. Seems like an important classic for a professional magician to read. Thanks for listing it.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Sep 29, 2014 08:41PM)
William- I also rate the Amateur Magicians Handbook highly on my list and essay about what I consider to be the top 39 books in mentalism:

http://www.lybrary.com/thirtynine-steps-mentalism-a-10.html
Message: Posted by: General_Magician (Sep 29, 2014 08:42PM)
[quote]On Sep 29, 2014, mastermindreader wrote:
William- I also rate the Amateur Magicians Handbook highly on my list and essay about what I consider to be the top 39 books in mentalism:

http://www.lybrary.com/thirtynine-steps-mentalism-a-10.html [/quote]


Thank you Bob. I never performed much in the way of mentalism. I mean a few tricks like Twisted Sisters for example. But not some of the tricks you have performed. However, I would not eliminate mentalism from my arsenal either. Some of it is very good and useful, especially for good paying trade shows. Mentalism can make you a lot of money from trade shows and I am sure for other events as well.
Message: Posted by: Magnus Eisengrim (Sep 29, 2014 09:46PM)
As an early reader:
Are you my Mother?--PD Eastman.

In elementary school:
Search for a Living Fossil: The Story of the Coelacanth--Eleanor Clymer
The Chronicles of Narnia--CS Lewis

Teen years:
Lord of the Rings--JRR Tolkein
Brave New World--Aldous Huxley
Paradise Lost--John Milton

Early Adulthood:
Steppenwolf--Hermann Hesse
Heart of Darkness--Joseph Conrad
Dubliners--James Joyce
Ulysses--James Joyce
Fifth Business--Robertson Davies
The Evolution of Cooperation--Robert Axelrod
A Bird in the House--Margaret Laurence
Godel, Escher and Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid--Douglas Hofstadter
Paradise Lost--John Milton

Mature Adulthood
Paradise Lost--John Milton
Lolita--Vladimir Nabokov
Oryx and Crake--Margaret Atwood
Wonderful Life--Stephen Jay Gould
A Theory of Justice--John Rawls
Symposium--Plato
Message: Posted by: landmark (Sep 29, 2014 09:55PM)
[quote]Are you my Mother?--PD Eastman. [/quote]
:)
Message: Posted by: tommy (Sep 29, 2014 10:09PM)
A Little Taste of China by Deh-Ta Hsiung and Nina Simonds
Message: Posted by: Michael Baker (Sep 30, 2014 01:27AM)
In no particular order and hardly the complete list...

1) Bart Starr (biography) - John Devaney
2) The Prophet - Kahlil Gibran
3) Tuesdays With Morrie - Mitch Albom
4) 1984 - George Orwell
5) An Introduction To Magic - 141 Professional Tricks You Can Do - Sherman Ripley
6) Greater Magic - John Northern Hilliard
7) Baby and Child Care - Benjamin Spock (I didn't read it, but my mom did.)
8) Scenery for the Theatre: The Organization, Processes, Materials, and Techniques Used to Set the Stage - Harold Burris-Meyer
9) Stage Make-Up - Richard Corson
10) The Magic Center Catalog
11) The Real Yellow Pages
12) How to Win Friends and Influence People - Dale Carnegie
13) Illusion Show Know-How - Ken & Roberta Griffin
Message: Posted by: Pakar Ilusi (Sep 30, 2014 03:02AM)
Reader's Digest

Tricks Of The Mind (Derren Brown)

On that note...

The Joy Of Sex has shaped some of us here, literally... :ohyes:
Message: Posted by: landmark (Sep 30, 2014 06:39AM)
[quote]9) Stage Make-Up - Richard Corson [/quote]
Loved that book! I thought it was so great that they used the same actors for all the pictures and then you got to see them in all the different make-ups.
I remember the days I used to use Clairol Silver Streaks 'n' Tips for my hair and eyebrows for age. Now, it's no longer necessary unfortunately.
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Sep 30, 2014 07:05AM)
I'll try a VERY short list, just to be different.

1. The Bible
2. World Book Encyclopedia
3. Childcraft
4. The Republic of Plato

It's a good list, I think.
Message: Posted by: landmark (Sep 30, 2014 07:58AM)
[quote]2. World Book Encyclopedia [/quote]
Favorite letter: F--it had the flags of the world plates.
Message: Posted by: HudsonView (Sep 30, 2014 08:55AM)
Only 3 books where my life was literally changed by reading them:

1. Siddhartha - Hermann Hesse
2. Tropic of Cancer - Henry Miller
3. Plexus - Henry Miller
Message: Posted by: General_Magician (Sep 30, 2014 09:02AM)
[quote]On Sep 30, 2014, Michael Baker wrote:

5) An Introduction To Magic - 141 Professional Tricks You Can Do - Sherman Ripley
6) Greater Magic - John Northern Hilliard
[/quote]

These two books seem to be classics of magic. I have heard of Greater Magic, but I never read it. I might have thumbed through some of the pages when I was much younger. Unfortunately, I can't be reading too many books at once. I prefer to stay focused on a book at a time until completion, that is, if it is not a book that is more of a reference guide. Are these two books more of a classic reference guide for a magician? Or should both books be read from cover to cover?
Message: Posted by: imgic (Sep 30, 2014 09:09AM)
Dang. I've got to read more.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Sep 30, 2014 09:12AM)
Michael- I have fond memories of the Sherman Ripley book. As soon as I got it, I cut out the entire photo section in the middle and stuck the magicians's pictures all over my wall.
Message: Posted by: Michael Daniels (Sep 30, 2014 09:58AM)
This has been quite a self-revealing exercise.

In sort-of chronological order of influence:

1. Huckleberry Finn - Mark Twain
2. The Moonstone - Wilkie Collins
3. Alice in Wonderland - Lewis Carroll
4. You-Forever - Lobsang Rampa
5. The Autobiography of a Yogi - Paramahansa Yogananda
6. Yoga - Ernest Wood
7. Brave New World - Aldous Huxley
8. Frankenstein - Mary Shelley
9. Romeo and Juliet - William Shakespeare
10. The Doors of Perception - Aldous Huxley
11. The Secret Doctrine - H.P. Blavatsky
12. The Way of Zen - Alan Watts
13. Under Milk Wood - Dylan Thomas
14. The Confessions of Aleister Crowley
15. The I Ching
16. Liber Lucis - Amado Crowley
17. The Varieties of Religious Experience - William James
18. The Farther Reaches of Human Nature - Abraham Maslow
19. Memories, Dreams, Reflections - C.G. Jung
20. The Atman Project - Ken Wilber

Mike
Message: Posted by: motown (Sep 30, 2014 11:02AM)
1. "The Hidden Persuaders" - Vance Packard

2. "Subliminal Seduction" - Wilson Bryan Key

3. "The Art of Advertising: George Lois on Mass Communication" - George Lois

4. "Bill Bernbach's Book: A History of Advertising That Changed the History of Advertising" - Evelyn Bernbach

5. "Gardner's Art Through the Ages" - Helen Gardner

6. "Josef Müller-Brockmann: Pioneer of Swiss Graphic Design" - Lars Muller & Paul Rand

7. "Shane" - Jack Schaefer

8. "The Illustrated History of Magic" - Milbourne Christopher

9. "The Outsiders" - S.E. Hinton
Message: Posted by: The Hermit (Sep 30, 2014 11:41AM)
As a mentalist, I found Secret Teachings of All Ages to be a great work for study. It discusses everything from various myths, religions, occult arts and philosophy in small segments. It's an entire education in ancient wisdom that is concise and accessible. It will open you mind for ideas.
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (Sep 30, 2014 11:59AM)
Most recently blindsight / echopraxia by Peter watts. It's an argument worth refuting. Contrasts nicely with the Heinlein story about to get movied, All You Zombies.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Sep 30, 2014 12:21PM)
Michael- I used to love reading Lobsang Rampa's books. Quite a strange and interesting character, even though he apparently never set foot in Tibet.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lobsang_Rampa
Message: Posted by: Michael Daniels (Sep 30, 2014 12:46PM)
[quote]On Sep 30, 2014, mastermindreader wrote:
Michael- I used to love reading Lobsang Rampa's books. Quite a strange and interesting character, even though he apparently never set foot in Tibet.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lobsang_Rampa [/quote]

Yes - Cyril/Lobsang was an extraordinary and enigmatic character. In many ways he was the Carlos Castaneda of his day. Probably a charlatan but very influential in popularising Western interest in the mystic East, specifically Tibetan Buddhism. I read most of his books in my early teens in the 1960s and found them absolutely fascinating.

Mike
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Sep 30, 2014 12:51PM)
That's when I read them, Michael. He was quite popular back then. (Seems like we're from the same generation.)
Message: Posted by: JoeHohman (Sep 30, 2014 01:48PM)
No particular order --

Franny and Zooey, by J.D. Salinger
Catch 22, by Joseph Heller
The Green Mile, by Stephen King
Team of Rivals, by Doris Kearns Goodwin
Truman, by David McCullough
John Adams, by David McCullough
Siddhartha, by Herman Hesse
The Three Musketeers, by Alexander Dumas

Now You See It, Now You Don't, by Bill Tarr
The Magic Book, by Harry Lorayne
Complete Course on Magic, by Mark Wilson
Stars of Magic
Message: Posted by: acesover (Sep 30, 2014 02:17PM)
I find it interesting that only two people were affected by reading The Bible yet affected by many other works. When I say affected I do not necessarily mean come away after reading a Bible and became be a Bible thumper. But I cannot imagine how it would not sort of shape your ideas of the world you live in. You have to come away with something. Whether it is agreeing or disagreeing it should create some sort of how others feel and act and why.

Myself, while an avid reader I can say that no book I have read has changed, or shaped me in of itself. However many have definitely given me insights to things I may never have encountered in my life other that reading about them. So for that I am grateful.

The more I ponder this topic, I believe "just about" everything we read does shape us somewhat, or at least become part of who we are. I believe that is what serious books worth reading are intended to do.

You can ask some people who have read "Animal Farm" by Orwell what is it about and they will tell you it is about animals (especially the pigs) on a farm who revolted and evolve. Do the math.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Sep 30, 2014 02:54PM)
The topic of the thread, as I understand it, is simply to list books that have "shaped us."

I certainly didn't list ALL of the books that have shaped me since I've read and enjoyed thousands. And while I certainly agree that the Bible is one of the most influential works ever written, it simply isn't among my own top twelve that I listed above. (Though there is no doubt that it had a strong influence on literature and authors who I have enjoyed. For example, without an understanding of the Bible, it would be impossible to fully appreciate the works of, say, James Joyce. Or, in the case of my own list, the writings of Borges.)
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Sep 30, 2014 03:14PM)
Since I grew up as the son of a Baptist missionary, the Bible had a gigantic influence on my life.

I am skeptical that it has as much influence on your average person.

Aces, I believe you are Roman Catholic, right?

The Bible generally has much less influence on catholics than catholics think it has had on them. They have been influenced by priests and catechisms and sermons and magisterial interpretations, but not the Bible itself.

Back in graduate school at a catholic university, I was shocked that my colleagues (doctoral students!) couldn't find their way through a Bible. Ask a Baptist to look up the book of Job or Habakkuk or 2 Peter, and they zip right through. Catholics fumble around until they accidentally stumble upon what they are looking for.

The Bible isn't an obvious or automatic entry on any list these days.

Unfortunately.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Sep 30, 2014 03:38PM)
There is no doubting, though, that it would be nearly impossible to appreciate literature and philosophy without at least a fundamental familiarity with the Bible.

I was raised Catholic myself and, you're right, it only compromises about a third of Catholic theology. But, nonetheless, I studied it in depth when I was in college in order to better understand the English literature that was my major.

And many atheists I know, also have studied the Bible as it is essential to understanding history.

I guess my point is that the Bible is an important work regardless of one's religion.
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Sep 30, 2014 03:59PM)
Exactly.
Message: Posted by: Orville Smith (Sep 30, 2014 04:13PM)
Since I've been influenced by both Christian books and books by the Dalai Lama, I'm into both Christianity and Buddhism. People frown on me and CRITICALLY say-how can I embrace both religions at the same time? To them, I say, why not? If it helps me spiritually, and helps me in my relationships with my fellow men, then why not?
Message: Posted by: acesover (Sep 30, 2014 04:14PM)
[quote]On Sep 30, 2014, stoneunhinged wrote:
Since I grew up as the son of a Baptist missionary, the Bible had a gigantic influence on my life.

I am skeptical that it has as much influence on your average person.

Aces, I believe you are Roman Catholic, right?

The Bible generally has much less influence on catholics than catholics think it has had on them. They have been influenced by priests and catechisms and sermons and magisterial interpretations, but not the Bible itself.

Back in graduate school at a catholic university, I was shocked that my colleagues (doctoral students!) couldn't find their way through a Bible. Ask a Baptist to look up the book of Job or Habakkuk or 2 Peter, and they zip right through. Catholics fumble around until they accidentally stumble upon what they are looking for.

The Bible isn't an obvious or automatic entry on any list these days.

Unfortunately. [/quote]


Yes I am Catholic. I do have a few issues with the way the Church has gone about some things. While you know I am I am anti abortion. It is only abortion for convenience that I am against. I feel rape and or incest are entirely different and should be looked at differently and on a case to case basis along with a few other exceptions I will not get into here and now. I do not want to turn this into another abortion thread. Have we ever discussed that? :)

I have had many discussions with priests and even the Late cardinal Oconnor (Archbishop of New York) whom I had the privilege to be in his company twice in a very informal settings which included dinner and great conversation after. Actually he served in the Navy as a chaplain. Probably one of the most mesmerizing and intelligent individuals I have ever had the privilege to meet. Wow do I digress. Sorry.

Only trying to say that while I am a Catholic I am not in complete agreement with everything they as a church say. Having talked to priests and others including Oconnor as I have mentioned it is OK. They informed me that just on that I am not condemned for eternal ***ation. :) Any one who really studies the Catholic religion would know that but I thought I would throw it in before someone said, "well aren't you worried about not following it to the letter". Again I don't want another religious topic. Just giving some of my life's experiences. Thanks for reading this far.

Now what were we discussing? Oh yea books that shaped us. Sorry. Probably one of the only times I have ever said I am sorry twice in the same post. I hate to apologize. :)
Message: Posted by: Magnus Eisengrim (Sep 30, 2014 04:37PM)
[quote]On Sep 30, 2014, mastermindreader wrote:
There is no doubting, though, that it would be nearly impossible to appreciate literature and philosophy without at least a fundamental familiarity with the Bible.

I was raised Catholic myself and, you're right, it only compromises about a third of Catholic theology. But, nonetheless, I studied it in depth when I was in college in order to better understand the English literature that was my major.

And many atheists I know, also have studied the Bible as it is essential to understanding history.

I guess my point is that the Bible is an important work regardless of one's religion. [/quote]


I considered putting Anatomy of Criticism--Northrop Frye on my list for precisely this reason.
Message: Posted by: foolsnobody (Sep 30, 2014 11:35PM)
The people who put their choices in chronological order caused me to reflect a little on books I had forgotten about. I would say John Steinbeck's In Dubious Battle. Dostoevsky's The Idiot. Also Crime and Punishment. Isaac Asimov's Foundation Trilogy. Erle Stanley Gardner's Perry Mason Pocketbooks. Mickey Spillane's Mike Hammer mysteries. Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe mysteries. Barnaby by Crockett Johnson (a series of children's books). Don Juan series by Castaneda. The works of John Lilly. William S. Burroughs. Jack Kerouac. Gary Snyder. Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche's Cutting through Spiritual Materialism.
Message: Posted by: landmark (Oct 1, 2014 12:01AM)
Foolsbody list reminded me of some more important ones for me...we must have been born under a similar star...Castaneda, Lilly, Burroughs, Rinpoche
Message: Posted by: George Ledo (Oct 1, 2014 11:19AM)
[quote]On Sep 30, 2014, Michael Baker wrote:
8) Scenery for the Theatre: The Organization, Processes, Materials, and Techniques Used to Set the Stage - Harold Burris-Meyer
[/quote]
Wow, I haven't heard anyone mention that book in years! It was considered the bible when I was in school, and it still sits on my shelf. Unfortunately, it hasn't been revised since the 70s, so a lot of the technical stuff is outdated, but the darn thing is still fantastic.
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Oct 1, 2014 11:21AM)
Isn't it interesting that nobody ever mentions textbooks on these kinds of lists?

No one ever says, Fundamentals of Physics, or Mathematics for Business, or the McGuffey readers (which begs the question of why home schoolers are so fond of them), or, say, what I'm about to list as my fifth book:

5. SRA cards

Most of y'all probably don't know about these. But the private school I attended in Taipei used SRA's reading system. And--without any exagerration whatsoever--those darn cards probably shaped my life more than anything else.

Honestly, what I've read has shaped me much less than my ability to read.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Oct 1, 2014 12:10PM)
What do you mean? "The Amateur Magicians Handbook" is the greatest textbook on magic I've ever read.


[Correction to earlier post: The sentence that included, "it only compromises about a third of Catholic theology," should read "comprises" NOT "compromises." Kind of inadvertently changed the meaning of the sentence there. :eek:]
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Oct 1, 2014 12:37PM)
I meant school textbooks.
Message: Posted by: JoeHohman (Oct 1, 2014 12:40PM)
Hi, Stoneunhinged.

I thought about listing my finance textbook by Burden and Faires, but I thought that would have looked odd. (Funny, the thought of appearing odd has never stopped any of my previous behaviors...)

And yes, I remember SRA's! Haven't thought about them in YEARS.....
Message: Posted by: General_Magician (Oct 1, 2014 02:16PM)
[quote]On Oct 1, 2014, mastermindreader wrote:
What do you mean? "The Amateur Magicians Handbook" is the greatest textbook on magic I've ever read.


[Correction to earlier post: The sentence that included, "it only compromises about a third of Catholic theology," should read "comprises" NOT "compromises." Kind of inadvertently changed the meaning of the sentence there. :eek:] [/quote]

I bought the book yesterday given your recommendation. It looks like it's going to be a great read.
Message: Posted by: General_Magician (Oct 1, 2014 05:19PM)
Hey Bob,

I read "The Trick Brain" but I noticed you thought another book was similar yet superior to the "Trick Brain." What was that book? I thought the "Trick Brain" was awesome and made perfect logical sense when it comes to understanding the mechanics of magic. What makes this other book you were talking about superior to "The Trick Brain?"
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Oct 1, 2014 05:38PM)
Any number of books are superior to the Trick Brain, which attempts to replace actual creativity with a mechanistic formula that produces ridiculously contrived effects. Pick a random prop from this list. Pick an effect from this one and pick a method from this one.

Sorry, but that's not how great acts are created.

I basically agree with this review that appeared in the November 17, 1944 issue of The Phoenix:

[quote]WE are in a quandary about how to review Dariel Fitzkee's monumental new book, "The Trick Brain". His analysis of effects and methods, his breakdowns of thought processes in the invention of tricks are superb. The book is encyclopedic and worthy of book space in a working magic library. But, and this is purely a personal but, the core of the book is the "Trick Brain" which is a formula for the creation of new tricks.

This is the first time to our knowledge that anyone has ever tried to do this with trick plots.

OUR criticism then, must be on what we know of the story plot method. Walter [editor Walter Gibson], one of the most stupendous word producers that has ever lived...has found it impossible to work from a formula book.

Bruce [editor Bruce Elliott], a newcomer to the fiction racket, has written and sold about four million words in the last three years. He can't work from the formula books either.

WE are not isolated instances. We know most of the other commercial writers and none of them have been able to use...any of the plot devices. They are too mechanical. And even when the device has given you the whole set up, there still remains the tiny factor of the creative idea which must be added.

It is that little factor, creation, and we as commercial fiction mills would be the last people to talk about genius, temperament and all the other bushwah that 'good writers' kid themselves with, that louses up the mechanical idea like this. Proof of our criticism, we think, are the tricks which Dariel gives as examples of the way the Brain operates. They are mechanically contrived. There are no little touches that make them tricks which you really want to do. They are admittedly new tricks, but not worldbeaters. That, we suppose, is valuable. It is thought provoking; a great deal of awfully hard work has gone into it. But we don't think a new generation of Jordans or Annemanns will arise after having used the "Trick Brain" itself.

As a matter of fact, we think that the book will be more valuable to youse (sic) guys for the reverse of what Dariel meant it. And that is, that a thorough study of the magic methods contained therein will enable you to crack down new tricks and deduce the modus operandi thereof.

BE that as it may, Dariel certainly deserves a lot of credit for the work that has gone into this pioneering work." [/quote]

Yes, Fitzkee did put a lot of work into the book, but as I said earlier, it is a poor substitute for actual creativity. The Trick Brain, sadly, is to magic, what paint by the numbers kits are to oil painting.
Message: Posted by: General_Magician (Oct 1, 2014 05:45PM)
I thought Fitzkee's book was brilliant. Loved it! The reason why I think it's brilliant is because part of understanding the Art of Magic is understanding the Science of Magic. Sure, you need creativity no doubt in the Art of Magic. However, there is also a science behind the art. So, Fitzkee's book helps in understanding the mechanics of magic, which the mechanics of magic is part of understanding the science of magic and the science of magic is part of understanding the overall Art of Magic. Science is just as important as Art and you can use science in helping to create and understand art. This applies in magic as well.

Edit: Bear in mind that "The Trick Brain" should only be considered a book towards helping somebody understand SOME of the science behind magic and that it's focus is primarily on the mechanics of magic. It is NOT a book that should be considered as something that gives somebody an OVERALL understanding of magic, just helping with the science aspect, mainly the mechanics of magic. Not the creative side of magic. But understanding the mechanics of magic helps one to be more creative with magic.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Oct 1, 2014 10:33PM)
I disagree. You'll get a much more thorough understanding of the mechanics of magic from "Our Magic" and the works of S.H. Sharp. Contrivance is not science. All Fitzkee did was categorize and create a formulaic device that simulates creativity. I've NEVER seen an effective act or effect that was developed by following Fitzkee's advice. I've seen a lot of bad ones, though.

Again, painting by the numbers isn't art, nor is it particularly creative.

Could you provide some examples of great effects you invented by using "The Trick Brain" that you actually use in your performances?
Message: Posted by: General_Magician (Oct 1, 2014 10:39PM)
It didn't seem like he was contriving to me. It seemed to fit in quite well and make perfect lgocal sense. That being said, after I finish reading over a few books, I'll check into "Our Magic" and some of the works of S.H. Sharp. So what makes these books superior to the "The Trick Brain?" What is it about them that make them better towards understanding the mechanics of magic? Are they logical and make sense? Or are these books just an example of the creative side of magic rather than the science or logic behind the mechanics of magic?
Message: Posted by: motown (Oct 1, 2014 11:11PM)
[quote]On Oct 1, 2014, stoneunhinged wrote:
Isn't it interesting that nobody ever mentions textbooks on these kinds of lists?

No one ever says, Fundamentals of Physics, or Mathematics for Business, or the McGuffey readers (which begs the question of why home schoolers are so fond of them), or, say, what I'm about to list as my fifth book:

5. SRA cards

Most of y'all probably don't know about these. But the private school I attended in Taipei used SRA's reading system. And--without any exagerration whatsoever--those darn cards probably shaped my life more than anything else.

Honestly, what I've read has shaped me much less than my ability to read. [/quote]On my list Gardner's Art Through the Ages is a textbook and was required for Art History when I was in college. A few of the others on my list, while not text books were required reading for courses in school.
Message: Posted by: Magnus Eisengrim (Oct 2, 2014 07:52AM)
[quote]On Oct 1, 2014, stoneunhinged wrote:
Isn't it interesting that nobody ever mentions textbooks on these kinds of lists?

No one ever says, Fundamentals of Physics, or Mathematics for Business, or the McGuffey readers (which begs the question of why home schoolers are so fond of them), or, say, what I'm about to list as my fifth book:

5. SRA cards

Most of y'all probably don't know about these. But the private school I attended in Taipei used SRA's reading system. And--without any exagerration whatsoever--those darn cards probably shaped my life more than anything else.

Honestly, what I've read has shaped me much less than my ability to read. [/quote]

LOL I was just thinking of SRA cards. In 1971 a bunch of nice Canadian kids got to slug through SRA cards telling us how to be a bunch of nice American kids.
Message: Posted by: Magnus Eisengrim (Oct 2, 2014 07:54AM)
[quote]On Oct 1, 2014, JoeHohman wrote:
Hi, Stoneunhinged.

I thought about listing my finance textbook by Burden and Faires, but I thought that would have looked odd. (Funny, the thought of appearing odd has never stopped any of my previous behaviors...)

And yes, I remember SRA's! Haven't thought about them in YEARS..... [/quote]

They wrote a finance textbook? I have their numerical analysis book next to this desk, as I speak.
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Oct 2, 2014 09:23AM)
[quote]On Oct 2, 2014, Magnus Eisengrim wrote:

LOL I was just thinking of SRA cards. In 1971 a bunch of nice Canadian kids got to slug through SRA cards telling us how to be a bunch of nice American kids. [/quote]

I honestly can't remember anything about the cards other than having to slog through them. My friend Robert and I had a contest of racing through them as fast as possible. I wonder if there are any of them online somewhere. I could google "vintage sra", maybe? LOL!
Message: Posted by: Magnus Eisengrim (Oct 2, 2014 09:30AM)
[img]http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_vIx36EnNOz4/S8gBYc_sybI/AAAAAAAABro/r5GxI4oMoO4/s1600/SRA-2.jpg[/img]

[img]http://gamesweplayed.files.wordpress.com/2012/09/sra-reading-cards.jpeg[/img]


[img]http://gamesweplayed.files.wordpress.com/2012/09/sra-reading-cards-4.jpeg[/img]
Message: Posted by: Michael Baker (Oct 2, 2014 10:14AM)
Jumping back in a bit late...

Greater Magic, 141 Tricks, and in fact most magic books that deal with tricks are reference books. They CAN be read cover to cover, but inmost cases, do not HAVE to be. I also consider them to be textbooks, especially if magic become the profession of choice, as with me. Much of the learning is achieved at the school of hard knocks. ;)

141 Tricks was the first book on magic that I ever got. I still have that copy, and maybe another half dozen more. It was released in several covers and there was an expanded version at one time. The sleight section taught me everything except what to do with the sleights, once I'd learned them, but the prop section was the kickstarter for what I do now.

I did not list The Trick Brain, although of course I have read it. If the book is taken at face value (a game or machine if you will, then I fully agree with Bob. However, I never saw use in that formula process. But, it was an eye-opener for me in that it made it possible to diagnose any desired effect when searching for a method. Knowing the objects and effects ahead of time is not the same as choosing them randomly.

General, I am surprised that you did not mention "Magic By Misdirection", the other in the trilogy.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Oct 2, 2014 12:02PM)
I agree, Michael. As I recall, my copy of the Ripley book was a paperback with a red cover.

As to, "The Trick Brain," I agree. Your point is the same as that made in the Phoenix review that I quoted. The value of the book is actually the opposite of what Fitzkee intended.
Message: Posted by: Michael Baker (Oct 2, 2014 12:50PM)
[quote]On Oct 2, 2014, mastermindreader wrote:
I agree, Michael. As I recall, my copy of the Ripley book was a paperback with a red cover.

As to, "The Trick Brain," I agree. Your point is the same as that made in the Phoenix review that I quoted. The value of the book is actually the opposite of what Fitzkee intended. [/quote]

Red cover indeed. I don't have my copies in front of me at the moment, but I'm sure one of them has a black cover.

Regarding "The Trick Brain", I agree that it lacks the creative process. If Fitzkee intended it to replace that, he was wrong (IMO). But, it is not entirely useless as a process, so long as it is seen as a preparatory element. By following the formula as a practice aid, rather than a tool to design a trick or an entire act, it can be helpful in that it gives the student practice of the process of assembling tricks. Therefore, when it comes time to truly be creative, the technical elements can be quickly managed, instead of becoming focal points, which would ultimately bog down the artistic side of things.

Think of it as mental calisthenics. The same as the act of doing push-ups, sit-ups, etc. for the body are not the final goal. But, they make it possible for the body to achieve its "more creative" goals much more easily. I see it as just another specialized tool. It doesn't do everything, but what it does do, it does better than most other tools.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Oct 2, 2014 02:17PM)
I see your point Michael. I think, though, that SH Sharpe did a far more complete job of categorizing principles and methods. I think, though, that if Fitzkee had left out the "Trick Brain" part of "The Trick Brain," it would have been a far better book.
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Oct 2, 2014 03:04PM)
[quote]On Oct 2, 2014, Magnus Eisengrim wrote:
[img]http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_vIx36EnNOz4/S8gBYc_sybI/AAAAAAAABro/r5GxI4oMoO4/s1600/SRA-2.jpg[/img]

[img]http://gamesweplayed.files.wordpress.com/2012/09/sra-reading-cards.jpeg[/img]


[img]http://gamesweplayed.files.wordpress.com/2012/09/sra-reading-cards-4.jpeg[/img] [/quote]

Wow!

Thanks, John.
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Oct 2, 2014 03:19PM)
As far as magic textbooks go, I would love to have Greater Magic, but don't want to pop out $300, since I'm just a connoisseur of magic and not a magician. Am I missing something? Did Penguin do a $50 reprint?

I'd be glad to buy a couple of Bob Cassidy books for my library, but I'd want signed copies, because I'm special.

The last book I bought from a Café member wasn't signed. Bummer.

But I digress.

Back on topic: I also cherish Peterson Field Guides.
Message: Posted by: Magnus Eisengrim (Oct 2, 2014 04:01PM)
[url=http://www.abebooks.com/servlet/BookDetailsPL?bi=12736490127&searchurl=x%3D59%26amp%3By%3D6%26amp%3Bbi%3D0%26amp%3Bds%3D30%26amp%3Bsts%3Dt%26amp%3Bbx%3Doff%26amp%3Bsortby%3D17%26amp%3Btn%3Dgreater+magic%26amp%3Ban%3DHilliard%26amp%3Brecentlyadded%3Dall]Greater Magic[/url] for $100.
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Oct 2, 2014 04:15PM)
Abe Books is awesome.
Message: Posted by: HudsonView (Oct 2, 2014 04:34PM)
"Greater Magic, but don't want to pop out $300"

I have the version that is just the card tricks pulled out. It is still a pretty hefty book. All I cared about was the card stuff anyway so I've never missed not having the rest. That book comes up on ebay now and then for way under $100.
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Oct 2, 2014 04:47PM)
Amongst those I'd list, in no particular order, are:

[b]The (New King James) Bible[/b], [i]various authors[/i]

[b]Mathematics[/b] (Time Science Library), [i]David Bergamini[/i]

My father's university trigonometry and calculus textbooks, the exact titles and authors of which escape me, alas

[b]Five Weeks to Winning Bridge[/b], [i]Alfred Sheinwold[/i]

[b]Mere Christianity[/b], [i]C. S. Lewis[/i]

[b]Stars of Magic[/b], [i]various authors[/i]

[b]The Amateur Magician's Handbook[/b], [i]Henry Hay[/i]

[b]Fun with Magic[/b], [i]Joseph Leeming[/i]

[b]More Fun with Magic[/b], [i]Joseph Leeming[/i]

Some grammar book my parents had, the title and author of which escape me, alas.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Oct 2, 2014 06:29PM)
[i]Mere Christianity[/i] is also one of my favorites.
Message: Posted by: landmark (Oct 2, 2014 07:22PM)
[quote]Fun with Magic, Joseph Leeming

More Fun with Magic, Joseph Leeming [/quote]

The Leeming books were such favorites of mine when I was a child that I recently got a hold of a copy of More Fun with Magic. Alas, Thomas Wolfe was right--you can't home again. It really doesn't hold up IMO.
Message: Posted by: JoeHohman (Oct 3, 2014 02:30PM)
Magnus, you are right -- I am confusing my authors! Embarrassed to death...

I think I meant to name Brealey and Myers -- their "Principles of Corporate Finance" is just 18" apart from "Numerical Analysis" on MY bookshelf, as I type this....

(Come to think of it, Burden and Faires was pretty good; but it wasn't, like, life-shaping or anything.....)

Magnus, I salute your sharp eyes! And good find on the SRA materials!
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Oct 3, 2014 02:57PM)
[quote]On Oct 2, 2014, Magnus Eisengrim wrote:
[url=http://www.abebooks.com/servlet/BookDetailsPL?bi=12736490127&searchurl=x%3D59%26amp%3By%3D6%26amp%3Bbi%3D0%26amp%3Bds%3D30%26amp%3Bsts%3Dt%26amp%3Bbx%3Doff%26amp%3Bsortby%3D17%26amp%3Btn%3Dgreater+magic%26amp%3Ban%3DHilliard%26amp%3Brecentlyadded%3Dall]Greater Magic[/url] for $100. [/quote]

Just ordered it. Thanks, John.
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Oct 3, 2014 03:01PM)
[quote]On Oct 3, 2014, stoneunhinged wrote:
[quote]On Oct 2, 2014, Magnus Eisengrim wrote:
[url=http://www.abebooks.com/servlet/BookDetailsPL?bi=12736490127&searchurl=x%3D59%26amp%3By%3D6%26amp%3Bbi%3D0%26amp%3Bds%3D30%26amp%3Bsts%3Dt%26amp%3Bbx%3Doff%26amp%3Bsortby%3D17%26amp%3Btn%3Dgreater+magic%26amp%3Ban%3DHilliard%26amp%3Brecentlyadded%3Dall]Greater Magic[/url] for $100. [/quote]

Just ordered it. Thanks, John. [/quote]

Magicians helping magicians.
Message: Posted by: Magnus Eisengrim (Oct 3, 2014 03:47PM)
What are the odds, eh, Joe? Burden and Faires did have a sweet cover, though :)


Very cool Jeff. Enjoy!

John
Message: Posted by: General_Magician (Oct 3, 2014 03:56PM)
[quote]On Oct 3, 2014, LobowolfXXX wrote:
[quote]On Oct 3, 2014, stoneunhinged wrote:
[quote]On Oct 2, 2014, Magnus Eisengrim wrote:
[url=http://www.abebooks.com/servlet/BookDetailsPL?bi=12736490127&searchurl=x%3D59%26amp%3By%3D6%26amp%3Bbi%3D0%26amp%3Bds%3D30%26amp%3Bsts%3Dt%26amp%3Bbx%3Doff%26amp%3Bsortby%3D17%26amp%3Btn%3Dgreater+magic%26amp%3Ban%3DHilliard%26amp%3Brecentlyadded%3Dall]Greater Magic[/url] for $100. [/quote]

Just ordered it. Thanks, John. [/quote]

Magicians helping magicians. [/quote]


Now that was funny Lobo. I got a good chuckle out of that one.
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Oct 3, 2014 04:06PM)
You chuckled?

Lobo wasn't joking.

Whatever.
Message: Posted by: General_Magician (Oct 3, 2014 04:50PM)
[quote]On Oct 3, 2014, stoneunhinged wrote:
You chuckled?

Lobo wasn't joking.

Whatever. [/quote]

I don't know man. It seems like he was joking. Don't get me wrong I have had magicians help out here every now and then and I have done the same, but it seems like most of the time the whole "magicians helping magicians" really is just a marketing, propaganda slogan rather than an accurate reflection of objective reality. And I know am I am not the only who would precieve it the same here so it's not "just me." In any event, I thought it was funny and good comedy from Lobo and it really did, honestly, no joke or sarcasm, made me laugh.
Message: Posted by: tommy (Oct 3, 2014 06:00PM)
"Give me 26 lead soldiers and I will conquer the world.”

― Benjamin Franklin, Wit and Wisdom from Poor Richard's Almanack
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Oct 3, 2014 06:02PM)
Lobo wasn't joking.

And "magicians helping magicians" is far more than a marketing, propaganda slogan here.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Oct 3, 2014 06:11PM)
A "marketing propaganda slogan?"

Hardly. The vast majority of members here actually do help each other. That's the whole purpose of the Café. (Except for NVMS, of course.)

Check out the Penny for Your Thoughts forum if you doubt me.
Message: Posted by: General_Magician (Oct 3, 2014 08:57PM)
[quote]On Oct 3, 2014, mastermindreader wrote:
A "marketing propaganda slogan?"

Hardly. The vast majority of members here actually do help each other. That's the whole purpose of the Café. (Except for NVMS, of course.)

Check out the Penny for Your Thoughts forum if you doubt me. [/quote]

Alright, I think that's a fair assessment. You like that whole "marketing propaganda slogan" didn't you? What's Penny for Your Thoughts about? I tell you Bob, I purchased this Kidabra DVD and man, that was well worth the money. I totally stink as a children's magician. How I got into childrens magic is I would amaze adults with close up magic and they would think it was so amazing they genuninely liked it that they wanted to book me for their kids birthday party and I would get so many requests, that I simply couldn't ignore the money making opportunity. Performing kids shows is a lot of fun once you can get an idea of how to do a kids show. You can't perform the same kind of magic for a children's birthday party that you would for a big corporate event. I've gotten to where I am getting better with balloon animals and even adults are begining to request some balloon animals from me. It's kinda nice to be able to do some cool magic tricks and a few cool balloon sculptures.
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Oct 4, 2014 12:10AM)
[quote]On Oct 3, 2014, General_Magician wrote:
You can't perform the same kind of magic for a children's birthday party that you would for a big corporate event.[/quote]
As a matter of fact, one can.

I've been doing it for years.
Message: Posted by: foolsnobody (Oct 4, 2014 02:17AM)
Wow S2000 I forgot about the bridge books. Add Play Bridge with Reese and Bridge with the Blue Team. Whether any of the authors cheated or not. Your choice of 5 Weeks to Winning Bridge is excellent also. I wish I could find a copy now. Also the S.J. Simon books.
Message: Posted by: General_Magician (Oct 4, 2014 06:47AM)
[quote]On Oct 4, 2014, S2000magician wrote:
[quote]On Oct 3, 2014, General_Magician wrote:
You can't perform the same kind of magic for a children's birthday party that you would for a big corporate event.[/quote]
As a matter of fact, one can.

I've been doing it for years. [/quote]


Really? Kids don't seem to be able to understand or follow my card tricks like the adults can. That's why in my kids show, as of right now, I don't include any of my card tricks that I perform for corporate events or an adult birthday party (had many bookings for adult birthday parties as well). Entertaining adults and entertaining kids seem to require two different skill sets. I find it more challenging to entertain kids as opposed to adults. I guess because most of my experience has been in close up magic designed for adults to fool the critical thinking, analytical and more mature adult mind as well as to entertain that mind in the process. So I have to had to change mode in thinking to better be able to entertain children and the tricks in my show have to be more down to their level. I have also included some tricks that are for children like using a change bag for example. I would never use a change bag to perform a magic trick to entertain adults.
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Oct 4, 2014 09:17AM)
[quote]On Oct 4, 2014, foolsnobody wrote:
Wow S2000 I forgot about the bridge books. Add Play Bridge with Reese and Bridge with the Blue Team. Whether any of the authors cheated or not. Your choice of 5 Weeks to Winning Bridge is excellent also. I wish I could find a copy now. Also the S.J. Simon books. [/quote]

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aag/main/ref=olp_merch_name_2?ie=UTF8&asin=B000MYI2NQ&isAmazonFulfilled=0&seller=A1G31V8EZLIGGE

Magicians helping magicians.

Nice selections.
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Oct 4, 2014 03:02PM)
[quote]On Oct 4, 2014, General_Magician wrote:
[quote]On Oct 4, 2014, S2000magician wrote:
[quote]On Oct 3, 2014, General_Magician wrote:
You can't perform the same kind of magic for a children's birthday party that you would for a big corporate event.[/quote]
As a matter of fact, one can.

I've been doing it for years. [/quote]
Really? Kids don't seem to be able to understand or follow my card tricks like the adults can. That's why in my kids show, as of right now, I don't include any of my card tricks that I perform for corporate events or an adult birthday party (had many bookings for adult birthday parties as well). Entertaining adults and entertaining kids seem to require two different skill sets. I find it more challenging to entertain kids as opposed to adults. I guess because most of my experience has been in close up magic designed for adults to fool the critical thinking, analytical and more mature adult mind as well as to entertain that mind in the process. So I have to had to change mode in thinking to better be able to entertain children and the tricks in my show have to be more down to their level. I have also included some tricks that are for children like using a change bag for example. I would never use a change bag to perform a magic trick to entertain adults.[/quote]
When I do a parlor show - whether for kids or adults - the only card trick I will do is [b][i]Cards Across[/i][/b]: adults and kids can follow and appreciate that one equally.

I use precious little apparatus for a parlor show. If you consider rope effects, linking rings, [b][i]Silk-to-Egg[/i][/b], and so on, you'll start to see that there are many, many effects that will entertain adults and children alike. As I say, my parlor show for a corporate Christmas party and for a seven-year-old's birthday party don't differ substantially.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Oct 4, 2014 03:29PM)
[quote]On Oct 3, 2014, General_Magician wrote:

... What's Penny for Your Thoughts about? [/quote]

It's a forum right here at the Café devoted to mentalism. You'll find the same level of helpfulness though in MANY of the other sections here.
Message: Posted by: slowkneenuh (Oct 4, 2014 04:04PM)
Alright, I am going to take the title of this thread literally. The book that has shaped me was "Top Secret Recipes: Creating Kitchen Clones of America's Favorite Brand-Name Foods". Unfortunately the shape isn't very flattering to many except possibly Santa Claus and Frosty The Snowman.
Message: Posted by: imgic (Oct 4, 2014 07:21PM)
As a young child:
Dr Suess Books
A series on great Americans (Jefferson, Ben Franklin, and Teddy Roosevelt being my favorites)
An illustrated Bible

As a teenager :
Isaac Asimovs Works
Amatuer Magicians Handbook
Jaws (not sure why...never had a book grip me like that)

Older
Out of the Crisis by Dr Deming
Air Forces Tongue & Quill (a guide to speaking and writing)
Frank Miller's Batman Graphic Novels (reminded me about being a kid again)

And is forgotten about the SRA reading cards...thise helped me develop a love for reading and helped my comprehensive skills.
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Oct 4, 2014 07:53PM)
[quote]On Oct 4, 2014, imgic wrote:
Jaws (not sure why...never had a book grip me like that)
[/quote]

"The great fish moved silently through the night water, propelled by short sweeps of its crescent tail."
I've read thousands of novels since [i]Jaws[/i]; few match its hook.
Message: Posted by: imgic (Oct 4, 2014 08:59PM)
[quote]On Oct 4, 2014, LobowolfXXX wrote:
[quote]On Oct 4, 2014, imgic wrote:
Jaws (not sure why...never had a book grip me like that)
[/quote]

"The great fish moved silently through the night water, propelled by short sweeps of its crescent tail."
I've read thousands of novels since [i]Jaws[/i]; few match its hook. [/quote]

I was 12 or so when I grabbed it to read on a trip over summer vacation. It was first book I couldn't put down. Stayed up til 3 am reading to finish it.
Message: Posted by: Salguod Nairb (Oct 5, 2014 10:17AM)
[img]http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51W2DW5KXBL._SX258_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg[/img]


After the first couple of chapters everything went pear-shaped.
Message: Posted by: General_Magician (Oct 5, 2014 07:05PM)
I had "The Amateur Magicians Handbook" waiting for me when I got home. It appears to be a more recent version that includes a section on shows for children as well as coaching yourself with videotape by The Amazing Randi. Looking forward to reading it.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Oct 6, 2014 11:30AM)
Excellent. I think you'll find it to be one of the most worthwhile books you've ever bought.
Message: Posted by: slowkneenuh (Oct 6, 2014 12:35PM)
Relative to entertainment, for the past several years it has been any book by Martin Gardner, God rest his soul.
Message: Posted by: critter (Oct 7, 2014 02:19PM)
First to come to mind:

The Tao of Pooh
Erdnase
Hardcore Zen
Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind
Tao Te Ching
Yoga Mala
The Complete Sherlock Holmes
Robert E. Howard's Conan stories
The Tao of Jeet Kune Do
The Hellbound Heart
Message: Posted by: JoeHohman (Oct 7, 2014 02:25PM)
Critter, I read The Tao of Pooh in Baltimore in 1987 and thoroughly loved it! Great pick.

Seeing that you have more than a little Zen thing going on, have you ever read any J.D. Salinger?
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Oct 8, 2014 09:29PM)
[quote]On Oct 2, 2014, S2000magician wrote:
Amongst those I'd list, in no particular order, are:

My father's university trigonometry and calculus textbooks, the exact titles and authors of which escape me, alas[/quote]
I just heard from my younger brother today that I'll soon be learning those titles. Our father passed away two weeks ago, and my brother's going to be shipping me all of his old textbooks.

I cannot wait! Christmas in October!
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Oct 8, 2014 09:41PM)
[quote]On Oct 4, 2014, foolsnobody wrote:
Add Play Bridge with Reese . . . .[/quote]
I'd have included that if I'd thought about it. An excellent book; I love Terence Reese's writing style.

[quote]On Oct 4, 2014, foolsnobody wrote:
Whether any of the authors cheated or not.[/quote]
I've read both Reese's and Truscott's books on the Buenos Aires Affair (for those of you who are unacquainted with the history of bridge World Championships, suffice it to say that this is not the title of an episode of [b][i]The Man From U.N.C.L.E.[/i][/b]), and I found Reese's arguments more compelling than Truscott's.
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Oct 8, 2014 10:45PM)
[quote]On Oct 8, 2014, S2000magician wrote:
[quote]On Oct 2, 2014, S2000magician wrote:
Amongst those I'd list, in no particular order, are:

My father's university trigonometry and calculus textbooks, the exact titles and authors of which escape me, alas[/quote]
I just heard from my younger brother today that I'll soon be learning those titles. Our father passed away two weeks ago, and my brother's going to be shipping me all of his old textbooks.

I cannot wait! Christmas in October! [/quote]

Sorry to hear about your father, Bill. :(
Message: Posted by: General_Magician (Oct 8, 2014 10:55PM)
[quote]
S2000Magician

I just heard from my younger brother today that I'll soon be learning those titles. Our father passed away two weeks ago, and my brother's going to be shipping me all of his old textbooks.

I cannot wait! Christmas in October![/quote]

Sorry to hear about your old man passing away S2000. My sympathies and condolences.
Message: Posted by: critter (Oct 8, 2014 11:43PM)
[quote]On Oct 7, 2014, JoeHohman wrote:
Critter, I read The Tao of Pooh in Baltimore in 1987 and thoroughly loved it! Great pick.

Seeing that you have more than a little Zen thing going on, have you ever read any J.D. Salinger? [/quote]

Not much. Catcher in the Rye a long time ago. Interesting dude.
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Oct 9, 2014 12:46AM)
[quote]On Oct 8, 2014, LobowolfXXX wrote:
[quote]On Oct 8, 2014, S2000magician wrote:
[quote]On Oct 2, 2014, S2000magician wrote:
Amongst those I'd list, in no particular order, are:

My father's university trigonometry and calculus textbooks, the exact titles and authors of which escape me, alas[/quote]
I just heard from my younger brother today that I'll soon be learning those titles. Our father passed away two weeks ago, and my brother's going to be shipping me all of his old textbooks.

I cannot wait! Christmas in October![/quote]
Sorry to hear about your father, Bill. :( [/quote]
Thanks, Lobo. I appreciate it.
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Oct 9, 2014 12:47AM)
[quote]On Oct 8, 2014, General_Magician wrote:
[quote]S2000Magician
I just heard from my younger brother today that I'll soon be learning those titles. Our father passed away two weeks ago, and my brother's going to be shipping me all of his old textbooks.

I cannot wait! Christmas in October![/quote]

Sorry to hear about your old man passing away S2000. My sympathies and condolences.[/quote]
Thanks, William. I appreciate it.
Message: Posted by: Magnus Eisengrim (Oct 9, 2014 08:00AM)
Sorry to hear about your father, Bill.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Oct 9, 2014 08:34AM)
My deepest sympathies and condolences, Bill.
Message: Posted by: landmark (Oct 9, 2014 08:43AM)
Condolences, Bill. A man's books say so much about who he was.
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Oct 9, 2014 09:13AM)
Thanks John, Bob, and landmark. I appreciate your thoughts.
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Oct 9, 2014 10:19AM)
Bob: shoot me a PM if you would. (Assuming that will allow me to reply.)
Message: Posted by: foolsnobody (Oct 10, 2014 02:09AM)
[quote]On Oct 7, 2014, critter wrote:
First to come to mind:

The Tao of Pooh
Erdnase
Hardcore Zen
Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind
Tao Te Ching
Yoga Mala
The Complete Sherlock Holmes
Robert E. Howard's Conan stories
The Tao of Jeet Kune Do
The Hellbound Heart [/quote]

Since you have read some Zen stuff I wondered if you ever looked into the Tibetan stuff? For an earthy and enlightened introduction to the real core of that kind of Buddhism I recommend "Words of My Perfect Teacher" by Patrul Rinpoche.
Message: Posted by: Mr. Mystoffelees (Oct 10, 2014 08:15AM)
Calvin & Hobbes
Message: Posted by: Steve_Mollett (Oct 11, 2014 05:44PM)
The works of E.A.Poe, H.P.Lovecraft, Robert Bloch and Kurt Vonnegut.
Message: Posted by: critter (Oct 13, 2014 02:31AM)
[quote]On Oct 10, 2014, foolsnobody wrote:
[quote]On Oct 7, 2014, critter wrote:
First to come to mind:

The Tao of Pooh
Erdnase
Hardcore Zen
Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind
Tao Te Ching
Yoga Mala
The Complete Sherlock Holmes
Robert E. Howard's Conan stories
The Tao of Jeet Kune Do
The Hellbound Heart [/quote]

Since you have read some Zen stuff I wondered if you ever looked into the Tibetan stuff? For an earthy and enlightened introduction to the real core of that kind of Buddhism I recommend "Words of My Perfect Teacher" by Patrul Rinpoche. [/quote]


I have read a few books on Tibetan Buddhism. I took a class on Buddhist Psychology that was taught by a Tibetan Lama who had fled with the Dalai Lama so we had the required reading from that and I've read a few by the Dalai Lama too.

Soto Zen and Taoism are kind of the core of my personal religiophilosophy. I learn lots of things from lots of different places though.