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Topic: Overrated Movies
Message: Posted by: landmark (Oct 26, 2014 07:23PM)
In another thread Bonnie and Clyde came up as an overrated movie.
Any other nominees?

I'll nominate Young Frankenstein. I don't think I laughed once. Spaceballs was much funnier.
Message: Posted by: rockwall (Oct 26, 2014 07:33PM)
LOL. I think the exact opposite. Spaceballs terribly overrated. Young Frankenstein hilarious.

But I'll nominate Natural Born Killers. What a waste of a couple of hours.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Oct 26, 2014 07:38PM)
Actually, Bonnie and Clyde was grossly under-rated when it was first released. Time magazine panned it for it "glorification" of violence and the Academy Award that year went to "In the Heat of the Night." The irony was that the latter was actually over-rated and the award was widely seen as an effort by the Academy to make up for not giving Rod Steiger's film "The Pawnbroker" the award the previous year.

Then, for the first time ever, Time magazine published a new review of Bonnie and Clyde, admitting that their initial review had completely missed the artistry and point of the film. This time they praised it highly.

Bonnie and Clyde remains a ground-breaking film and is hardly "over-rated."

"In the Heat of the Night," on the other hand, would qualify, IMO, as an over-rated film.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Oct 26, 2014 07:40PM)
I agree with rockwall, though, that Young Frankenstein was hilarious and FAR better than Space Balls.
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Oct 26, 2014 07:51PM)
If it was grossly underrated, it certainly recovered quickly; it was one of the top grossing movies of the year, and no film that year had more Oscar nominations.
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Oct 26, 2014 08:01PM)
Agree with Rockwall on Natural Born Killers.
Message: Posted by: tommy (Oct 26, 2014 08:12PM)
It is all a matter of taste, isn't it?
Message: Posted by: Dannydoyle (Oct 26, 2014 08:19PM)
I am speaking of the Bonnie and Clyde offering from the History channel.

But American Beauty takes the prize for me.
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Oct 26, 2014 08:23PM)
[quote]On Oct 26, 2014, tommy wrote:
It is all a matter of taste, isn't it? [/quote]

Certainly not!
Message: Posted by: tommy (Oct 26, 2014 08:30PM)
Http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ZI_aEalijE
Message: Posted by: arthur stead (Oct 26, 2014 08:41PM)
[quote]On Oct 26, 2014, mastermindreader wrote:
The irony was that the latter was actually over-rated and the award was widely seen as an effort by the Academy to make up for not giving Rod Steiger's film "The Pawnbroker" the award the previous year. [/quote]

Heck of a movie, The Pawnbroker.
Message: Posted by: motown (Oct 26, 2014 09:00PM)
[quote]On Oct 26, 2014, mastermindreader wrote:
Actually, Bonnie and Clyde was grossly under-rated when it was first released. Time magazine panned it for it "glorification" of violence and the Academy Award that year went to "In the Heat of the Night." The irony was that the latter was actually over-rated and the award was widely seen as an effort by the Academy to make up for not giving Rod Steiger's film "The Pawnbroker" the award the previous year.

Then, for the first time ever, Time magazine published a new review of Bonnie and Clyde, admitting that their initial review had completely missed the artistry and point of the film. This time they praised it highly.

Bonnie and Clyde remains a ground-breaking film and is hardly "over-rated."

"In the Heat of the Night," on the other hand, would qualify, IMO, as an over-rated film. [/quote]Bonnie and Clyde was the first adult film my friends and I snuck in on. Still like the film as much today.
Message: Posted by: Salguod Nairb (Oct 26, 2014 09:49PM)
Titanic.
Message: Posted by: Chessmann (Oct 26, 2014 10:10PM)
I've watched "Casablanca" 3 times recently. A good movie, certainly, but for me not a classic.

But one person's opinion doesn't make it 'overrated'.
Message: Posted by: Dannydoyle (Oct 26, 2014 10:14PM)
[quote]On Oct 26, 2014, Salguod Nairb wrote:
Titanic. [/quote]

I put up with it to get laid so while I totally agree and spent the entire movie screaming"sink the ship already" I can't call it to over rated.

The ending bugged me too. Just throw it away and don't sell it to use the money to do any good.
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Oct 26, 2014 10:22PM)
The Piano.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Oct 26, 2014 10:25PM)
[quote]On Oct 26, 2014, LobowolfXXX wrote:
If it was grossly underrated, it certainly recovered quickly; it was one of the top grossing movies of the year, and no film that year had more Oscar nominations. [/quote]

As I noted, it was initially grossly under-rated by critics, including Time magazine. No question that it was a major box office success. Bonnie and Clyde was also among the first 100 films selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry.

Pretty good for a film that some consider "over-rated."
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Oct 26, 2014 10:26PM)
Re: Titanic.

Female takeaway: That was so romantic, he was willing to give up his life for her.

Male takeaway: If she would have just done what he told her, they'd have lived happily ever after, but NOOOOO, she had to get him killed*.

*- Spoiler: He tells her to get in the lifeboat and he (established as an extremely resourceful survivor) will meet up with her later. She refuses so they can be together, and they go on to find buoyant material...that's only big enough for one of them. I think to think he spent his last hours cussing her out in his mind.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Oct 26, 2014 10:27PM)
Danny- I agree with you about the television version of Bonnie and Clyde. What was the point of remaking a classic anyway?
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Oct 26, 2014 10:30PM)
[quote]On Oct 26, 2014, mastermindreader wrote:
[quote]On Oct 26, 2014, LobowolfXXX wrote:
If it was grossly underrated, it certainly recovered quickly; it was one of the top grossing movies of the year, and no film that year had more Oscar nominations. [/quote]

As I noted, it was initially grossly under-rated by critics, including Time magazine. No question that it was a major box office success. Bonnie and Clyde was also among the first 100 films selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry.

Pretty good for a film that some consider "over-rated." [/quote]

I'm not sure how long your "initially" time period was. It was released in August, and by nomination time, at least among the Oscar folks, it wasn't underrated by the nominators.

Of course is has many trappings of success. The fact that it was a major box office success and an early selection for preservation (and a Best Picture nominee) is precisely WHY some of us consider it overrated.

Thoughts on B & C vs. The Graduate or Guess Who's Coming to Dinner (two other Best Picture nominees that year)?
Message: Posted by: landmark (Oct 26, 2014 11:38PM)
Guess Who's Coming to Dinner was pretty awful in my opinion, and I haven't seen The Graduate in a long time. I don't know if it still holds up. But back in 1968 (?) we thought it was the bee's knees. Dustin's first movie and he was different from all the other Hollywood leading men.
Message: Posted by: Dannydoyle (Oct 26, 2014 11:39PM)
[quote]On Oct 26, 2014, mastermindreader wrote:
Danny- I agree with you about the television version of Bonnie and Clyde. What was the point of remaking a classic anyway? [/quote]

I saw no point unless they seriously wanted a documentary. Which obviously they didn't.
Message: Posted by: Dannydoyle (Oct 26, 2014 11:41PM)
To be fair you fellas are much more connoisseurs than myself. If there are no car chases or explosions or gun fights and partial nudity I will probably pass anyhow.
Message: Posted by: landmark (Oct 26, 2014 11:41PM)
Here's one I probably will get disagreement on: Gone with the Wind.
Message: Posted by: Chessmann (Oct 26, 2014 11:45PM)
[quote]On Oct 26, 2014, landmark wrote:
Here's one I probably will get disagreement on: Gone with the Wind. [/quote]

Yep, I disagree :)
Message: Posted by: Dannydoyle (Oct 26, 2014 11:52PM)
[quote]On Oct 27, 2014, landmark wrote:
Here's one I probably will get disagreement on: Gone with the Wind. [/quote]

Frankly I don't give a..... yea I just went there.
Message: Posted by: landmark (Oct 27, 2014 12:14AM)
Oh, one more I know I will get disagreement on : The Deer Hunter. Brilliant acting, but a mess of a movie and politically incoherent and dishonest. OTOH, Apocalypse Now! (the movie, not the Harry Lorayne command) is in my top five favorite movie list.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Oct 27, 2014 12:22AM)
Actually, landmark, I agree with you about both The Deer Hunter and Apocalypse Now!
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Oct 27, 2014 12:27AM)
Lobo-

Here's exactly what I'm talking about and the time frame. (Note that I made a mistake earlier and said that it was Time Magazine that changed its position. I remembered incorrectly- it was Newsweek):

[quote]The film was controversial on its original release for its supposed glorification of murderers, and for its level of graphic violence, which was unprecedented at the time. Bosley Crowther of The New York Times was so appalled that he began to campaign against the increasing brutality of American films.[35] Dave Kaufman of Variety criticized the film for uneven direction and for portraying Bonnie and Clyde as bumbling fools.[36] Joe Morgenstern for Newsweek initially panned the film as a "squalid shoot-'em-up for the moron trade." After seeing the film a second time and noticing the enthusiastic audience, he wrote a second article saying he had misjudged it and praised the film. Warner Brothers took advantage of this, marketing the film as having made a major critic change his mind about its virtues.[37]

Roger Ebert gave Bonnie and Clyde a largely positive review, giving it four stars out of a possible four. He called the film "a milestone in the history of American movies, a work of truth and brilliance." More than 30 years later, he added the film to his "Great Movies" list. Film critics Dave Kehr and James Berardinelli have also praised the film in the years since.

The fierce debate about the film is discussed at length in For the Love of Movies: The Story of American Film Criticism. This 2009 documentary film chronicles what occurred as a result: The New York Times fired Bosley Crowther because his negative review seemed so out of touch with the public, and Pauline Kael, who wrote a lengthy freelance essay in The New Yorker in praise of the film, became the magazine's new staff-critic.

[/quote]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bonnie_and_Clyde_%28film%29#Reception
Message: Posted by: Magnus Eisengrim (Oct 27, 2014 07:42AM)
[quote]On Oct 27, 2014, landmark wrote:
OTOH, Apocalypse Now! (the movie, not the Harry Lorayne command) is in my top five favorite movie list. [/quote]

If you're gonna steal, stealing from Conrad can't be a bad idea.
Message: Posted by: Pakar Ilusi (Oct 27, 2014 07:45AM)
The Shawshank Redemption.

Totally overrated imho...
Message: Posted by: Dannydoyle (Oct 27, 2014 08:01AM)
[quote]On Oct 27, 2014, mastermindreader wrote:
Actually, landmark, I agree with you about both The Deer Hunter and Apocalypse Now! [/quote]

We used to play a version of Russian Roulette we called The Beer Hunter with one of the cans shaken up. .. I'm sure you guys get the idea.

Wasn't really a fan of a Clockwork Orange.
Message: Posted by: Mr. Mystoffelees (Oct 27, 2014 08:23AM)
Chariots Of Fire
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Oct 27, 2014 12:01PM)
[quote]On Oct 27, 2014, Pakar Ilusi wrote:
The Shawshank Redemption.

Totally overrated imho... [/quote]

Really? I think it's one of the best ever adaptations of a Stephen King work.
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Oct 27, 2014 01:09PM)
[quote]On Oct 27, 2014, mastermindreader wrote:
[quote]On Oct 27, 2014, Pakar Ilusi wrote:
The Shawshank Redemption.

Totally overrated imho... [/quote]

Really? I think it's one of the best ever adaptations of a Stephen King work. [/quote]

I agree that it's the best adaptations of a King work (Stand By Me is right up there, too) and I'd say one of the best movies in history.
Message: Posted by: tommy (Oct 27, 2014 02:34PM)
My robe, Lobo. For a film about freedom it was hardly a patch on Spartacus.
Message: Posted by: Dannydoyle (Oct 27, 2014 04:18PM)
[quote]On Oct 27, 2014, LobowolfXXX wrote:
[quote]On Oct 27, 2014, mastermindreader wrote:
[quote]On Oct 27, 2014, Pakar Ilusi wrote:
The Shawshank Redemption.

Totally overrated imho... [/quote]

Really? I think it's one of the best ever adaptations of a Stephen King work. [/quote]

I agree that it's the best adaptations of a King work (Stand By Me is right up there, too) and I'd say one of the best movies in history. [/quote]

A friend of mine saw it first. His recommendation was "just go". Nothing to sell it none of that. This speaks volumes about the film.

It was one of my favorite endings. Really tied it up well and at a great pace.

Did you ever see the Family Guy treatment of the Steven King works? Shawshank, Misery and Stand By Me. Really great way to spend a half hour.
Message: Posted by: Ray Tupper. (Oct 27, 2014 05:32PM)
Dr Zhivago.
Contrived drivel.
The soundtrack goes a long way to saving it though.
Message: Posted by: R.S. (Oct 27, 2014 07:05PM)
I know I'll get a lot of flack for this one, but here goes... Star Wars (any of them). Way overhyped, imo.

On the other end of the spectrum, I agree with Bob and Lobo... Shawshank Redemption is one my all-time favorites, and totally deserving of any accolades. :-)


Ron
Message: Posted by: landmark (Oct 27, 2014 07:48PM)
I don't know that Shawshank was one of my best evers, but it was an entertaining movie in my opinion.

Okay: this. Everything directed by Stanley Kubrick except for Dr. Strangelove. Overrated, all.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Oct 27, 2014 08:28PM)
Disagree on Kubrick. "A Clockwork Orange" and "2001- A Space Odyssey" are masterpieces of cinema.
Message: Posted by: Rick Holcombe (Oct 27, 2014 09:09PM)
Avatar
Message: Posted by: landmark (Oct 28, 2014 12:07AM)
[quote]On Oct 27, 2014, mastermindreader wrote:
Disagree on Kubrick. "A Clockwork Orange" and "2001- A Space Odyssey" are masterpieces of cinema. [/quote]
Interesting. I intensely disliked both of those movies.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Oct 28, 2014 12:09AM)
Why is that "interesting," landmark? I'm hardly alone in my assessment of those films.
Message: Posted by: tommy (Oct 28, 2014 12:35AM)
Gone with the wind.
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Oct 28, 2014 12:49AM)
[quote]On Oct 28, 2014, mastermindreader wrote:
Why is that "interesting," landmark? I'm hardly alone in my assessment of those films. [/quote]

It's interesting to him because while he doesn't hold out much hope re: the tastes of the masses, he expected a little more out of you. :)

Full Metal Jacket would be the Kubrick flick that I love.
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Oct 28, 2014 02:36AM)
My wife and I just watched Into the Wild on Sunday.

Interesting flick, but having read the book I found myself annoyed at the liberties Sean Penn took with the story.
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Oct 28, 2014 03:11AM)
[quote]On Oct 28, 2014, stoneunhinged wrote:
My wife and I just watched Into the Wild on Sunday.

Interesting flick, but having read the book I found myself annoyed at the liberties Sean Penn took with the story. [/quote]

Not quite a simulpost, but interestingly, I hadn't read this post when I created the "RIP Jay Adams" thread 1/2 hour later. Emile Hirsch portrayed both "Alexander Supertramp" in [i]Into The Wild[/i] and Jay Adams in [i]"The Lords of Dogtown."[/i]
Message: Posted by: landmark (Oct 28, 2014 06:40AM)
[quote]On Oct 28, 2014, LobowolfXXX wrote:
[quote]On Oct 28, 2014, mastermindreader wrote:
Why is that "interesting," landmark? I'm hardly alone in my assessment of those films. [/quote]

It's interesting to him because while he doesn't hold out much hope re: the tastes of the masses, he expected a little more out of you. :)

Full Metal Jacket would be the Kubrick flick that I love. [/quote]
@Bob: Oh, what I found interesting was the way you can agree with a person about their taste on some things but disagree strongly on others, even within a narrow focus. So having agreed with you about Apocalypse Now and Deer Hunter, I thought we might have further agreement on Kubrick.

@Lobo: Okay, I take it back a little bit about Kubrick. The first 45 minutes of Full Metal Jacket is brilliant. But then it falls apart in my opinion.
Message: Posted by: Dannydoyle (Oct 28, 2014 07:26AM)
[quote]On Oct 28, 2014, LobowolfXXX wrote:
[quote]On Oct 28, 2014, mastermindreader wrote:
Why is that "interesting," landmark? I'm hardly alone in my assessment of those films. [/quote]

It's interesting to him because while he doesn't hold out much hope re: the tastes of the masses, he expected a little more out of you. :)

Full Metal Jacket would be the Kubrick flick that I love. [/quote]

I liked the first half of it then it lost me some.

Bob I found it interesting as well. I disliked both of those films also.

Now I shall add another classic with "One Flew Over the Cukoo's Nest".
Message: Posted by: Dannydoyle (Oct 28, 2014 07:28AM)
Lord of the Rings.... Pick one I thought were over rated.

And prepare to disagree with me more but Easy Rider.

(Landmark are we the same person?)
Message: Posted by: landmark (Oct 28, 2014 09:08AM)
Lord of the Rings, I can't really say, because that genre is really not my thing. I'll leave it to the fantasy fans to slug it out.

I liked Easy Rider.

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest is an interesting thing. I have a special affinity to that story because back before the movie, it was first adapted from the novel as an Off-Off Broadway play by Dale Wasserman. It was the first play I ever got free tickets to because I was doing a review for my college newspaper. It turned out to be a terrific production. It featured a hilarious newcomer named Danny DeVito in one of the supporting roles. William Devane, who later got fame from Knots Landing and as the President of the US in The Dark Knight Returns, played the lead role and he too was fantastic. DeVito later reprised the role in the movie.

The Milos Forman movie, I think made a very bad mistake by trying to open up the film outside the confines of the asylum. Later, I got to direct the play for a local theatre company and really appreciated what a well-constructed piece of drama it was. It builds up all kinds of tension based specifically on the premise that there is no way out and the inmates are stuck with each other and the staff every day. When that finally explodes, it literally explodes on stage. What is just another special effect in a movie theater is really quite stunning to an audience sitting in front of live actors.
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Oct 28, 2014 10:41AM)
I love One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest. The only problem I have with it is similar to Landmark's - The book is just better. But the movie is very, very good IMO. I think the difference is that the movie can't capture Chief Bromden's voice.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Oct 28, 2014 01:45PM)
[quote]On Oct 27, 2014, LobowolfXXX wrote:
[quote]On Oct 28, 2014, mastermindreader wrote:
Why is that "interesting," landmark? I'm hardly alone in my assessment of those films. [/quote]

It's interesting to him because while he doesn't hold out much hope re: the tastes of the masses, he expected a little more out of you. :)

[/quote]

Sorry not to live up to your expectations. :eek: They remain, nonetheless, among the top one hundred films ever made. (IMO, of course, even though most film historians also agree.)
Message: Posted by: slowkneenuh (Oct 28, 2014 01:52PM)
The English Patient.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Oct 28, 2014 01:56PM)
Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein

(And any Jerry Lewis movie)
Message: Posted by: Magnus Eisengrim (Oct 28, 2014 02:04PM)
Lord of the Rings horrified me. I liked everything visual about the book, but the characters were undeveloped, and the powerful ethical background of the book was surrendered for a few cheap laughs.
Message: Posted by: Pakar Ilusi (Oct 28, 2014 02:08PM)
[quote]On Oct 27, 2014, mastermindreader wrote:
[quote]On Oct 27, 2014, Pakar Ilusi wrote:
The Shawshank Redemption.

Totally overrated imho... [/quote]

Really? I think it's one of the best ever adaptations of a Stephen King work. [/quote]

I don't think so.
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Oct 28, 2014 02:12PM)
The screenplay might as well have been the novella. It's like The Godfater; you could pretty much just follow along with the book.
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Oct 28, 2014 02:17PM)
[quote]On Oct 28, 2014, Magnus Eisengrim wrote:
the powerful ethical background of the book... [/quote]

Powerful ethical backgrounds played better in the 30s and 40s. If LOTR came out today, Tolkien would be branded a racist and prosecuted for a hate crime, or he'd have written it with an inter-tribal council that spent months debating what the elves, dwarves, and men had done to contribute to the orcs' discontent, and possibly given them The Shire to make up for their past misconduct.
Message: Posted by: Chessmann (Oct 28, 2014 02:19PM)
[quote]On Oct 28, 2014, landmark wrote:
The first 45 minutes of Full Metal Jacket is brilliant. But then it falls apart in my opinion. [/quote]

This movie will live forever for (IMHO) one reason: R. Lee Ermey's performance.

(on another, somewhate related note, I've been wanting to watch "Tribes" - a boot camp movie - with Jan Michael Vincent and Darren McGavin for some time now.)
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Oct 28, 2014 02:20PM)
[quote]On Oct 28, 2014, mastermindreader wrote:
[quote]On Oct 27, 2014, LobowolfXXX wrote:
[quote]On Oct 28, 2014, mastermindreader wrote:
Why is that "interesting," landmark? I'm hardly alone in my assessment of those films. [/quote]

It's interesting to him because while he doesn't hold out much hope re: the tastes of the masses, he expected a little more out of you. :)

[/quote]

Sorry not to live up to your expectations. :eek: They remain, nonetheless, among the top one hundred films ever made. (IMO, of course, even though most film historians also agree.) [/quote]

Not MY expectations; I was just (facetiously) putting words in Landmark's mouth. I like 2001 and A Clockwork Orange ok (though I prefer Full !Metal Jacket to either).

I also agree with you in spades about Abbott and Costello Meet Framkenstein and Jerry Lewis movies.
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Oct 28, 2014 02:21PM)
[quote]On Oct 28, 2014, Chessmann wrote:
[quote]On Oct 28, 2014, landmark wrote:
The first 45 minutes of Full Metal Jacket is brilliant. But then it falls apart in my opinion. [/quote]

This movie will live forever for (IMHO) one reason: R. Lee Ermey's performance.

(on another, somewhate related note, I've been wanting to watch "Tribes" - a boot camp movie - with Jan Michael Vincent and Darren McGavin for some time now.) [/quote]

Ermey is brilliant, unfortunately overshadowing some other excellent performances (most notably Matthew Modine's).
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Oct 28, 2014 02:23PM)
The screenplay is significantly more developed than the novella. In fact, I think it's much better.

[quote]The Shawshank Redemption garnered widespread critical acclaim from critics. Entertainment Weekly reviewer Owen Gleiberman praised the choice of scenery, writing that the "moss-dark, saturated images have a redolent sensuality" that makes the film very realistic.[15] While praising Morgan Freeman's acting and oratory skills as making Red appear real, Gleiberman felt that with the "laconic-good-guy, neo-Gary Cooper role, Tim Robbins is unable to make Andy connect with the audience."[15]

The film garnered a 91% approval rating from 64 critics—an average rating of 8.2 out of 10—on review aggregation website Rotten Tomatoes.[16] Metacritic provides a score of 80 out of 100 from 19 critics, which indicates "generally favorable" reviews.[17] The film has been critically acclaimed for depicting Jean-Paul Sartre's ideas about existentialism more fully than any other contemporary movie.[18]...

...In 1998, Shawshank was not listed in AFI's 100 Years...100 Movies, but nine years later (2007), it was #72 on the revised list, outranking both Forrest Gump (#76) and Pulp Fiction (#94), the two most critically acclaimed movies from the year of Shawshank's release. In 1999, film critic Roger Ebert listed Shawshank on his "Great Movies" list.[25] It has been #1 on IMDb's user-generated Top 250 since 2008, when it surpassed The Godfather.[26]

Readers of Empire magazine voted the film as the best film of the 1990s, and it placed number 4 on Empire '​s list of "The 500 Greatest Movies of All Time" in 2008.[24][27] In March 2011, the film was voted by BBC Radio 1 and BBC Radio 1Xtra listeners as their favorite film of all time.[28] Additionally, the Writers Guild of America included Frank Darabont's screenplay on its 101 Greatest Screenplays list, at number twenty-two.[/quote]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Shawshank_Redemption#Critical_response
Message: Posted by: slowkneenuh (Oct 28, 2014 02:47PM)
Mastermindreader said: "Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein (And any Jerry Lewis movie)".

Good grief. Part of growing up for my generation was Saturday matinees watching Abbott and Costello, Jerry Lewis (and westerns) and enjoying every minute of them. Abbott and Costello endured, westerns hung on for a long time and Jerry Lewis not so much. After so many decades childhood memories should be preserved and not criticized. :)

My still favorite movie is Wizard of Oz and the one that terrorized me from childhood is The Thing, with James Arness.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Oct 28, 2014 02:50PM)
I agree about the Wizard of Oz and The Thing. Both great movies.

I wasn't criticizing Abbott and Costello. I was criticizing that particular film which, justifiably, marked the end of Universal's golden age of horror films. (Even Costello said that his five year old daughter could have written a better script.)
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Oct 28, 2014 03:16PM)
[quote]On Oct 28, 2014, mastermindreader wrote:
The screenplay is significantly more developed than the novella. In fact, I think it's much better.

[quote]The Shawshank Redemption garnered widespread critical acclaim from critics. Entertainment Weekly reviewer Owen Gleiberman praised the choice of scenery, writing that the "moss-dark, saturated images have a redolent sensuality" that makes the film very realistic.[15] While praising Morgan Freeman's acting and oratory skills as making Red appear real, Gleiberman felt that with the "laconic-good-guy, neo-Gary Cooper role, Tim Robbins is unable to make Andy connect with the audience."[15]

The film garnered a 91% approval rating from 64 critics—an average rating of 8.2 out of 10—on review aggregation website Rotten Tomatoes.[16] Metacritic provides a score of 80 out of 100 from 19 critics, which indicates "generally favorable" reviews.[17] The film has been critically acclaimed for depicting Jean-Paul Sartre's ideas about existentialism more fully than any other contemporary movie.[18]...

...In 1998, Shawshank was not listed in AFI's 100 Years...100 Movies, but nine years later (2007), it was #72 on the revised list, outranking both Forrest Gump (#76) and Pulp Fiction (#94), the two most critically acclaimed movies from the year of Shawshank's release. In 1999, film critic Roger Ebert listed Shawshank on his "Great Movies" list.[25] It has been #1 on IMDb's user-generated Top 250 since 2008, when it surpassed The Godfather.[26]

Readers of Empire magazine voted the film as the best film of the 1990s, and it placed number 4 on Empire '​s list of "The 500 Greatest Movies of All Time" in 2008.[24][27] In March 2011, the film was voted by BBC Radio 1 and BBC Radio 1Xtra listeners as their favorite film of all time.[28] Additionally, the Writers Guild of America included Frank Darabont's screenplay on its 101 Greatest Screenplays list, at number twenty-two.[/quote]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Shawshank_Redemption#Critical_response [/quote]

In what way do you think the novella was underdeveloped relative to the screenplay? I haven't read it in a while, but as I recall, the movie essentially bought the novella to light right off the page. The cinematography and music were great, and added to the overall experience, but aside from "stuff that can be in the movies but not in the book," I thought it was pretty much a dead-on match.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Oct 28, 2014 03:35PM)
Well, for one, the movie fleshed out a lot more of the story and added a good amount of detail. (And it changed things as well. Recall that Morgan Freeman's "Red" was a white guy in the novella, so named because of his red hair.)
Message: Posted by: HudsonView (Oct 28, 2014 03:45PM)
The Big Chill
Message: Posted by: Magnus Eisengrim (Oct 28, 2014 03:55PM)
[quote]On Oct 28, 2014, LobowolfXXX wrote:
[quote]On Oct 28, 2014, Magnus Eisengrim wrote:
the powerful ethical background of the book... [/quote]

Powerful ethical backgrounds played better in the 30s and 40s. If LOTR came out today, Tolkien would be branded a racist and prosecuted for a hate crime, or he'd have written it with an inter-tribal council that spent months debating what the elves, dwarves, and men had done to contribute to the orcs' discontent, and possibly given them The Shire to make up for their past misconduct. [/quote]

:) Agree (although somewhat less hyperbolically). My point is that the ethical codes of all involved are fundamental to the storytelling, xenophobia and all. Lopping the head off an unarmed messenger is simply impossible in the context of Tolkien's story. But it provided comic relief in the film.
Message: Posted by: landmark (Oct 28, 2014 04:09PM)
[quote]On Oct 28, 2014, slowkneenuh wrote:
Mastermindreader said: "Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein (And any Jerry Lewis movie)".

Good grief. Part of growing up for my generation was Saturday matinees watching Abbott and Costello, Jerry Lewis (and westerns) and enjoying every minute of them. Abbott and Costello endured, westerns hung on for a long time and Jerry Lewis not so much. After so many decades childhood memories should be preserved and not criticized. :)

[/quote] Yes, that A&C movie gave me such pleasure as a child, I could never criticize it.
Message: Posted by: landmark (Oct 28, 2014 04:13PM)
[quote]On Oct 28, 2014, HudsonView wrote:
The Big Chill [/quote]
I don't know if you remember, but the Big Chill came out not too long after the debut of another movie about young college age radicals getting back together again: John Sayles's The Return of the Secaucus Seven. The Sayles movie was funny and true--I felt I had known each one of those characters in real life. The Kasdan film was much slicker (but I think, ripped off from the Sayles film). I preferred the Sayles film.
Message: Posted by: Daryl -the other brother (Oct 28, 2014 05:26PM)
"The Shining". I thought Nickelson's performance was way over the top and took away from the main story, Danny and the Overlook. The mini-series with Steven Weber had better casting and followed the book (King's best, IMOH) much better.