(Close Window)
Topic: The Origins of Pop Haydn's Persona
Message: Posted by: Anand Khalsa (Dec 31, 2014 12:35PM)
I originally PM'ed Pop asking him this question:

I was wondering if you could shed light on how you came up with/settled on your persona of a con man/medicine show huckster?

He thought that it would be better if I asked this question in a thread so that more people could hear and benefit from the answer, and I absolutely agree. Here it goes! :)
Message: Posted by: MagiUlysses (Dec 31, 2014 01:44PM)
Greetings and Salutations,

I, too, would be interested in Pop's thoughts on his character, and how he developed it. Also, Pop, I'd be interested in knowing what if any characters you had previously that may have led to the development of your character. In other words, did your character come together more or less whole, or did he progress in stages to where he is today.

Joe Zeman aka The Mage Ulysses
Message: Posted by: Dr. Hoodwink (Dec 31, 2014 08:51PM)
I'll add this:

How far did you feel you needed to go from "yourself?" I'm not a performer...and probably will never be. I do, however, think often on the wisdom of those ancients who came before, and ponder their sagacious words. In this case, I wonder how or why you may (or may not) have diverged from the advice of the great magi of yore: Be Yourself.

Are you "you" on stage, or did you revel in the realms of imagination (tempered with commercial sensibilities) and veture outside the bounds of common thought and invent a totally new persona?

In other words, did you make a conscious decision to be the lead dog (where the scenery is ever-changing) or did you evolve from being just another dog on that dogsled (where the scenery never changes).

I ask this as a once-aspiring magic-user and equally as a 30-year veteran of [shudder] retail. Show + Business = "Show Business."

Yr. Friend,
Rob
Message: Posted by: Pop Haydn (Jan 1, 2015 03:40PM)
Thanks everyone! I always enjoy talking about this subject. There are so many different things to consider.

First, for those of you who are not aware of my previous work, before becoming Pop, I will show two videos of the same routine:

This is the character that I worked with from the mid-1970's until 2005.

[youtube]rnbhEbQqqvw[/youtube]

This is my character that I have been working on since 2005:

[youtube]v-C10zSiz9o[/youtube]

Before I start talking, I would love to hear your questions and comments about these two videos.
Message: Posted by: Anand Khalsa (Jan 1, 2015 08:43PM)
It's very interesting to see your old work in direct comparison to your new work (also how it plays to an older vs modern audience). I think your current persona makes the trick much more entertaining and astounding, but other people might think differently. Have you gotten better reactions to this effect after changing your character? Thanks again for being willing to answer these questions, it means a lot and I really appreciate it!
Message: Posted by: Anand Khalsa (Jan 1, 2015 08:46PM)
Additionally, I would like to thank MagiUlysses and Dr. Hoodwink for contributing! :)
Message: Posted by: Dr. Hoodwink (Jan 1, 2015 11:41PM)
Well, both were entertaining. I think I'd have felt like I got my ticket's monetary worth out of both routines. It sounded like both audiences enjoyed themselves too.

"Whit" in the first video, while fun to watch, was more "magician-ish." (not my term). I dunno what I'm trying to say here...he'd be worth asking to perform at my social event or whatever but I probably wouldn't remember as much about him as I would about Pop.

"Pop" was like your rascally uncle, the one you looked forward to seeing at Christmas as a child. Garb, speech, the chapeau all blend into a more "solid"(?) character. I don't feel that Whit mistreated his volunteer in any way badly, but look how Pop sent his volunteer back to her seat; that little "thank you" moment as she left the stage was classy. There was also more byplay with the audience.

Discuss: Did Pop evolve slowly or was there a moment in time when you looked around and said to yourself, "something's gotta change."

And one more: How much of your character development was artistic and how much of it was commercial? I mean, ya gotta eat, right?

The magic was great in both videos. Pop just comes off more memorably.

Am I making any sense?
Message: Posted by: Bill Thompson (Jan 3, 2015 10:47AM)
Whit Vs. Pop from the videos above: Whit came first and I was familiar with him from your first videos and manuscripts. He seems like perhaps an over the top version of yourself (Whitney Hadden). kind of a put upon substitute teacher with an unruly class, making it up as he goes, but magic happens.

Pop is a rascal... but a lovable one. Is he serious or not? Can you believe him? Does he even believe what he is saying? Who cares he is fun to watch! Pop is very entertaining, a more 3 dimensional, rounded character... He seems so real, so genuine.

I do have some questions that I have wondered about... you have effectively created an alter ego here... a separate personality even... I hope this makes sense...

How much does the "masque" slip when you are out and about? What about on stage? Does Whit slip out at times? What about Whitney Hadden (the real you)? Who is pulling the strings on Pop? Whit or Whitney? (Are you Whitney playing Pop or are you Whitney playing Whit playing Pop)... I know Whitney is at the root but is Whit still there between Whitney and Pop? When the "masque" slips on stage is that Whit winking at us or is it Whitney?

Do you ever find yourself lost in the Character at times? How often do you get to be Whitney if at all or ever any more? How does your family react to Pop? How does your wife react to Pop? How does she feel about him being around all the time? Do you ever have conflict with your characters? I could go on but I will stop here... This is fascinating. Thanks for being so open with us, Pop.
Message: Posted by: Anand Khalsa (Jan 3, 2015 09:45PM)
Thank you SO MUCH for your contribution to this thread, misterbill. I am really excited to see how Pop answers your questions!
Message: Posted by: FatherWilliam57 (Jan 4, 2015 08:48PM)
Seems to me "Pop" makes far better use of facial expressions, especially the eyes. I particularly like the wide-eyed, innocent "Aw, shucks folks, you can trust me" (wink, wink) look. I agree with Dr. Hoodwink; I think practically everyone has had a "dutch uncle" in their life who was a truly enjoyable and lovable rascal at heart. While both characters are thoroughly entertaining, Pops is far more endearing. Of course, YMMV...
Message: Posted by: Pop Haydn (Jan 5, 2015 03:04AM)
I will be answering more tomorrow. Just finished a run at the Castle which kept me busy this weekend.
Message: Posted by: Anand Khalsa (Jan 5, 2015 08:26PM)
No problem, Pop, thanks again for doing this!
Message: Posted by: Pop Haydn (Jan 6, 2015 04:10AM)
For a more current version of my character, here is my twenty minute show from the Magic Castle last weekend:

[youtube]LEnMaI4mnVs[/youtube]
Message: Posted by: Dr. Hoodwink (Jan 6, 2015 06:31PM)
Ha! I needed that after the day I had at work.

That's cool, seeing those three videos back to back. It's evolution Right Before Our Very Eyes!
Message: Posted by: damien666 (Jan 7, 2015 01:01PM)
I attended a lecture done by Mr. Haydn this past summer..
He mentioned that it was Billy McComb that told him once a performer gets to a certain age, they need to find a character to play onstage..
Perhaps Pop could expand further on that advice here.
By the way - if anyone here ever gets a chance to see Pop lecture - don't miss it!! One of the best to be sure!
Message: Posted by: Jason Simonds (Jan 8, 2015 02:52PM)
I'm also intrigued by this line of questioning. Ever since I read the manuscript for Chicago Surprise, I've been a fan. Thank you, Pop for this opportunity.

When you came up with the Pop persona, how much of the backstory had you developed? For instance, when you teleported the town from 1910 to the 21st century, did you have the Medicine Show initially in mind, or did you develop this idea over time as you built your variety show?

I thought I remember reading somewhere that you worked with a voice coach to rid yourself of your southern accent. How long did it take to get comfortable slipping back into your southern drawl? 10 years later, do you now find it hard to talk without your drawl? What did your friends and family think of your new mannerisms and speech patterns?

Obviously, your research into history of the street cons and medicine shows of the 19th century influenced your decision to become Pop. Were there any specific people/characters (fictional or real) that helped influence your character development?

You spent about 20 years performing as Whit Haydn. When you were performing as Whit Haydn was this performing as yourself, or perhaps an exaggerated caricature of yourself? Had you developed a bit of a backstory for Whit as well? If so, what was the gist of that backstory?

You said you began performing as Pop in 2005. Was this idea a few years in the making or did you just wake up one day and decide to do it? 10 years from now, do you still plan to be living and breathing the Pop character? Have you had any ideas on a new and different performing persona that you'd like to try?
Message: Posted by: cage (Jan 8, 2015 06:15PM)
Thanks for being open to this line of questioning, Pop!

I noticed in the two ring videos that the scripting changed very little--probably no more than would have been expected with a single character during that time span.

Did the creation of a new character prompt you to change any of your scripts? Why, or why not? And if so, how?
Message: Posted by: Pop Haydn (Jan 9, 2015 05:23PM)
My mentor and friend Billy McComb told me that when one gets to be about 55, things change, and the performer should look for a character that he can play into old age--an "older man" character.

It was in 2005--just a few months before I became 55--that I was asked to perform at a Cowboy Festival in Santa Clarita. They wanted me to do the shell game on the street as an 1890's con man. I had been doing the School for Scoundrels at the Magic Castle since 1996, and was delighted to have a chance to put together a costume and work out an 1890's character that I could do when I was demonstrating the shell game and three card monte.

I put together a costume, and put on a fake moustache. I tried to do a Western accent, but really couldn't get it right. So I finally settled on doing an impression of my grandfather from Virginia, who had a voice much deeper and a much thicker accent than my own real Southern accent. I was able to do a pretty good impression.

I was surprised by the effect of using a Southern accent. I have a loud speaking voice from years working on the street and from vocal training. But the deep voice and Southern accent seemed to cut through the clutter. People came to see what was going on. I discovered the power of an archaic and different accent.

Soon after that, I began thinking about this Western con man character and how I might be able to bring my magic into it--thinking perhaps this could be the "old man" character that I needed.

I decided that he would have to be a stage magician and performer as well as a con man, so I created the idea that he was a con man who had "reformed" and become an entertainer and medicine show pitchman. Since I wanted to include my Teleportation Device routine, I also decided to make him an inventor and electrical experimenter.

As my character and show developed, I found that it was very difficult to go back and forth from my adopted mid-western accent and the Southern accent I had developed for Pop. I grew up with a Southern accent, but in voice training in my early twenties I learned to speak without it, and spoke on and off stage with the accent in the first video above. The Southern accent I worked on was based on a Tidewater accent, but with Westernisms and rhetorical elements that would have come from his travels, education and work, and certain Nineteenth Century idioms and phrases.

It quickly became apparent that I couldn't sell two so different characters in both Close-Up and Stage, so I decided to perform as Pop full time. By the end of 2006, I was performing only as Pop Haydn.

I found it very difficult to overcome my friends and family resistance to the accent at first. It became more and more comfortable for me, and more and more difficult to go back and forth. So eventually I just started using it all the time, even at home. I developed an "onstage"/"off stage" character for Pop, both with the same accent and mannerisms but much toned down for off stage.

This change in performing character killed my work. I lost all my cruise ship and corporate work because people couldn't adjust to the new character. It was like starting over.

I was sure that this would pay off eventually, though, so we kept going. Just as things were beginning to get traction and we were preparing to put on the first of our Medicine Shows in 2008, the economy went bad. So we have sort of been treading water until this past year. But I believe the whole project has been worthwhile and I think a success at least artistically.

Most of my routines both close-up and stage were rolled into the Pop character without any changes in patter. Some routines had to change a bit, and because of the clarity of the character, I found it very easy to write new routines for him.

The Color-Changing Handkerchief, Six Card Trick, Tesla Girl, Sphere of Destiny and Magnetized Water and the Amazing Miracle Oil are all routines I created for Pop.

The character and his backstory have changed over time as I needed to add more types of magic performance into the show. I needed a reason for the character from 1910 to be here in the 21st Century, selling patent medicines to a modern audience. I didn't want to do a recreation or reenactment. I wanted the character to know everything that was going on in this modern world, so that he could make reference to cultural, political and technological things familiar to the audience. I early realized that he had to be some sort of time traveler. I didn't want to get involved in time machines and going back and forth--I needed a company of time travelers for the medicine show. So I settled on a story in which the whole 1910 village of Whitehorse Ranch, Ca--in the desert near Landers--was accidentally blown into the 21st Century by a feed back loop in a massive magnifying transformer I was building to provide the town with wireless electricity. The town and all its inhabitants, along with the members of my medicine show, were suddenly stranded in the 21st Century in 2005.

We all had to find a way to support ourselves here in a strange world without documentation. We have been here for ten years, and are completely adjusted to the internet, technology and the customs of this place. But we still have the ideas, tastes and artistic and musical sense of the 19th Century. We have tried to create a show that will appeal to people here, without revealing our actual story. Our backstory is never mentioned in performance, although it is available online: http://www.pophaydn.com/pops-true-story.html

Here is some video from our first show:

[youtube]k7pz4AYf1Vo[/youtube]
Message: Posted by: D. Yoder (Jan 9, 2015 09:39PM)
This has been a wonderful read. You have a group of admirers in Lancaster, PA USA ever since your appearance at Kutztown a few years ago.
Message: Posted by: LeoH (Jan 11, 2015 07:46PM)
Thanks for the graduate course in character development! Wonderful ideas.
Message: Posted by: Pop Haydn (Jan 11, 2015 08:56PM)
I am fascinated by the type of magic that has a nine-year old heart. Dime Novels. Stories for Boys and Girls. Adventure!

Such nonsense fiction is a lot of fun for kids and grownups alike. It needs to be multi-layered and fun. The Indiana Jones movies are a good example of what I mean.

In this world, kids and idiots can build working teleportation devices, if you steal a magic wand you can zap things with it, if you look into the witch's crystal you can find out what you need to know (you don't have to meditate in a dark room for years), if you have the right machine you can control gravity, violate the laws of nature, etc. This sort of magic is real, and represents power. This power can be owned, and it can be stolen. It is the magic of fairy tales and adventures. It is magical thinking on a child's level, but with the glow of wonder that reminds us of when we wished wishes could be made to come true by simply willing it.

The audience and the magician enter into play, in which the magic is considered to be real by the magician, who tries to demonstrate and prove it to the audience. When the show is over, the audience is left with the story of what they have witnessed--their memory of it--and that story doesn't make any sense. They couldn't have seen what they thought they saw. The magic leaves a little burr under the saddle of the mind that makes the experience sticky: it is mired halfway between memory of the real and fantasy. The experience of the impossible is couched in the fantasy of the impossible.

Pop comes to the stage with the intent to sell his products and make some money. He is a professional stage magician. Most of the magic is trickery, which he readily admits. The color-changing scarf, the Mongolian Pop Knot--these are intended to be standard stage magic, done well by a pro. Pop will pretend to believe the fake magic he is doing is real, because that is the way magic is performed. Pop is from 1910. He was blown into this century by accident along with his troupe of musicians and variety performers. Pop is a patent medicine maker and pitchman, and his demonstrations of magnetic water are presented as science. The teleportation device being demonstrated is science. The Tesla Girl (Georgia Magnet) is presented as science. The magic is supposed to be fake and the science is supposed to be real.

What my theory of Pop Haydn came from a question.

What would it be like if you met someone who claimed to be from another world, or another time. What if you were to meet a wild and amazing character like Dr. Who or Professor Marvel? If you were suddenly actually relating and talking to this strange and other worldly person. Would you think they were nuts? Would you think it was a prank? What if you met this guy as a member of his audience? What if he was really believable, and he did things that seemed completely inexplicable unless he was who he claimed to be? What if he had a Sonic Screwdriver that worked, and a Tardis that was bigger inside that outside?

I wanted to create a show that embodied all this fun sort of story into a magical experience of the impossible. The idea is not to convince people the story is real, but to get them to remember having been part of a story for a short time. But the story is a remembrance of something real, and the magic that is unsolved creates a strange sort of opening in the imagination.

Pop seems to be a crackpot. But his inventions work. He seems to be oblivious to the practical uses or value of his powerful objects, and he is impatient, impetuous, careless and absent-minded. He seems the last person who should own the Sphere of Destiny, or be playing around with the forces of high-pressure electricity and gravity, or teleporting objects into other objects by guesswork and aiming. On the other hand, perhaps we can trust him never to put any of these things to an improper or selfish use.

He is a retired conman, gambler and adventurer. But he always survives it seems more by luck than anything else. His ideas are ridiculous and his inventions based on idiot theories, but they always seem to work. It is as if he is the Inspector Clousseau of technology. Whatever he slaps together does what it is supposed to do, seemingly just by luck.
Message: Posted by: Bill Thompson (Jan 11, 2015 10:16PM)
The insight here is fascinating. The real thought behind the performance and development of the character is amazing. Watching the character develop has been a wonderful trip for me to witness. Thank you so much for sharing this.
Message: Posted by: Pop Haydn (Jan 11, 2015 10:33PM)
[img]http://media-cache-ec0.pinimg.com/736x/10/0c/42/100c4257ee902148b1bc179f79a0d39b.jpg[/img]
Message: Posted by: Pop Haydn (Jan 13, 2015 02:33PM)
[quote]On Jan 3, 2015, misterbill wrote:
Whit Vs. Pop from the videos above: Whit came first and I was familiar with him from your first videos and manuscripts. He seems like perhaps an over the top version of yourself (Whitney Hadden). kind of a put upon substitute teacher with an unruly class, making it up as he goes, but magic happens.

Pop is a rascal... but a lovable one. Is he serious or not? Can you believe him? Does he even believe what he is saying? Who cares he is fun to watch! Pop is very entertaining, a more 3 dimensional, rounded character... He seems so real, so genuine.

I do have some questions that I have wondered about... you have effectively created an alter ego here... a separate personality even... I hope this makes sense...

How much does the "masque" slip when you are out and about? What about on stage? Does Whit slip out at times? What about Whitney Hadden (the real you)? Who is pulling the strings on Pop? Whit or Whitney? (Are you Whitney playing Pop or are you Whitney playing Whit playing Pop)... I know Whitney is at the root but is Whit still there between Whitney and Pop? When the "masque" slips on stage is that Whit winking at us or is it Whitney?

Do you ever find yourself lost in the Character at times? How often do you get to be Whitney if at all or ever any more? How does your family react to Pop? How does your wife react to Pop? How does she feel about him being around all the time? Do you ever have conflict with your characters? I could go on but I will stop here... This is fascinating. Thanks for being so open with us, Pop. [/quote]

I dropped my accent and developed a more "urban" persona in the early seventies. I spoke and performed in a midwest accent until 2005 when I started doing Pop. So really, I haven't been Whitney for forty years.

I am Pop all the time now, but I feel authentic. I don't feel I am playing a role when I am not performing. The accent is familiar and comfortable, even if different from the one I grew up with. My feelings and beliefs and attitudes toward things haven't changed. Pop has the same political, social, and philosophical positions and outlooks as I have. That was intentional. His history and experiences and skills mirror my own.

I never have conflict with my characters because I only have the one. I tinker with it, and enlarge the possibilities, but it is the persona I will probably maintain the rest of my life. I actually like it.

It is like playing Santa Claus all the time.

I think the young people today have much more experience with role-playing games and fantasy. They are much more adept at going in and out of character and playing on several layers. People know that Pop isn't real in some sense, but they like to play with him and talk to him. Much like the ventriloquist and his dummy. They know the ventriloquist is there and is the one they are really talking to, but they can't resist the illusion of the dummy. The dummy has a stronger and more attractive and interesting personality. It eclipses the personality of the ventriloquist.

People interact with Pop all the time, both in person in social situations or on Facebook.

They "hook" into the character, and can go in and out of relating to the character or to the "real" Whit effortlessly. They might joke and play with me about being a con man, or a politician or liar and pitchman, and I answer back in character and in story. The next comment might be about my wife or dog or where I will be performing next, and I answer as the "real" me.

Like Jack Benny's "tightwad" image, the good hearted but amoral Pop gives people handles with which they always know how to get a funny response from him. It makes him seem approachable and familiar.

In the same way, I have little trouble slipping in and out of the character, from my onstage to my offstage version of the same persona.

I think my wife likes Pop better, although Whit and Pop both snore and make messes around the house about the same...
Message: Posted by: Bill Thompson (Jan 13, 2015 05:38PM)
[quote]On Jan 13, 2015, Pop Haydn wrote:
...

I think my wife likes Pop better, although Whit and Pop both snore and make messes around the house about the same... [/quote]

LOL! Thanks for answering my questions. This has been a real insight.
Message: Posted by: Perkins (Jan 14, 2015 01:11AM)
[quote]On Jan 11, 2015, Pop Haydn wrote:
I am fascinated by the type of magic that has a nine-year old heart.[/quote]

This resonates with me, sir. Thank you. And thank you for taking the time to share the arc of your character development.

I've found that some of the most engaging live characters to play are good-hearted and a tad cantankerous. This gives the performer the opportunity to be endearingly comic and yet have complete audience control. You wield that with the skill of surgeon here in these videos.
Message: Posted by: Pop Haydn (Jan 14, 2015 02:09PM)
[quote]On Jan 13, 2015, Perkins wrote:
[quote]On Jan 11, 2015, Pop Haydn wrote:
I am fascinated by the type of magic that has a nine-year old heart.[/quote]

This resonates with me, sir. Thank you. And thank you for taking the time to share the arc of your character development.

I've found that some of the most engaging live characters to play are good-hearted and a tad cantankerous. This gives the performer the opportunity to be endearingly comic and yet have complete audience control. You wield that with the skill of surgeon here in these videos. [/quote]

Thanks. It is great for the magical character to have as wide an emotional range as possible. The performer who can enthuse and excite an audience, as well as engender sympathy and provoke, has a lot of advantages when it comes to managing and directing an audience to the place he wants them.

My older persona "Whit" has a similar emotional range as myself, which is not great. He is very stiff and cerebral, without much beyond nervousness, treading water, irritation, and smarmy manipulation. When I created Pop, I wanted him to be much more interesting and stretchable. Pop can pitch a product, laugh out loud, get angry, demand applause, manipulate, scheme and show both fear and resolution--he is much bigger in his range and power of expression than Whit.

Early on, as I became comfortable with the mannerisms and voice of Pop, I began experiencing a strange thing. Ghosts from the past would come out of nowhere and sort of take over my character's face and body. It was amazing, really. These were the old men I knew growing up in the South, the big-eyed story tellers both black and white who would sit around the harness racing stable and spit into cups as they tried to top each other's jokes and stories. I found Pop sort of channeling their expressiveness and wild expressions and mannerisms. This is what gave a lot of authenticity and realism to the the otherwise over the top characterization.

BTW, the name "Pop" was chosen because the old-time conmen loved to use avuncular names. "Dad" Ryan, "Uncle" Willie, "Brother" Bowers were all dangerous conmen. With a name like "Pop," half the battle for a scam artist was won by the time the introductions were over:

"Hello! I'm Whitney Wesley Haydn, but most everybody around here calls me "Pop!"

"Hi, Pop! Pleasure to meet you."

"My pleasure, son. Now what can I do for you?"

If everyone calls him "Pop" then the man must be likeable and responsible and respected, right? As soon as the sucker calls him Pop, he is one step down socially and power-wise. "Howdy, son."

The other reason "Pop" was chosen was that it resonates with "Papa Haydn" as Joseph Haydn was famously called. Pop Haydn (pronounced Hayden) is similar enough to Papa Haydn to make it sound "familiar" without being immediately connected.

Also, Pop was not a popular name--not many people want to play a grandfather role anymore--so Pop Haydn comes up on Google pretty much alone.
Message: Posted by: Anand Khalsa (Jan 14, 2015 07:20PM)
Wow! Thank you SO MUCH Pop! I need a little time to process and reread everything :)
Message: Posted by: Pop Haydn (Jan 16, 2015 01:10PM)
The internet offers a wonderful and inexpensive way to connect our on stage characters with our backstories, and to make connections with our fans. I have set up several fake websites that give credence to the backstory of Pop and of his routines. If people look up "Cleopatra's Eye" or "Sphere of Destiny" they will find websites that I created that tell stories that support my performances on stage. The same with magnetized water. If you search "magnetized water" on youtube, you will find some of my videos that support and extend the performance piece.
Message: Posted by: Bill Thompson (Jan 16, 2015 03:15PM)
[quote]On Jan 16, 2015, Pop Haydn wrote:
The internet offers a wonderful and inexpensive way to connect our on stage characters with our backstories, and to make connections with our fans. I have set up several fake websites that give credence to the backstory of Pop and of his routines. If people look up "Cleopatra's Eye" or "Sphere of Destiny" they will find websites that I created that tell stories that support my performances on stage. The same with magnetized water. If you search "magnetized water" on youtube, you will find some of my videos that support and extend the performance piece. [/quote]

Have you ever thought of planting more false clues on the internet... perhaps fake scans of newspapers with articles about the disappearance of a town or leading to records of Pop's existance in 1910?
Message: Posted by: Pop Haydn (Jan 16, 2015 04:43PM)
Sphere of Destiny:

http://www.ilovetodig.com/blog/cleopatras-sanctum-sanctorum
http://www.studentsocculthistory.com/sphere-of-destiny.html
http://www.pophaydn.com/sphere-of-destiny.html

Magnetized Water:

http://www.electricwaterbc.com/magnetized-water.html
http://www.pophaydn.com/magnetized-water.html
http://youtu.be/8JRXt3QSh0c
http://youtu.be/MIfRMMF3G5U
http://youtu.be/6Y2cYMBM3e0
http://youtu.be/MG-hvj0RhgQ

[img]http://media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/4f/e0/1c/4fe01cb4032311d80fb9098e36699e9c.jpg[/img]
Message: Posted by: Pop Haydn (Jan 16, 2015 06:25PM)
Pop Haydn images available in a number of places online:

[img]http://media-cache-ec0.pinimg.com/736x/bc/39/50/bc39509a48b4c9d118288a9e76af3872.jpg[/img]

[img]http://media-cache-ec0.pinimg.com/736x/77/0f/79/770f791d7699ef5e2854ced083c27caf.jpg[/img]

[img]http://media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/a4/d0/7a/a4d07a0bd379bc7157ab0ae856f4c66b.jpg[/img]

[img]http://media-cache-ec0.pinimg.com/736x/92/95/29/929529c1c04e420149b66ecf3e5a47c5.jpg[/img]

More here:

http://www.pinterest.com/pophaydn/pop-haydn/

and here:

https://www.google.com/search?q=pop+haydn&espv=2&biw=1536&bih=865&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=h6-5VLPSAoinNtTygtAF&ved=0CAcQ_AUoAg

So, yes, I am working to plant as much fake supporting evidence as possible. :)

I like to think of it as peeing in the pool of knowledge...
Message: Posted by: ZachDavenport (Jan 20, 2015 12:41PM)
Certain spots of google have been feeling kind of warm lately. :lol:
Message: Posted by: Pop Haydn (Jan 21, 2015 12:40PM)
It is only virtual warmth, Zach.
Message: Posted by: Jason Simonds (Jan 23, 2015 11:18AM)
Hey Pop,

Thank you for the great insight into your character and it's development. It has been fascinating reading. I appreciate you taking time out of your day to answer our questions. Have you considered compiling your various internet articles into an "autobiography" of your Pop character and pitching that after your shows, alongside your magnetic water and elixirs? I can already see it, a collection of short stories detailing the Many Adventures of Pop Haydn, with each chapter being a new and exciting adventure.
Message: Posted by: Pop Haydn (Jan 23, 2015 12:30PM)
Yes. We are working on a series of Dime Novels that we will sell online and at the shows. We have the Hard Rock Candy, Amazing Miracle Oil, and the Dime Novels. You can see some of the photos we took for the dime novels on my website.
Message: Posted by: LeoH (Jan 24, 2015 09:26PM)
I like the one of you riding the lion.
Message: Posted by: NYCTwister (Jan 27, 2015 09:33AM)
I'd like to add my thanks to Pop for sharing his thought process in developing his character.

As someone in a competitive market like NYC, I'm finding it hard to differentiate myself so inssight into the mind of a true master is incredible.

On a side note I checked out his website and what he has to say about magnetic fields, and magnetized water, is fascinating.
I spent most of yesterday following the links on his site. Truly amazing stuff.

And here I thought it was just snake water. :)

Truly sincere thanks for that Mr. Haydn.
Message: Posted by: Pop Haydn (Jan 27, 2015 11:52AM)
My pleasure. If anyone has questions about character and development of character I will be happy to talk about it.

As I said, this is a very unique approach, and one that would not suit most performers. I don't recommend it. But character study is always important, even when you are just playing yourself. It helps you to be at ease when performing or just talking with people afterwards because you know how to answer questions and deal with people because you know your backstory and who you are and what you are about.
Message: Posted by: ZachDavenport (Jan 27, 2015 12:19PM)
You said in this thread that you are now pop all the time. Are you acting all the time, or Has your original self ceased to exist? Can you turn Pop off, an be Whit sometimes? I just can't imagine completely changing myself into a different person.
Message: Posted by: Pop Haydn (Jan 28, 2015 12:28AM)
I haven't changed into a different person. My accent has changed. But the accent is more my own than the mid-western accent I assumed for thirty years. Being the real "me" is to be as honest as civility allows, and as unfiltered about my beliefs, opinions, and feelings as possible. I don't believe speaking in a different language or accent changes any of that.
Message: Posted by: Brynmore14 (Jan 29, 2015 04:25AM)
Pop you are an inspiration! I have only recently become aware of your work, but I am most decidely a fan. Do you have any recommended resources for those wishing to explore character development? Also whose work inspires you?

Regards,

Brynmore
Message: Posted by: Pop Haydn (Feb 9, 2015 02:00PM)
Character development is best explored through mime and acting class. I have been influenced by many magicians, including Max Howard, The Great Blackstone, Chung Ling Soo, Duke Stern, Billy McComb, Terry Seabrooke, John Thompson and many others.
Message: Posted by: Brynmore14 (Feb 12, 2015 05:39PM)
Pop,

I had certainly considered acting classes, but mime for character development I hadn't really considered. I can see how it would force you to exoress yourself through your physicality rather than through dialogue.

Thanks for the tip.
Message: Posted by: Pop Haydn (Feb 12, 2015 06:25PM)
Mime helps us to break down our emotional reactions and follow a path of focused action. It is very good for clarifying your character's point of view and pointing out or making clear his intentions and actions.
Message: Posted by: DaleTrueman (Mar 3, 2015 01:37AM)
I will join in the thanks for sharing as well Pop. It was your Pop character that drove the final nail in and made me pursue magic as a career (which is still a work in progress). It's the ability of your character to inject a fun, less serious, non pompous atmosphere into the event that I love. My own character (not my own personality) could be described as a loveable Aussie larrikin. He's dodgy, ambitious, resourceful and fun, well at least I hope he comes across that way. I've only performed him a few times now but have more gigs coming and so far he's been loved. I wouldn't dare to compare myself to you, but I have been inspired by Pop heavily. Your writing here has taken what I want to achieve to a new level already.

Dale (aka Davo)
Message: Posted by: Pop Haydn (Mar 3, 2015 01:47AM)
Great, Dale! It is fun. I think that the non pompous fun is the key. Not seeking approval and affirmation, but seeking play and fun and interaction.
Message: Posted by: Anand Khalsa (Mar 4, 2015 07:46PM)
I am so glad I approached Pop with the idea of creating this thread and that people have gotten so much out of it. Thank you for your wisdom, Pop! :)
Message: Posted by: DaleTrueman (Mar 4, 2015 08:05PM)
[quote]On Jan 16, 2015, Pop Haydn wrote:

So, yes, I am working to plant as much fake supporting evidence as possible. :)

I like to think of it as peeing in the pool of knowledge... [/quote]

hahaha, I missed this the first time I read the post
Message: Posted by: Terrible Wizard (Mar 8, 2015 04:24AM)
This thread needs a 'genius at work' label. Pop is one of the greatest magical character creations, up there with Chung Ling Soo, IMHO.
Message: Posted by: Stellan (Mar 9, 2015 06:50PM)
You mentioned Inspector Closeau. This character has no tongue in cheek and therefore, I think, he wouldn't work as a magician stage character the same way Pop does.
On stage it seems like Pop always uses tongue in cheek sometimes in subtle ways sometimes in not so subtle ways. This seems like one of his most powerful magic tools.
I would be interested if you can say something more about this.
Message: Posted by: Pop Haydn (Mar 9, 2015 08:01PM)
What do you mean by "tongue in cheek?" I'm not sure I follow.
Message: Posted by: Stellan (Mar 9, 2015 08:22PM)
I mean saying something that could be taken serious but on the same time by other means of expressions letting people know that you are pulling their leg. Also other ways of creating double messages like explaining the color changing silk but in reality not.
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tongue-in-cheek
Message: Posted by: Stellan (Mar 11, 2015 02:39PM)
I also have another question. I know that you run for president and have strong opinions on politics and social questions like women's rights. Do you ever express this from stage? Do you think there are ways to do this for your character?
Message: Posted by: Pop Haydn (Mar 11, 2015 07:20PM)
Part of the "tongue in cheek" feeling comes from the nature of the magician as a theatrical character. The magician can play the part of someone who believes in the magic that is supposedly happening, but the audience at the same time "knows" the magic isn't real, and therefore are aware of the "trickster" behind the magical character. The mask slips.

Both the trickster and the magical character are interesting to the audience, and often the trickster seems to wink at the audience or even comment on the situation both the real and the imagined. It is this multi-level play that makes the magic character sometimes reminiscent of coarse acting, where the actor is playing to the audience and mugging and clowning for approval rather than staying within the part he is playing. But in magic, it is built in. The audience and the performer both recognize the situation, much like the ventriloquist's audience is aware that all the dummy's actions and voices are coming from the ventriloquist, they continue to talk to the dummy.

I play Pop as a magical character who believes in the magic as real, but Pop the con man and trickster peeks out every now and then and grins, or makes a comment about the action. Pop is a liar who cheats and swindles while believably playing the part of an honest person who believes all the magic is real. He has no intention of convincing the audience that the magic he is doing is real. All the traditional magic that Pop performs is presented within the convention of the magical performer.

But when Pop is demonstrating Magnetized Water, the Teleportation Device, the Sphere of Destiny, or Tesla Girl--he doesn't have that same kidding con man presentation. He really believes this is science and the supernatural. Or he is trying to convince people he does.

If I were playing the part of the character Pop Haydn in a story in a movie or play, I would not have that element of "tongue in cheek" in everyday life except in my performances of magic for people.

As far as politics and other things go, I don't feel much interest or need to bring that into my performances. Nor do I tell the story of Pop and how he came to be here. I do what the character would do if he were here performing for this crowd--comedy and magic.

In a larger theatrical show, I include pitches for candy, medicine or magnetized water, and these often contain satirical elements, but the point of my work is not polemical. I am not here to express my opinions, or propagandize, but to do art. I am here to do conventional, familiar stage and close up magic and to mock manipulative and deceptive practices.

When I am playing Pop the Politician, I am not really promoting any ideas, but rather burlesquing the process and puncturing the overblown rhetoric of the political class. Again, propaganda is not art, and is not the way to find meaning in art.

On the other hand, I am not shy about stating my political or religious beliefs and advocating for them. But this is for social media, my blog or other appropriate places where people are supposed to share opinions of that nature.

I deliberately made Pop Haydn a 1910 era free-thinking Teddy Roosevelt Progressive so he and I wouldn't fight. But Pop Haydn would never allow politics or religion to intrude inappropriately in a social situation or public performance.
Message: Posted by: Stellan (Mar 11, 2015 08:20PM)
Thank you very much Pop, very enlightening. The only thing I miss is some explanation for why this seems to strengthen the magic experience. I also assume that in everyday life you have to cut down the "tounge in cheek" as it is mostly a tool to strengthen your magic?

This also means that you explicitly would deny that magnetized water has anything to do with the fact that Iceland has the highest gender equality in the world? You would never mention this?
Message: Posted by: Pop Haydn (Mar 11, 2015 10:00PM)
Why what strengthens the magic experience? I would never use the term "tongue in cheek" which indicates insincerity. There are two or more characters in play at the same time in the conventional magic character. What you call "tongue in cheek" I would call slipping a mask.
Message: Posted by: Stellan (Mar 12, 2015 10:08AM)
You are right, it is not a good term. I am thinking, as you are underlining, that the prime reason you are here (on stage) is to do magic. But this is not enough. You also need strategies to support the magic. One is a multilayered character that, almost like a snake charmer with his music holds the attention of the snake, creates and holds the interest of the audience. One of his tools is creating a sort of (interactive) dualities (like tongue in cheek) that on the same time tickle two different parts of the brain.
Message: Posted by: Stellan (Mar 12, 2015 11:56AM)
Thanks also for pointing out that this slipping of the masks is contained in the traditional (and perhaps archetypical) role of the magician. The commercial culture of magic often highlights the importance of a new trick and in another thread I saw somebody mention how easy it for magicians nowadays to find information, but where do you find the kind of information that helps you develop these profound aspects of performing magic?

I may be wrong but I don't think that earlier traditional magicians have taken this aspect of performing magic as far as you have. I am thinking of John Calvert who outside the stage reached an almost Indiana Jones like character. On stage he certainly had the charisma, the wink and "tongue in cheek" but was perhaps a bit more limited in his range of expressions. (Interestingly he did an anti smoking propaganda.)
Message: Posted by: Pop Haydn (Mar 12, 2015 01:33PM)
[quote]On Mar 12, 2015, Stellan wrote:
Thanks also for pointing out that this slipping of the masks is contained in the traditional (and perhaps archetypical) role of the magician. The commercial culture of magic often highlights the importance of a new trick and in another thread I saw somebody mention how easy it for magicians nowadays to find information, but where do you find the kind of information that helps you develop these profound aspects of performing magic?

I may be wrong but I don't think that earlier traditional magicians have taken this aspect of performing magic as far as you have. I am thinking of John Calvert who outside the stage reached an almost Indiana Jones like character. On stage he certainly had the charisma, the wink and "tongue in cheek" but was perhaps a bit more limited in his range of expressions. (Interestingly he did an anti smoking propaganda.) [/quote]

[img]http://www.moviemem.com/images/pictures/store/DEVILSCARGO2.jpg[/img]

[img]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/d/d2/Blackstone47.jpg[/img]

[img]http://p2.la-img.com/306/37499/15836501_1_x.jpg[/img]

[img]http://p2.la-img.com/3086/68503/35142739_1_x.jpg[/img]

[img]http://photoncitynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/houdini-robot.jpg[/img]
Message: Posted by: Stellan (Mar 12, 2015 02:38PM)
😊
Message: Posted by: Pop Haydn (Mar 12, 2015 03:08PM)
?
Message: Posted by: Stellan (Mar 12, 2015 03:40PM)
😊 = nice examples of magicians creating fantastic characters.
Message: Posted by: Stellan (Mar 12, 2015 04:35PM)
One could ask oneself why they went through the trouble of creating those characters. The obvious answer would be to draw attention and interest for more business. There is however another more secret reason. In order to understand that you have to ask the question if this in anyway strengthened their magic. The answer is that it most certainly did in some unsuspected ways.
Message: Posted by: Pop Haydn (Mar 12, 2015 05:02PM)
[img]https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/7b/2b/27/7b2b273e9a5f74b4a434fda65796ab9d.jpg[/img]
Message: Posted by: Pop Haydn (Mar 12, 2015 05:03PM)
[img]https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/236x/35/da/35/35da359ba4544db8f7a85253e85ea748.jpg[/img]
Message: Posted by: Pop Haydn (Mar 12, 2015 05:05PM)
[img]https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/88/73/5b/88735b756cd363eda9b5ed1f4d2ff383.jpg[/img]
Message: Posted by: Pop Haydn (Mar 12, 2015 05:06PM)
[img]https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/236x/a8/87/e2/a887e2d0ad689019c5840b2e6ac8a6d0.jpg[/img]
Message: Posted by: Pop Haydn (Mar 12, 2015 05:10PM)
Http://www.pophaydn.com/sphere-of-destiny.html
Message: Posted by: Pop Haydn (Mar 12, 2015 05:12PM)
Https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&es_th=1&ie=UTF-8#q=%22sphere%20of%20destiny%22&es_th=1
Message: Posted by: Stellan (Mar 12, 2015 05:32PM)
🙏
Message: Posted by: Stellan (Mar 14, 2015 05:17AM)
Don't you think that the different roles of Pop the magician and Pop the merchandiser in some way could be confusing to the audience? The risk being that the role of the magician could be a bit diluted?The merchandiser is doing propaganda for the magnetized water and the magic is no longer the point. It is reduced to to arguments to support selling the water. It is amusing but could be confusing to the audience.
Message: Posted by: Pop Haydn (Mar 14, 2015 10:19AM)
You are right. My magnetized water routine is not a magic trick. It is a character piece. The magic is used as a special effect. I also do the Amazing Miracle Oil pitch in the show. The Shell Game is not a magic trick.

But the Teleportation Device, Tesla Girl, Color-Changing Hank, Mongolian Pop-Knot, Four Ring Routine and Torn and Restored Newspaper are all strong magic.

I don't think that "Pop the Merchandiser" and "Pop the Magician" are two different roles. I don't believe the audience has any trouble understanding who Pop is and what he is about. I never explain anything about who Pop is and where he is from. Pop just goes about his business trying to make a living in the 21st Century just like you or I would.
Message: Posted by: Stellan (Mar 14, 2015 11:05AM)
I also find it interesting that you have a big chunk of background that you keep to yourself. It is almost like a Stanislawski warm up to come into the character and make it more solid. Is that your intention? Do you feel that this works in terms of confidence and authority? Or do you see it another way?
Message: Posted by: Pop Haydn (Mar 14, 2015 11:21AM)
All actors create a backstory for their character. I believe the character can be extended beyond the show, to places where a more complete story would be more appropriate. My websites, social media sites and so on give me an opportunity to enlarge the character and his story much like Blackstone used radio and comic books.

On stage, I am selling medicine and other products, but that gives me a reason to be there. It motivates all the other stuff.

Here is a video from last week:

[youtube]ptHQ5x5nW-M[/youtube]
Message: Posted by: Pop Haydn (Mar 14, 2015 12:45PM)
[img]https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/24/fe/e1/24fee1777d2f3cfdb09ef2d153abf240.jpg[/img]
Message: Posted by: DaleTrueman (Mar 14, 2015 04:57PM)
[quote]On Mar 14, 2015, Stellan wrote:
I also find it interesting that you have a big chunk of background that you keep to yourself. It is almost like a Stanislawski warm up to come into the character and make it more solid. Is that your intention? Do you feel that this works in terms of confidence and authority? Or do you see it another way? [/quote]


Like in any storytelling I think a back story is very important to any character. Most of it may not come out directly in the story but it informs the narrative by giving substance and motivation to what might otherwise be a directionless persona.

Sorry I know I'm answering a question not asked of me but that's my two cents worth anyway.
Message: Posted by: DaleTrueman (Mar 14, 2015 05:03PM)
An example might be Darth Vader.
In the original Star Wars we knew very little of his background. But George Lucas did. This would make it so much easier to write his scenes with his personality, knowing that he was a slave boy who rose the ranks to become the most feared dark Jedi in the galaxy. Knowing his past would inform the way he acted in the present, making the character more fleshed out and real.
Message: Posted by: Stellan (Mar 16, 2015 03:43AM)
I buy what you say Dale and of course you are very welcome with your thoughts. A backgrund certainly can help in giving the character a direction.

Pop, I hope you will not be offended, but isn't that photo arranged?
Message: Posted by: ZachDavenport (Mar 16, 2015 07:19AM)
Not at all. That was just taken before his teleportation to the 21st century.
Message: Posted by: Pop Haydn (Mar 16, 2015 01:08PM)
Backstory isn't just about direction. The character lives in the story. As you imagine yourself into the story, you need to follow the details of the story that lead you into this scene--the events and details that bring you in front of this particular audience. Most performers neglect this important thing.

If an actor is portraying a surgeon who comes out of the Operating Room to give the family bad news, he doesn't just swing the doors open and enter the room. He needs to imagine the past ten minutes, losing the patient, cleaning his hands, thinking about what he will say to the parents, wondering what their reaction will be, taking a deep breath and preparing to face the next room as he pushes open the doors...This type of immersion is what makes the actor seem to be real and believable the moment he walks into the room.

In the same way, the magical character has to know why he is here before this audience and what he wants to accomplish.

This is part of how an actor prepares.

The detailed movement of the imagination from detail to detail of the fantasy is what makes the body react emotionally.

In the same way that an erotic fantasy can produce physical changes in the body, the actor fantasizes him/herself into a detailed, step by step image of the scene, and the body reacts with the appropriate sensations and realness of feelings. The actor cries real tears for an imagined event.

There is a past for the character, and that backstory is important to the character, but the immediate few minutes of backstory that lead into THIS scene--the performance--are what is most important.

How did you get here, why are you here, what do you expect, what do you want from this audience, what are you here to give them, what do you think they know about you, and what do you want to keep hidden--all these are important backstory and motivational questions.
Message: Posted by: Anand Khalsa (Oct 10, 2015 02:48AM)
Hey guys! I am digging up this old thread to suggest to anyone interested in hearing more of Pop's invaluable wisdom and experience surrounding character, acting, and showmanship in magic, to consider purchasing Pop's recently published lecture notes from his acting and character workshop.

The PDF is titled "On Acting and Magic".

Here is the link to purchase it: [url]http://www.popsmagic.com/store/p66/On_Acting_and_Magic_~_Download.html[/url]

I cannot recommend this highly enough!
Message: Posted by: Pop Haydn (Feb 2, 2016 03:31PM)
These are studies for a series of Dime Novels featuring Pop Haydn as an adventure character. The Sphere of Destiny is the crystal Pop uses in his Q&A act:

Pop Haydn and the Sphere of Destiny
[img]http://www.pophaydn.com/uploads/7/7/6/6/7766194/3827672_orig.jpeg[/img]
https://pophaydn.wordpress.com/2016/02/01/pop-haydn-the-sphere-of-destiny/


Pop Haydn and the Vanishing Train
[img]http://www.pophaydn.com/uploads/7/7/6/6/7766194/2368632_orig.jpeg[/img]
https://pophaydn.wordpress.com/2016/02/01/pop-haydn-and-the-vanishing-train/
Message: Posted by: Pop Haydn (Jun 29, 2017 02:43PM)
Here is a more than two-hour interview on this subject:

https://www.artofmagic.com/blogs/podcast/pop-haydn-episode-57
Message: Posted by: Rook (Jun 29, 2017 03:12PM)
I look forward to gleaning from this! Thanks for posting it!
Message: Posted by: Pop Haydn (Jun 29, 2017 07:33PM)
Let me know what you think.
Message: Posted by: Pop Haydn (Aug 6, 2017 04:28PM)
Here is the first in a series of one hour podcasts on magic theory. This one is on Magic and Story:

http://www.popsmagic.com/store/p112/MagicStory
Message: Posted by: Anand Khalsa (Aug 14, 2017 04:47AM)
Thanks so much for posting these podcasts, Pop!
Message: Posted by: Pop Haydn (Aug 14, 2017 01:26PM)
Did you find it helpful, Anand?
Message: Posted by: Anand Khalsa (Aug 14, 2017 03:17PM)
Definitely!

I've been constructing a mentalism show and a key piece of the puzzle that I have struggled with is fully fleshing out my character, and the first podcast came at a great time.

As an actor myself, your thoughts on character/acting have helped me apply my experience in theater to magic. It's been a bit difficult to change my frame of mind from the format/context of stage productions to a magic show, but I think your advice has helped me in that process.
Message: Posted by: HeronsHorse (Jan 14, 2019 01:11AM)
Yes this is an old topic, however it will never become irrelevant!

Hey Pop.
I've just had the most informative 3 hours, drinking in everything you've written here, following the links, reading your websites and supporting 'evidence' and thoroughly enlightening and enjoyable it was too. Most of all, educational.
What you've said about character development and on-stage persona has got me thinking in all kinds of directions. I just want to sit down with you and talk for hours!
I'm only 2 years into practicing and learning and, due to various reasons, *HEALTH* I can't do my own show yet. Besides, Im not ready. But that's another story. My point here is that what you offer to someone in my position is so valuable, on a par with what I'm reading in Henning Nelms book or some of the Fitzkee trilogy. The theory of performing as a magician. Your words read like a modern update on those same texts and I'm like a sponge with all of this, evaluating and soaking it up. My Skeleton plan is to become technically brilliant(yup, unpopular maybe but that's how I want to do things), then build upon my performance ability -as myself, an easy going character who makes people laugh and is self-deprecating in a more British way, though maybe not as much as Morrissey :D . Definitely not pompous and no showing off allowed, which I dislike in a magician and think it can be so off-putting. I already love the play between myself and the audience. Note, I've only performed to small informal groups in Cafés or bars or even in the street but I've felt the same play as I've seen described and read about. I would love to see this play evolve theatrically, if you like. The thing is I've toyed with this whole concept of character a lot ever since becoming a true student of this Art. I've immersed myself and all along the way I'm getting a nagging urge to think of character: to explore this in some way. I'm thinking to do, as many old books suggest, some theatre work, then maybe get on the stage in another capacity. To learn to understand the stage and possibly explore acting within a character. I like the idea of mime that you mentioned. I never would've thought of that as being helpful. I've experienced audience in the past when I travelled as a young man and was a singing guitarist busker. Some places, you'd have a large circle crowd awaiting your first song and it was intimidating at first but I soon learned to adore the audience and the play between us. Instead of intimidating, it became my favourite part of the experience, the interaction.
I could go on but I'll stop there. Let me day this had been a wonderful read and has my creative spark firing, although probably the timing is off and perhaps the spark plugs need a little adjustment! Information overload!
Seriously, I can need ever get enough.
If you would like to add anything more to this thread Pop, please do. If anything I've said stirs any advice in your mind, don't hesitate to throw it at me.
Thanks again and I love the character. Well done on all the work it's taken. You definitely got there in the end.
Paul.