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Topic: A foodie thread
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (Apr 27, 2015 04:16AM)
Since we've been talking about food lately I thought I'd start this thread. What awesome food are you making this week? I know some of you are foodies! OR- what awesome food are you planning on eating out? Any good restaurants in your area?

I've loved cooking (and eating) all my life. I used to work in restaurants and although I have no desire to cook professionally anymore, I love cooking for family and friends.

I've got some killer stuff lined up this week.

Slow roasted corned beef sandwiches on rye with deli mustard, muenster cheese and Cole slaw. Pickles, don't forget the pickles.

An awesome macaroni salad with vegetables, dill and tuna that I make at least a few times every summer. Hey- I know it's only April, but that is already kinda like summer in Arizona. Minus the freak thunderstorm we had last night that left snow on the Catalinas.

Grilled veggie sandwiches on Hawaiian bread. Zucchini, mushrooms, onions and tomatoes with cheese.

Fettuccine with homemade Alfredo sauce for the wife and some frozen leftover meat sauce for me and the kids. But yeah, I will be swiping some of that rich Alfredo goodness. It's weird, my kids don't like Alfredo. Easy recipe too: Half and half, butter, salt, garlic powder and Parmesan.

And tomorrow (today) I'm making cheese ravioli, using egg roll wrappers, served with sage butter and a grilled, hot Italian sausage.

I'm curious, what are some of you chefs are whipping up?

:hotcoffee:
Message: Posted by: TonyB2009 (Apr 27, 2015 11:16AM)
I am getting hungry!

This week I will be too busy typing and gigging to make a big effort in the kitchen, but I will be visiting a farmers market for some outstanding organic and well prepared food. One of my favourites recently has been blue steak with melted raclette cheese, sauteed potatoes, pickles, and homemade bearnaise and mayo. The best street food I know.
Message: Posted by: Dougini (Apr 27, 2015 11:27AM)
I was a chef in the 80's. Today, my specialty is Vietnamese and Thai. [i]Moo Pad Prik Khing[/i] is a specialty of mine. Vietnamese Chicken Curry is another. One of my favorite Vietnamese dishes is Chả giò. Vietnamese Spring Rolls! Along with the dipping sauce, known as Nước chấm! Anyone ever had this?

Doug
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (Apr 27, 2015 03:47PM)
I just bought the latest and greatest pellet smoker tube to add smoke to my weber gas grill. The best smoker accessory I've ever owned (and I've owned a LOT of them). I smoked some great chicken last week and this week I'm going to try my first baby back ribs. I love this thing!

If you're into smoking, you might want to try this (the tube smoker):

http://www.amazenproducts.com/SearchResults.asp?Cat=12
Message: Posted by: Tom Cutts (Apr 27, 2015 03:49PM)
Made some shrimp bisque last night to go with a pork and cucumber dish. And homemade bread!
Message: Posted by: Magnus Eisengrim (Apr 27, 2015 03:50PM)
[quote]On Apr 27, 2015, Bob1Dog wrote:
I just bought the latest and greatest pellet smoker tube to add smoke to my weber gas grill. The best smoker accessory I've ever owned (and I've owned a LOT of them). I smoked some great chicken last week and this week I'm going to try my first baby back ribs. I love this thing!

If you're into smoking, you might want to try this (the tube smoker):

http://www.amazenproducts.com/SearchResults.asp?Cat=12 [/quote]

I bought the Weber Smokey Mountain smoker last year. Best frivolous purchase I've made in years. The ribs are phenomenal. But the smoked salmon--ERMAGERD!
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (Apr 27, 2015 04:41PM)
I've used those smokers before but haven't had much luck with them. Maybe I should give them another try!
Message: Posted by: Magnus Eisengrim (Apr 27, 2015 04:55PM)
I've been working my way through the recipes [url=http://virtualweberbullet.com/]here[/url]. Very satisfied so far. FWIW a digital meat thermometer is worth its weight in gold.
Message: Posted by: Daryl -the other brother (Apr 27, 2015 05:31PM)
Tonight is butterfly pork chops soaked in a homemade sesame seed marinade and slow cooked on my outside Grill Dome (superior version of a Green Egg). Sides are baked potatoes and bacon wrapped grilled asparagus.
Message: Posted by: Tom Jorgenson (Apr 27, 2015 06:00PM)
I'm currently going thru a Vadouvan-discovery mania period. I'm trying to do a notebook/cookbook thingy on it and am trying it in everything. The vadouvan I get locally is not hot so the aromatics come thru. Vadouvan is a Masala Curry spice mixture tweaked by the French enough to become it's own thing.

I'm currently finishing up a meatloaf using Vadouvan. The 80/20 beef has a tub of cherry tomatoes mixed into the meat and the loaf is roasted on a bed of pearl onions, which melt, caramelize, etc. Great flavors and textures. The whole tiny tomatoes were a great idea I tried once...they stay whole, and when you bit into one, it acts like a palate cleanser. Very nice and I've used them ever since.

I'll make a boxed beer bread next, with a handful of raisins/cranberries thrown in, a fat handful of walnut halves and a Tsp. of Vadouvan. It's dense, aromatic and almost a desert bread. I toast it.

Last week I added Vadouvan to a Cioppino and it was a good combo. They went very well together. You can't quite identify the Vadouvan flavors but they add a depth to whatever you use it in. I'll do that Cioppino again this week, I've been thinking about it since the first one.

Oh, and Vadouvan frosting is amazing...It tasts very good, you can't quite identify the flavor and is ISN'T pumpkin...3 things going for it.

Too much fun, and this is going to be a great thread...I've already picked out my next smoker gizmo from it.
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (Apr 27, 2015 06:19PM)
Wow! I knew we had some cooks around here!

I've been wanting to buy a smoker this year and start doing my own BBQ. I make a pretty delicious sauce. I don't know if it's in the budget right now though, I've found that decent smokers aren't exactly cheap. Then again, maybe a new Weber and that pellet smoker might do the trick.

TonyB2009- When you say blue steak, do you mean cooked black and blue?

Doug- I have never had Vietnamese food. It sounds really good though. There's a couple here in Tucson; I guess I'll have to try them out.

Tom Cutts- Sounds delish. Did you have shells and everything to make the bisque? I also love to make bread. Love the smell of fresh bread coming out of the oven.

Daryl- I'll be over.

You guys are ALL impressive! Keep 'em coming; this is fascinating seeing what you all like to cook and eat.

I've got to get started on the raviolis and sage butter!
Message: Posted by: Tom Cutts (Apr 27, 2015 06:29PM)
Before it even comes out of the oven that smell of the crust browning on a loaf says its almost done. Permeates the house to let you know.

I made the bisque with only the shells. Cleaned 20 shrimp and ate them the night before.
Message: Posted by: imgic (Apr 27, 2015 06:52PM)
Cold spell in Colorado so making potato leek soup and working on perfecting my grilled ham and cheese.

Finding out you grill the inside first then have right mix of cheeses (still working on that). Assemble, then light mayo on outside and grill.
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (Apr 27, 2015 08:01PM)
[quote]On Apr 27, 2015, Magnus Eisengrim wrote:
I've been working my way through the recipes [url=http://virtualweberbullet.com/]here[/url]. Very satisfied so far. FWIW a digital meat thermometer is worth its weight in gold. [/quote]
I have a great Weber two probe remote digital thermometer and you're right, it's worth its weight in gold. I love it! Gonna' have to check those Weber smokers now!
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (Apr 27, 2015 08:03PM)
[quote]On Apr 27, 2015, Tom Jorgenson wrote:

Too much fun, and this is going to be a great thread...I've already picked out my next smoker gizmo from it. [/quote]

Right on with that Tom, great thread! You lookin' at that Weber?
Message: Posted by: TonyB2009 (Apr 27, 2015 08:04PM)
[quote]On Apr 27, 2015, Theodore Lawton wrote:
TonyB2009- When you say blue steak, do you mean cooked black and blue?
[/quote]
The pan is as hot as possible, and the steak is seared on both sides, but fried for an even shorter period than a very rare steak. The centre is barely warmed. I love steak that way.

A number of years ago, while doing a season in a hotel in Lapland, Finland, the chef shared some interesting meals with me, including a smoked bear tongue. At the end of the season he gave me a small smoke box, which makes fantastic hot smokes salmon and mackerel. Delicious.
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (Apr 27, 2015 10:19PM)
That's what I was thinking. Yes, that is a delicious way to eat steak; that char and the rare meat, yum!

The raviolis were a huge hit. I know I did okay when the little woman is asking me to make them again sometime and she's not even done eating yet. Kids loved 'em too. Their first experience with sage butter sauce.

The char and the heat of the spicy Italian sausage cut through the richness of the cheese filling and the sage butter sauce quite nicely. Now that I know how well the egg roll wraps work I'll definitely use them again.

funny thing- I made WAY too much filling. First time with this recipe and I usually just wing things anyway. So with a quick improvise I made a 13x9 pan of manicotti and threw them in the freezer for later. I got 54 raviolis out of this and the manicotti. Not bad really.
Message: Posted by: motown (Apr 27, 2015 11:40PM)
I enjoy cooking and am a bit of cookbook junkie.
I'll grab a book and try something new most weekends,
especially some dish from around the globe.
Everything from Swedish meatballs to chicken satay to Czech goulash.

Love trying new foods and restaurants when traveling.
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (Apr 28, 2015 03:56AM)
So I'm sitting here watching the Lord of the Rings and looking at my bag of tortilla chips that I have no nacho cheese for. And I'll admit it, I usually eat the store bought nacho cheese and enjoy it's cheesy, phony goodness. So out of desperation I made this:

roux with 1 tbs flour and 1 tbs butter
add 1 cup 1/2 n 1/2 and bring to a bubble
add salt, pepper, garlic powder and New Mexico chile powder to taste. approx 1/2 tsp, 1/2 tsp, 1/2 tsp and 1 tsp give or take

add about 1 or 2 tbs chopped pickled jalapenos, 1 or 2 tbs whole pickled jalapenos and enough juice from the pickled jalapeno jar to thin out the sauce to nacho cheese consistency.

grab a straw and enjoy!

I'm NEVER goin back to phony.

Oh man! This is good...
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (Apr 28, 2015 08:31AM)
Oh, and uh, cheese. Forgot that part. Cheddar, Jack and Colby.
Message: Posted by: Dougini (Apr 28, 2015 08:45AM)
Yum! Theodore, that is epic!

I figured I'd share the recipe for Vietnamese Nước chấm. Anyone brave enough to make this?

You need one thing, kinda unusual. Fish Sauce. Not just any fish sauce. Ya want the best you can get. The lower quality stuff is not recommended. Ya wanna see the word, "Nhi" on the label. That is the highest quality. Look for this brand name:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51SPl6mJpsL._SL1200_.jpg

4 tbsp white vinegar (or lime juice)
4 tbsp 3 Crabs Fish Sauce
4 tbsp sugar
2 cloves pressed garlic
1 or 2 fresh Thai Bird Chiles, sliced (Or any small red hot pepper). Or use red pepper flakes
Dilute with up to 1 cup water

Let it sit in the fridge overnight. The garlic will sink to the bottom.

This is used in every Vietnamese meal in place of salt. Try it and PLEASE let me know how you like it! :)

Doug
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Apr 28, 2015 08:48AM)
The best thing you can do for chips is befriend S2000Magician, then invite him over and ask him to make and bring some salsa.

Note, though: When he says "spicy," he's not kidding.
Message: Posted by: Dougini (Apr 28, 2015 08:59AM)
Spicy I can DO! Most Americans cannot handle what I eat. I dated a Thai girl for a year! She introduced me to the incendiary Thai Bird Chile!

Doug
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (Apr 28, 2015 12:46PM)
I've been on a porkbelly kick lately. I mean, it's BACON!

I'm finding it in many restaurants these days and also seeing it on several of the food network shows.

I've been trying different recipes but have failed. Some are time consuming preps, others aren' crisp enough and so I haven't made the perfect one yet in at least a half dozen tries.

But that may change this week. The most recent "Pressed Pork Belly" I had in one of the better restaurants in our area is the best I've had, and I've had all kinds. When I asked the chef how he prepared his, he didn't skip a beat and he told me exactly how he does it. Salt, sugar and water. That simple.

First, you have to find the pork belly. Not easy in some parts. I buy the whole belly then cut it up into about four equal parts and freeze them till I'm ready to use them.

Add to water in a baking dish large and deep enough to hold the belly submersed in water:

1.5 cups salt

1.5 cups sugar

Place belly in dish with water/sugar/salt mixture, then place a smaller dish with heavy weights (I use two five-pound lead weights wrapped in foil) over the belly in the larger pan. The weight in the inner dish presses the belly in the larger dish. Make sure the belly is completely submerged and the larger dish is not so full that you won't be able to carry it to your fridge!

Finally, place in your fridge for two weeks allowing the brine to do its work.

When ready, remove the belly, rinse it in cold water then pat dry.

Cube the belly into two inch squares and deep fry till crispy and done. (Haven't figured the time yet.)

My pork belly has been in the fridge for two weeks as of tomorrow. I'm hoping to fry it up it tomorrow evening. I'll report back no matter how it turns out. :-)
Message: Posted by: TonyB2009 (Apr 28, 2015 06:13PM)
I will try that pork belly idea. And perhaps the Thai hot sauce too.

Inspired by reading this last night I went to a new farmers market this morning and got the best crepe I have had in ages. A buckwheat pancake filled with free range egg topped with hollandaise, organic smoked bacon, local artisan cheese, and a sort of spinach salsa. Made my day.
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (Apr 28, 2015 06:41PM)
I want to try several new things too, after reading your posts. This is going to be a fun, eye-opener of a thread.
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (Apr 29, 2015 08:33AM)
Here's a fun thing to do if you have kids. Or even if you don't. When our kids were younger I would cover the table in sheets of waxed paper, overlap them, tape them together and flip them over. You could also use foil or a cheap plastic table cloth.

Then I'd make a huge batch of chicken wings and fries and dump them in big piles right on the table. The kids loved it, they could pour their ranch and ketchup right on the table too. And easy cleanup.

This is really a fun way to eat. One time the kids had some friends over and they got all wide eyed when they saw me dumping all the food out onto the table, "Do you guys eat like this ALL the time?"

When my son came home from combat the last time we did this again for "old time's sake." We had a lot of fun and they were all sharing pictures of their piles of food on the table on Facebook.

:)
Message: Posted by: imgic (Apr 29, 2015 02:33PM)
There's a restaraunt in Madison, WI called Bunky's.

They have menu item called "spaghetti on a board". They cover your table with clean board them in center put spaghetti, sauce and meatballs. Then everyone digs in. Pulling what you want to you and eating. Kids used to love going there! (It helped that the food was really good).
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (May 1, 2015 08:51PM)
[quote]On Apr 28, 2015, Bob1Dog wrote:
I've been on a porkbelly kick lately. I mean, it's BACON!

I'm finding it in many restaurants these days and also seeing it on several of the food network shows.

I've been trying different recipes but have failed. Some are time consuming preps, others aren' crisp enough and so I haven't made the perfect one yet in at least a half dozen tries.

But that may change this week. The most recent "Pressed Pork Belly" I had in one of the better restaurants in our area is the best I've had, and I've had all kinds. When I asked the chef how he prepared his, he didn't skip a beat and he told me exactly how he does it. Salt, sugar and water. That simple.

First, you have to find the pork belly. Not easy in some parts. I buy the whole belly then cut it up into about four equal parts and freeze them till I'm ready to use them.

Add to water in a baking dish large and deep enough to hold the belly submersed in water:

1.5 cups salt

1.5 cups sugar

Place belly in dish with water/sugar/salt mixture, then place a smaller dish with heavy weights (I use two five-pound lead weights wrapped in foil) over the belly in the larger pan. The weight in the inner dish presses the belly in the larger dish. Make sure the belly is completely submerged and the larger dish is not so full that you won't be able to carry it to your fridge!

Finally, place in your fridge for two weeks allowing the brine to do its work.

When ready, remove the belly, rinse it in cold water then pat dry.

Cube the belly into two inch squares and deep fry till crispy and done. (Haven't figured the time yet.)

My pork belly has been in the fridge for two weeks as of tomorrow. I'm hoping to fry it up it tomorrow evening. I'll report back no matter how it turns out. :-) [/quote]

OK, the results are in; we had it tonight.

If you like pork belly (also known as chicharrones) you will like this recipe. The only thing we changed at the last minute was a dusting of corn starch on the cubed pieces of pork belly before deep-frying which helped in the crispy department.

So far, this has been my most successful attempt at it it. They turned out crispy and tender, just the way I like 'em,

That said I will make a few adjustments next time. The salt suger water mix was fine, but we should have removed the belly from the brine and soaked it in fresh water for some time before deep-frying to remove the heavy salt taste.

I fried them at 360 degrees (the highest temp our deep fryer reaches) for about 18 minutes. While about half of them came out crisp and tender, others turned out a little more cooked and less tender. I'd probably only fry for 15 minutes the next time and keep fine tuning to my liking. I also attempted cubing them into two inch squares, but the ones that came out less tender and juicy were the smaller pieces.

We served it with a corn relish with a sweetness that nicely complimented the pork.

Definitely going to try again.
Message: Posted by: imgic (May 2, 2015 07:17AM)
Mmmmm. Heavily salted, deep fried cubes of pork fat....
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (May 3, 2015 04:45PM)
[quote]On Apr 28, 2015, Dougini wrote:
Yum! Theodore, that is epic!

I figured I'd share the recipe for Vietnamese Nước chấm. Anyone brave enough to make this?

You need one thing, kinda unusual. Fish Sauce. Not just any fish sauce. Ya want the best you can get. The lower quality stuff is not recommended. Ya wanna see the word, "Nhi" on the label. That is the highest quality. Look for this brand name:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51SPl6mJpsL._SL1200_.jpg

4 tbsp white vinegar (or lime juice)
4 tbsp 3 Crabs Fish Sauce
4 tbsp sugar
2 cloves pressed garlic
1 or 2 fresh Thai Bird Chiles, sliced (Or any small red hot pepper). Or use red pepper flakes
Dilute with up to 1 cup water

Let it sit in the fridge overnight. The garlic will sink to the bottom.

This is used in every Vietnamese meal in place of salt. Try it and PLEASE let me know how you like it! :)

Doug [/quote]

I've heard that there is no such thing as a stupid question, only stupid people; so I'll ask away. lol

How fishy is the flavor Doug? I ask because I'd try this, but I'm worried I may be the only one eating it. I'm about the only one who likes fish in our house.

thanks!
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (May 3, 2015 04:48PM)
[quote]On Apr 27, 2015, imgic wrote:
Cold spell in Colorado so making potato leek soup and working on perfecting my grilled ham and cheese.

Finding out you grill the inside first then have right mix of cheeses (still working on that). Assemble, then light mayo on outside and grill. [/quote]

I like to add sauteed onions to my grilled ham and cheese. Or turkey and cheese.
Message: Posted by: ZachDavenport (May 3, 2015 06:52PM)
I'm getting a pizza tonight. Does that count for anything?
Message: Posted by: imgic (May 3, 2015 07:19PM)
[quote]On May 3, 2015, ZachDavenport wrote:
I'm getting a pizza tonight. Does that count for anything? [/quote]

As long as you have a good beer to go with it...beer and pizza...mmm

We've been getting flat- out pizza crusts, or stonefire pizza crusts (not sure if they're national). Then store bought pizza sauce and toppings. Fresh mozzerala cheese and yummy. Cheaper and better than any delivery (though not as convenient).
Message: Posted by: imgic (May 3, 2015 07:23PM)
[quote]On May 3, 2015, Theodore Lawton wrote:
[quote]On Apr 27, 2015, imgic wrote:
Cold spell in Colorado so making potato leek soup and working on perfecting my grilled ham and cheese.

Finding out you grill the inside first then have right mix of cheeses (still working on that). Assemble, then light mayo on outside and grill. [/quote]

I like to add sauteed onions to my grilled ham and cheese. Or turkey and cheese. [/quote]

Mmm. Will have to try that. I've been using sharp cheddar, Colby jack and a little goat cheese. Been pretty good but not perfection.

Also I've been having trouble getting crispy brown outside of the sandwich. I think I've got too low if heat.
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (May 3, 2015 07:24PM)
Nice. We got Domino's pizza last night. Tried a different combination, bacon and cheddar. Highly recommended.

For some reason I'm craving a good quality hot dog and a beer.
Message: Posted by: ZachDavenport (May 3, 2015 08:15PM)
[quote]On May 3, 2015, imgic wrote:
[quote]On May 3, 2015, ZachDavenport wrote:
I'm getting a pizza tonight. Does that count for anything? [/quote]

As long as you have a good beer to go with it...beer and pizza...mmm

We've been getting flat- out pizza crusts, or stonefire pizza crusts (not sure if they're national). Then store bought pizza sauce and toppings. Fresh mozzerala cheese and yummy. Cheaper and better than any delivery (though not as convenient). [/quote]
I'm 15 and think drinking of any kind is a prime example of the foolishness of humans, so no beer.
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (May 3, 2015 09:21PM)
Point taken.

Since this is a foodie thread we will sometimes suggest beer and wine pairings with certain foods.

Also, this thread was started as a way to have something to talk about that does not involve people's moral opinions, religion or politics.

If anyone doesn't like drinking or thinks it is wrong they can feel free to move on to another thread.

I can't believe I'm having to say this in this thread. :rolleyes:

Moving on.

I enjoy a good beer with a hot dog.

Anyone ever had Kilt Lifter?
Message: Posted by: ZachDavenport (May 3, 2015 10:00PM)
Sorry, not trying to derail the topic. Stating my opinions in the wrong place is a nasty habit of mine. Anyway, I've found that Dr. pepper goes well with pizza. Maybe it's one of the 23 flavors.
Message: Posted by: Daryl -the other brother (May 3, 2015 10:20PM)
Tonight we had home made white sauce pizza. Chicken and diced sweet onions with a home made Alfredo sauce topped with mozzarella and fontinella cheese. Baked outside in my pizza oven.
Message: Posted by: imgic (May 3, 2015 11:19PM)
Not sure why but I almost always get Dr Pepper when eating a burger out. Just tastes right
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (May 4, 2015 12:00AM)
Dr Pepper and/or root beer with pizza is a fine pairing.

Daryl- I'm totally jealous!
Message: Posted by: tommy (May 4, 2015 12:50AM)
As a kid I trained as a chef but I hardly cook these days. About the only things I cook now are a few breakfasts for the fellows coming in from the casinos in early hours of the morning. Breakfast things, they are all pretty simple and quick things to cook in England. The Wolseley Breakfast book is more less where we get our breakfasts from.

https://www.thewolseley.com/breakfast-at-the-wolseley-book


I used to eat like a horse when I was young but not much now; a cup of tea and a cigar.
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (May 4, 2015 08:03AM)
Now that is truly fascinating, just knowing more about you, that is. And here I never would have known that about you Tommy if I hadn't started this thread. It's amazing how personal food is and how through food we can come closer together and learn more about each other.

I'm finding it interesting how many of us magi love, cook and appreciate good food. I wonder if there is some correlation between the artistry involved in being a magician and the magic of preparing a delicious meal that draws us all to both arts. We are using interesting, colorful, sometimes mysterious objects to create something wonderful.

I'm guessing you could make a killer bangers and mash back in the day Tommy.
Message: Posted by: Dougini (May 4, 2015 09:08AM)
[quote]On May 3, 2015, Theodore Lawton wrote:
I've heard that there is no such thing as a stupid question, only stupid people; so I'll ask away. lol

How fishy is the flavor (Fish Sauce) Doug? I ask because I'd try this, but I'm worried I may be the only one eating it. I'm about the only one who likes fish in our house.
[/quote]

That's the thing about it. It has no [i]fish flavor[/i]! Made per my recipe, the sweet/sour/umami flavor is unmatched by anything you have ever tasted. My friend [i]drinks[/i] what's left in the dipping bowl, it's so good! He fears fish sauce, so I don't tell him.

One thing I recommend. Do NOT smell the bottle! It smells like a Port-O-Potty! Nasty! That however, is NOT the flavor! Whenever it is used, the Vietnamese add an equal amount of sugar. Try it. The whole bottle is less than $4. Use it whenever a recipe calls for it. Do not fear it. Americans need to get over that...

Doug
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (May 4, 2015 11:34AM)
Alright man, I'm keeping this one in mind. What do you like it on?

It sounds like it would be good on anything. I'm thinking spring rolls and some kind of fried rice for the experiment at our house.
Message: Posted by: Kabbalah (May 4, 2015 12:09PM)
[quote]On May 4, 2015, Theodore Lawton wrote:
Alright man, I'm keeping this one in mind. What do you like it on?

It sounds like it would be good on anything. I'm thinking spring rolls and some kind of fried rice for the experiment at our house. [/quote]

Make a larger batch of the sauce.

Get some ****ake and oyster mushrooms, napa cabbage and [b]good[/b] soba or ramen noodles.

Use the sauce as the broth for some excellent noodle soup.

Add some beef, chicken or pork for a one pot meal.

ETA: I can't believe a certain type of mushroom was censored by the Café software!
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (May 4, 2015 12:34PM)
You know you're a fungi when they have to censor your name!
Message: Posted by: Dougini (May 4, 2015 01:48PM)
Not if ya spell it right! LOL!

Shiitake. See?

Doug
Message: Posted by: Dougini (May 4, 2015 01:58PM)
Vietnamese Nước Chấm is used as a condiment, as we would use salt. Now, Nước Mắm is just the fish sauce itself, right out of the bottle. No one would use that as a soup base! GACK! One or two drops in a soup, or sauce is plenty! An equal amount of lime juice and sugar, plus hot pepper and fresh garlic is the basis for most Nước Chấm and is universally good on anything from white rice to chicken salad! :)

Doug
Message: Posted by: Tom Cutts (May 4, 2015 04:42PM)
I made shiitake, hand shredded chicken breast, and French cut green beans in a sauté for lunch. Rocked it!
Message: Posted by: Intrepid (May 4, 2015 08:17PM)
[quote]On May 4, 2015, Dougini wrote:
Vietnamese Nước Chấm is used as a condiment, as we would use salt.
[/quote]
In Maryland it's all about Old Bay seasoning. (Okay, that's a bit of an exaggeration, but hard to deney the reginal popularity of Old Bay).
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (May 5, 2015 01:11AM)
Maryland and Louisiana use a lot of Old Bay. They're both very shellfish.
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (May 6, 2015 08:21PM)
I baked the manicotti tonight with meat sauce and Italian cheeses for a topping. I made alfredo sauce to put over it after baking. Very low calorie! ;)
Message: Posted by: Daryl -the other brother (May 8, 2015 09:28PM)
[quote]On May 6, 2015, Theodore Lawton wrote:
I baked the manicotti tonight with meat sauce and Italian cheeses for a topping. I made alfredo sauce to put over it after baking. Very low calorie! ;) [/quote]


My arteries are clogging up just thinking about it!

Since we're on a health kick, here's one of my favorite shrimp appetizers to serve guests. Quick, easy and tasty.

In a glass bowl with a lid, mix equal parts (1/2 cup) mayo and sweet pepper sauce (ratio can be tweaked for more or less spice)
Add sriracha sauce (Hot Asian spice) to taste. We like it on the mild side so I use about a capful.
Mix well and set aside.

Shell and devein 1 lb shrimp (I like medium size) Place cleaned shrimp along with 1/2 cup of corn starch and a tbsp. of garlic powder in a container with a tight fitting lid. Coat shrimp evenly and fry in a skillet 2-3 mins. per side. Pat cooked shrimp with paper towel to remove excess grease then add to the premade sauce along with the chopped tops of 2-3 green onions. Mix together and serve.
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (May 9, 2015 01:45AM)
Sounds good. What exactly is your sweet pepper sauce? Is it something you make or buy?

My grandmother used to make a sweet chile relish for pork that was delish. Very Northeastern U.S.

Tonight I made chicken noodle soup. I can't wait for my knee to heal up more so I can get back in the kitchen.
Message: Posted by: Tom Cutts (May 9, 2015 08:59AM)
[quote]On May 6, 2015, Theodore Lawton wrote:
I baked the manicotti tonight with meat sauce and Italian cheeses for a topping. I made alfredo sauce to put over it after baking. Very low calorie! ;) [/quote]
When I was a kid I made manicotti with my mom. We stuffed 'em one teaspoonful at a time.

Last night I had a favorite. Broiled lamb loin and Oregon Pinot.
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (May 9, 2015 09:20AM)
Well that sounds amazing. :exclaim:
Message: Posted by: Michael Baker (May 9, 2015 09:29AM)
[quote]On May 9, 2015, Tom Cutts wrote:

When I was a kid I made manicotti with my mom. We stuffed 'em one teaspoonful at a time.

[/quote]

When I read this, it made me laugh...

A long, long time ago, I worked in a restaurant owned by a guy from Northern Italy. His non-English speaking mother had come to visit from the old country and naturally, she gravitated toward the kitchen. She wanted to make a specialty dish for the night, so she had me "assisting" by doing a few things she probably didn't want to. One of these was peeling mushrooms (yeah, you read that right).

So, here I was with a 10 lb. box of small mushrooms and a tiny paring knife, eating up all the prep time for the rest of the night's set-up.

The owner came back and saw me carefully peeling a mountain of mushrooms, stared at me in disbelief, and immediately went into his classic arm-flailing, cocaine-induced, Italian way of asking WTF I was doing.

I told him, of course that I was peeling mushrooms.

"WHY!!??" he asked.

"Because your mom wanted me to."

After a few choice words that should not be translated into English, especially on this forum, he told me that men invented things like this to keep women in the kitchen.

OK, so the guy was candidate for the world's biggest sexist, but it was kind of funny to hear the analogy delivered in his classic manner.

Long story short... of course the time spent with your mom is priceless, but in the future use a pastry bag to stuff manicotti. ;)
Message: Posted by: NYCTwister (May 9, 2015 10:33AM)
I recently made my first hamburger.

Does that count?
Message: Posted by: Magnus Eisengrim (May 9, 2015 10:46AM)
[quote]On May 9, 2015, NYCTwister wrote:
I recently made my first hamburger.

Does that count? [/quote]

Yes.
Message: Posted by: Daryl -the other brother (May 9, 2015 08:37PM)
[quote]On May 9, 2015, Theodore Lawton wrote:
What exactly is your sweet pepper sauce? [/quote]

Dyslexia kicking in. I use bottled Thai sweet CHILE sauce.
Message: Posted by: Dougini (May 10, 2015 10:04AM)
This?

http://nexxtlevelup.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/namjimgai.jpg

Doug
Message: Posted by: Tom Jorgenson (May 10, 2015 07:36PM)
Nước chấm is in the making, Dougini. I picked up my bottle of 3-Crabs at a local Vietnamese/Phillipine/Korean grocery store. I'll try vamping a Cioppino with it in a day or two.

Tonight is a Vadouvan Meat Loaf. I need a picture of the Meatloaf as I'm doing a small recipe book on Vadouvan. I might as well eat well while I'm doing it. I'm thinking I can find out what Indian Curry and Vietnamese Fish Sauce do to each other. It could get ugly. We'll see.
Message: Posted by: Dougini (May 11, 2015 11:42AM)
A little goes a long way! An equal amount of sugar is added, remember.

Doug
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (May 12, 2015 04:26PM)
I'm still a gimp after my surgery so I'm trying not to be on my feet in the kitchen too much. But I did manage some homemade mac n cheese yesterday since boiling noodles and making cheese sauce isn't too hard.

Somebody gave me the idea for grilled ham and cheese sandwiches that we'll be having tonight! :D

Doug- I plan on trying your sauce when I'm a little better on my feet. I was going to try it this week but it was hard enough going to the few stores I went to with my knee. I got to ride the go-cart through the store though! :lol: :cool:

And yes, at one point I was singing Born To Be Wild. :smoke:
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (May 13, 2015 03:07AM)
I did buy a bag of "spits" this week. That is, sunflower seeds. I developed an addiction in the Army when we were on training exercises. I usually go through a couple bags per year before I get sick of them until the next spring.

Chime in if you love seeds! :sun:
Message: Posted by: Magnus Eisengrim (May 13, 2015 12:11PM)
[quote]On May 13, 2015, Theodore Lawton wrote:
I did buy a bag of "spits" this week. That is, sunflower seeds. I developed an addiction in the Army when we were on training exercises. I usually go through a couple bags per year before I get sick of them until the next spring.

Chime in if you love seeds! :sun: [/quote]

When I was 21 or 22 my roomie asked if I could give him and a couple of his friends to a party. I agreed. The friends (strangers to me) sat in the back seat. Next morning I found about half an inch of spit shells on the floor of the car. I'm still so p!ssed, that I can't even look at the d@mned things.
Message: Posted by: Kabbalah (May 13, 2015 12:31PM)
[quote]On May 13, 2015, Theodore Lawton wrote:


Chime in if you love seeds! [/quote]

Pumpkin for me!
Message: Posted by: imgic (May 13, 2015 02:44PM)
[quote]On May 9, 2015, Magnus Eisengrim wrote:
[quote]On May 9, 2015, NYCTwister wrote:
I recently made my first hamburger.

Does that count? [/quote]

Yes. [/quote]

I didn't know how to brown hamburger meat until senior year in college. Now finding cooking a great little hobby.

After the Pink Slime news, I've started grinding my own hamburger meat (had gotten free grinder when we bought Kitchen Aid Mixer). Oh my...what a difference freshly ground meat makes! And the differences when you use different cuts...who knew there's whole forum dedicated on what cuts to mix to get right blend of fat and flavor.

Also, last year at end of tomato season I got whole case of bruised tomatoes, so made Tomato-Honey Jam (basically boiled chopped tomatoes with honey and spices) It's like a fancy ketchup...but so much better.
Message: Posted by: Tom Jorgenson (May 15, 2015 02:02PM)
DOUGINI-

I used the Nước chấm on a bag of Korean Fish-Gristle patties I had in the freezer. Nước chấm saved them for sure. I was surprised at the pleasant taste...nothing overpowering and fishy, but a fresh distant ocean-hint to it all. Thanks for the heads up, I'll keep some made up in the fridge from now on. I found the 3-crabs (24 oz. bottle) for under $4.

Q: How long does it last in the refrigerator? I'm guessing a long time, since vinegar, sugar and fermented are all long term items. Only the garlic might deteriorate, but even that's pickled after a day or so, right?

Great stuff, thanks for the recipe.
Message: Posted by: imgic (May 15, 2015 08:37PM)
I'm thinking if trying this over the weekend...well, maybe just one pie/cake...

http://www.neatorama.com/2011/11/22/a-cherry-pie-an-apple-pie-and-a-pumpkin-pie-each-cooked-inside-a-separate-cake-and-then-all-cooked-together-inside-another-cake/
Message: Posted by: Dougini (May 16, 2015 03:11PM)
Hi Tom! Mine lasts a month or more. But it's gone WAY before then! That's just one recipe! America has not yet truly discovered the magic of Vietnam.

Doug
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (May 16, 2015 03:20PM)
[quote]On May 15, 2015, imgic wrote:
I'm thinking if trying this over the weekend...well, maybe just one pie/cake...

http://www.neatorama.com/2011/11/22/a-cherry-pie-an-apple-pie-and-a-pumpkin-pie-each-cooked-inside-a-separate-cake-and-then-all-cooked-together-inside-another-cake/ [/quote]

That earns the title ridonkulous!
:approve:

Please let us know how it goes!
Message: Posted by: AGMagic (May 16, 2015 08:21PM)
I'm a little late to this party but last week for Mother's Day weekend dinners I made my wife Warf Shrimp (as served in San Francisco). Pretty simple recipe of shrimp, butter, garlic, white wine, diced tomato and green onions saute'd together and served over rice. The following evening for Mother's day my son & I made Chicken Dijon with artichoke hearts. Mom Was happy!
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (May 18, 2015 11:42PM)
So I made huge sandwiches last night. They were based on Muffalettas minus the olive tapenade because my kids don't like olives. These are fun because you can do them however you'd like.

Here's the rundown...

Two large round loaves. I used shepherds loaves. Cut off the top and hollow out most of the insides. Then the layers began.

These were in each loaf from bottom to top:

1/4 pound sliced Havarti
spicy brown mustard
1/4 pound black forest ham
1/4 pound hard salami
1/3 pound roast beef
1/4 pound Lebanon Bologna
A veggie concoction of my own design- recipe below- probably about 8-10 tbls per sandwich
1/4 pound Muenster cheese
Top of the loaf

I went out back and found a brick in my yard, wrapped it in foil and put it in a large Ziploc bag. Put the loaves back in their bags after loading them full and placed them between plates. I put the brick on top of this stack and put them in the fridge overnight to compress.

Slice into wedges and serve. The family went nuts. These were a huge hit.

Here is the veggie mix I came up with to substitute for the tapenade. Everything was chopped small.

2 12 oz jars roasted red bell peppers drained and chopped
about 7 sweet mini gherkins chopped
2 tbls pickle chips chopped
1/2 red onion chopped
5 scallions chopped
1 stalk of celery chopped
salt about 1/4-1/2 tsp?
black pepper about 1/2 tsp
1 tsp red pepper flakes
2 tsp dried parsley flakes
1 tbsp extra virgin olive oil

mix and let chill for 1 or 2 hours to combine before making sandwiches.

Here's a remnant photo:

[img]http://i1161.photobucket.com/albums/q510/Theodore68/Photo-0012-1.jpg[/img]
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (May 19, 2015 09:09PM)
I "grilled" some hot dogs on our stove top grill pan today. Do any of you use these? They allow you to get a nice char on meat without using an outdoor grill.

We also used some leftover veggie mix I still had from the sandwiches on the hot dogs and they were very good.
Message: Posted by: Dougini (May 20, 2015 01:27PM)
[quote]On Apr 28, 2015, I wrote:

I figured I'd share the recipe for Vietnamese Nước chấm.

4 tbsp white vinegar (or lime juice)
4 tbsp 3 Crabs Fish Sauce
4 tbsp sugar
2 cloves pressed garlic
1 or 2 fresh Thai Bird Chiles, sliced (Or any small red hot pepper). Or use red pepper flakes
Dilute with up to 1 cup water

Let it sit in the fridge overnight. The garlic will sink to the bottom.

This is used in every Vietnamese meal in place of salt. Try it and PLEASE let me know how you like it! :)
[/quote]

OK! If ya made this, you're ready for the next part. Vietnamese Carrot Salad is kept in a mason jar in the fridge. A TBSP (undrained) is added to Nước chấm just before serving:

Carrot Salad

2 Cups Water
4 Tablespoons White Vinegar
2 Tablespoons Sugar
1 Teaspoon Salt
4 to 5 Carrots

In a small bowl, combine water, vinegar, sugar and salt. Stir
until dissolved.

Peel carrots and shred finely.

Pour liquid over carrots, cover and refrigerate overnight.

This is good by itself or made into a chicken salad. Or, it can be added to Vietnamese Fried Spring Rolls:

Pork & Crab Spring Rolls (Chả giò)[tya-YAW']

1 1/8 Ounce Package Cellophane Noodles
2 Tablespoons Dried Tree Ears
1 Egg
3/4 Lb Ground Pork
1/2 cup Carrots, Peeled & Shredded
1 Small Onion, Finely Chopped
3 Ounces Cooked Crab Meat
1/2 Teaspoon Salt
1/2 Teaspoon Pepper
1/4 cup Chopped Scallions
1 Pkg Bánh Tráng (Rice Paper)
1/2 Cup Peanut Oil

Soak noodles in hot water, drain and cut into 2-inch pieces.

Soak tree ears in hot water about 3 minutes, drain and chop.

In a large bowl, beat the egg, then add noodles, pork, crab, carrots,
onion, salt, pepper, and scallions and mix well.

Roll up mixture in rice paper by first wetting paper, then roll up
like a burrito. Keep them small.

In the wok, heat peanut oil until hot over medium heat, 3 at a time,
until golden brown. Keep the fried rolls in the oven at about 200 degrees.

Makes about 25 Chả giò

Doug
Message: Posted by: Dougini (May 20, 2015 01:30PM)
Ya like meatballs?

Vietnamese Meatballs

1 Lb Ground Pork
1/2 Small Onion, Finely Chopped
1/2 Cup Chopped Scallions
1/2 Teaspoon Fish Sauce
1/2 Teaspoon Soy Sauce
1/4 Teaspoon Pepper
1/2 Teaspoon Sugar
Fresh Cilantro For Garnish

Preheat oven to 300 degrees, and combine ingredients in a large
mixing bowl and mix well.

Roll the meat mixture into 1 inch balls with wet hands. Then put meatballs
in a 9 x 9-inch baking dish, and bake uncovered for 30 minutes.

Sprinkle chopped cilantro over the top and serve with toothpicks and Nước chấm.

Doug
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (May 20, 2015 06:34PM)
Your making me hungry Doug. I'm going to have to try some of these recipes!
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (May 25, 2015 01:01PM)
Doug, can fish sauce be of any brand, or must it be Three Crabs?

Tryin' to keep this thread going.

Looking for someone with a great recipe for barbecued beef ribs. Every time I do them they come out tough and dry. This weekend was my best yet, though still tough and dry. I put them on the grill and kept temperature low at between 200 and 225 for five hours. I also used the smoker cylinder I mentioned in an early post here, which is the best smoker I've ever used on a grill. But still, the meat wasn't very tender. Maybe I need a particular section of ribs from the back, or around the belly?

I'm thinking they might need braising or some other kind of treatment before grilling. Any suggestions greatly appreciated.
Message: Posted by: Kabbalah (May 25, 2015 01:20PM)
Try pressure cooker ribs.

You will never do them on the grill again.
Message: Posted by: Tom Jorgenson (May 25, 2015 02:01PM)
Kabbalah has it on the ribs...a lot of people seem to recommend a bit of time in the pressure cooker to do the actual cooking, and the BBQ grill for the last part: the social fun of BBQing and for addng the grilled flavors and sauces...

For a great change-up, try a dry rub of Vadouvan on your ribs and do them in the Slow Cooker. You miss the social BBQ thing, but the results are pretty amazing, and they're always tender.
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (May 25, 2015 02:05PM)
[quote]On May 25, 2015, Kabbalah wrote:
Try pressure cooker ribs.

You will never do them on the grill again. [/quote]
Interesting; do you pressure cook in a special liquid (fruit juice, for example) for flavoring? And for how long once the weight starts its thing?

The only thing we've pressure cooked is corned beef and cabbage. That's it.
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (May 25, 2015 02:12PM)
[quote]On May 25, 2015, Tom Jorgenson wrote:
Kabbalah has it on the ribs...a lot of people seem to recommend a bit of time in the pressure cooker to do the actual cooking, and the BBQ grill for the last part: the social fun of BBQing and for addng the grilled flavors and sauces...

For a great change-up, try a dry rub of Vadouvan on your ribs and do them in the Slow Cooker. You miss the social BBQ thing, but the results are pretty amazing, and they're always tender. [/quote]

I like the idea of finishing them off on the grill if only because I like a little crust on ribs that forms from the carmelization of the brown sugar based rub I like to use.

I also like the idea of the slow cook method. Will have to play with both methods. :-) Thanks!
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (May 25, 2015 10:48PM)
Beef ribs I would cook the same way as pork country style ribs- low and slow in a homemade bbq sauce, covered, in the oven or slow cooker.

While those were becoming a thing of beauty I'd be making the greens, mac n cheese and cornbread.

Tonight I picked up 2 rotisserie chickens some hummus and french bread.
Message: Posted by: Dougini (May 26, 2015 07:13AM)
[quote]On May 25, 2015, Bob1Dog wrote:
Doug, can fish sauce be of any brand, or must it be Three Crabs?
[/quote]

3 Crabs is the easiest to find. But there are others, like Phu Quoc:

http://www.chicagoreader.com/binary/6d9c/1287435528-img_0874.jpg

Here are the three I have.

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3141/2531256851_c9cd8d2c89.jpg

The Squid brand is NOT Nhi, and has a "stronger" flavor. Really, until you have acquired a taste for it, stick to Nhi. On the bottle it'll say "Nước Mắm Nhi".

Doug
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (May 26, 2015 01:45PM)
Doug, just curious, how did you acquire your taste for Vietnamese cuisine?

I acquired mine in Hong Kong about 35 years ago, where I've had the best Vietnamese cuisine ever.

Someone in this thread (may have been you) said that Vietnamese cuisine is largely undiscovered in American taste and that's absolutely correct in my opinion as well.

Thanks for the response about the fish sauce. :-)
Message: Posted by: Kabbalah (May 26, 2015 01:57PM)
[quote]On May 25, 2015, Bob1Dog wrote:

Interesting; do you pressure cook in a special liquid (fruit juice, for example) for flavoring? And for how long once the weight starts its thing?

The only thing we've pressure cooked is corned beef and cabbage. That's it. [/quote]

I put the ribs on a rack above beef broth to which I've added liquid smoke. Unless I am making a gravy, then I use beef consomme and eliminate the liquid smoke.

I have a digital pressure cooker and I usually let the ribs go for about fifty minutes.

On another note, I highly recommend the electronic pressure cookers.
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (May 26, 2015 05:30PM)
Do any of you ever grill your vegetables?

I cut up some zucchini tonight and tossed it in

Olive oil
Balsamic vinegar
Seasoned salt
Black pepper
Garlic powder
Onion powder
Chile powder

Let them sit while I did some other prep and kept tossing them, then grilled them on my stove top grill.

My kids love these. Sometimes I'll include yellow squash, onions and tomatoes.
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (May 26, 2015 10:23PM)
[quote]On May 26, 2015, Kabbalah wrote:
[quote]On May 25, 2015, Bob1Dog wrote:

Interesting; do you pressure cook in a special liquid (fruit juice, for example) for flavoring? And for how long once the weight starts its thing?

The only thing we've pressure cooked is corned beef and cabbage. That's it. [/quote]

I put the ribs on a rack above beef broth to which I've added liquid smoke. Unless I am making a gravy, then I use beef consomme and eliminate the liquid smoke.

I have a digital pressure cooker and I usually let the ribs go for about fifty minutes.

On another note, I highly recommend the electronic pressure cookers. [/quote]
Wow, electronic pressure cookers; another foodie toy I must have, I think! (But I still haven't convinced myself that the sous vide thing is all it's cracked up to be.) Thanks for the help!
Message: Posted by: Dougini (May 27, 2015 06:41AM)
[quote]On May 26, 2015, Bob1Dog wrote:
Doug, just curious, how did you acquire your taste for Vietnamese cuisine?
[/quote]

Long story. I went to Germany in 1973, after my orders were changed from Vietnam. In Ft. Benjamin Harrison IN, I met some Vietnamese military personnel. I immediately clicked with them and was invited regularly to eat with them.

After returning to the States in 1975, I met a Vietnamese dollbaby named Xuan (Swan). That was my REAL intro to this wonderful cuisine! :)

Doug
Message: Posted by: imgic (May 28, 2015 03:31PM)
After seeing them on TV, I've been making Bahn Mi sandwiches. I pickle my own daikon and carrots. Hardest part is finding really good bread. Also, since I've never tasted a "real" Bahn Mi I have no idea if what I'm making compared to the real thing. But I must be doing something right because it's the most requested dish when we have company.

But I'm in San Francisco for business. And tonight we're going out for Vietnamese food...perhaps I'll get my chance
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (May 28, 2015 03:55PM)
[quote]On May 27, 2015, Dougini wrote:
[quote]On May 26, 2015, Bob1Dog wrote:
Doug, just curious, how did you acquire your taste for Vietnamese cuisine?
[/quote]

Long story. I went to Germany in 1973, after my orders were changed from Vietnam. In Ft. Benjamin Harrison IN, I met some Vietnamese military personnel. I immediately clicked with them and was invited regularly to eat with them.

After returning to the States in 1975, I met a Vietnamese dollbaby named Xuan (Swan). That was my REAL intro to this wonderful cuisine! :)

Doug [/quote]

:smiles:
Message: Posted by: Dougini (May 28, 2015 04:51PM)
In Boston, we have the Banh Mi Ba Le:

http://banhmibaleboston.com/

Here is their menu:

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_JeHRV7VYUUo/TSXQ8t8bZsI/AAAAAAAAALE/ptgOeAT5OnY/s1600/BaLe2.jpg

A good Banh Mi look like this:

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-XRXHDHKpSaM/VAthmKWEVdI/AAAAAAAAA3A/hCco7F077Ao/s1600/Ba%2BLe%2B3.jpg

The recipe? Simple:

https://eclecticspot.files.wordpress.com/2012/06/banhmiunstacked.jpg

Doug
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (May 28, 2015 09:04PM)
I have never tried Vietnamese food so I've been hesitant to try your sauce Doug. I want to try it in a restaurant first, but I'm also wondering how good the Vietnamese food in Tucson will be. Most of the Vietnamese restaurants here advertize themselves as Pho specialists so that leaves me guessing as to the rest of the menu options.

I will try some and report back and then I can maybe try making some myself.

Pho sho! :kewl:
Message: Posted by: Dougini (May 29, 2015 07:53AM)
LOL! That's what I'm here Phở!

And speaking of Phở (it is pronounced, "[i]Fuh-h?[/i]"), this is a beef noodle soup like you have never had! Phở consists of broth, linguine-shaped rice noodles called bánh phở, a few herbs, and meat, primarily served with either beef or chicken. Phở is a popular food in Vietnam and the specialty of a number of restaurant chains around the world. Southern Vietnamese eat it for breakfast and occasionally lunch, whereas those from northern Vietnam consume it at any time of day.

Phở originated in the early 20th century in northern Vietnam, and was popularized throughout the rest of the world by refugees during the Vietnam War. The Hanoi and Saigon styles of Phở differ by noodle width, sweetness of broth, and choice of herbs. A related noodle soup, bún bò Huế, is associated with Huế in central Vietnam.

Doug
Message: Posted by: balducci (Jun 5, 2015 01:35AM)
[url=http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2015/06/eating-placenta/394910/]Mmmm, yummy.[/url]
Message: Posted by: Dougini (Jun 5, 2015 07:55AM)
GACK! W-whoa! Boy! Took THIS thread in a vomitous direction! ~UUURRRP!~

Doug
Message: Posted by: NYCTwister (Jun 5, 2015 12:37PM)
Here's a question for you foodies.

When I buy ground beef the meat that's visible is always red, but often the meat in the middle is brown to varying degrees.
From what I've read online it's supposed to be safe but......it's very unappetizing.

Is it safe? A natural process?

Bear in mind I'm not one to grind my own like you gourmets.
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (Jun 5, 2015 05:01PM)
It's safe as long as it isn't old, in which case the exterior would most likely be brown as well.

Much of the ground beef in stores is treated to keep it looking pink. To some people this is a big issue. I'm not one of those people.

Here's a short article that explains it pretty well. The bonus section mentions what I'm describing.

http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2010/04/the-red-juice-in-raw-red-meat-is-not-blood/

And even more specifically to your point about inside versus outside:

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/food-safety-education/get-answers/food-safety-fact-sheets/meat-preparation/ground-beef-and-food-safety/CT_Index
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (Jun 5, 2015 05:09PM)
Yesterday it was crock pot chuck roast, oven roasted red potatoes, corn and sauteed mushrooms.

A nice trick I learned from a Bosnian friend- saute mushrooms whole. I do mine in olive oil with a little butter, seasoned salt, pepper, granulated garlic and parsley flakes.

Today I'm making big batch of egg salad.

Earlier this week I did pasta shells with tomato cream sauce and grilled hot Italian turkey sausage.
Message: Posted by: imgic (Jun 5, 2015 09:04PM)
Last weekend we made "rainbow salmon" kebabs. Cut salmon filet into chunks and skewered them with red onion and red, yellow, and green peppers. Brushed on oil and salted. Grilled over hardwood charcoal. Served over yellow rice. Was best salmon we've had. Sometimes simple works out.
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (Jun 5, 2015 09:17PM)
Sounds great!
Message: Posted by: NYCTwister (Jun 5, 2015 10:06PM)
[quote]On Jun 5, 2015, Theodore Lawton wrote:
It's safe as long as it isn't old, in which case the exterior would most likely be brown as well.

Much of the ground beef in stores is treated to keep it looking pink. To some people this is a big issue. I'm not one of those people.

Here's a short article that explains it pretty well. The bonus section mentions what I'm describing.

http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2010/04/the-red-juice-in-raw-red-meat-is-not-blood/

And even more specifically to your point about inside versus outside:

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/food-safety-education/get-answers/food-safety-fact-sheets/meat-preparation/ground-beef-and-food-safety/CT_Index [/quote]

Thanks Theodore.
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (Jun 25, 2015 02:01AM)
Some cool recent junk food finds:

Oscar Meyer Selects black angus uncured hot dogs with no nitrates or nitrites except; as the package states, those naturally occurring in celery juice. These hot dogs are crazy good! I got them nice and charred up on my stove top grill. They had a nice snap to them and were juicy and delicious. These are gonna be our "go to" dogs for a while. Full of flavor.

Sam's club thin crust, triple pepperoni, frozen pizza. These little things are just pictures of greasy, spicy goodness.

Also, lately I've been making my own spice mix and baking chicken thighs. I can buy a package of about a dozen thighs for 6-7 bucks so they're cheap. Last night we had some with Jasmine rice that I jazzed up with minced garlic, salt, pepper, garlic powder, onion powder, cumin, chile powder and turmeric. The rice had a nice yellow rice color and my daughter loved it.
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (Jun 25, 2015 02:07AM)
And I need to fill you all in on Boylan's soda. https://www.boylanbottling.com/

I was thirsty and picked up one of their cream sodas on a whim at World Market a couple weeks ago- we buy all our coffee there. Wow. This is the best soda I've ever had. It's made with cane sugar. They make a few different flavors and I've only had the root beer and the cream, but these are some fantastic sodas- both are super creamy, just awesome. And I usually don't drink soda. At 1.49 each they aren't cheap so I buy a six pack and ration them out as a treat to myself during the week. Highly recommended!
Message: Posted by: imgic (Jun 25, 2015 07:39AM)
Love Boylans soda. They're getting into restaraunts now. Just had their cola in Mod Market.
Message: Posted by: Dougini (Jun 25, 2015 10:36AM)
Speaking of soda, anyone ever heard of a New York Egg Cream? I've made them for more than ten years, after a doo-wop guy from Brooklyn showed me how. Ya gotta use this:

http://www.foxsyrups.com/theoriginaleggcream_files/small_2609.jpg

Use half & half instead of milk.

Anyone?

Doug
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (Jun 25, 2015 12:11PM)
I grew up on egg creams in Queens, NY. They were the most popular drinks at any place with a soda fountain!
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (Jun 25, 2015 05:00PM)
I could just Google it, but in the interest of pursuing the dying art of conversation, what is an egg cream?
Message: Posted by: Dougini (Jun 26, 2015 08:02AM)
Here ya go! :)

http://www.artofmanliness.com/2014/07/08/the-history-of-the-egg-cream-and-how-to-make-one-in-the-authentic-brooklyn-style/

Doug
Message: Posted by: TonyB2009 (Jun 26, 2015 10:42AM)
Don't know how relevant this is but this is a foodie thread so here goes.

I am just back from the Camino Way in northern Spain, where I had some of the best food I have enjoyed in years. Highlights included beef cheeks in gravy, pigs feet in red bean sauce (a surprise as I normally hate pigs feet) and fried foie gras on toast. Divine. In northern Spain they call their tapas pinchos, and they are dirt cheap. You eat like a king, drink like a fish, and have plenty of change from your ten in your pocket afterwards. I should move there!
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (Jun 26, 2015 10:11PM)
Thanks Doug! They sound great.

Tony- it doesn't get more relevant than that! One of my friends visited Spain once and said the same thing about the prices and the food quality. I'd love to go sometime. Beef cheeks are some of the best meat.
Message: Posted by: EsnRedshirt (Jun 27, 2015 09:48PM)
I'll probably be shouted down here, but I really, -really-, REALLY HATE the word "foodie." It's right up there with "yummo" and "glamping." In fact, if I ever hear a self-professed foodie say "Yummo!" while glamping, I will probably take a flame thrower to them, regardless of the fire danger.

Why make up a stupid HGTV word when there's already the perfectly servicable "gourmet?"

That said, I've played around with sous vide before, using a fairly cheap water heater/circulater unit I got off Amazon.com. That will turn the toughest cut of beef into a melt-in-your-mouth delight (provided you've got a few hours to spare to cook it.) Does fish up fantastic, too- fully cooked, with the texture of sushi. Not for everyone, but I loved it.
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Jun 28, 2015 07:00PM)
[quote]On Jun 27, 2015, EsnRedshirt wrote:
Why make up a stupid HGTV word when there's already the perfectly servicable "gourmet?"[/quote]
Or [i]gourmand[/i], or [i]epicure[/i], or [i]gastronome[/i], or . . . ?
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Jun 28, 2015 09:27PM)
[quote]On Apr 28, 2015, LobowolfXXX wrote:
The best thing you can do for chips is befriend S2000Magician, then invite him over and ask him to make and bring some salsa.

Note, though: When he says "spicy," he's not kidding.[/quote]
I feel like a celebrity or something.

You're even starting to capitalize my name.
Message: Posted by: imgic (Jun 28, 2015 09:51PM)
With heat lately I've been grilling a lot. Will roast the veggies (carrots, beets, sweet potatoes, pototatos, etc). Usually chunk em up then coat in oil and sprinkle kosher salt. Other day wife brought home lemon infused olive oil. I don't use it for grilling (olive oil has low burn point). But sprinkle some on after the grilling. It tastes great! Especially on sweet potatoes and beets. Grilled salmon yesterday and put a bit on theme as well. My new favorite thing.
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Jun 28, 2015 09:55PM)
Try grilling parsnips. Slice them about ¼ inch thick and brush them with olive oil.

Yum!

Or grilled artichokes!

Or grilled fennel!
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (Jun 29, 2015 12:28AM)
Yummo!
Message: Posted by: imgic (Jun 29, 2015 02:44AM)
[quote]On Jun 28, 2015, S2000magician wrote:
Try grilling parsnips. Slice them about ¼ inch thick and brush them with olive oil.

Yum!

Or grilled artichokes!

Or grilled fennel! [/quote]

We had grilled romaine salad at restaraunt other night..eager to try it at home
Message: Posted by: Dougini (Jun 29, 2015 08:13AM)
Any of you guys like Thai? Ever heard of Pad Prik Khing?

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4020/4287925498_b9d99888d4.jpg

Doug
Message: Posted by: imgic (Jun 29, 2015 09:34AM)
During Air Force Survivsl school we were taught many things are edible, but we just have aversions to eating them. To get over such food aversions, it was suggested that we find a true authentic Thai restaurant and blindly order off the menu. If we could eat that, we could eat anything.
Message: Posted by: EsnRedshirt (Jun 29, 2015 02:36PM)
I've eaten Baluut before, and I'm not even in the armed forces. It tastes like chicken-egg-drop soup. Just don't look down mid-bite if seeing assorted internal organs might make you squeamish.
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (Jun 29, 2015 02:37PM)
Doug, that picture looks delicious. The most "exotic" Asian I've ever had was Korean. I liked it, but my wife hates it so we never go. Although- I did buy some Korean sweet and spicy sauce for this week's pork chops! Maybe she'll like it?!

imgic, that's hilarious! :lol:

Chocolate eclair ice cream bars anyone?
Message: Posted by: Dougini (Jun 29, 2015 02:56PM)
[quote]On Jun 29, 2015, EsnRedshirt wrote:
I've eaten Baluut before, and I'm not even in the armed forces. It tastes like chicken-egg-drop soup. Just don't look down mid-bite if seeing assorted internal organs might make you squeamish. [/quote]

Balut is a fertilized duck egg:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balut_(food)#/media/File:BALUT.jpg

The baby duck is fully formed. It is soft and mostly jelly-like. Tastes a bit like chicken livers. Not bad, but I won't eat more than one or two.

Doug
Message: Posted by: Dougini (Jun 29, 2015 03:03PM)
[quote]On Jun 29, 2015, Theodore Lawton wrote:
Doug, that picture looks delicious. The most "exotic" Asian I've ever had was Korean. I liked it, but my wife hates it so we never go. Although- I did buy some Korean sweet and spicy sauce for this week's pork chops! Maybe she'll like it!
[/quote]

Korean? Like hot stuff? Kim Chee rocks the house! And Beef Bulgogi. Your wife would LOVE it! Real easy to make. Slice ribeye into strips, and marinate overnight in this:

http://www.ezionmarket.com/media/catalog/product/cache/2/image/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/c/j/cj-__2_2.jpg

Wrap in individual leaves of red leaf lettuce.

Doug
Message: Posted by: EsnRedshirt (Jun 29, 2015 03:06PM)
[quote]On Jun 29, 2015, Dougini wrote:
[quote]On Jun 29, 2015, EsnRedshirt wrote:
I've eaten Baluut before, and I'm not even in the armed forces. It tastes like chicken-egg-drop soup. Just don't look down mid-bite if seeing assorted internal organs might make you squeamish. [/quote]

Balut is a fertilized duck egg:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balut_(food)#/media/File:BALUT.jpg

The baby duck is fully formed. It is soft and mostly jelly-like. Tastes a bit like chicken livers. Not bad, but I won't eat more than one or two.

Doug [/quote]
Yep. I looked down halfway through and realized I was staring straight down an esophagus, and was munching on the head. I almost lost it at that point, but did manage to finish. Would have enjoyed it more if I hadn't looked. :)
Message: Posted by: Dougini (Jun 29, 2015 03:19PM)
Not my favorite. The Vietnamese love it with beer. The Vietnamese, Thai, Cambodians and Laotians have FAR tastier, and more appetizing things! I don't see Balut very often. Kind of expensive here in the states. One thing I have fallen IN LOVE with is Indonesian Mie Goreng! I finally found it! They call themselves Very Asian and I get TWO boxes of these:

http://www.veryasia.com/mi-goreng-indomie-instant-noodle/

60 total. A little over $30. It is the BEST Ramen I gave EVER had! Look for it in Asian markets. How lucky to find THIS! Wow! You gotta try it. Order just a few. They're really great.

Doug
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Jun 29, 2015 05:05PM)
I love Thai food.

I have Thai chilies and Thai basil in my garden.

Nam sod, tom kah gai, larb, pad see eew, prik king . . . I could go on and on.
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Jun 29, 2015 08:26PM)
Speaking, as Lobo was, about salsa, I shall probably make some tomorrow.

I've had a (viral) throat infection for the last couple of weeks, so I'm not going to make my usual chunky salsa: too much work.

Here's what'll likely go into it:

[list][*]1# tomatillos (blackened under the broiler, then pureed)
[*]1-2/3 red onions, chopped, then run through the food processor
[*]6 - 8 habanero chilies from my garden (blackened under the broiler, then pureed)
[*]4 - 5 green onions, sliced, then run through the food processor
[*]Lime juice
[*]Salt[/list]
Maybe some ground cumin, maybe some oregano. We'll see.

As Lobo suggested: it'll be spicy.
Message: Posted by: imgic (Jun 29, 2015 09:05PM)
Was in the Philippines and saw folks eating baluut. Couldn't not bring myself to try it.

Have been in Korea and love kimchi and bulgolgi. Was surprised at the "hardiness" of Korean food.

Was stationed in Okinawa and use to go to little soba (noodle) shop. They had a dish called Chuka Dunburi. Some type of chicken and vegetable stir fry in sauce over rice. A raw egg cracked in top. You stirred egg and heat from food cooked it. It was my favorite food. Have not been able to find it anywhere or a recipe. Evidently it must have been a local concoction.
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Jun 29, 2015 09:17PM)
I love soba.

Especially zaru soba: cold soba noodles. With grated daikon and tempura flakes.

Da . . . rn! Now I'm hungry for Japanese food. (We're likely having barbecued pizza for dinner; not a bad second choice.)
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Jun 29, 2015 10:46PM)
I love all sorts of food.

Chicken California (chicken braised in red wine with onions, cumin, coriander, chili powder, blanched almonds, and green olives).

Stir-fried beef with caramelized onions and red bell peppers.

Sushi and sashimi.

Beef curry, with Anaheim chilies and onions.

Chili verde (tomatillos, pork, pinto & black beans, cumin, chili powder)

Tuna salad, with olive oil, Dijon, celery, parsley (lots of parsley!), capers, slivered almonds, habanero chilies.

Steak au poivre (with tons! of au poivre).

Pizza with cherry tomatoes, chilies, olives, mushrooms, basil, oregano.

Rare steak (e.g., carne asada, marinated with serrano chilies, lime juice, garlic, oregano, vinegar, olive oil, salt and pepper).

I love many strong cheese (parmesan, blue cheese), but hate many other cheeses (e.g., swiss), and generally hate melted cheese (except on pizza: go figure!).

I despise mayonnaise (look at the tuna salad recipe, above), but will readily substitute sour cream for mayo on almost anything.

I love spicy food: jalapeño dill pickles, habanero mustard, and so on.

I'll throw chilies (habaneros, Thais, cayennes, Tabascos, serranos, whatever) into scrambled eggs, pasta sauce, casseroles, and so on.

Leek and potato soup.

White bean soup (especially with fresh rosemary and ham/bacon).

Beef curry udon.

Country Captain.

Beef curry

Jasmine rice with fruit (e.g., golden raisins, mango, papaya, cherries).

Pozole. (There's a Tex-Mex restaurant near us that makes pozole with tomatillos, cilantro, serranos, and red onion: perfect! (They include cotija cheese, but I don't like it soggy in the soup.))

Pizza. (Tonight, it's barbecued, with pepperoni, serranos (for me, not for my wife), tomato sauce with rosemary, sliced mozzarella and provolone, grated parmesan, Monterey jack, and basil from the garden).

Any of the above with a good hefeweisen or good (i.e., not Glenfiddich) single malt Scotch.
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Jun 29, 2015 11:01PM)
Update: the pizza was spectacular!
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (Jun 29, 2015 11:08PM)
Nice post- lots to think about!

One thing I really miss from my time in the Army- while stationed in Germany we used to pig out on real, Turkish (German) Doner Kebabs. Man do I miss those! I wouldn't even try to make them here as the bread is what helped make them so special.
Message: Posted by: Dougini (Jun 30, 2015 09:22AM)
Thai Curry is one of my specialties. I used to make the paste. Now, after finding that most Thai use this:

https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&site=imghp&tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1024&bih=681&q=maesri+curry+paste&oq=maesri&gs_l=img.1.8.0l9j0i30.1323.10223.0.15016.7.7.0.0.0.0.157.977.0j7.7.0....0...1ac.1.64.img..1.6.819._pY6_gwJFMg

I make a Vietnamese Chicken Curry with sweet potatoes using this:

https://www.ishopindian.com/images/D/maesri_yellowcurry_c.jpg

I also use the green, yellow and red curries. Each has a different flavor. The Masaman is the yellow. The Thai cannot say, "Muslim". It comes out [i]Mas[/i]-a-man! It is the closest thing to Indian Curry.

Panang Curry is quite different. It's made using beef. But Prik Khing is the only one that does not use coconut milk in its prep.

Doug
Message: Posted by: imgic (Jun 30, 2015 09:31AM)
I do miss good bread. I'm Europe the bread is amazing and it's everywhere. In Japan the used rice flour and bread came out do other like angel food cake.
Back in Wisconsin we had lots of German bakeries. The best was Sunday mornings as they would have hot ham and kaiser rolls. Crusty outside and light chewy inside.

Have not found any really good bakeries in Colorado. Must be the altitude... Though the brownies here are really good lately.
Message: Posted by: Dougini (Jun 30, 2015 10:26AM)
[quote]On Jun 30, 2015, imgic wrote:
...Though the brownies here are really good lately.[/quote]

Ha! I imagine! Quality "goods" in Colorado! Maine ain't doing too bad either! I'm a "card holder", myself. The options are getting better. Slowly, but hey...

Doug
Message: Posted by: EsnRedshirt (Jun 30, 2015 11:40PM)
Man, I'm currently laid up with a pulled muscle in my leg- it hurts to even stand more than a minute or two at a time, which makes cooking most things out of the question. (Took me ten minutes just to make a sandwich the other day- slice cheese, sit down till pain stops, spread guacamole, sit down till pain stops, etc.) I do have some yeast I picked up, though. Once I can stand long enough, I think I'll make some gourmet pizza on a homemade crust in my ceramic cooker (Big Green Egg). Top it with some salmon and roasted garlic maybe...
Message: Posted by: imgic (Jul 1, 2015 10:22AM)
Years ago I had a trip to upstate New York, near Canadian border. We had Poutine one night...what a great dish! French fries topped with brown gravy and cheese curds (Especially enticing for a Wisconsin kid like myself).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poutine

We went out the other night and some place in Boulder had a newfangled "gourmand" version of Poutine with fancy goat cheese and strips of duck breast. Didn't sound all that good, so am thinking I'll make a basic Poutine this weekend.
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Jul 23, 2015 04:38PM)
I was going to post that I made a batch of chicken tikka masala last night, but the fact is that I made two: half a recipe for me (with twice the number of serranos (and ripe serranos, to boot, from my garden) as recommended for the full recipe), and half a recipe for my wife ([i]sans[/i] serranos). I also made some fried potatoes with mustard seed, cumin, turmeric, and cayenne.

Dinner was wonderful!

If you're going to make chicken tikka masala, I strongly encourage you to grill the marinated chicken (I put it on skewers) instead of merely braising it in the sauce; it's much more flavorful.

And the best part: [i]beaucoup de[/i] leftovers for lunch today!
Message: Posted by: Dougini (Jul 24, 2015 12:03PM)
Man! That makes my mouth water! This guy has the ripe ones on the right:

http://www.las-lolas.com/english/chiles1.jpg

I can only get the green ones. There is a red jalapeno that Huy Fong uses to make Sriracha. I thought that might be the same strain as the one used to make Chipotle Peppers, but it's not. It's a Jalapeno/Vietnamese pepper hybrid.

I don't care for Scotch Bonnet/Habaneros. They have a sour flavor that interferes. I much perfer the Thai Bird Chile, the Filipino Bird's Eye, or even the Caribbean Ghost Pepper.

Doug
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Jul 24, 2015 12:20PM)
[quote]On Jul 24, 2015, Dougini wrote:
I don't care for Scotch Bonnet/Habaneros. They have a sour flavor that interferes. I much perfer the Thai Bird Chile, the Filipino Bird's Eye, or even the Caribbean Ghost Pepper.

Doug [/quote]
Interesting. I disagree.

I find habaneros and scotch bonnets (ripe ones) quite sweet, and very flavorful (i.e., not just hot). (I'll agree that unripe chilies, in general, are a little sour.) The ghost chilies I've grown (not Caribbean, by the way: ghost chilies - bhut jolokias or naga jolokias - are from India) did not have anywhere near the flavor of habaneros. Hotter than blazes, but otherwise quite bland.

I do agree on the Thai chilies and the Bird's Eyes: very good flavor. I have a Thai chili plant (and a nice Thai basil plant . . . an interesting story for another day), but I've never grown Bird's Eyes.

If you get green chilies and want them to ripen, put them in a plastic bag with an apple. The ethylene gas that the apple produces will hasten the ripening of the chilies.

I'm really eager to see if the Carolina Reapers I'm growing have some flavor in addition to the heat. I love the different flavors you get from different chilies; quite the gamut.
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Jul 24, 2015 12:44PM)
On the topic of chilies, a book my wife got me last Christmas has a recipe for candying chilies.

Once I get a good batch, I'm going to try my hand at that. Imagine:
[list][*]Candied cayennes
[*]Candied habaneros
[*]Candied tepins and pequins
[*]Candied Trinidad Moruga scorpions
[*]Candied serranos
[*]Candied bhut jolokias
[*]and so on[/list]
Message: Posted by: imgic (Jul 24, 2015 03:09PM)
I make a pretty good Pepper Jelly. My parents use to get Jalapeno Jelly (colored a ghastly green) when they'd be in Arizona and bring it back north. They'd spoon it on block of cream cheese. It looked like the cheese had been slimed from the ghost in Ghostbusters. But it was tasty. When they stopped going to Arizona we had jelly withdrawals, so I've learned how to make my own. Combine it with Peach, or Cherry...mmmm...tasty.

While it's getting more common in markets, it's not as good as homemade. You can control heat and sweetness. And with the Jalapeno-Cherry jelly, you can cook it down to make a sauce that's killer on pork.
Message: Posted by: EsnRedshirt (Jul 24, 2015 04:44PM)
My company has a farmer's market in front of the Caféteria on Thursdays. I really should check it out- one of the products is "Ghost Salt", a seasoning mix featuring, among other things, powdered ghost peppers.
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (Jul 25, 2015 09:27PM)
Those were some great contributions to this thread. I really like reading what you all share because it gets my own thoughts flowing.

The tikka masala sounds delicious and I love pepper jelly.

It does go great with pork. I used to do 2 different pork dishes that it went great with: a bacon wrapped pork tenderloin that you spread with chopped, fresh rosemary and spicy mustard before wrapping and another one with a 1/2 loin rolled and stuffed with chorizo. Either one tastes great with chile jelly or a rosemary demi. Or both!

Next weekend I'm making a couscous salad for a party my wife is having. I use this recipe I got from Food Network and "basically sorta" double it. It's easy and it rocks! Bill- feel free to add as much torment (chiles) as you desire!


Ingredients

1 box flavored couscous (garlic or Parmesan), cooked
1 can chickpeas
1 red bell pepper, finely chopped
1/2 Vidalia onion, chopped
1 English cucumber, peeled, seeded, and finely chopped
1 tomato, chopped
1/4 cup fresh parsley leaves, chopped
1/2 cup crumbled feta cheese
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
1/4 cup olive oil
2 to 3 limes, juiced

Directions

In a large bowl, toss all the ingredients with the olive oil and lime juice, to taste.
Message: Posted by: Dougini (Jul 26, 2015 09:55AM)
Bill this oughta crack ya up:

I have a bad habit. You know the company that makes Sriracha? Rooster brand? Well, they make two other products. [i]Tương Ớt Tỏi Vietnam[/i], a chili garlic sauce, and [i]Sambal Oelek[/i]. This last one comes in jars with a gold label:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61TW5096ULL._SX425_.jpg

Here is what it looks like:

http://www.ryanspilken.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/Sambal_Spoon_101025_3014-Edit-700x435.jpg

This is made with the peppers David Tran grows in Irwindale CA. Here is the story:

Hot sauce creator, David Tran, began his chili making mastery in 1975 in Vietnam. During his humble beginnings, the unsurpassable genius produced his first hot sauce called Pepper Sa-te. He filled his Sa-te sauce in recycled glass baby food jars that then was sold and delivered by family members via bicycle. In 1979, his astounding voyage began by departing communist Vietnam on a Taiwanese freighter that was registered in Panama, named Huey Fong.

Later that name became the inspiration namesake of his beloved company, Huy Fong Foods. After the United States accepted Tran as a refugee when no other countries would, he started right away doing what he did best -- making hot sauce. So in 1980, he started his chili legacy in a 5,000 sq foot building nestled near Chinatown in Los Angeles.

His creations included his Pepper Sa-te Sauce, Sambal Oelek, Chili Garlic, Sambal Badjak and Sriracha Hot Sauce. He was quite content just to sell whatever he could produce each day and deliver them to Asian restaurants and markets in his blue Chevy van - often driving as far as San Francisco and even San Diego.

Believe it or not, Tran actually hand painted his first hot sauce logos onto that blue Chevy van himself! At that time, little did Tran realize his delectable sauces, particularly the iconic Sriracha Hot Sauce, made from just fresh jalapeño chili peppers, would spread like HOT wild fire...

[i]“We started this because we like fresh, spicy chili sauce.”[/i] -David Tran

OK. You know the history. That Sambal Oelek is the tastiest hot pepper sauce I have EVER tried! I eat it out of the jar! Last night I opened a new jar, and over a couple hours ate HALF of it. Delicious. Today, however? Not good. Now I know why a dog drags his ass around the living room carpet!

I could sit on something flammable and start a fire! This kinda says it all:

http://i.ytimg.com/vi/buOKNyq3TqA/hqdefault.jpg

Know what I'm sayin'?

Doug
Message: Posted by: BeachCat (Jul 26, 2015 11:05AM)
You men are all forgetting about dessert! I'm a pastry chef and I've got lots of great things that I love to make but my favorite to consume- Creme Brûlée (especially coffee flavored), Warm molten chocolate cake with creme anglaise or a slice of pear and almond tart with cinnamon ice cream. Yum!
Message: Posted by: Dougini (Jul 26, 2015 11:39AM)
[quote]On Jul 26, 2015, BeachBum wrote:
You men are all forgetting about dessert! I'm a pastry chef and I've got lots of great things that I love to make but my favorite to consume- Creme Brûlée (especially coffee flavored), Warm molten chocolate cake with creme anglaise or a slice of pear and almond tart with cinnamon ice cream. Yum! [/quote]

Wow. I make Creme Brûlée! Just the plain vanilla. Now Lava Cake, BeachBum! Now that is decadent! Welcome to the Café, by the way! ;)

Doug
Message: Posted by: BeachCat (Jul 26, 2015 12:34PM)
Thank you Doug! I can't say I share the same interest in your duck eggs. (bleck!) but to each his own. There's a reason why I chose to just work with the sweet stuff. ;-)
Message: Posted by: Dougini (Jul 26, 2015 02:35PM)
Oh, I don't like the balut either! I do like the curries! :)

Doug
Message: Posted by: Tom Jorgenson (Jul 26, 2015 06:15PM)
Doug, I found your Ramen reccommend at my neighborhood Philipino/Asian grocery store. Very nice, thanks.
Message: Posted by: Dougini (Jul 27, 2015 07:19AM)
[quote]On Jul 26, 2015, Tom Jorgenson wrote:
Doug, I found your Ramen recommended at my neighborhood Filipino/Asian grocery store. Very nice, thanks. [/quote]

Indo-Mie? The Mie Goreng? My pleasure! Nothing like it anywhere! Also, look for the MAMA brand of Ramen.

Doug
Message: Posted by: imgic (Jul 27, 2015 11:02AM)
Great weekend...found frozen custard in Denver!

While a staple back in the Dairyland state of Wisconsin, frozen custard is not well known throughout the states. It's ice cream's more decedent sibling...made with cream, eggs, sugar, and flavoring, it's richer, smoother and creamier than ice cream. There is a chain, Culvers (started in Wisconsin) that now has two locations in Colorado. And while pretty good, it's not on par with the various small mom & pop places (such as Leon's Frozen Custard stand on south side of Milwaukee...it was the inspiration for the hangout in Happy Days).

During an adventure this weekend exploring Denver, we came across a small place "Cloud 9 Frozen Custard" We thought it might be good when one of the reviews on Yelp raved about the custard and said they'd punch a kitten to get the hot fudge. We truly were on Cloud 9 as we ate our sundaes (though, as food comas hit on ride home, we weren't as enthusiastic about our choices).

For those of you who haven't tried it; I highly recommend you find some frozen custard...
Message: Posted by: Tom Jorgenson (Aug 4, 2015 01:46PM)
[quote]On Apr 28, 2015, Dougini wrote:
Yum! Theodore, that is epic!

I figured I'd share the recipe for Vietnamese Nước chấm. Anyone brave enough to make this?

You need one thing, kinda unusual. Fish Sauce. Not just any fish sauce. Ya want the best you can get. The lower quality stuff is not recommended. Ya wanna see the word, "Nhi" on the label. That is the highest quality. Look for this brand name:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51SPl6mJpsL._SL1200_.jpg

4 tbsp white vinegar (or lime juice)
4 tbsp 3 Crabs Fish Sauce
4 tbsp sugar
2 cloves pressed garlic
1 or 2 fresh Thai Bird Chiles, sliced (Or any small red hot pepper). Or use red pepper flakes
Dilute with up to 1 cup water

Let it sit in the fridge overnight. The garlic will sink to the bottom.

This is used in every Vietnamese meal in place of salt. Try it and PLEASE let me know how you like it! :)

Doug [/quote]

Doug, this is now officially my new favorite 'soy' sauce. Many thanks for the recipe! Last night I warmed up a tub of cream cheese to soften it, then stirred in a tablespoon of Nuoc Cham...it lightened up the cheese and made it great! A new bright flavor. Next I do it again and start adding in other flavors (olives, etc) to see what I can come up with. The Nuoc Cham is a very nice discovery.

PS, My store stocks about 4 flavors of Mie Goreng ...I'm staying away from the HOT style...too afraid they're serious about that label.
At any rate, I'd sure recommend Nuoc Cham to anyone who likes playing in the kitchen. Better than Soy Sauce I think, less salt and less 'earthy' flavor. It goes into a wide number of dishes and foods. Perked up Pilaf really well and popped Meatloaf.
Message: Posted by: Dougini (Aug 5, 2015 08:08AM)
Boy, that is good news! Vietnamese Nước Chấm is the best kept culinary secret! :)

Doug
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Aug 9, 2015 12:00AM)
On Friday I made some chili. The plan had been to make it with green tomatoes that we'd bought at a local vegetable stand on Monday; unfortunately, by Friday most of them weren't green any more.

Sigh.

So . . . tomatoes, ground sirloin, grilled flank steak, red onion, garlic, beef bouillon, chili powder, poblano chili (from my garden), black, pinto, and kidney beans, and oregano, all in the crock pot, thickened at the end with some stone ground corn meal.

The house smelled wonderful!

But the best part was the . . . well . . . sort of [i]pico de gallo[/i] that I made to accompany it:

[list][*]8 tomatillos, diced
[*]One small red onion, finely chopped (we got this at the vegetable stand; I don't recall the variety, but it looks a lot like a shallot, with a similar flavor)
[*]One ripe Trinidad Moruga Scorpion chili (from my garden), finely chopped
[*]One handful of cilantro, chopped
[*]lime juice
[*]salt
[/list]
Awesome!

The Scorpion is very much like an habanero: sweet, fruity, very flavorful. And hotter than blazes.
Message: Posted by: Kabbalah (Aug 9, 2015 06:09AM)
[quote]On Aug 9, 2015, S2000magician wrote:

So . . . tomatoes, ground sirloin, grilled flank steak, red onion, garlic, beef bouillon, chili powder, poblano chili (from my garden), black, pinto, and kidney beans, and oregano, all in the crock pot, thickened at the end with some stone ground corn meal.

[/quote]

No cumin?
Message: Posted by: imgic (Aug 9, 2015 08:45AM)
Made granola this weekend. Started a few years back with Alton Browns recipe:

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/granola-recipe.html

Have tweaked it some since. Will add flax meal and wheat germ. Will mix up the nuts (favorite in house is pecans and almonds). And add local honey to maple syrup and oil. Once it's all baked I add local bee pollen to mine. The local honey and pollen have greatly reduced allergies and increased energy.

Usually make a double back that lasts about two weeks. I love it with yogurt. Wife mixes it with her oatmeal. Daughter likes it with milk and fruit.
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Aug 9, 2015 12:13PM)
[quote]On Aug 9, 2015, Kabbalah wrote:
[quote]On Aug 9, 2015, S2000magician wrote:
So . . . tomatoes, ground sirloin, grilled flank steak, red onion, garlic, beef bouillon, chili powder, poblano chili (from my garden), black, pinto, and kidney beans, and oregano, all in the crock pot, thickened at the end with some stone ground corn meal.[/quote]
No cumin?[/quote]
Yes, freshly ground cumin; forgot to mention it.

Thanks.
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Aug 31, 2015 11:20AM)
I've had a hankering for some carrot-ginger soup recently. I've never had it, but it sounds aces.

I plan make some tonight, and report on it ex post.
Message: Posted by: balducci (Aug 31, 2015 11:58AM)
[quote]On Aug 31, 2015, S2000magician wrote:

I plan make some tonight, and report on it ex post. [/quote]
"I plan to make some tonight, and report on it ex post."

Finally, the chance to correct one of your posts for grammar. Lol.

:)
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Aug 31, 2015 02:22PM)
[quote]On Aug 31, 2015, balducci wrote:
[quote]On Aug 31, 2015, S2000magician wrote:
I plan make some tonight, and report on it ex post.[/quote]
"I plan to make some tonight, and report on it ex post."

Finally, the chance to correct one of your posts for grammar. Lol.

:) [/quote]
I'm not sure what you mean.
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Aug 31, 2015 04:07PM)
Pesky prepositions!
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (Aug 31, 2015 07:20PM)
Sunday I browned 2 pounds of seasoned and floured beef stew meat. Added tomato paste to the pan after the meat was removed, cooked it briefly and deglazed with half a bottle of Merlot.

Threw this all in my slow cooker with sliced baby bella mushrooms, diced onions, bay leaves, thyme and parsley flakes, 1 qt. of beef stock and let it simmer for about 7 hours. Tightened it up a little with corn starch slurry when we got home from church, re-seasoned to taste and served it over parsley-butter noodles.

Killer. I might go have some left-overs right now.
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Aug 31, 2015 07:29PM)
We make a Spanish beef stew with, amongst other things, green olives.

The flavor they give the broth is wonderful.
Message: Posted by: imgic (Sep 1, 2015 02:08PM)
Roasting a chicken tonight. Took me longest time to get learn how to roast meat and vegetables. Not sure why, relatively easy.
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Sep 1, 2015 04:17PM)
If you butterfly the chicken and roast it at 450°F for an hour it comes out perfectly done. A little olive oil, salt, and pepper is all you need to season it.

Turn the pan around after half-an-hour, in case your oven has hot or cold spots.
Message: Posted by: imgic (Sep 1, 2015 05:20PM)
I just started to butterfly chickens for grilling then realized it'll work for roasting (I'm a little slow sometimes).

Yes, oil, salt, and pepper is the best!
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (Sep 1, 2015 06:46PM)
[quote]On Aug 31, 2015, S2000magician wrote:
We make a Spanish beef stew with, amongst other things, green olives.

The flavor they give the broth is wonderful. [/quote]

I want to try Ropa Vieja, Cuban shredded beef stew. I believe it has olives in it as well.
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Sep 1, 2015 07:50PM)
I've made Ropa Vieja; I don't recall it having olives. But recipes differ, of course.
Message: Posted by: Tom Cutts (Sep 1, 2015 08:26PM)
Got a great deal on a pound of shrimp! Making shrimp pasta and trying to decide if I make a bisque with the shells or boil that bisque down and include it in the pasta. Oh the toils of cheffing. Pouring a Viognier I found which is quite non Viognier like. Instead it's got crisp acidity and nice apple tones. Perfect for sea food, which many viogniers are not.. Being lighter and flowery.

Cheers!
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Sep 4, 2015 11:02PM)
The plans (for Monday) got scuppered, but I did make the soup on Wednesday, and it came out great!

[url=http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ginger-carrot-soup-recipe.html]Here[/url]'s the recipe; it's trivial to make.

(I decided not to try to purée it hot; I let it cool for about 15 minutes, puréed it in the blender, then reheated it.)
Message: Posted by: Tom Jorgenson (Sep 8, 2015 03:25PM)
Here's a recipe for a chip-dip that turned out very well. It uses Dougini's Nước Chấm.

1 - 8 ox pkg Cream Cheese, softened.
8 - 12 oz Bruschetta, drained. (I use Trader Joe's jarred version)
2-4 Tablespoons of Nước Chấm (Vietnamese dipping sauce)
1/8 Tsp. French Vadouvan or scant Tsp. of standard curry powder.

Mix all, and chill.

People couldn't keep away from it.

I really have to recommend the Nước Chấm...what a discovery! I now keep a bottle prepped all the time in the fridge. It goes in almost anything and improves everything.
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (Sep 8, 2015 04:41PM)
Nice. I need to try these.
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Sep 8, 2015 07:38PM)
Yesterday I made a brisket, stuffed with slivered almonds and bacon, browned, then braised in a chili sauce (California (dried Anaheim) chilies, cloves, cinnamon, garlic, oregano, marjoram, thyme, red wine vinegar, salt and pepper) with small white potatoes.

Yummy!
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (Sep 8, 2015 08:37PM)
Right now I'm trying something different. Southwestern style chicken soup. Chicken, stock, onions, green chiles, black beans, roasted tomatoes and seasonings. Chile powder, cumin, etc.

But I'm trying out some corn bread dumplings in it made with corn bread mix, green chiles, corn, green onions, jack cheese, sour cream and eggs. I'll let you know how it turns out.

Oh, and I sweated the onions and chiles in bacon fat. :cool:
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Sep 9, 2015 11:56PM)
[quote]On Sep 8, 2015, Theodore Lawton wrote:
Oh, and I [b][i]sweated[/i][/b] the onions and chiles in bacon fat.[/quote]
Sweated?

Eeewww!
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (Sep 10, 2015 07:58PM)
Lol. We keep antiperspirant on the table with the salt and pepper.

It came out great! It's a keeper.

Tonight it's pesto pasta with grilled, hot Italian turkey sausages.
Message: Posted by: imgic (Sep 10, 2015 09:08PM)
Made shrimp scampi tonight...but wasn't paying attention and overcooked the shrimp...a bit rubbery...
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (Sep 12, 2015 07:21PM)
Too bad about the shrimp.

Here a pic of my new pan! This replaces an old beater. Got it at World Market for 20 bucks when the 30% off sale was combined with my extra 10% off shopping pass. It's a nice 6 quart stainless.

:baby:

[img]http://i1161.photobucket.com/albums/q510/Theodore68/Photo-0031.jpg[/img]
Message: Posted by: EsnRedshirt (Sep 12, 2015 11:12PM)
Having a BBQ tomorrow, and put some beef ribs in a bourbon mustard garlic marinate, with Ghost Salt- a little bottle of spice from a local farmer's market that includes ghost pepper as one of the ingredients. Tag-line- "A little dash'll boo ya." Smells fantastic, should turn out awesome.
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (Sep 14, 2015 06:28PM)
Love the tag line! How'd it turn out?
Message: Posted by: EsnRedshirt (Sep 15, 2015 12:02PM)
[quote]On Sep 14, 2015, Theodore Lawton wrote:
Love the tag line! How'd it turn out? [/quote]
Turned out fantastic- smoked the beef ribs, as well as some pork ribs, and a tri-tip, over hickory chips on my Big Green Egg, followed up with removing the indirect heat plate to cook hot dogs for the kids. Everyone was in a meat coma afterwards. I saved the unused marinate as dipping sauce; I just may use it again sometime soon.
Message: Posted by: imgic (Sep 15, 2015 11:30PM)
How do you like your Big Green Egg. I've heard some good things about them , but all secondhand.
Message: Posted by: Tom Cutts (Sep 16, 2015 01:04AM)
Made ceviche tonight... But it won't be done until tomorrow.

I did have ahi tuna poke for dinner though... Along with a Mendocino Pinot Noir.
Message: Posted by: EsnRedshirt (Sep 16, 2015 11:08AM)
[quote]On Sep 16, 2015, imgic wrote:
How do you like your Big Green Egg. I've heard some good things about them , but all secondhand. [/quote]
I honestly don't use it as much as I should- I really like it. You can consider it a ceramic oven as much as a grill- retains heat very well, easy to smoke on, great for grilling, can do pizza, crank up the temperature to sear things at high heat- I've even seen pictures of people using it for tandoori by putting the skewers through the hole in the top.

I think the best thing about it is that things don't over-cook; even when they're cooked to medium-well, they're still juicy inside. (I can even do chicken breasts on it, and I find chicken notoriously difficult to grill properly.)

They are expensive, but I think mine was worth it.
Message: Posted by: Daryl -the other brother (Sep 16, 2015 11:27PM)
I have a Grill Dome. Same idea as the green egg. I use it a lot. From bread and pizza to ribs and brisket.
Message: Posted by: Tom Jorgenson (Sep 17, 2015 11:10AM)
Out of curiosity, how much charcoal does it take to fire one up? Half a bag?
Message: Posted by: Daryl -the other brother (Sep 17, 2015 11:30AM)
You can fill the fire box 4-5 times from a standard 25 lb bag. But a full box will last for several cooks depending on duration of the fire and it's intensity. This can range from 225 for a slow cook to 700 plus for pizzas. The nice thing is once your done cooking you can shut it down and the coals will go out so you can use them for another cook. I can slow cook a brisket for 18 -20 hours on one load of lump charcoal.
Message: Posted by: EsnRedshirt (Sep 17, 2015 03:48PM)
I do find it fires better with freshly poured charcoal, but then again, I don't use it often enough so it probably sucks up some humidity sitting in the firebox outside. It is very efficient- which is good, because it does use more expensive hardwood charcoal, not briquettes.
Message: Posted by: Daryl -the other brother (Sep 17, 2015 09:44PM)
I always add fresh lump before a cook. I stir up the sitting coal to remove the ash then I fill the firebox back to the top.
Speaking of firing better if you have an outlet near your cooker they make an electric lighter that you put in your coals and plug in, 6-7 minutes and you have a very nice fire started. It sure makes things a lot easier.
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (Sep 18, 2015 06:27PM)
I have nowhere near the discretionary income for these types of cookers. They sure look nice though. I'm just hoping to get a Weber somewhere down the road. Or maybe scrape up the cash to buy a little pile of sticks. For now I like using my stove-top grill pans.

I would like to get into smoking meats.

Oh well. :cry:
Message: Posted by: imgic (Sep 18, 2015 10:31PM)
You've intrigued me. After leaving Georgia for Colorado a few years ago I missed good BBQ so I got myself an offset smoker/grill ( basically a 55 gallon drum grill with smaller barrel attached to side for smoking. I thought it would be easy...boy was I wrong. Spent 10 hours smoking pork shoulder, running to check coals every hour. Still not done. Another 2 hours smoking...still below temp. Ended up putting in oven for an hour. I've a lot more respect now for using the right tools...
Message: Posted by: Daryl -the other brother (Sep 19, 2015 02:17PM)
I put in an outdoor kitchen when I retired, a present to myself. My ceramic cooker is the center piece and I use at least twice a week all year long. I've attached a picture of the Grill Dome in action, smoking a chicken on a rainy day. The little white box next to the Grill Dome is a Stoker Auto Temp. Controller. Light the fire, set the temp you want and close the lid, the Stoker does the rest. It can monitor air and 3 meat temps. all which can be controlled from my cell phone, lap top or PC. I love technology.
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (Sep 26, 2015 09:47PM)
Bought a new pizza stone today for cheap at World Market. I like that place. :)

Got a pizza peel. Made some fresh dough and whipped out some pizzas for the family tonight. Not too shabby for the first go-round. I used bread flour for the dough.

Do any of you use pizza stones or have favorite dough recipes? I plan on experimenting and having fun with this over the next few weeks.

Also- tried a coffee flavored soda, World Market brand. I like it. It tastes like strong, sweet fizzy coffee.
Message: Posted by: Tom Cutts (Sep 27, 2015 07:38AM)
I have a stone but it's for bread. After knowing a couple pizza dough makers, I'm overwhelmed by the detail they put into what flours to use for their dough.

Then again, I'm using Chardonnay grape flour in my bread, so maybe it's just about interests. ;)
Message: Posted by: imgic (Sep 29, 2015 06:48AM)
Daryl: wow, very nice set up. A few years ago I started planning a wood over, smoker, grill set up to build in my back yard of half an acre. Then moved out of state and never got chance to build it.

For pizza dough I use a recipe found in my bread maker. It mixes the dough, let's it rise, and turns out great every time. Thought lately I e been lazy and picking up the Stonefire brand artisan pizza crusts from the store.
Message: Posted by: Tom Cutts (Sep 29, 2015 11:58AM)
It is the culmination of strawberry season in California. That means tons of ripe berries faster than they can sell them. Which has led me to create a low fat strawberry shake.

1 lb of strawberries
8oz milk
2 teaspoons brown sugar

Blend

Drink
Message: Posted by: TonyB2009 (Sep 29, 2015 11:59AM)
[quote]On Sep 19, 2015, Daryl -the other brother wrote:
I put in an outdoor kitchen when I retired, a present to myself. My ceramic cooker is the center piece and I use at least twice a week all year long. I've attached a picture of the Grill Dome in action, smoking a chicken on a rainy day. The little white box next to the Grill Dome is a Stoker Auto Temp. Controller. Light the fire, set the temp you want and close the lid, the Stoker does the rest. It can monitor air and 3 meat temps. all which can be controlled from my cell phone, lap top or PC. I love technology. [/quote]
This looks like something I want. I am building next year, and now I know what to do with the decking!
Message: Posted by: critter (Sep 29, 2015 07:31PM)
[quote]On Apr 27, 2015, Tom Cutts wrote:
Made some shrimp bisque last night to go with a pork and cucumber dish. And homemade bread! [/quote]


That's what she said?
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (Sep 30, 2015 06:50PM)
[quote]On Sep 29, 2015, Tom Cutts wrote:
It is the culmination of strawberry season in California. That means tons of ripe berries faster than they can sell them. Which has led me to create a low fat strawberry shake.

1 lb of strawberries
8oz milk
2 teaspoons brown sugar

Blend

Drink [/quote]

Sounds delicious!

btw- I used my pizza stone to make some french bread tonight. It was great with our spaghetti.
Message: Posted by: Tom Cutts (Oct 1, 2015 12:32AM)
In my early baking days I used a terra cotta floor tile as a stone. Passable, but not the same as the real deal.
Message: Posted by: Tom Jorgenson (Oct 1, 2015 12:47PM)
Yes. Some of those alternatives tend to explode on you from the steam, etc.
Message: Posted by: TonyB2009 (Oct 1, 2015 03:49PM)
Tonight's dinner was a traditional ox-tail stew, at the request of the kids. I hadn't had it in a few years. Last time ox tail was seen as peasant food, and I got the tails for a euro each. Now it is trendy and the price has increased to E7. Still tastes great though.
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (Oct 1, 2015 05:32PM)
And chicken used to be for "poor" people until we all realized it was "healthy."
Message: Posted by: EsnRedshirt (Oct 1, 2015 09:11PM)
Ditto for lobster. My wife hates it- overpriced, giant shrimp. I don't hate it but fail to see the allure.
Message: Posted by: imgic (Oct 4, 2015 06:59PM)
Was at art fair this weekend. They had lobster rolls. Mmmmmm. So good.
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Oct 10, 2015 12:09AM)
Tonight's dinner was cream of asparagus soup, Greek marinated grilled chicken, and steamed artichokes.

Washed down with a Hacker-Pschorr hefeweisen.

My wife married a good cook.
Message: Posted by: Daryl -the other brother (Oct 13, 2015 11:32AM)
Went to the Bi-annual Knob Creek machine gun rally in Kentucky this week end. Somehow managed to spend over $50 on food and the best I had was a dried out chicken sandwich (to be fair, nobody was there for the food).

Next morning I was treated to a continental breakfast of cold cereal and biscuits with luke warm gray. The taste of the gravy reminded me it is time to repaint my garage!!
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Oct 13, 2015 11:33AM)
Steak fajitas and lime-cilantro rice last night.

Easy, quick, delicious!
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (Oct 13, 2015 03:53PM)
We did a meat and cheese deal on Sunday. I bought turkey, pastrami, liverwurst, ham and hot cappicolla. Smoked Gouda cheese spread, goat cheese, brie. Hummus, marinated mushrooms, marinated olives and roasted garlic. Served it all with fresh bread I baked and had a glass of OZV 2013 Old Vine Zinfandel.

Pretty darn good!

Pizza dough is in the fridge for some time this week.
Message: Posted by: imgic (Oct 13, 2015 03:59PM)
[quote]On Oct 13, 2015, Theodore Lawton wrote:
We did a meat and cheese deal on Sunday. I bought turkey, pastrami, liverwurst, ham and hot cappicolla. Smoked Gouda cheese spread, goat cheese, brie. Hummus, marinated mushrooms, marinated olives and roasted garlic. Served it all with fresh bread I baked and had a glass of OZV 2013 Old Vine Zinfandel.

Pretty darn good!
[/quote]

Love eating like that! Good stuff!
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (Oct 17, 2015 06:07PM)
I'm right now enjoying a vanilla latte and a couple of pumpkin doughnuts. It's tough work, but somebody's gotta do it!
:hotcoffee:
Message: Posted by: imgic (Dec 12, 2015 04:50PM)
Finally tried my hand at beef short ribs. Seared them in bacon fat then braised in sherry. Served on potato mash and honey glazed carrots. Turned out wonderful!
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (Dec 12, 2015 05:19PM)
Here's a terrific, simple and quick method of making a wonderful mushroom and parsley salad: Goes great with anything!

1 lb large button mushrooms trimmed, cleaned and sliced to your likeness. Original recipe calls for thin, but I like about 1/8 - 1/4 inch thick slices.

1/3 cup of chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
1/4 cup of extra virgin olive oil
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
2-ounce piece of Parmesan

Directions:

In a medium salad bowl, mix together the mushrooms and parsley

In a small bowl, whisk together the oil and lemon juice until smooth. Season with S&P to taste.

Add the oil mixture to the salad bowl and toss until all the ingredients are coated. Using a begetable peeler, shave the Parmesan on top and serve.

NOTES: We added cumin seeds fresh garlic sliced thin, oregano, basil and some sliced scallions. Once prepared we like to set it in the fridge for about an hour, which lets the mix sort of "cook" the mushrooms, as you would see in a ceviche.

It's a real crowd pleaser. It's delicious and low calorie. You can also play around with more or less lemon juice, or if too tart, add a few pinches of sugar.

Try it! I'm betting you'll like it. :-)
Message: Posted by: Tom Cutts (Dec 12, 2015 08:36PM)
Sounds great. Will give it a go and let you know how I do!

I just got an Anova Sous Vide cooker. It really does make for far more tender and moist meats! Not sure a rib eye for 3-4 hours is worth the wait. I can do it in the oven perfectly in just 15 minutes total. I did cook a chuck steak, and it turned out VERY similar to a rib eye in taste and texture. I think the meat cooking in its own fat dramatically intensifies the favors.

Super simple; once it's in the pot, let it sit as long as you can.
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (Dec 13, 2015 12:37PM)
[quote]On Dec 12, 2015, Tom Cutts wrote:
Sounds great. Will give it a go and let you know how I do!

I just got an Anova Sous Vide cooker. It really does make for far more tender and moist meats! Not sure a rib eye for 3-4 hours is worth the wait. I can do it in the oven perfectly in just 15 minutes total. I did cook a chuck steak, and it turned out VERY similar to a rib eye in taste and texture. I think the meat cooking in its own fat dramatically intensifies the favors.

Super simple; once it's in the pot, let it sit as long as you can. [/quote]

We talked about the Sous Vide cooker, it seems about a year ago and I remember that time that I was interested in trying it. I just might have to pull the trigger on this (maybe even in time for Christmas :) )

Just curious, what made you choose that particular brand? I'm looking at a Gourmia brand, which I never heard of, but I'm wondering if all sous vides are created equal? I'd think that capacity of the cooker is important?

I still can't get used to the idea of cooking steaks in the sous vide method; Steak without grill marks and char just don't seem like they'll be the same. But everyone I've talked to about it says the same thing. Y'all can't all be that wrong!
Message: Posted by: imgic (Dec 13, 2015 01:07PM)
[quote]On Dec 13, 2015, Bob1Dog wrote:
[quote]On Dec 12, 2015, Tom Cutts wrote:
Sounds great. Will give it a go and let you know how I do!

I just got an Anova Sous Vide cooker. It really does make for far more tender and moist meats! Not sure a rib eye for 3-4 hours is worth the wait. I can do it in the oven perfectly in just 15 minutes total. I did cook a chuck steak, and it turned out VERY similar to a rib eye in taste and texture. I think the meat cooking in its own fat dramatically intensifies the favors.

Super simple; once it's in the pot, let it sit as long as you can. [/quote]

We talked about the Sous Vide cooker, it seems about a year ago and I remember that time that I was interested in trying it. I just might have to pull the trigger on this (maybe even in time for Christmas :) )

Just curious, what made you choose that particular brand? I'm looking at a Gourmia brand, which I never heard of, but I'm wondering if all sous vides are created equal? I'd think that capacity of the cooker is important?

I still can't get used to the idea of cooking steaks in the sous vide method; Steak without grill marks and char just don't seem like they'll be the same. But everyone I've talked to about it says the same thing. Y'all can't all be that wrong! [/quote]



I've looked at sous vide cooker as well. My understanding is that after cooking it Sous Vide, you can throw it on hot grill to get browning/char marks. In fact you should as the meat comes out of Sous Vide a bland biege

Anyone with a Sous Vide, please correct me if I heard wrong...would love to learn more.
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (Dec 13, 2015 01:13PM)
^ What he said.
Message: Posted by: Tom Cutts (Dec 13, 2015 02:12PM)
I went with Anova because they had a killer sale. I got the basic model for $99. It's an emersion style so you put it in the pot or tub of water and it heats the water. No app hookup on this model. If you can set the timer on your phone just like any other cooking method, then you will know when it is "done". I put done in quotes because you can leave it doing its thing way past the "done" time. For most meats extra time in the water only makes them more tender; it doesn't cook them further. I'm excited to try that out on some tougher cuts of beef.

Anova has three models.
Basic - no smartphone connectivity
Bluetooth - connects to phone via Bluetooth so limited range of connectivity and better adjustability to pot sizes.
Wifi - connects to phone via wifi so you can roam wherever your wifi is and still be connected to the cooker plus better adjustability to pot sizes..

All are emersion style. Think giant stick blender.

I had a quick look at Gourmia, too. I was interested in their full countertop model which is a complete appliance, but it takes up a lot of counter space, like a small toaster oven. It is marked down for a great price on Amazon right now. If I recall its like $149 marked down from $300. If you aren't aware Amazon slashes the price of products which they bought and are not selling. That gave me pause, but it's probably just a brand and product recognition issue.

The Anova units I bought take up less space and cost me less than the Gourmia. Anova is all over Facebook right now pushing the Bluetooth unit at a huge discount still.

I had been all set to get one of these for my birthday, but then life got in the way, so it was delayed 6 weeks. :goof:

Like all technology, these are getting smaller, and in some cases less expensive as competition increases. I see now a very compact unit but it is priced at $300 and only on presale right now. I think it's called Joile, or something like that.

Now about those steaks. I put mine under the broiler but that was not a great result. Even a broiler was not hot enough, I didn't want to over cook them. I'm a medium rare on the more rare side steak person. Next time I am putting them on my grilling pan when it's as hot as I can get it! Another option is to take a torch to them. I have a creme brûlée torch which I will try at some point.
Message: Posted by: EsnRedshirt (Dec 13, 2015 02:25PM)
You guys are correct that you can sear the meat once it comes out of the sous vide bath. Hot grill or cast iron grill/skillet will do it fine.

On the ceramic cooker front, this year I'm going to try smoking a turkey for Christmas. Got a 13 pound bird, and an upright roaster, and a bunch of pecan wood chunks. Now I just need to figure out the proper rub and what juice or libation to put in the roaster.
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (Dec 13, 2015 02:56PM)
[quote]On Dec 13, 2015, Tom Cutts wrote:

......Now about those steaks. I put mine under the broiler but that was not a great result. Even a broiler was not hot enough, I didn't want to over cook them. I'm a medium rare on the more rare side steak person. Next time I am putting them on my grilling pan when it's as hot as I can get it! Another option is to take a torch to them. I have a creme brûlée torch which I will try at some point. [/quote]

Thanks for that input Tom! I have a grill that can reach 600+ degress F and should work nicely for some quick grill and charring for steaks.
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (Dec 13, 2015 03:04PM)
[quote]On Dec 13, 2015, EsnRedshirt wrote:
You guys are correct that you can sear the meat once it comes out of the sous vide bath. Hot grill or cast iron grill/skillet will do it fine.

On the ceramic cooker front, this year I'm going to try smoking a turkey for Christmas. Got a 13 pound bird, and an upright roaster, and a bunch of pecan wood chunks. Now I just need to figure out the proper rub and what juice or libation to put in the roaster. [/quote]

You may want to try John Henry's, East Texas variety of meat rubs. A friend of mine put me onto them and they're really good. I particularly like their Bourbon Rub Seasoning and their Maple Bacon Seasoning. You can also get a wide variety of wood for smoking from them: http://johnhenrysfoodproducts.com/
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (Dec 14, 2015 02:45PM)
[quote]On Dec 13, 2015, Tom Cutts wrote:

.....Anova has three models.
Basic - no smartphone connectivity
Bluetooth - connects to phone via Bluetooth so limited range of connectivity and better adjustability to pot sizes.
Wifi - connects to phone via wifi so you can roam wherever your wifi is and still be connected to the cooker plus better adjustability to pot sizes..

All are emersion style. Think giant stick blender.

I had a quick look at Gourmia, too. I was interested in their full countertop model which is a complete appliance, but it takes up a lot of counter space, like a small toaster oven. It is marked down for a great price on Amazon right now. If I recall its like $149 marked down from $300. If you aren't aware Amazon slashes the price of products which they bought and are not selling. That gave me pause, but it's probably just a brand and product recognition issue.

The Anova units I bought take up less space and cost me less than the Gourmia. Anova is all over Facebook right now pushing the Bluetooth unit at a huge discount still.

I had been all set to get one of these for my birthday, but then life got in the way, so it was delayed 6 weeks. :goof:

Like all technology, these are getting smaller, and in some cases less expensive as competition increases. I see now a very compact unit but it is priced at $300 and only on presale right now. I think it's called Joile, or something like that.

[/quote]

I found a study by [b][i]Cooks Illustrated[/b][/i] magazine where they tested several models and the one they most Highly Recommended for the home cook, all things considered,is the Anova One. https://www.cooksillustrated.com/equipment_reviews/1562-sous-vide-machines

It sells for $199. I'm very close to pulling the trigger. Apparently temp control is key with these devices, but I'm wondering if there is a recommended pot for use with the immersion units? It appears that some pots are better than others at holding accurate temperature, which seems key to the operation. Can't seem to find any data on that.

Also, it appears that you also need a vaccuum sealer, but some also say you can use zip-locs, so i'mm wondering which way to go there.

I think I'm sold on the immersion device simply because it's a space-saver.

All comments welcome!

Thanks!
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (Dec 14, 2015 11:30PM)
I just bought the Anova One. Now the fun begins! :hamburger:
Message: Posted by: Tom Cutts (Dec 15, 2015 02:06AM)
I'm using zip lock bags.

Welcome to the sous vide world!
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (Dec 15, 2015 11:22AM)
:)
Message: Posted by: imgic (Dec 15, 2015 03:05PM)
Due to weather, I'm stuck in Texas for the day. On the bright side, I'll be able to go to Hutchin's BBQ in McKinney. Some of the BEST ribs I've ever come across!
Message: Posted by: Tom Cutts (Dec 16, 2015 08:34PM)
Bob Dog, which unit did you go with?

I have two rib eyes and some green beans in the sous vide bath right now. Bought Crimini mushrooms and Italian parsley for your salad. Adding green tops of scallions and olive oil is flavored with garlic and rosemary (homemade). The Crimini mushrooms really opened up a rather closed '13 Mendocino Pinot. I also put it in an Oregon Pinot glass to soften up the profile. Worked great at that!

Moving on to a new Oregon Pinot from a new winery that tracked me down on Facebook and invited me to their stunning hilltop tasting room while I was in Oregon for Thanksgiving!

How many folks would be interested in wine reviews here?

Cheers!
Message: Posted by: Tom Cutts (Dec 16, 2015 08:35PM)
[quote]On Dec 15, 2015, imgic wrote:
Due to weather, I'm stuck in Texas for the day. On the bright side, I'll be able to go to Hutchin's BBQ in McKinney. Some of the BEST ribs I've ever come across! [/quote]
Hey Craig, killer ribs are a destination trip! Lucky guy!!
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (Dec 16, 2015 11:29PM)
[quote]On Dec 16, 2015, Tom Cutts wrote:
Bob Dog, which unit did you go with?

I have two rib eyes and some green beans in the sous vide bath right now. Bought Crimini mushrooms and Italian parsley for your salad. Adding green tops of scallions and olive oil is flavored with garlic and rosemary (homemade). The Crimini mushrooms really opened up a rather closed '13 Mendocino Pinot. I also put it in an Oregon Pinot glass to soften up the profile. Worked great at that!

Moving on to a new Oregon Pinot from a new winery that tracked me down on Facebook and invited me to their stunning hilltop tasting room while I was in Oregon for Thanksgiving!

How many folks would be interested in wine reviews here?

Cheers! [/quote]
Tom, we went with the Anova One, which is supposed to be the latest, but it depends on which source I pay attention to. It's the one that was most recommended by Cooking Illustrated magazine. Can't wait to hear how your rib eyes turned out. I'd be striving for rare. Are you bathing the green beans in a separate bag and with other seasoning? I'm curious because I love tender green beans in butter.

I presume by the wine comment on the mushroom salad that you liked it. Did you? It's easily altered to your own tastes.

As for the wine, I'm always looking for good wine pairings and reviews. I'm a red guy myself (Cabs, Malbec, and the typical Bordeaux types, but I also enjoy the Pinots), though I enjoy slightly fruity, yet dry Sauvignon Blancs. Don't like Chardonnays in the least. Far too Oaky, even the ones that aren't supposed to be. [b][i]So, yes, I'm interested in pursuing wine reviews! Wonder if it shouldn't be in a wine thread?[/b][/i]

I also don't spend more than $20 on a bottle of wine, and my typical purchases range between $9 and $15. The last $20 bottle of Kendall Jackson, Vintners Reserve, Cabernet Sauvignon, Sonoma County 2012, couldn't hold a candle to some of the Chilean and Argentinian wines in the $10 range.

PS Sorry for seeming clueless, but what's an Oregon Pinot glass? I live on the mid-Atlantic coast and hven't heard of it. Wider or narrower?
Message: Posted by: Tom Cutts (Dec 17, 2015 02:11AM)
Rib eyes were great, but a touch beyond med rare in parts. Dropping them on my grilling pan when super hot pushed them past where I would have liked. They looked spectacular by the way. Just that they ended up on the more medium side of medium rare, rather than than the more rare side.

Beans were in a separate bag with dark soy sauce, sriacha, olive oil and sesame seeds.

An Oregon Pinot glass is flared at the top lip specifically to accentuate the more delicate favors of Oregon Pinot.

Did you go blue tooth or wifi for the Anova unit?

Really liked the earthiness of the mushroom salad, and it showed both the Mendocino and Oregon pinots quite well. Oddly I had just seen a Rachel Ray snippet of her serving a mushroom and parsley pasta. Also got me thinking about a parsley pesto I make which is awesome and really easy to make.
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (Dec 17, 2015 08:31PM)
That's my concern with steaks; medium is just not good enough for me. Rare to Med. Rare is as far as I will go and that's an unknown I'm not wild about. Guess I'll have to wait and see.

To be perfectly honest, I haven't a clue as to whether I have blue tooth or wi fi, because I wasn't that interested in either. It's supposed to be the latest model, so it may have both or just one or the other. I guess if I had my druthers I'd go for the blue tooth, but again, it's not a big deal for me. I'll let you know when I get it.

As you can see, here is the model I purchased, but it's not described with either/or: http://www.amazon.com/Anova-Sous-Vide-Immersion-Circulator/dp/B00UET2UI2

I'm sure I'll have fun with it though :)

Glad you liked the mushroom salad.
Message: Posted by: Tom Cutts (Dec 17, 2015 11:29PM)
I think you got wifi, Bob Dog.

I dialed the bath temp back tonight and took the grilling pan up till it was smoking. Still ended up dead on medium. So I would suggest if you a rare fan, dial the cook temp back 7C if you intend on hitting a grilling pan. Sounds like we share taste in "doneness". I will let you what my mix is that gets me there.

Next day the mushroom salad still kick bootay!
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (Dec 18, 2015 12:59AM)
I'll let you know, but ya' gotta' admit that it's not well explained in that purchase. Unless I missed something, and if so, I'm curious why you think it's the WiFi. Not that I care, since I was more interested in getting the Anova One and the ones I didn't pull the trigger on for $199, ended up getting sold lickity-split on Amazon, so I went for the ones that were left at the prices that were out there.

We're on the same page with steak. Here's my thoughts even though I have no experience with sous vide. It seems to me the thicker the cut, the easier it will be to achieve rare. Why? I don't know; just an instinct. For me, it's easier to control the doneness on a grill with a thicker cut of beef and for that reason, 1 1/2 inches is minimum thickness of steaks I grill and I have my butcher cut them per order. Two inches is better. Since it's only my wife and I, I'll go for the larger steak in the interest of rareness, with leftovers the next day being quite good.

So I'm thinking sous vide will work in the same manner except that it may take a lot longer to cook. Whaddaya' think?

Am anxious for your updates on the steaks and glad the mushrooms worked well. I love 'em! :-)
Message: Posted by: Tom Cutts (Dec 18, 2015 05:18AM)
The wifi unit is their latest. I have found that explaining things is not their strength. Pairing the Bluetooth model is not set up intuitively and the search feature on the app is very limited. The unit, however, once you figure it out, is great.

As for steaks, the unit cooks them perfectly, they just have no sear to them. It's the searing (second step) which puts the steaks beyond where I like them. Still trying to figure that out.
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (Dec 18, 2015 06:44PM)
After all that- I'd just say that cheap Chilean wine can be amazing. I'm a red guy btw.
Message: Posted by: EsnRedshirt (Dec 18, 2015 09:10PM)
Bob, you're correct. Try a sous vide London broil. It's thick enough that you can sear the outside and leave the inside rare.

I just got a big pack of vacuum seal bags. I think I'm going to do some rearranging of the kitchen counter tops and cook some sous vide next week. My company's forcing us to take mandatory PTO. Need to find a good sous vide mushroom salad recipe- it sounds delicious. I'll probably be the only one eating it, though. My wife dislikes mushrooms, and, well, my son's only six. His diet consists of corn dogs, mac'n'cheese, and peanut butter and jelly sandwiches.

Still planning my pecan smoked turkey for Christmas. Have a 13 pound bird I need to stick in the fridge on Sunday. It's apparently pre-brined, so that's one less worry, but I still need to figure out a rub, or herbs to stick under the skin. I've got rosemary growing in the back yard. Probably should do the old Simon and Garfunkel (parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme...) Also not sure how much drippings I'll get for gravy, but I'm probably going to pick up some turkey broth and onion skins for a nice dark one. Some other family member's going to have to bring the stuffing. I'm overbooked as it is.
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (Dec 18, 2015 09:56PM)
[quote]On Dec 18, 2015, Theodore Lawton wrote:
After all that- I'd just say that cheap Chilean wine can be amazing. I'm a red guy btw. [/quote]
I agree all the way!
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (Dec 18, 2015 10:10PM)
[quote]On Dec 18, 2015, EsnRedshirt wrote:
Bob, you're correct. Try a sous vide London broil. It's thick enough that you can sear the outside and leave the inside rare.

I just got a big pack of vacuum seal bags. I think I'm going to do some rearranging of the kitchen counter tops and cook some sous vide next week. My company's forcing us to take mandatory PTO. Need to find a good sous vide mushroom salad recipe- it sounds delicious. I'll probably be the only one eating it, though. My wife dislikes mushrooms, and, well, my son's only six. His diet consists of corn dogs, mac'n'cheese, and peanut butter and jelly sandwiches.

Still planning my pecan smoked turkey for Christmas. Have a 13 pound bird I need to stick in the fridge on Sunday. It's apparently pre-brined, so that's one less worry, but I still need to figure out a rub, or herbs to stick under the skin. I've got rosemary growing in the back yard. Probably should do the old Simon and Garfunkel (parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme...) Also not sure how much drippings I'll get for gravy, but I'm probably going to pick up some turkey broth and onion skins for a nice dark one. Some other family member's going to have to bring the stuffing. I'm overbooked as it is. [/quote]
Your smoked turkey sounds wonderful; keep us posted!

Thanks for the tip on the London broil; I can definitely work with that!

As for the mushroom salad, you don't need a sous vide to do the one I posted above; check it out, it's really good and stays good as a leftover for a day or two or three in the fridge because if it's cure. It serves well at room temperature. Try it! It's easy and you might like it. :-)

As for PTO, better to use it than lose it; have fun! And Merry Christmas!
Message: Posted by: Tom Cutts (Dec 19, 2015 07:25PM)
I went mushroom crazy when I picked up Criminis for Bob's salad recipe... So I have shiitake in need of use tonight, ready to whip up a mushroom and parsley linguini tonight. Sous vide gets the day off.

Last night's salmon was the most tender and moist salmon I've ever had.

ESN, Smoked turkey is amazing! Do you do the bird complete, or do you chop it up?
Message: Posted by: EsnRedshirt (Dec 19, 2015 09:30PM)
Never done it before, so I'm really hoping it turns out right... Or we'll be making an emergency trip to the Chinese supermarket for some meat of another sort.
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (Dec 19, 2015 10:22PM)
My Anova One sous vide device arrives Monday! :-)
Message: Posted by: Tom Cutts (Dec 20, 2015 12:48AM)
[quote]On Dec 19, 2015, EsnRedshirt wrote:
Never done it before, so I'm really hoping it turns out right... Or we'll be making an emergency trip to the Chinese supermarket for some meat of another sort. [/quote]
If you don't want to be smoking it for 12 hours, I'd look at chopping it up.

Bob, it will start your wheels spinning on what you can do!
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (Dec 20, 2015 09:19AM)
Soul food Sunday

:coolspot:

I've got a pork shoulder with wet rub in the slow cooker. When we get home later I'm cooking collard greens and mac and cheese.
Message: Posted by: imgic (Dec 20, 2015 10:57AM)
What Mac and cheese recipe do you use? I did Alton Browns recipe and just wasn't creamy or rich enough...
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (Dec 20, 2015 12:18PM)
[quote]On Dec 20, 2015, Tom Cutts wrote:

Bob, it will start your wheels spinning on what you can do! [/quote]
It already has!
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (Dec 20, 2015 01:58PM)
[quote]On Dec 20, 2015, imgic wrote:
What Mac and cheese recipe do you use? I did Alton Browns recipe and just wasn't creamy or rich enough... [/quote]


I have my own; it's pretty creamy and rich. 3 Tbls each butter and flour for the roux added to 4 cups milk makes the sauce thinner than a 4 to 4 ratio, but it thickens after it comes out of the oven. 1 lb of shredded, extra sharp cheddar, about 1 tsp salt and about a 1/2 cup of parm finish out the sauce. 1 lb of pasta shells because they capture the sauce really nice. I top it with some crushed saltines mixed with butter and more cheese.

I'm making some cornbread today too!

And maybe brownies for dessert.
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (Dec 20, 2015 02:42PM)
I also picked up some smoked turkey sausages. After pan grilling they will be awesome with my homemade bbq sauce.

Oh yeah, I'm making homemade bbq sauce. :bg:
Message: Posted by: Dr SH (Dec 21, 2015 04:12PM)
If somebody is visiting Sydney let me know , we have a great variety of food due to our immigration from all over the world .... Think of something and you can find it in Sydney
If you come around , I will give you a nice list of place to eat depending of your taste
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (Dec 22, 2015 08:32PM)
Question for the sous vide folks:

Just got mine yesterday and haven't prepared anything yet. Trying to get ideas looking at recipes. However I bought a two-pound fresh octopus yesterday that I put in the freezer for later (they say octopus is one of those things that actually is better after freezing than before). Anyone tried octopus with sous vide? My goal is to cook, marinade and grill.

Also, is there any reason one shouldn't take a cryovaced meat, say a rack of lamb and put it directly into the water bath for cooking?

Looking forward to get started with this. :-)
Message: Posted by: Tom Cutts (Dec 22, 2015 10:42PM)
Shouldn't be an issue with cryo lamb or beef. The bath will get it up to a uniform temp after defrosting it.

Never ever considered octopus. Had the most awesome grilled octopus in Walla Walla Washington a few weeks ago. Have you done a web search on it?
Message: Posted by: Dr SH (Dec 23, 2015 07:35AM)
In the same family , here a delicious recipe of a stuff calamari.....
http://www.sbs.com.au/food/recipes/stuffed-calamari-calamari-ripieni
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (Dec 23, 2015 11:43AM)
[quote]On Dec 22, 2015, Tom Cutts wrote:
Shouldn't be an issue with cryo lamb or beef. The bath will get it up to a uniform temp after defrosting it.

Never ever considered octopus. Had the most awesome grilled octopus in Walla Walla Washington a few weeks ago. Have you done a web search on it? [/quote]
I have searched for and found several recipes for octopus, but I was hoping to find someone who has actually tried it. Like you, I enjoy grilled octopus that's been marinated. The best I've ever had was at a little Italian restaurant in Philadelphia several years ago. Have had many since, but nothing can compare.

Which raises another question, can meat (think octopus) be marinated first, placed in a sous vide pouch and cooked with the marinade? Then grilled after with more marinade? Sounds like a simple question, but when one knows nothing about the process, one questions everything!

I have a cryo rack of lamb that may just be my first foray into sous vide. :-)
Message: Posted by: Tom Cutts (Dec 23, 2015 04:32PM)
Yes, you can sous vide in marinade. Be aware that it may drastically increase the power of the marinade.

I'm going a little crazy right now... Poaching salmon in the shrimp bisque I made last night.
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (Dec 23, 2015 05:57PM)
[quote]On Dec 23, 2015, Tom Cutts wrote:
Yes, you can sous vide in marinade. Be aware that it may drastically increase the power of the marinade.

I'm going a little crazy right now... Poaching salmon in the shrimp bisque I made last night. [/quote]
:hamburger:
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (Dec 23, 2015 06:00PM)
[quote]On Dec 23, 2015, Dr SH wrote:
In the same family , here a delicious recipe of a stuff calamari.....
http://www.sbs.com.au/food/recipes/stuffed-calamari-calamari-ripieni [/quote]
Calimari is another fave of mine; yet another one to try. So many recipes, so little time!
Message: Posted by: Dr SH (Dec 24, 2015 12:06AM)
I am glad you enjoyed them , it is not too long to prepare ...
I do love calamari too , what is your best recipe ?
Message: Posted by: Tom Cutts (Dec 24, 2015 01:28AM)
Soooo..... Last night I put two hunks of beef in the bath. I ate the first one last night after four hours in the bath. It had tenderized the rather generic cut of beef. Had the consistency of a ribeye, but not the flavor since it lacked the fat content of a ribeye.

I left the second hunk of beef in the bath, let it cool overnight, and cooked it another 4 hours this afternoon. (While I was eating the salmon poached in shrimp bisque, and the now shrimp and salmon bisque.). That's 8 hours of bath time!!

The second one melted in my mouth and was a perfect medium rare. It might have even been too tender, but not by much. Might have to get used to highly tender meats! This was a thick 1.5" cut so a fast pan sear didn't affect it. It looked great and it tasted even better. I had seasoned it with salt, pepper, and a hickory mix from Costco.

Bob, is yours wifi or bluetooth?
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (Dec 24, 2015 02:28AM)
[quote]On Dec 24, 2015, Tom Cutts wrote:
Soooo..... Last night I put two hunks of beef in the bath. I ate the first one last night after four hours in the bath. It had tenderized the rather generic cut of beef. Had the consistency of a ribeye, but not the flavor since it lacked the fat content of a ribeye.

I left the second hunk of beef in the bath, let it cool overnight, and cooked it another 4 hours this afternoon. (While I was eating the salmon poached in shrimp bisque, and the now shrimp and salmon bisque.). That's 8 hours of bath time!!

The second one melted in my mouth and was a perfect medium rare. It might have even been too tender, but not by much. Might have to get used to highly tender meats! This was a thick 1.5" cut so a fast pan sear didn't affect it. It looked great and it tasted even better. I had seasoned it with salt, pepper, and a hickory mix from Costco.

Bob, is yours wifi or bluetooth? [/quote]

I'll get to your last question after I ask this first. Is it possible to sous vide a rare steak? I can live with medium rare if the tenderness and flavor is there, but I'm conditioned for rare. I still don't understand the sous vide cooking instructions. Looking at some of the rack of lamb recipes I've found, times range from two to four or or more hours. If cooked at the specified water bath temp, is it possible to over cook for extra hours? This isn't explained well in any of the recipes I've found. My gut tells me that if you have the water temp at the specified temp, you can't over cook it no matter how long the meat is in the bath. Yeah? Nay?

OK, as for the model I received, it's neither wifi or bluetooth, which really POed me when I discovered that on receipt. I paid $214 for what I thought was the Annova One, when what I got was the Annova Precision, or something of that description. Not the same animal that was described in the Amazon ad I purchased it from. I smelled a rat in a bogus ad for it and phoned Amazon and told them I didn't get the machine I thought I was getting. It was purchased through an Amazon vendor (one of their distributors whose name escapes me in writing this.) They clearly misrepresented the model in the ad and I told Amazon I wanted to return it and threatened action on the bogus ad. (I was bluffing)

After reviewing the order, the Amazon rep came back and said I could indeed return the unit for a full refund. Then she said that they would refund me $46 and change if I wished to keep the unit, which netted a cost of about $175, which seemed to be the going price for the unit I received. I think it's also the later model, but without the bluetooth and wifi. Since my wife and I never really intended to use either application anyway, I took their deal. Not sure if I got a good deal or not, but I'm happy in the end. At this point I just want to start using it. :-)
Message: Posted by: Tom Cutts (Dec 24, 2015 08:23AM)
All the models are called "precision cooker". Did it come packaged in a box, or a tube? I find the Bluetooth feature just about pointless. The only advantage for me at this point is the Bluetooth model is more adjustable, so it fits a wider array of pot sizes.

You can cook to rare, and as my experiment showed you can't over cook the done level. It just becomes more tender. My steak was done at 4 hours, but at 8 hours it had become so much more tender, and still medium rare.

I know what you mean about lamb ribs. The temps and cooking times vary greatly. The recipe feature of the app, and maybe all sous vide cooking is in its infancy.
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (Dec 24, 2015 12:56PM)
It came in a nice black box, and the instruction manual calls it the "Precision Sous Vide Immersion Circulator." As for the instruction manual, it's a joke, but then these days, most instruction manuals are jokes. Gonna wait a few days till we try something, the next few days not being an opportune time to start experimenting. :-)

I'll let you know how it goes.
Message: Posted by: Tom Cutts (Dec 24, 2015 01:15PM)
Sounds like you, indeed, got the basic first model. It works great by the way.

Yup, the instructions are weak, but the function is very simple. You should have it working in less than 60 seconds.

If you pull off the metal housing and clean the heating elements, you will find it difficult to get the housing back on. The instructions do make a point of this, but are woefully short on help for it. The reason is that the assembly of coils quite snugly fits the opening it needs to go through to get the housing to close the last 1/4 of an inch needed. I found it best to hold the entire assembly upside down and lightly jiggle the unit as you gently place the housing down onto the body. This allows the heating elements to wobble ever so slightly and find the alignment into the opening without force.

If necessary we can skype about that and I can show you. Making lamb ribs tonight and a small section of pork country ribs.

Merry sous vide Christmas! :rotf:
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (Dec 24, 2015 04:32PM)
Thanks for the cleaning tips Tom! Much appreciate that. Have fun with the lamb; we're dining out tonight. Merry Sous Vide Christmas back at ya! :xmas:
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (Dec 25, 2015 07:47PM)
OK! I did my first sous vide dinner tonight. Rack of lamb. While I made the mistake of not finishing properly, I was amazed at the rareness and tenderness I obtained from a four-hour bath. We didn't broil long enough with the recipe mustard coating at the end and so the fat didn't render out properly. Next time we try this we'll have one of those cooking torches to finish it off good and proper! I can see all kinds of possibilities with this new gadget. :-)
Message: Posted by: lunatik (Dec 26, 2015 09:35AM)
I'm sure the food is great, but man that is a long time to wait for it to cook lol. There would def have to be some pre-planning to make it worth the effort.
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (Dec 26, 2015 12:34PM)
[quote]On Dec 26, 2015, lunatik wrote:
I'm sure the food is great, but man that is a long time to wait for it to cook lol. There would def have to be some pre-planning to make it worth the effort. [/quote]

Pre-planning?

When you're retired son, you don't need to pre-plan anything. You can do anything you want during whatever time period you're looking at because essentially the cooking is hands-free the entire time. Read up on the process, you might learn something interesting enough to want to try yourself.

While you're cooking, you can go to work, go shopping, go to a movie, visit a friend, whatever. :-)
Message: Posted by: lunatik (Dec 26, 2015 12:42PM)
Man it sure would be nice to be retired! From the sounds of it, you could go visit a friend and not worry how long you'll be as the meat will only get more tender! I'll look into it, it does sound interesting!
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (Dec 26, 2015 02:03PM)
Yeah, I'll admit retirement is nice. You'll get there too, but don't rush it. Once there you'll wonder where all the years went.

Anyway, do look further into the sous vide, I've been considering it for more than a year and I finally pulled the trigger on it. Its possibilities are endless. I'm even betting you might like it. :-)
Message: Posted by: EsnRedshirt (Dec 28, 2015 11:56AM)
A little after the fact now, but the smoked turkey turned out great. It cooked in about three hours in my Big Green Egg, so I wrapped it in foil and covered it with towels until it was dinner time. It's amazing seeing turkey breast with a smoke ring, and it was very juicy and flavorful.

I cooked it on a vertical roaster, over pecan chunks. The only seasoning I used was some Trader Joe's 21-Seasoning Salute sprinkled liberally over the inside and outside. The drippings made for some good gravy; I put chicken stock in the drip pan, along with onions and celery salt. This were mixed with the stock I made from simmering the giblets during the entire time the turkey was smoking. I then chopped the giblets up and added them to the gravy as well, along with some flour and corn starch (mixed well with cold water.)

I'll probably end up doing it again next year.
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (Dec 28, 2015 12:16PM)
Mmmmm, sounds great. :-)
Message: Posted by: imgic (Dec 28, 2015 07:58PM)
The turkey sounds really good
Message: Posted by: Daryl -the other brother (Dec 28, 2015 11:56PM)
Here is a great tip for resting your bird. When Gordon Ramsey was training in Paris the Chefs told him a turkey should rest for as long as it cooks. Now when I cook a turkey, if it takes 3 hours to cook I then double wrap it in foil, wrap it in a blanket and put it in a cooler. I leave it untouched for another 3 hrs. The turkey stays hot and when cut it is extremely juicy.
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (Dec 29, 2015 10:18AM)
Great tip!
Message: Posted by: Tom Cutts (Dec 29, 2015 06:18PM)
Surf and turf tonight! Lobster tails were half price today!
Message: Posted by: Tom Cutts (Dec 29, 2015 06:19PM)
[quote]On Dec 29, 2015, Daryl -the other brother wrote:
Here is a great tip for resting your bird. When Gordon Ramsey was training in Paris the Chefs told him a turkey should rest for as long as it cooks. Now when I cook a turkey, if it takes 3 hours to cook I then double wrap it in foil, wrap it in a blanket and put it in a cooler. I leave it untouched for another 3 hrs. The turkey stays hot and when cut it is extremely juicy. [/quote]
How does the skin stay crisp?
Message: Posted by: Daryl -the other brother (Dec 29, 2015 11:35PM)
[quote]On Dec 29, 2015, Tom Cutts wrote:

How does the skin stay crisp? [/quote]

I've done the extra long rest 3 times so far. Never had any issues with the skin. Stays nice and golden brown. Try it, you'll like it. :bigsmile:

How did you cook your lobsters? Boil, broil or grill?
Message: Posted by: Tom Cutts (Dec 30, 2015 12:03AM)
Why sous vide, of course! They came out great!
Message: Posted by: Daryl -the other brother (Dec 30, 2015 09:47AM)
So instead of putting the lobsters in boiling water for a few minutes, you put them in hot water for several hours?
Message: Posted by: Tom Cutts (Dec 30, 2015 11:04AM)
You need to do your homework. You are missing several key points and just coming across as argumentative.
Message: Posted by: Daryl -the other brother (Dec 30, 2015 11:58AM)
Yes Tom, you are right, I need to do my homework and part of that homework is asking questions to people who use this method. As I said in the other thread I never heard of this before it came up on the Café. Sorry if it came across as argumentative, that wasn't the intent. My main question (as stated on the other thread) do you need a special cooker? If the idea is to keep the water at a specific temp. for a long period of time can't I achieve this by using a crock pot?
Message: Posted by: Tom Jorgenson (Dec 30, 2015 01:13PM)
Crockpots don't keep chosen temperatures beyond 'Low' 'Medium' and 'High'. With Sous Vide, you can select the exact temperature you'll cook at...and the meat will never cook beyond what it becomes at that temperature, no matter how long you keep it in the pot. The meat gets more tender, never gets over done, or well done, dried out or burnt.

You can generally use any large pot and the Sous Vide device itself is the thing that heats the water. Since the thermostat is intrinsic to the device, it keeps the water at exact temperatures. Time is less a factor than temperature.

Sous Vide has been used in upscale restaurants for awhile, but consumer models are relatively recent (a year or so at best) and are dropping in price as more and more units are being sold. Good ones are floating a bit above $100 nowadays. Soon, we'll be seeing a model 'As Seen On TV' with incessant commercials and 'But Wait, There's More!'.

Somebody correct me if I'm wrong...
Message: Posted by: Daryl -the other brother (Dec 30, 2015 02:10PM)
Thanks Tom. Sounds very interesting.
Message: Posted by: Tom Cutts (Dec 31, 2015 04:59PM)
Bob, I did a variation on the mushroom salad you posted. I went with cilantro instead of parsley. Since cilantro is a more delicate flavor I used about twice as much, and added the green tops from five scallions. Turned out nice, and perfect with the Arbor Brook Oregon single clone Pinot I had!

:drinkup:
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (Jan 1, 2016 12:57PM)
Thanks for that Tom, will try the cilantro next time myself!
Message: Posted by: imgic (Jan 6, 2016 01:35PM)
Finding myself in Dallas this week...gorging on way to much BBQ. Found Hutchin's BBQ in McKinney (because I stopped at the magic store up that way)...and have been eating pounds of ribs and brisket since...
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (Jan 6, 2016 03:42PM)
<feeling envious>
Message: Posted by: Dr SH (Jan 11, 2016 11:07PM)
Does anybody watch the TV serie "Heston's Feasts"? His cooking is pretty much magic.....
Message: Posted by: Dr SH (Feb 16, 2016 01:54AM)
Since the "sous vide" cooking left this group , nobody is posting anymore here ...
Does it mean the traditional cooking , the taste of a good roast and the flavor of your grandma's cooking is dying ?
Message: Posted by: Bob1Dog (Feb 16, 2016 11:50AM)
Not at all! Sous vide is just another tool for the kitchen. :-)
Message: Posted by: imgic (Feb 17, 2016 07:11PM)
I just made a killer minestrone soup...no sous vide techniques involved.
Message: Posted by: Daryl -the other brother (Feb 17, 2016 11:22PM)
[quote]On Feb 17, 2016, imgic wrote:
I just made a killer minestrone soup...no sous vide techniques involved. [/quote] Didn't you have to heat the water?
Message: Posted by: Tom Cutts (Feb 17, 2016 11:41PM)
In the past few days I have broiled lamb loin chops, a ribeye, and whipped up a giant pot of turkey vegetable soup.

The meats were just faster going traditional. The turkey soup has been a three day thing!
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Feb 17, 2016 11:44PM)
On Valentine's day my wife made Greek fried chicken.

The chicken is marinated in lemon juice, wine vinegar, olive oil, onions, garlic, thyme, marjoram, oregano, pepper, coriander seed, and juniper berries. It's coated with seasoned flour and fried to a light brown, then baked. It's crispy, not oily, and makes the house smell wonderful. And it's delicious.
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Feb 18, 2016 12:37AM)
Tonight she made tamale pie, which I augmented with homemade pico de gallo:

[list][*]2 Roma tomatoes, finely (3/16", 5mm) diced
[*]3 dark green tomatillos, finely diced
[*]¼ cup red onion, finely diced
[*]4 - 5 green onions (green part only), finely sliced
[*]1 large habanero pepper, minced
[*]6 large sprigs cilantro, finely chopped
[*]salt and lime juice to taste[/list]
Mix together and chill.

Yummy!
Message: Posted by: Dr SH (Feb 18, 2016 03:51AM)
Thank you S2000magician, Tom Cutts, imcic and to reassure me that the “sous vide” is not the only tools in a magician kitchen.
All your cooking and S2000magician’s wife cooking looks like to be delicious… shame I am too far to visit ;)
Message: Posted by: imgic (Feb 18, 2016 09:15AM)
[quote]On Feb 17, 2016, S2000magician wrote:
On Valentine's day my wife made Greek fried chicken.

The chicken is marinated in lemon juice, wine vinegar, olive oil, onions, garlic, thyme, marjoram, oregano, pepper, coriander seed, and juniper berries. It's coated with seasoned flour and fried to a light brown, then baked. It's crispy, not oily, and makes the house smell wonderful. And it's delicious. [/quote]

That sounds so good. Will be on my list to make soon.
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Feb 18, 2016 11:56AM)
[quote]On Feb 18, 2016, Dr SH wrote:
Thank you S2000magician, Tom Cutts, imcic and to reassure me that the “sous vide” is not the only tools in a magician kitchen.
All your cooking and S2000magician’s wife cooking looks like to be delicious… shame I am too far to visit ;) [/quote]
I am blessed by having married a woman who is a fantastic cook.

My wife is blessed by having married a man of similar talent.
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (Feb 19, 2016 05:25PM)
[quote]On Feb 18, 2016, imgic wrote:
[quote]On Feb 17, 2016, S2000magician wrote:
On Valentine's day my wife made Greek fried chicken.

The chicken is marinated in lemon juice, wine vinegar, olive oil, onions, garlic, thyme, marjoram, oregano, pepper, coriander seed, and juniper berries. It's coated with seasoned flour and fried to a light brown, then baked. It's crispy, not oily, and makes the house smell wonderful. And it's delicious. [/quote]

That sounds so good. Will be on my list to make soon. [/quote]

Ditto
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Feb 19, 2016 09:25PM)
I'll post the recipe for the Greek fried chicken this weekend.
Message: Posted by: Tom Cutts (Feb 20, 2016 01:33AM)
Lobster poached in a butter sauce... again.
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Mar 28, 2016 04:24PM)
For Christmas, 2014, my wife got me a lasagna pan and an Italian cookbook.

Odd, inasmuch as I've never cooked lasagna. Primarily because I despise ricotta, and loathe cooked ricotta.

A couple of weeks ago I made lasagna:

[list][*]Lasagne noodles
[*]Bechamel sauce
[*]Seared chicken breast, thinly sliced
[*]Seared, sliced red and orange bell peppers
[*]Seared, sliced artichoke hearts
[*]Castelvetrano olives
[*]Coarsely shreaded parmesan
[*]Fresh basil[/list]
It was fabulous!

Next time, tomato sauce with fresh rosemary, portabella mushrooms.
Message: Posted by: Theodore Lawton (Mar 28, 2016 05:14PM)
I'm still sad about the lack of a Greek chicken recipe.

The lasagna sounds great though.