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Topic: Proper Care of Cups?
Message: Posted by: elgranmago (Mar 1, 2004 01:55PM)
This past weekend at a Magic Fair I picked up, at a really great price, a pair of very nice, used, Paul Fox style copper cups. I have been wanting a heavier set for some time now but this wasn´t in my budget yet. I do the Williamson routine. Since I have been using Morrisey´s, I finally understand how the weight can make a difference in the quality of the moves. I´m very excited and pleased.

Should I polish them? How and with what?

Also, I notice they stain my hands and this will eventually soil the red knit balls. Advice?

Thank you in advance.

José
Message: Posted by: Larry Barnowsky (Mar 1, 2004 02:06PM)
Copper will oxidize so if you start cleaning them with a copper cleaner you will have to maintain the shine by repeated applications of the product. You could clean it once and then spray a clear laquer over it and then they won't oxidize anymore. Most people like the look or patina of the tarnished copper especially if your patter is that these are ancient cups.
Message: Posted by: Bill Hegbli (Mar 1, 2004 03:27PM)
No you should build or by a glass presentation case from a trophy store and put them in and never touch them. Just keep using your Morrissey Cups.

Get some Mike Rogers baseballs for the cups. They are nice and if they get dirty, you just tell people you been playing with baseball alot.

It is up to you, I don't like to polish anything all the time. So I polished with Brasso then cleaned them with lacqure thinner and paint with Krylon clear Plastic coating. Lacqure paint is not necessarily clear even though the can says so. It has a brown tint to it.
Message: Posted by: garyanimal (Jan 30, 2005 06:35PM)
Don't clean them beat the crap out off them and then buy some more.
Message: Posted by: rikbrooks (Jan 31, 2005 12:35PM)
I've heard both ways. I can attest to the feeling of frustration after carefully shining my cups only to watch them begin to lose their luster by the end of the day!

I'm trying something else now. I went to a music store and got a sealant that is used for brass instruments.
Message: Posted by: rikbrooks (Feb 1, 2005 06:46AM)
Here's another key. I asked a guy that works in metal how to keep the shine on the copper. He told me how to clean the copper perfectly then I should spray some clear laquer on the cups.

WRONG!

Now I'm spending a lot of time with turpentine and my dremel tool trying to get laquer off my cups. Thenk goodness I was smart enough to do it on my practice cups. Still, I hate the feel of the laquer so I'm taking the time to get rid of it.

A patina is sounding better and better.
Message: Posted by: Mark Rough (Feb 1, 2005 09:03AM)
I am of the school of not cleaning copper cups. Of course, if you get them and they're so nasty their staining your fingers then clean them and let them patina again. It shouldn't come off on your fingers, tha must be something else.

If you want cups that will keep their shine, I wouldn't go with copper at all. Brass will hold a shine longer, and some of the brass finishes work quite well.

These cups were made to be used, so use them. Don't, I repeat, do not, put them in some display case to get dusty. Shine them if you must, but use them.

Mark
Message: Posted by: elgranmago (Feb 2, 2005 04:17PM)
[quote]
On 2005-01-30 19:35, garyanimal wrote:
Don't clean them beat the crap out off them and then buy some more.
[/quote]

Great advice from a master.

Thanks for all these thoughts on the cups. Also, I finally got around to getting the Mike Rogers Mini Baseballs and I am so pleased with them. The knitted balls are being shelved.

José.
Message: Posted by: BSutter (Feb 4, 2005 08:40AM)
[quote]
On 2005-02-01 07:46, rikbrooks wrote:
Here's another key. I asked a guy that works in metal how to keep the shine on the copper. He told me how to clean the copper perfectly then I should spray some clear laquer on the cups.

WRONG!

Now I'm spending a lot of time with turpentine and my dremel tool trying to get laquer off my cups. Thenk goodness I was smart enough to do it on my practice cups. Still, I hate the feel of the laquer so I'm taking the time to get rid of it.

A patina is sounding better and better.
[/quote]

Rick,
If you wish to maintain the polished look apply a coat of nonabrasive car wax after cleaning. This will make the desired finish (shiny or patina) last longer with none of the negative effects of a laquer coating.
Bill
Message: Posted by: rikbrooks (Feb 4, 2005 11:36AM)
Thanks. I think I'll try that.
Message: Posted by: BSutter (Feb 4, 2005 03:50PM)
Rick,
Johnson Paste wax is an excellent choice.
Bill
Message: Posted by: Pete Biro (Feb 6, 2005 01:21AM)
Nickle plate if you don't want a patina. I prefer the copper to age and darken.
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Feb 21, 2005 11:16PM)
Bronze, which is what the copper alloy most copper cups are made of, will patinize to a really deep, brown color. Take a look at the Stubby cups at http://www.cupsandballsmuseum.com/standardcupsdu.htm These cups are about 45 years old, and have never been cleaned. I got them when I was in high school.

Down the page a bit from those is a set of cups that belonged to Danny Dew. Somebody cleaned them a long time ago, but they have begun to mellow again.

I agree with Pete. Have them plated if you don't want them to change color. The only finish that is really durable is "Magipoxy," which was Rings and Things epoxy finish. There is only one solvent that will remove it. Lacquer will get nicked, and then tarnish will start in the bare places.