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Topic: The Illogical $100.00 bill switch
Message: Posted by: daffydoug (Mar 3, 2004 10:22PM)
I have never used the $100 bill switch alot, because I just could not see past the illogical aspect of the routine.

You borrow a small denomination from someone, magically turn it into a $100.00 bill, then , illogically, after you have multiplied the money for the spectator, you inevitably turn the hundred back into a piddly litlle one dollar bill and hand it back to the spectator.

Not the nicest of things to do.
Seems more logical to me, to start with a large bill then make it shrink, then grow back, then hand it to the specator.


What are your thoughts on this ?
Message: Posted by: Chris Berry (Mar 3, 2004 11:43PM)
I think you are right, although I have never been a fan of bill switches. Mostly because it seemd stupid to have it change, then have to change it back.

I think Jeff Ezell had a great idea (although it has been done before I saw him do it first). To start with a blank piece of paper and change it into a bill.

It opens up the door for many LOGICAL presentations.

Chris
Message: Posted by: Jordan Piper (Mar 4, 2004 01:04AM)
I think the whole attraction to a bill switch is that it teases the spectator just a bit. When I first had the bill switch performed on me the magician asked if I had a twenty dollar bill. I was hesitant at first but he persuaded me to hand it over. He then asked me what 20 times five was (as he folded the bill five times). I replied 100. He then showed me that my twenty had turned into a one hundred dollar bill. The magician asked if I wanted to keep it and as I went to grab it he said, "No? Okay." And then changed it back to the twenty.

If he had started with a blank piece of paper it surely wouldn't have had the same effect because the paper was not mine and therefore had no value to ME.

As for the shrinking of the money, I still don't feel the effect would be the same because who would want "less" money?
Message: Posted by: Pete Biro (Mar 4, 2004 01:20AM)
IMHO the Mis-made bill is the only one that makes sense in this context.
Message: Posted by: vmendoza (Mar 4, 2004 01:58AM)
The first magician I saw do a bill transformation was Doug Henning. He framed the routine nicely, he'd to borrow a dollar bill, then offer to buy the bill from the owner for two dollars. In case anything happened to the bill, the owner was covered and made 100% profit.

The bill now belonged to Henning who promptly turned it into a $100 bill and pocketed it.
Message: Posted by: MacGyver (Mar 4, 2004 02:06AM)
After I saw Dan Garret do his Bill switch routine at a lecture I have never gone back(good thing since someone stole my 100 dollar bill too ;) )

It is a great routine, where you have a spectator rip up their own money(priceless laughter), then you restore it into a torn mis-made bill.

Then you take back the torn bill and fix it, only the bill you hand back is really ripped and fixed with tape!

While it is true this isn't so much a bill switch as a ripped and restored bill type routine, it never fails to get great reactions, it makes complete sense, and if you were so inclined, you could do it with 5 dollar bills and expect to get quiet a bit of tips with that bill. I think it is partly due to the fact that once the specatator has ripped up the bill they are less connected with it, and the fact that the final bill is only taped instills a sense that it is worthless. and the fact that it is in your hands helps...

Also the bigger the bill, the funnier the ripping part is, although if you want to make a mismade 5 or 10, you will have to buy a whole sheet which can be expensive($5 is the most I've done). The good part is you can salvage most of the sheet and use as real money.

I also like the plot a lot more, as changing the value of the money creates a lot of logical problems, while doing it this way is very justified and logical.
Message: Posted by: daffydoug (Mar 4, 2004 05:19AM)
Wow! This thread is just starting, and allready my head is swimming with new presentational ideas!
Message: Posted by: JackDaniel (Mar 4, 2004 06:26AM)
WellDaffydoug -
if you like bill switch routines check this thread out:

http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewtopic.php?topic=57008&forum=3&33

Sure got my Imagine running...
Jack.
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (Mar 4, 2004 06:43AM)
Taking a five and turning it into a one and a pile of quarters is cute.
Message: Posted by: James Harrison (Mar 4, 2004 08:32AM)
I've used the bill switch when I get a tip.

Up in canada, are lowest bill is the 5 so when I get one of those for a job well done I tell them that I love it when I get bills for a tip, then use Richard Sanders visi-bill to turn it into a 20.

They don't ask for it back, (they gave it to me for a tip), and the old saying it takes money to make money would really apply to this effect.

Also, you don't have to change it back to the five. So the switch makes sense.
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Mar 4, 2004 10:16AM)
I may have posted this elsewhere, but it is worth mentioning again. Several years ago, the story was circulating that a magician had borrowed a one dollar bill and changed it into a hundred. The spectator would not return the hundred to him.

So he took it to court. Even after he explained how the trick worked to the judge, he lost the case. Perhaps the judge's reasoning was that the magician said he would change the spec's bill into a hundred.

Three lessons. Don't make promises you can't keep. Don't give the spectator your hundred. Don't expose.

Better idea. Borrow a twenty or a hundred. Change it to a one. Then change it back. You won't ever lose a bill that way.

When I saw Roger Klause do it the first time, he changed a 1 into a 20. It was quite effective -- perfect work in his hands.
Message: Posted by: Eric Grossman (Mar 4, 2004 10:20AM)
Daffydoug,
I always felt the same way as you, about the bill switch, until recently. I have been using this routine to great success, for about a year, now.

Show an empty purse, and a reason for showing it. Toss it on the table. Borrow a large bill($5 or more). Have it marked for identification. Change it to a one dollar bill. Thank them for their time. Bow and say goodbye. Milk this moment. After spectator sweats for a short time, show that the bill is now in the purse, which has been in full view. Have spectator unfold it and show his mark.
I love this routine, and after putting the bill switch on the backburner for a long time, it is now a regular in my repertoire.

Eric Grossman
Message: Posted by: Larry Barnowsky (Mar 4, 2004 10:20AM)
At the end of a perpetual coins routine/misers dream I end by changing my one dollar bill into a hundred. It's also kept me out of court.
Message: Posted by: Rob Elliott (Mar 4, 2004 10:56AM)
John Carney's Logical Bill (found on the Coin Classics, Vol 1 video) is a great coin effect that culminates in a bill switch for its climax. You use your own bill so there's no danger of the spectator claiming it for their own.
Message: Posted by: Karl Miller (Mar 4, 2004 11:52AM)
A good presentational approach is this: When you borrow the bill, tell the spectator,"I promise no harm will come to your bill. I give you my word that I will return this bill in the exact condition I borrowed it. Fair enough?". Then do the switch, and act like you are going to give the $100 bill to the spectator, then retract your hand and say,"But wait just a second, I said I would return your bill in the exact same condition, and it wasn't a hundred when you loaned it to me, was it?". The spectators will insist that it is OK and they will "accept" the bill in its changed condition. Then say,"Oh no, I am a man (or woman) of my word. All I have to do is fold it four times and it returns to its exact original condition". This presentation works really well, and it adds a little comedy without making the spectator look foolish.

Another presentation for paying gigs is to change a one to a five and let the spectator keep the five. This creates a really strong impression on the audience.

By the way, the first presentation I gave above will also keep you out of court.

People will sue for anything theses days!
Message: Posted by: Pete Biro (Mar 4, 2004 11:57AM)
A great line for the in the pocket switch... You ask, "Is this the bill you GAVE ME?" When they answer, "Yes." You put the bill in your pocket and say, "Thanks, I'll have it back next Thursday."

This gets a mild laugh, but covers the work. You switch in your pocket on the laugh and bring out the other bill.
Message: Posted by: mike gallo (Mar 4, 2004 02:11PM)
The first magician I saw do a bill transformation was Doug Henning. He framed the routine nicely, he'd to borrow a dollar bill, then offer to buy the bill from the owner for two dollars. In case anything happened to the bill, the owner was covered and made 100% profit

A great presentation if you can afford to lose a buck on every performance! Another way to do it would be to borrow a 10 or 20 dollar bill and change it into 2 5's or 10's...hand them to the spectator and go on to your next miracle!

Mike
Message: Posted by: cheesewrestler (Mar 4, 2004 02:30PM)
[quote]
On 2004-03-04 15:11, mike gallo wrote:
The first magician I saw do a bill transformation was Doug Henning.

A great presentation if you can afford to lose a buck on every performance!
Mike
[/quote]

That's nothing.

Steve Cohen borrows a spectator's bill, changes it into a hundred ... and gives 'em the hundred.
Message: Posted by: Chris Berry (Mar 4, 2004 03:05PM)
[quote]
On 2004-03-04 15:11, mike gallo wrote:
A great presentation if you can afford to lose a buck on every performance! Another way to do it would be to borrow a 10 or 20 dollar bill and change it into 2 5's or 10's...hand them to the spectator and go on to your next miracle!

Mike
[/quote]

Oh!!! That sounds really good! Ha! I guess I'm going to have to go and re-learn bill switches now.

Chris
Message: Posted by: Alex Linian (Mar 4, 2004 03:08PM)
[quote]
On 2004-03-04 15:30, cheesewrestler wrote:
[quote]
On 2004-03-04 15:11, mike gallo wrote:
The first magician I saw do a bill transformation was Doug Henning.

A great presentation if you can afford to lose a buck on every performance!
Mike
[/quote]

That's nothing.

Steve Cohen borrows a spectator's bill, changes it into a hundred ... and gives 'em the hundred.
[/quote]

Yeah, But his show costs $50 per person
Message: Posted by: Chris Thibault (Mar 4, 2004 03:19PM)
Jay Sankey has many ideas throughout his work. One of my favorites is on his "Very Best Of" series. It moves holes on the bill like in a matrix effect.
Message: Posted by: Greg Arce (Mar 4, 2004 06:39PM)
No matter how well you do the switch I'm sure your spectators will assume it was a switch. Now, do the mismade bill instead and see how many of your spectators will try and refold their bills to make them look that way.
Greg
Message: Posted by: daffydoug (Mar 4, 2004 07:21PM)
Greg,

Do you feel that there is absolutely no way to ever have them convinced that a switch did not occur?
Message: Posted by: Greg Arce (Mar 4, 2004 08:16PM)
Well, daffydoug, I'll ask you a question: Do you think that most people actually believe you turned the one into a hundred?
I know we like to believe that people go with everything we say and do, but I believe that most people have an immediate sense of wonder of what they have seen, but a little later some logic kicks in and they realized they just saw a really good trick.
Doesn't it happen for everything we do? No. But this is one of those effects that lends itself to have only one path to follow... you switched it.
On the other hand, and only say this from experience, when I've done the mismade bill I can't count the amount of times I've seen individuals try to refold the bill back.
Some have mentioned Jay Sankey's ideas on the bill and I believe he also changes the experience... they will believe you were able to do some incredible fold that allowed the bill to look that way.
Having said all that, is it still magical to change the bill to another demonination? Yes. Is it illogical to change it bac? Well, that's an easy answer... if you could really do it wouldn't you be home right now changing bills. (Yes, I know, you are.}
Greg
Message: Posted by: Paul Chosse (Mar 4, 2004 08:45PM)
Look here for my unpublished handling:
http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewtopic.php?topic=14113&forum=27

or, buy #12 in the Ron Bauer Private Studies Series for the published effect, with contributions by several other great guys!

Best, PSC
Message: Posted by: sleightly (Mar 4, 2004 09:03PM)
Just wanted to mention that the idea Eric Grossman posted is Jim Sisti's handling and appears I believe in the first issue of The Magic Menu...

Andrew
Message: Posted by: Eric Grossman (Mar 5, 2004 10:28AM)
Yes, Andrew, since I didn't publish it, all credit should go to Mr. Sisti. Really, it's just an anything to impossible location, though. I'd bet that it predates both of us, if not everyone here.

Eric Grossman
Message: Posted by: sleightly (Mar 5, 2004 10:42AM)
Eric:

Wasn't knocking your idea, it is a good one! Just wanted to let people know where they could find an extended version in print (Jim also teaches it on the Stevens restaurant video and in lectures).

The effect could certainly be construed in the category you described (anything to impossible location) although I think of it more as a transposition.

Since we're talking about it though, I think the only flaw with Jim's piece is the demonstration of the empty purse to begin with. Wouldn't it be better to remove a $1 from the purse (in the process showing it empty) and change via the BS to a $5. When the expected question is asked (by performer or audience) then the $1 can show that it has made its way home...

Maybe this is better as a pseudo con routine? $5 bill removed from purse, signed by spectator and then folded up. Upon unfolding the bill is transformed to play money and the real thing found back in the purse???

Intriguing premise that lacks the conviction of borrowed funds, but the signature serves as a nice convincer...

But then it makes it a transposition (into impossible location).

Grin!

ajp
Message: Posted by: Eric Grossman (Mar 5, 2004 10:49AM)
No problem, Andrew, and my apologies to Mr. Sisti. How does he justify showing the empty purse?

Eric Grossman
Message: Posted by: itsmagic (Mar 5, 2004 11:23AM)
The bill switch is illogical in most performing situations. However, I've used it in a couple of everyday situations, which led the people who witnessed it to believe in "real magic."

First occurence was in a restaurant. As the waiter came by to dropoff the check, I asked him if he takes this (holding a $1 bill). After he said "Yes" I started to fold the bill and changed it into a $20. You should of seen his mouth drop. I handed him the $20 along with the bill. A few moments passed, when he returned with my change, he had the manager, the cook, and other waiters and waitresses with him too asking for a repeat demonstration. I took one of the $1 bills that was changed to me and proceeded to change that into another $20. "I love eating here. The food is good, and I make money too," I said.

The second time I used the bill switch outside of a performance situation was at Disneyland. My friend asked to borrow some money. I reached in my pocket and pulled out a $1 bill. "Sorry this is all I have...Wait a minute, since this is supposed to be the most magical place on earth, and I feel a little magical. How about you? Do you believe in magic?" Then I turned the $1 into a $100. She never forgot that moment at Disney.
Message: Posted by: mike gallo (Mar 5, 2004 03:03PM)
Or, buy #12 in the Ron Bauer Private Studies Series for the published effect, with contributions by several other great guys!


Paul, I was gonna mention that...but I was having a "greedy" moment and was hoping to keep it to my self!!!

Mike
Message: Posted by: delgadil (Mar 10, 2004 11:57AM)
I don't think it's illogical at all. Here's what I do: I borrow a $1 bill and I say "I promise to give it back to you in the same condition". Change it into a $100 bill; begin to give it back to the spectator, but DON'T actually give it to him as you say "wait a minute, I promised I would give it back to you in the same condition it was in when you lent it to me." Change it back to a $1 and return it to the spectator. Works great for me.

Kevin