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Topic: Family, work, and practice.
Message: Posted by: BlindWizard (Jan 3, 2017 09:49PM)
What I was wondering is how do you manage time for family work and practice of magic?

How do you schedule your time to allow your magic to grow?

I know a lot of you do magic professionally. As your second job or only job. And some of you may live alone and have less to divide your time. This topic is for anyone who actively Studies magic.

I am looking for different perspectives and ideas to help myself and others better manage their time.

I have been actively working on reading Card College for about two months. I have read the chapters on theory a few times and am only on chapters 1 & 2 so as to really understand the concepts and give myself time to really learn and understand each technique.

I work as a massage therapist, I am married with two kids. I have been keeping a deck on me and working on things when I am free between clients. I will do most of my reading after everyone has gone to sleep so I don't miss out on family time after work.
Message: Posted by: WitchDocChris (Jan 4, 2017 11:26AM)
I generally try to read for at least an hour a day. Twice a week, while my wife is taking classes, I sit somewhere with my notebook(s) and work on writing new material or fixing existing stuff.
Message: Posted by: BlindWizard (Jan 4, 2017 12:08PM)
[quote]On Jan 4, 2017, WitchDocChris wrote:
I generally try to read for at least an hour a day. Twice a week, while my wife is taking classes, I sit somewhere with my notebook(s) and work on writing new material or fixing existing stuff. [/quote]

When do you practice new slights and tricks or run through routines?
Message: Posted by: WitchDocChris (Jan 4, 2017 02:44PM)
In the evenings, after work.

Also, I rarely take on a completely new piece. I write the show and rehearse it, and that's what I perform for a few years. I will sometimes swap out routines but for the most part it's just minor tweaks to improve the quality of the show.

I do study all the time, but I am not the type who is constantly learning new tricks or routines.
Message: Posted by: BlindWizard (Jan 4, 2017 03:15PM)
I have started to notice a lot of professionals have 1 or a few routines that they use for years. Each routine is usually suited for each situation.
Message: Posted by: BlindWizard (Jan 4, 2017 03:21PM)
[quote]On Jan 4, 2017, WitchDocChris wrote:
I do study all the time, but I am not the type who is constantly learning new tricks or routines. [/quote]

So learning slights and studying Card College and Erdnase is just to add tools to allow the building of acts and routines? More methods of achieving a desired outcome and not just getting a pile of tools you never use.
Message: Posted by: WitchDocChris (Jan 4, 2017 03:45PM)
I don't study much in the way of card magic these days.

I don't read magic books to learn tricks. Most of the time I barely pay attention to the method unless it's something I might be performing. I read magic books to study the philosophy, theory, and performance ideas. Ideally the books I get these days talk more about how to perform, rather than how to do tricks.

I do have a lot of tools I can use when needed, but I'm far more interested at this point in my career in learning how to perform well and construct quality routines.

Sometimes I stumble across something I can apply to things I'm working on, but in general, as I said, I don't pay much attention to the methods taught in the books.
Message: Posted by: BlindWizard (Jan 4, 2017 04:16PM)
[quote]On Jan 4, 2017, WitchDocChris wrote:
I don't study much in the way of card magic these days.

I don't read magic books to learn tricks. Most of the time I barely pay attention to the method unless it's something I might be performing. I read magic books to study the philosophy, theory, and performance ideas. Ideally the books I get these days talk more about how to perform, rather than how to do tricks.

I do have a lot of tools I can use when needed, but I'm far more interested at this point in my career in learning how to perform well and construct quality routines.

Sometimes I stumble across something I can apply to things I'm working on, but in general, as I said, I don't pay much attention to the methods taught in the books. [/quote]

The chapters on theory in Card College have had my attention for a long time now and have read and reread them in order to put the theory as my foundation rather then tricks. Studying them has changed my approach to my Cups and Balls and all magical study.

Would you recommend books with more perspective on magical theories. Being legally blind I view magic as a way to help me understand how others see the world. How to connect with those people. And finally how to share my perspective of the world with others. These three things are magic in my opinion.
Message: Posted by: WitchDocChris (Jan 5, 2017 09:36AM)
Most of what I read is geared towards mentalists.

Eugene Burger's Mastering the Art of Magic was good. Show Doctor by Jeff McBride was good. Pure Effect by Derren Brown, as well as Absolute Magic by him, both changed the way I think about magic. Alchemical Tools by Paul Brook was also mind bending for me.

I have just received Strong Magic by Darwin Ortiz but have not read it yet. I am very excited about it, though, as people have been recommending it for years.
Message: Posted by: BlindWizard (Jan 5, 2017 05:27PM)
Thank you so much for the book list. I will begin to hunt down what I can.
Message: Posted by: Paul Brook (Jan 6, 2017 05:30AM)
[quote]On Jan 5, 2017, WitchDocChris wrote:
Eugene Burger's Mastering the Art of Magic was good. Show Doctor by Jeff McBride was good. Pure Effect by Derren Brown, as well as Absolute Magic by him, both changed the way I think about magic. Alchemical Tools by Paul Brook was also mind bending for me.
[/quote]

Very, VERY flattered to be included in the same sentence as these amazing people; far too kind.

Sincerely heart-warming :thanx:
Message: Posted by: WitchDocChris (Jan 6, 2017 08:44AM)
The pleasure is mine, Paul. I'm working on getting all of the Pleiades collection to make a run at the code. Probably won't figure it out as I'm rubbish with codes, but it'll be fun and the books are well worth it regardless.
Message: Posted by: disbelief (Jun 15, 2022 09:37PM)
To answer the original question. I like many others always feel too busy to do anything. But, what I realized is that if you actually force yourself to find time itís actually amazing how much time a person has if they just commit to doing it. An hour here an hour there it adds up to hundreds of hours per year. You basically just have to decide if itís important enough to you.