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Topic: Has Amazon killed the Brick and Mortar Magic Shop?
Message: Posted by: Salguod Nairb (Jan 31, 2017 09:11AM)
You may have seen on another section of the forum about a brick and mortar shop facing a financial crisis.

In the movie "Other People's Money" starring Danny Devito he gave a very apt speech, perhaps some of you recall it. I only mention it because it sprang to mind when I read about the situation.

I thought I could buy something from the shop to boost its sales and their prices are comparable to Amazon, but the shipping cost stopped me.

Just to be clear this isn't a slam on the brick and mortar owner, just an observation about the age of Amazon.

I could always use spare 3d Rabbits and $15 is a fair price. Same price on Amazon, however, the brick and mortar wanted to charge me $6 for shipping while Amazon offered free shipping.

Now back to the Danny Devito movie. Is this another situation of the Buggy Whip argument?

For the record I love going to brick and mortar shops, but my location sort of make that difficult and Amazon really knows how to Woo you.

Thoughts?
Message: Posted by: NYCTwister (Jan 31, 2017 09:24AM)
The efficiency (?) of the internet has caused a massive paradigm shift in the way we do everything.

Survival of the fittest, and all that.
Message: Posted by: Salguod Nairb (Jan 31, 2017 09:31AM)
True, but I hate to see them go.

I've always imagined that in my latter years that I could become a surly magic shop owner. It was a dream I had.

I suppose once magic became available to the masses online that this was inevitable.
Message: Posted by: NYCTwister (Jan 31, 2017 10:00AM)
I agree.
Also,I think that the retail experience is am important part of our social interaction.

Ultimately, the brick and mortars will have to adapt to the point where their online presence is strong enough to allow them to compete.

The rest are already dinosaurs; and we know what happens to them.
Message: Posted by: Salguod Nairb (Jan 31, 2017 10:12AM)
Maybe they need to specialize.

Everything that is prepackaged can always be undersold by Amazon.

A limited release of a quality prop would be worth the extra money just not to be a Borg Magician.

Just look at all of the chair suspensions out there...
Message: Posted by: Magnus Eisengrim (Jan 31, 2017 10:44AM)
[quote]On Jan 31, 2017, NYCTwister wrote:
I agree.
Also,I think that the retail experience is am important part of our social interaction.

Ultimately, the brick and mortars will have to adapt to the point where their online presence is strong enough to allow them to compete.

The rest are already dinosaurs; and we know what happens to them. [/quote]

Isn't this precisely the argument for free trade, outsourcing of jobs, etc.? If local factories can't manufacture as cheaply as foreign ones, then they should go the way of the dinosaur...

I'm not stating my opinion on the matter. But it is certainly topical.
Message: Posted by: NYCTwister (Jan 31, 2017 10:47AM)
That prop would have to do something amazing; otherwise economics dictate that the more you make of them, the more you make.

In many areas, magic for example, I think there is a great benefit to seeing it in person, by real people in the real world.

The are many factors involved here.
In New York City, for example, the skyrocketing rents make it virtually impossible to make a profit. Many larger retailers opened stores knowing they wouldn't make a profit; the premise being that they needed a real world presence. Now they are closing those stores.
Message: Posted by: Salguod Nairb (Jan 31, 2017 10:50AM)
The ZigZag was pretty amazing now, but do to mass saturation of the market they have become pasay but I see your point.
Message: Posted by: Salguod Nairb (Jan 31, 2017 12:01PM)
I just added up my Subscribe and Save items on Amazon and was surprised to find that I'm spending over $200 a month.

I do have 4 accounts though (family members).

Maybe Amazon will kill the grocery stores one day...
Message: Posted by: Dannydoyle (Jan 31, 2017 12:11PM)
Amazon did not do the killing. Customers who stopped going did.
Message: Posted by: Salguod Nairb (Jan 31, 2017 12:26PM)
[quote]On Jan 31, 2017, Dannydoyle wrote:
Amazon did not do the killing. Customers who stopped going did. [/quote]


Isn't that sort of like a magician blaming his audience for a bad show?
Message: Posted by: Dannydoyle (Jan 31, 2017 03:03PM)
Not at all. Why did they quit conning? Because the customer service and experience of going into the shop didn't outweigh savings.

All I pointed out in your analogy was a bad show. I did not, until now, mention a possible reason for such a thing.
Customers have to come through the door or there is no reason for a door.


I worked at Magic Inc. for 10 years. Believe me the decline long predates the advent of Amazon.
Message: Posted by: Escamoteur (Jan 31, 2017 04:05PM)
Funny. Just a few years ago I was given for Christmas an Amazon gift card of decent value. As it had been a tight year budget wise and I had not purchased any magic, I looked on Amazon hoping to perhaps be able to get something nice. A book maybe. Sadly, besides magic kits geared towards children or beginners, there was nothing. Nada. Zip. Times sure change.

That said, I've always prefered brick and mortar stores, whether for magic and other special interests. Part of it was the "fun" or "experience" factor. I still to this day remember the anticipation and excitement that ran through me the first time I took the elevator up to Tannen's and waited for the door to open (although the niave teen me had visions of it being a large showroom based on my perusal of their catalog). Sadly, like old fashioned comic book stores, hobby shops, bookstores (old-school!), and record stores, they are a very endangered species in this time.

Carter
Message: Posted by: Salguod Nairb (Jan 31, 2017 04:44PM)
I tried to find a brick and mortar magic shop on my last trip to the States, but there wasn't one within an hours drive.

It is always nice to see something demo'ed live instead of watching a heavily edited video.

I buy things like sponge bunnies and long handled change bags on Amazon, but the few props that I don't make I buy on Auction sites.
Message: Posted by: Poof-Daddy (Jan 31, 2017 07:06PM)
I don't think "Amazon" is killing brick and mortar unless you are using "Amazon" as a generic term for "internet magic shops". I think Penguin is the biggest culprit. Actually, several Amazon "order fulfillers" are actual brick and mortar stores also (The Magic Warehouse for example). I agree with Danny to a point. Customers who have, or had, a real brick and mortar need to utilise them whenever possible. Unfortunately many, if not most people nowadays, only have online access for their magic needs.
Message: Posted by: tommy (Jan 31, 2017 07:31PM)
I don't think I have used Amazon yet.
Message: Posted by: imgic (Jan 31, 2017 08:16PM)
I travel for work. When I do I always try boy go to brick and mortar magic shops. Almost all have added additional goods or seadvices...costumes, make up, games, comics. Or unique, handcrafted items or areas for performances/shows/special events. So many are trying to offer unique experiences. But I've been so disappointed in my visits to various shops. Most can demonstrate or even explain a trick they have on display. Once I was talking to an owner and asked about a trick he had...he asked me if the knew about the magician who was creator. When I said I didn't he called me a dumb sh!t. I stood...froze...not believing what I heard. Only time I've gone into a shop and not bought a thing.

Brick and mortars can survive...but they have to offer value to their customers.
Message: Posted by: Devious (Feb 1, 2017 11:11AM)
Im curious as what the effect rick was Imgic?
Message: Posted by: imgic (Feb 1, 2017 11:25AM)
I don't recall the trick but he asked if I knew Brother John. I'm a hobbyist and not all that well versed in magic, and didn't realize he was talking about Brother John Hamman
Message: Posted by: NYCTwister (Feb 1, 2017 12:52PM)
I once worked for a man who insisted the internet was a fad, even as sales plunged.
His only strategy was to constantly raise prices in response to shrinking sales.
When I asked him why people would pay those prices, his response was "they have to, because I need them to."

Like I said, dinosaurs.
Message: Posted by: WitchDocChris (Feb 1, 2017 03:20PM)
I think it's not so much Amazon, as it is that the internet in general has changed how we socialize and that includes shopping. The idea of magicians gathering in the back room of the magic shop is not really something that happens a lot these days, as far as I can tell. Magicians gather on forums, Google Hangouts, and at conventions now.

Personally brick and mortar stores don't really do it for me. I live in the middle of nowhere and it's at least two hours to get to any magic store (Denny & Lee's) - and that's two hours in the opposite direction of anything else I do. I did place an order online when I heard he needed the money (My shipping was also $6 so I'm guessing he does a flat rate, which he's losing money on that shipping I'm pretty sure). I get that the charm of a physical store is seeing a trick demo'd in front of you before you buy it - but I almost never buy tricks. I buy books, which don't need demos, and I buy bizarre props or routines that can't be found in physical stores.

In today's retail market I don't think anything as niche as a magic store has much of a chance if it doesn't also sell online. Maybe in a big city enough random people will come in to make purchases and pay the rent, but it would be very risky to try that.

So in that way I'm agreeing with previous posts - it's not Amazon per se, but just the internet in general has shifted how people shop. Though I will say I rarely purchase magic from Amazon. I will go to Penguin, or directly to creators, long before I resort to Amazon regardless of how attractive the 2 day free shipping is.
Message: Posted by: Salguod Nairb (Feb 1, 2017 04:21PM)
There's not a brick and mortar magic shop within a thousand miles of me.

I prefer the auction/surplus sites, but Amazon offers free shipping on most magic staple items.
Message: Posted by: tommy (Feb 1, 2017 04:24PM)
It is impossible to compete with China prices. Importing products from China and selling them online – mainly through Amazon & eBay is what everybody is doing. It is a sort of combination punch which eventually will knock everybody out, not just magic shops out in the West.
Message: Posted by: Dannydoyle (Feb 1, 2017 04:28PM)
While a book needs no demo if you have a guy do a trick from the book you are far more likely to buy it if you like the trick.
Message: Posted by: WitchDocChris (Feb 1, 2017 04:47PM)
For most I agree completely, Danny, but in my case specifically I focus on theory, business, and history. I never buy books for the tricks, I buy them for the insight from the author.
Message: Posted by: magicfish (Feb 1, 2017 05:45PM)
No. Penguin has.
Message: Posted by: Salguod Nairb (Feb 2, 2017 03:42AM)
I buy most of my books now from lybrary.com. Every since my book collection was rained upon while sitting (mailbag) on the flight line, I've been weary of buying hard copies.
Message: Posted by: tommy (Feb 2, 2017 06:40AM)
I plunge my hand into the virtual world and grab a fish.
Message: Posted by: WitchDocChris (Feb 2, 2017 08:33AM)
I think Penguin was just better at the internet sales thing than most other magic stores. It's not their fault that people prefer to shop online, they just adapted to the demands of the market.

I have a lot of eBooks but I genuinely prefer the real thing. There's just something about having it in my hands, on paper. You can lose data to a computer crash just as easily as physical objects getting damaged. I've seen it many times.
Message: Posted by: Chris (Feb 2, 2017 10:42AM)
[quote]On Feb 2, 2017, WitchDocChris wrote:
You can lose data to a computer crash just as easily as physical objects getting damaged. I've seen it many times. [/quote]
But you have an influence on your data security (meaning backups), you have no control over the weather or if the carrier handles your packages well or not. I have received parcels torn open, half the contents missing, broken, besides wet due to rain.
Message: Posted by: Salguod Nairb (Feb 2, 2017 10:48AM)
My warped book collection will attest to the previous post.

Besides, backing up e-data is extremely easy to do externally or on a cloud.
Message: Posted by: WitchDocChris (Feb 2, 2017 11:09AM)
All systems have a point of failure. Cloud servers can crash, data can be corrupted, accounts can be lost, links go dead, so on.

If it works for you that's great. I just don't trust it that much. I've got hundreds of books, I've moved cross country with them multiple times. I pack them in weather-proof containers so short of driving into a lake nothing is going to happen to them. On top of that, and I know this is old fashioned, I love the feel and smell of books. Books are knowledge and creativity in physical form.
Message: Posted by: slowkneenuh (Feb 2, 2017 11:28AM)
Two major sources of magic literature in ebook form (Lybrary & Penguin) allow you permanent access to your digital purchases and serve as a backup.
Message: Posted by: Salguod Nairb (Feb 2, 2017 11:43AM)
If the grid goes down it'll be human sacrifices, dogs and cats living together... mass hysteria! :)

One day when I stop being mobile I would like to have a study full of books, but for now e-books work for me.
Message: Posted by: tommy (Feb 2, 2017 12:41PM)
There some advantages to virtual books etcetera. There are some things in old newspaper archive;, history of magic, magician interviews and so on, that I find interesting and which I would never had read if it wasn’t for being able to search on the net. I have found books I have bever heard of on line and which I bought then as a result.
Message: Posted by: Chris (Feb 3, 2017 08:31AM)
[quote]On Feb 2, 2017, WitchDocChris wrote:
All systems have a point of failure. Cloud servers can crash, data can be corrupted, accounts can be lost, links go dead, so on.
[/quote]
This is a bit of a silly argument. Yes, you are correct that hard discs can break, cloud servers and accounts can vanish or be lost, etc. But this only applies if you use ONE backup and solely rely on it. That was true twenty years ago when storage was expensive. One backup was all one could afford. These days storage is dirt cheap. Most folks will be able to fit all their magic digital media on one USB flash memory, or on an additional external hard disc. Back-up your belongings two or three times, and then store the hard disc or USB flash memory in different locations. Even in the catastrophic event of your house burning down or some other major disaster striking one of your backups is likely to survive. Add to this a cloud storage solution (such as the Lybrary.com digital shelf which everyone of our customers automatically gets) and you would need some global event to loose your data. And in that case you will have other worries than your magic ebooks.
Message: Posted by: WitchDocChris (Feb 3, 2017 09:06AM)
Again, I'm not saying anyone is wrong for preferring digital or even using digital. I'm just saying I don't prefer it for these reasons.

I have helped customers who made their redundant backups only to have it all fail at the same time (Or more likely, they failed over time without the customer noticing). Yes, it's a bit of paranoia, I know this. I prefer books, and on top of preferring books I don't trust digital storage completely. So for me, I will continue going for real books by default and eBooks when there's no other option. Though I am still considering printing the ones I really like.
Message: Posted by: ed rhodes (Feb 7, 2017 10:00AM)
[quote]On Feb 1, 2017, NYCTwister wrote:
I once worked for a man who insisted the internet was a fad, even as sales plunged.
His only strategy was to constantly raise prices in response to shrinking sales.
When I asked him why people would pay those prices, his response was "they have to, because I need them to."

Like I said, dinosaurs. [/quote]

You're making the presumption that ALL brick and mortars are following this man's lead.

Some (not all, sadly, not even most) are trying to embrace the technology and make an internet identity for themselves. (Although, they still have to stand in the shadow of Penquin.)

This guy is definitely the second character in "Who Moved My Cheese?" Starving to death, but certain that if he stands there long enough, the cheese will come back.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Who_Moved_My_Cheese%3F

[youtube]fEH6fvU8i7o[/youtube]
Message: Posted by: Dannydoyle (Feb 7, 2017 10:13AM)
He didn't make any presumptions. He related a story.
Message: Posted by: NYCTwister (Feb 7, 2017 11:13AM)
Admittedly he was extremely old fashioned.

The really sad part was that he held onto his belief that things would go back to the way they were for so long that he ended up putting all his (substantial) savings into his stores just to keep them afloat.

Now he drives a cab. aaaaand he's going on and on about Uber.

Ironically I got back into entertaining after the store I was managing closed and we parted ways.
I've done so well through simple word of mouth that I've never needed much of a virtual presence.
Message: Posted by: ed rhodes (Feb 7, 2017 03:57PM)
[quote]On Feb 7, 2017, Dannydoyle wrote:
He didn't make any presumptions. He related a story. [/quote]

I believe his last line implied that all dealers are following the lead of the guy in the story
Message: Posted by: NYCTwister (Feb 7, 2017 04:51PM)
On the other hand, living in NYC, I've gone to Tannen's many times.

They seem to have really merged the two ways of doing business.
The last few times there were many more employees than you would expect. Certainly more than were needed for the foot traffic. Most seemed to be filling orders for their online site.

Nonetheless, the guy behind the counter was friendly and patient, and was willing to show me a few things even though I indicated that I wasn't going to buy them.

Small businesses, whether a single store, or small chain face many difficulties beyond just the effect if the internet.
For instance when the lease was up after ten years the landlord raised the rent from 25K to 75K.
It's now a Chipotle.

I've known a few people like my former boss. They know what's worked, possibly for a very long time, and they don't want to accept it when it stops working.
Message: Posted by: Salguod Nairb (Feb 7, 2017 04:52PM)
I think the editor of that video did a horrible job... after all he is the one that cut the cheese.

[img]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v705/turboprop/Fart.gif[/img]
Message: Posted by: motown (Feb 7, 2017 06:57PM)
[quote]On Jan 31, 2017, Salguod Nairb wrote:
You may have seen on another section of the forum about a brick and mortar shop facing a financial crisis.

In the movie "Other People's Money" starring Danny Devito he gave a very apt speech, perhaps some of you recall it. I only mention it because it sprang to mind when I read about the situation.

I thought I could buy something from the shop to boost its sales and their prices are comparable to Amazon, but the shipping cost stopped me.

Just to be clear this isn't a slam on the brick and mortar owner, just an observation about the age of Amazon.

I could always use spare 3d Rabbits and $15 is a fair price. Same price on Amazon, however, the brick and mortar wanted to charge me $6 for shipping while Amazon offered free shipping.

Now back to the Danny Devito movie. Is this another situation of the Buggy Whip argument?

For the record I love going to brick and mortar shops, but my location sort of make that difficult and Amazon really knows how to Woo you.

Thoughts? [/quote]Don't you have to Spend $50 to get the Free Shipping?
Message: Posted by: Salguod Nairb (Feb 8, 2017 12:46AM)
[quote]On Feb 8, 2017, motown wrote:
Don't you have to Spend $50 to get the Free Shipping? [/quote]

Not since I switched to Prime, but even before it was only like $35 minimum order to get free shipping.

Prime is $10.95 a month I think... but I have received over $200 worth of goods for free and have been given a free month of Prime due to issues with my order.

Amazon really goes out of their way to make you happy and they ship to APO's.
Message: Posted by: tommy (Feb 8, 2017 02:00AM)
The internet is no good for finding that which nobody knows.
Message: Posted by: The Hermit (Feb 8, 2017 10:15AM)
If you go back to my heyday of magic shops - 60s/70s it was still hard for them to make money. Most all rented costumes or stocked lots of jokes and novelties. The market for magic is small. In my city, Memphis, there was one shop and it never made money on the magic. In large cities, you could support two or three. Kids today don't think of brick and mortar. They think online. That's where they learn, that's where they buy and will buy. The brick and mortar shop was often more a labor of love than a business. Given the costs of having a business today with all of the regs, taxes and whatnot, it's hard to do something for the love of it. How we acquire and learn magic has gone online. It will never go back. Good or bad, who knows?
Message: Posted by: WitchDocChris (Feb 8, 2017 11:16AM)
Physical retail stores fail regularly no mater what they sell. That's just a fact. Many people who want to own a business don't understand how to get people through the door and buying things. The specific niche of a magic store just makes it all the harder.
Message: Posted by: 1KJ (Mar 6, 2017 11:02AM)
The success of B&M magic shops is going to depend upon their location. In the Los Angeles area, we have The Magic Apple. It is in a great location, in the middle of a large population with a large number of magicians. It is a great store, the owner is a great guy, many very successful magicians are there regularly, their prices are good, no hassles with shipping, etc.

Every time I'm in there, I ask him how business is going. So far, he is doing well. In fact, a few years ago he expanded his shop by doubling the size.

I am constantly promoting his business with my magician friends

Hopefully he continues to do well.

kj
Message: Posted by: Salguod Nairb (Mar 6, 2017 11:14AM)
I think B&M will remain as long as the owners are receiving income elsewhere.

I've been practicing for years in hope of becoming a surly magic shop owner one day...
Message: Posted by: Salguod Nairb (Mar 20, 2017 11:00PM)
I ordered some beginner magic for my niece from Penguin this weekend. Never ordered from them before and I rarely buy anything except from auction sites these days.

I was pleasantly surprised to receive a video of them packing her magic tricks. It was a nice added touch.

I'm sure you folks are fully aware of this service, but it was new to me and allowed me to send the video to her to add to the excitement.
Message: Posted by: lynnef (Mar 21, 2017 12:11AM)
My local magic shop has evolved over the years. The owner makes ends meet nowadays by doing online business as well as sponsoring lectures, magic shows etc. He simply couldn't break even without these extras. This just reflects how the market has changed over the years. I certainly appreciate interacting with the owner whenever I drop by. He knows my specialties, shows me tips, etc etc. I feel lucky to live close enough to drop by every couple of weeks, aware that relatively few people have that convenience. Another benefit of brick and mortar is the ability to 'shop' and examine effects close up. However, I also buy magic online as well if I know exactly what I want. Nothing to feel guilty about; it's just evolution... and skyrocketing rent. Lynn
Message: Posted by: arthur stead (Mar 21, 2017 12:48AM)
Shopping online is very convenient, but I must say I really miss the old brick and mortar shops. In the old days it was wonderful just to spend time hanging out. The demonstrators would demo new stuff, you could ask questions about props on display, and you could peruse all the books until you decided which one to buy. You’d meet other magician shoppers and share ideas, and hear the latest gossip or information about upcoming lectures & conventions. Very often a “name” magician would show up. That was always very exciting because they’d perform their latest inventions and/or give you tips on handling, etc. Haven’t had that experience in years, and I really miss it.
Message: Posted by: Dannydoyle (Mar 21, 2017 10:19AM)
I have never been an online magic shop fan.

Just a couple weeks ago I saw someone here part a beef with Penguin. Seemed a bit odd.

Penguin came on, went WAY above and beyond with customer service. I was impressed.

I will buy from them now, though I don't buy much. The customer service is extraordinary.

I always thought that was the part lacking. I was wrong. You still can't hang out and do all that cool live stuff no doubt.
Message: Posted by: Salguod Nairb (Mar 21, 2017 11:14AM)
I read that thread Danny, I too thought Penguin went above and beyond the call of duty to make him happy. Though, IMO he didn't appreciate it and was still being critical.

That is why I gave them a try.
Message: Posted by: Dannydoyle (Mar 21, 2017 08:14PM)
Yes it was strange he didn't seem to appreciate it much at all. But in the end it seems as if they gained a couple of customers so that is a net benefit.
Message: Posted by: Salguod Nairb (Mar 22, 2017 03:07AM)
The interesting thing is that Penguin (when you buy $50+ and get free shipping) was still cheaper than Amazon using prime.
Message: Posted by: WitchDocChris (Mar 22, 2017 08:43AM)
I'm pretty sure that a lot of places that participate with Amazon Prime adjust their prices a bit upwards to compensate for the lack of shipping cost.

I will also say Penguin is one of the only magic stores I regularly purchase from.
Message: Posted by: Dannydoyle (Mar 22, 2017 10:12AM)
Actually most don't.
Message: Posted by: ringmaster (Mar 23, 2017 08:24PM)
You did it!
Message: Posted by: NYCTwister (Mar 24, 2017 04:18AM)
They seem to be killing more than the magic shops.

http://bigthink.com/david-ryan-polgar/blame-china-amazon-may-be-the-one-killing-more-american-jobs
Message: Posted by: Salguod Nairb (Mar 24, 2017 05:16AM)
I dunno... my brother works for Amazon and is probably the best job he has had so far, as benefits and stability are concerned.

Didn't they say the same thing about Wal*Mart 10 years ago?
Message: Posted by: landmark (Mar 25, 2017 12:00AM)
Hey, my brother's best job was working as clean-up man for the elephants in the circus, but it doesn't mean he was in show business.
Message: Posted by: Salguod Nairb (Mar 28, 2017 06:01AM)
I do spend a lot of time searching through Amazon for ideas for routines.

So far I have bought a set of black plastic nesting dolls (blanks) for a card mind reading effect, and a large copper penny, a copper shot glass, and an eye chart iron-on transfer.

Have fun trying to figure that one out. ;)
Message: Posted by: imgic (Mar 29, 2017 05:54PM)
Ironically I just started at Amazon this week. The reason they're so successful isn't the technology. Their first leadership principle is "Obsession with the customer." The lengths they go to to ensure a great customer experience is amazing. Any company that puts as much focus on the customer as they do will be successful.

Also Amazon encourages partners to sell through them, even if it competes with Amazon products. They do it to offer wider selection and options to the customer. So they are actually providing increased options to magic sellers.
Message: Posted by: Salguod Nairb (Apr 1, 2017 09:12AM)
Wow! Check [url=http://www.businessinsider.com/how-to-see-how-much-youve-spent-on-amazon-in-your-lifetime-2016-2]this[/url] out!

I was curious how much I spent over the years on Amazon and was surprised to see that for the last 10 years I spent $9,017.93

That is a lot more than I expected.
Message: Posted by: Dannydoyle (Apr 1, 2017 10:19AM)
I spend about that a year.
Message: Posted by: Magnus Eisengrim (Apr 1, 2017 10:25AM)
Danny and Brian: you've put your finger on Amazon's success. If you buy hundreds of little things, you'll barely notice that yoh've emtied your savings. It's the new economy: from phone charges to Costco impulse buys to online purchases. Vendors count on our not being aware of our indulgences.
Message: Posted by: Dannydoyle (Apr 1, 2017 10:44AM)
Oh actuality quite the contrary for me. I know exactly what I am buying. I use Prime Now for groceries when I am on the way home from the airport in Uber. I buy equipment for shows we produce.

Not only do we have savings and rebates but the convenience and savings of time is in and if itself worth it.

Having things like toothpaste and shampoo on recurring delivery is helpful for our lifestyle.

The company is almost Taylor made for us.
Message: Posted by: landmark (Apr 1, 2017 10:47AM)
Thanks for that info, Brian. I'm almost scared to click on my record. At some point, Amazon started doing more than books, and made it very easy to buy most of what I buy online. Always the first place I look for just about everything.

But they still treat their workers like crap. I definitely have a guilty conscience about it. Another example of where information isn't enough to change behavior.
Message: Posted by: Salguod Nairb (Apr 1, 2017 11:31AM)
[quote]On Apr 1, 2017, Dannydoyle wrote:
I spend about that a year. [/quote]

Up to a few years ago the available items that could be shipped here was limited, but now I buy almost every non-perishable item from Amazon instead of off the economy.

They still won't send me Caffeine Free Diet Coke though...
Message: Posted by: Salguod Nairb (Apr 1, 2017 11:33AM)
[quote]On Apr 1, 2017, Magnus Eisengrim wrote:
Danny and Brian: you've put your finger on Amazon's success. If you buy hundreds of little things, you'll barely notice that yoh've emtied your savings. It's the new economy: from phone charges to Costco impulse buys to online purchases. Vendors count on our not being aware of our indulgences. [/quote]


The steady spending I do now is items for the family back in the States. Since I don't get 'home' that often a monthly box of goodies lets them know that I'm still thinking about them.
Message: Posted by: imgic (Apr 4, 2017 11:58PM)
Amazon has a charitable program called Amazon Smiles. 0.5% of purchase goes to a charity of your choice. Check them out:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/help/customer/display.html?nodeId=201365340


If you're invovled in a charity, you can get it registered for folds to donate...
Message: Posted by: Dannydoyle (Apr 9, 2017 04:40PM)
[quote]On Mar 21, 2017, Salguod Nairb wrote:
I read that thread Danny, I too thought Penguin went above and beyond the call of duty to make him happy. Though, IMO he didn't appreciate it and was still being critical.

That is why I gave them a try. [/quote]

I just ordered from Penguin. A DVD which I almost never do.

Process was smooth as could be. I have to admit that I didn't price shop unbuttountil after I ordered, but it is cheaper at Penguin than amazon.

I guys my conversion is complete.
Message: Posted by: Salguod Nairb (Apr 15, 2017 08:41AM)
I found a great deal on colored rope and colored bells awhile back on Amazon. I'm working on a bells[i] (cups) [/i]on and off rope routine. Sort of a magnetic color thing.

I have just received today my shipment of my subscribe and save items (Amazon) and they were rather beaten up. Whoever packed the items put rather heavy items with several light ones, so the light ones got crushed. No padding in the box either. The last time this happened Amazon sent free replacement items with rushed priority shipping.

I sent them an email and expect a response by tomorrow. So far Amazon has fixed every issue I had [i](as far as shipping items that is; I mean I still do that thing when out in public but can't expect Amazon to fix that, but I digress).[/i]
Message: Posted by: Salguod Nairb (Apr 15, 2017 02:17PM)
Amazon update:

They are sending free replacement items for those damaged and refunded me an item that they can't send to my APO, all in under 6 hours too.